Russia finishes its war

Having routed the Georgian army, secured South Ossetia, and “punished” the Georgian state, Russia has halted combat operations. The ramifications, though, remain. It isn’t just Islamic terrorism we need to worry about.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Carl Vehse
  • Carl Vehse
  • CRB

    Oh, no! You mean we have to add this worry to the news that 100′s of Starbucks are closing in our country!!

  • CRB

    Oh, no! You mean we have to add this worry to the news that 100′s of Starbucks are closing in our country!!

  • Bruce

    Easy does it. When seen through the eyes of Russia, it is the West that have been the aggressors in the past decade or so, promising (via George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton) not to expand NATO to the previous satellite countries of the former Soviet Union and then doing so with Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic. Add to this the Orange Revolution in the Ukraine and you can understand that Russia feels as though they are being encircled by US backed interests. Since the US is currently militarily tied up in Afghanistan and Iraq, it is not entirely unexpected that the Russians would flex their military muscle in faraway (for us) Georgia. I see it more as a gesture (civilian deaths notwithstanding) than a threat. One might even compare it to the US response (with Russian means, of course, which are never quite how the US would do things) to the Cuban missile crisis. It is right and salutary that we send Condoleeza Rice to Georgia for the same reasons: to make a symbolic statement. But for it to escalate beyond that is improbable and would not serve Russia’s interests, and certainly not our own.

  • Bruce

    Easy does it. When seen through the eyes of Russia, it is the West that have been the aggressors in the past decade or so, promising (via George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton) not to expand NATO to the previous satellite countries of the former Soviet Union and then doing so with Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic. Add to this the Orange Revolution in the Ukraine and you can understand that Russia feels as though they are being encircled by US backed interests. Since the US is currently militarily tied up in Afghanistan and Iraq, it is not entirely unexpected that the Russians would flex their military muscle in faraway (for us) Georgia. I see it more as a gesture (civilian deaths notwithstanding) than a threat. One might even compare it to the US response (with Russian means, of course, which are never quite how the US would do things) to the Cuban missile crisis. It is right and salutary that we send Condoleeza Rice to Georgia for the same reasons: to make a symbolic statement. But for it to escalate beyond that is improbable and would not serve Russia’s interests, and certainly not our own.

  • Anon

    The current news is that Russian armored columns continue to roll into Georgia proper.

  • Anon

    The current news is that Russian armored columns continue to roll into Georgia proper.

  • Joe

    Reports this morning are that Russian tanks are providing cover while the native separatists loot cities south of the line Russia agreed to withdraw behind. Clear violations of the cease-fire agreement.

  • Joe

    Reports this morning are that Russian tanks are providing cover while the native separatists loot cities south of the line Russia agreed to withdraw behind. Clear violations of the cease-fire agreement.

  • Joe

    Bruce – I would suggest that Russia ask itself why all of its former satellites want to sign up with US and EU instead of Mother Russia. Russia was in a position to establish strong and mutually beneficial economic ties with these states. So much infrastructure already in place, so much trade already occurring. Post break up Russian policy has played a huge role in driving these countries west.

  • Joe

    Bruce – I would suggest that Russia ask itself why all of its former satellites want to sign up with US and EU instead of Mother Russia. Russia was in a position to establish strong and mutually beneficial economic ties with these states. So much infrastructure already in place, so much trade already occurring. Post break up Russian policy has played a huge role in driving these countries west.


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