The mysterious Marlins

The Florida Marlins have won two World Series in their brief 17-year life span. But they have baseball’s lowest attendance figures and lowest payroll. Their strategy is whenever they get a good player to get rid of him to save money. And yet, no matter what they do, they keep winning. The latest cut-rate team is just three games behind the division-leading Phillies. Read this account and be encouraged that you really can do a lot with a little.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Scots

    Whenever someone brings up the Marlins and their two WS in 17 years, I immediately think of my Cubs and 100 years of losing and I become sad.

    So, thanks for bringing up the Marlins. Thanks a lot. While you’re at it, why not mention the D’Backs and the Blue Jays…

  • Scots

    Whenever someone brings up the Marlins and their two WS in 17 years, I immediately think of my Cubs and 100 years of losing and I become sad.

    So, thanks for bringing up the Marlins. Thanks a lot. While you’re at it, why not mention the D’Backs and the Blue Jays…

  • DonS

    The other thing that’s odd about the Marlins is the heat in which they play. Many believe that the Cubs’ and Rangers’ lack of success over the years is due in part to the heat. The Rangers because they play in oppressive Texas in an outdoor stadium, and the Cubs because they play so many day games. But the Marlins play in Miami! Of course, their propensity to get rid of so many players and to keep such a young team may help them deal better with the heat.

  • DonS

    The other thing that’s odd about the Marlins is the heat in which they play. Many believe that the Cubs’ and Rangers’ lack of success over the years is due in part to the heat. The Rangers because they play in oppressive Texas in an outdoor stadium, and the Cubs because they play so many day games. But the Marlins play in Miami! Of course, their propensity to get rid of so many players and to keep such a young team may help them deal better with the heat.

  • LAJ

    I think that’s great! A team that is fiscally conservative! Their stands ought to be packed with people supporting their team since the ticket prices are probably low also.

  • LAJ

    I think that’s great! A team that is fiscally conservative! Their stands ought to be packed with people supporting their team since the ticket prices are probably low also.

  • MikeR

    The fact that the Marlins have managed to win the World Series twice in their short lifespan is impressive, but the idea that they have “an ability to field contenders seemingly every year” is ridiculous. The Marlins have never won their division, and the two years they won the World Series are the only two years they have ever made the postseason. It’s great when small-market teams manage to compete year after year with a low payroll (teams like the Twins and Athletics, for example), but the Marlins have been mediocre-to-awful in 14 of their 16 seasons.

    As for their being “fiscally conservative”, according to the article their new stadium is going to cost $634 million, and the team’s contribution is “at least $154 million”. So Florida taxpayers are shelling out about $480 million in a recession to pay for a building in which a private corporation will conduct its business. Sadly, that probably is relative fiscal conservatism in today’s sports world.

  • MikeR

    The fact that the Marlins have managed to win the World Series twice in their short lifespan is impressive, but the idea that they have “an ability to field contenders seemingly every year” is ridiculous. The Marlins have never won their division, and the two years they won the World Series are the only two years they have ever made the postseason. It’s great when small-market teams manage to compete year after year with a low payroll (teams like the Twins and Athletics, for example), but the Marlins have been mediocre-to-awful in 14 of their 16 seasons.

    As for their being “fiscally conservative”, according to the article their new stadium is going to cost $634 million, and the team’s contribution is “at least $154 million”. So Florida taxpayers are shelling out about $480 million in a recession to pay for a building in which a private corporation will conduct its business. Sadly, that probably is relative fiscal conservatism in today’s sports world.


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