Ancient Egyptian coins depict Joseph

The Jerusalem Post reports a startling archeological discovery. Coins with Joseph’s name found in Egypt :

Archeologists have discovered ancient Egyptian coins bearing the name and image of the biblical Joseph, Cairo’s Al Ahram newspaper recently reported. Excerpts provided by MEMRI show that the coins were discovered among a multitude of unsorted artifacts stored at the Museum of Egypt.

According to the report, the significance of the find is that archeologists have found scientific evidence countering the claim held by some historians that coins were not used for trade in ancient Egypt, and that this was done through barter instead.

The period in which Joseph was regarded to have lived in Egypt matches the minting of the coins in the cache, researchers said.

“A thorough examination revealed that the coins bore the year in which they were minted and their value, or effigies of the pharaohs [who ruled] at the time of their minting. Some of the coins are from the time when Joseph lived in Egypt, and bear his name and portrait,” said the report.

Bear his PORTRAIT? So we might be able to see what a major figure in the Bible LOOKED LIKE? That would be beyond remarkable. Not to mention strong evidence for the historicity of the Genesis account.

This story says that the coins include pictures of cows and grain, as in Pharoah’s dream that Joseph interpreted.

I can find no published images of the coins or of Joseph’s face. If anyone finds any, let us know.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://biblicalpaths.wordpress.com Stephen Smuts

    I have been struggling with this news report since it first broke. It seems to be most inaccurate. The use of the word ‘coins’ alone, is in and of itself, quite problematic… since numismatics has that the earliest known coins date to the seventh century BC. Let’s date Joseph conservatively, say 1915-1805 BC, Middle Bronze Age I? That is more than 1200 years before all other known coins even started circulating?! No, something is very much amiss here…

    In Genesis 23:15-16 when Abraham purchased the Cave of Machpelah for 400 shekels of silver, the transaction was not done in coins. Precious metals (like silver and gold) were weighed (not struck into coins) throughout most of the Old Testament before the advent of minted coins. Coins it seems by consensus, came from Anatolia (modern day Turkey) spreading into Greece and gained widespread acceptance only in Persian times (sixth century BC).

    Moreover, the archaeologists here seem to be seeking Koranic support, and say that these verses indicate that coins were used in Egypt in the time of Joseph. That is completely false.

    One also has to question why the discovery has received no widespread mainline coverage? An Egyptian newspaper is not the place where a credible scholarly archaeological story will break. Only the Jerusalem Post mentions it, and why the editor let this one through, beats me.

    So if not coins (and they cannot be), what have they then found inside the vaults of the Egyptian Antiquities Authority? From the small photo released, it looks more like scarabs. But I suppose, let us rather wait and see as things unfold…

    But really, don’t hold out for too much…

  • http://biblicalpaths.wordpress.com Stephen Smuts

    I have been struggling with this news report since it first broke. It seems to be most inaccurate. The use of the word ‘coins’ alone, is in and of itself, quite problematic… since numismatics has that the earliest known coins date to the seventh century BC. Let’s date Joseph conservatively, say 1915-1805 BC, Middle Bronze Age I? That is more than 1200 years before all other known coins even started circulating?! No, something is very much amiss here…

    In Genesis 23:15-16 when Abraham purchased the Cave of Machpelah for 400 shekels of silver, the transaction was not done in coins. Precious metals (like silver and gold) were weighed (not struck into coins) throughout most of the Old Testament before the advent of minted coins. Coins it seems by consensus, came from Anatolia (modern day Turkey) spreading into Greece and gained widespread acceptance only in Persian times (sixth century BC).

    Moreover, the archaeologists here seem to be seeking Koranic support, and say that these verses indicate that coins were used in Egypt in the time of Joseph. That is completely false.

    One also has to question why the discovery has received no widespread mainline coverage? An Egyptian newspaper is not the place where a credible scholarly archaeological story will break. Only the Jerusalem Post mentions it, and why the editor let this one through, beats me.

    So if not coins (and they cannot be), what have they then found inside the vaults of the Egyptian Antiquities Authority? From the small photo released, it looks more like scarabs. But I suppose, let us rather wait and see as things unfold…

    But really, don’t hold out for too much…

  • WebMonk

    This is from the Jerusalem Post:

    “Studies by Dr. Thabet’s team have revealed that what most archeologists took for a kind of charm, and others took for an ornament or adornment, is actually a coin. Several [facts led them to this conclusion]: first, [the fact that] many such coins have been found at various [archeological sites], and also [the fact that] they are round or oval in shape, and have two faces: one with an inscription, called the inscribed face, and one with an image, called the engraved face – just like the coins we use today,” the report added.

    Note that the identification as coins or charms is something to be argued over, but I can’t find the report which the JP references, so I don’t have any idea how serious the contentions are.

    But, even if they are charms instead of coins, the fact still stands that there is a Joseph charm reinforcing the accuracy of the Genesis story of Joseph.

  • WebMonk

    This is from the Jerusalem Post:

    “Studies by Dr. Thabet’s team have revealed that what most archeologists took for a kind of charm, and others took for an ornament or adornment, is actually a coin. Several [facts led them to this conclusion]: first, [the fact that] many such coins have been found at various [archeological sites], and also [the fact that] they are round or oval in shape, and have two faces: one with an inscription, called the inscribed face, and one with an image, called the engraved face – just like the coins we use today,” the report added.

    Note that the identification as coins or charms is something to be argued over, but I can’t find the report which the JP references, so I don’t have any idea how serious the contentions are.

    But, even if they are charms instead of coins, the fact still stands that there is a Joseph charm reinforcing the accuracy of the Genesis story of Joseph.

  • http://chaz-lehmann.livejournal.com Rev. Charles Lehmann

    Re #1:

    I think the fallacy of your assertion regarding coinage at the time of Joseph is rather simple and straightforward, and known in laboratories the world over:

    Absence of proof is not proof of absence.

    That’s not to say that it’s absolutely sure that you’re not right. But it is certainly far from certain that the archaeological team is wrong.

  • http://chaz-lehmann.livejournal.com Rev. Charles Lehmann

    Re #1:

    I think the fallacy of your assertion regarding coinage at the time of Joseph is rather simple and straightforward, and known in laboratories the world over:

    Absence of proof is not proof of absence.

    That’s not to say that it’s absolutely sure that you’re not right. But it is certainly far from certain that the archaeological team is wrong.

  • Z

    Coins aren’t so much the point, are they? The face and the accuracy of the story is the important thing, as WebMonk says. Stephen, many Christian finds aren’t covered by the mainstream media. And, then, mostly to discount.

  • Z

    Coins aren’t so much the point, are they? The face and the accuracy of the story is the important thing, as WebMonk says. Stephen, many Christian finds aren’t covered by the mainstream media. And, then, mostly to discount.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    I think it is conceivable that Egypt had something approximating coinage before it became the more popular form of commerce. And that whether these are charms or coins is a moot point.
    Where I have a problem with the referenced story is where Smutz has one of his biggest problems. How do you use a Seventh century A.D. Text “The Koran” as evidence for a claim made about the time of Joseph. One wonders is this author trying to prove the Koran correct? Or is he trying to back up his claim that these are coins. The logic there defies logic.
    Why are these coins because the Koran, a seventh century text, claims that there were coins, and this is the closest thing we could find to coins. Therefore they must be coins. Oh, and now see, The Koran is inspired, how would Mohammed know they had coins, no one else thought they had coins back then, but see these they are coins. “Well they don’t look like coins. Why do you say they are coins”? “Well we know they are coins because the Koran says they had coins.”
    Think I’m dealing with Mormon’s here. They argue this way for the veracity of the Book of Mormon, and it is quite hilarious except that it is extremely sad at the sometime.
    But if these people are bonified archeologists, or historians, why are they using a seventh century text as evidence for what they are claiming? It throws the whole piece into the realm of highly suspect, as much as I want to believe that there are coins with Josephs image on them. Perhaps objective investigation will prove this to be true. But so far I haven’t read anything objective here, and would like to maybe see a close up picture atleast of what they are talking about.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    I think it is conceivable that Egypt had something approximating coinage before it became the more popular form of commerce. And that whether these are charms or coins is a moot point.
    Where I have a problem with the referenced story is where Smutz has one of his biggest problems. How do you use a Seventh century A.D. Text “The Koran” as evidence for a claim made about the time of Joseph. One wonders is this author trying to prove the Koran correct? Or is he trying to back up his claim that these are coins. The logic there defies logic.
    Why are these coins because the Koran, a seventh century text, claims that there were coins, and this is the closest thing we could find to coins. Therefore they must be coins. Oh, and now see, The Koran is inspired, how would Mohammed know they had coins, no one else thought they had coins back then, but see these they are coins. “Well they don’t look like coins. Why do you say they are coins”? “Well we know they are coins because the Koran says they had coins.”
    Think I’m dealing with Mormon’s here. They argue this way for the veracity of the Book of Mormon, and it is quite hilarious except that it is extremely sad at the sometime.
    But if these people are bonified archeologists, or historians, why are they using a seventh century text as evidence for what they are claiming? It throws the whole piece into the realm of highly suspect, as much as I want to believe that there are coins with Josephs image on them. Perhaps objective investigation will prove this to be true. But so far I haven’t read anything objective here, and would like to maybe see a close up picture atleast of what they are talking about.

  • http://www.ericdarylmeyer.wordpress.com Eric Meyer

    Yes, the provenance of the piece raises my hermeneutical eyebrows of suspicion as well. The Jerusalem Post would be quicker to pull the publishing trigger on this kind of story (sells papers, eh?) than most.

    If it’s legit, it will be vetted elsewhere.

  • http://www.ericdarylmeyer.wordpress.com Eric Meyer

    Yes, the provenance of the piece raises my hermeneutical eyebrows of suspicion as well. The Jerusalem Post would be quicker to pull the publishing trigger on this kind of story (sells papers, eh?) than most.

    If it’s legit, it will be vetted elsewhere.

  • WebMonk

    I doubt the picture looks like anything beyond a fairly stylized face. I assume the statement that the coins have representations of Joseph’s face is based on the inscription found on the back of the coin/charm.

    If anyone can find some more original information on this, I would be very grateful. What the inscription says, how many items were found, where they were found, pictures, etc.

  • WebMonk

    I doubt the picture looks like anything beyond a fairly stylized face. I assume the statement that the coins have representations of Joseph’s face is based on the inscription found on the back of the coin/charm.

    If anyone can find some more original information on this, I would be very grateful. What the inscription says, how many items were found, where they were found, pictures, etc.

  • JonSLC

    “Joseph’s name appears twice on this coin, written in hieroglyphs: once the original name, Joseph, and once his Egyptian name, Saba Sabani, which was given to him by Pharaoh when he became treasurer.”

    What about the name Zaphenath-Paneah mentioned in Genesis 41:45? Is “Saba Sabani” from the Koran?

  • JonSLC

    “Joseph’s name appears twice on this coin, written in hieroglyphs: once the original name, Joseph, and once his Egyptian name, Saba Sabani, which was given to him by Pharaoh when he became treasurer.”

    What about the name Zaphenath-Paneah mentioned in Genesis 41:45? Is “Saba Sabani” from the Koran?

  • WebMonk

    Jon, I’m not sure about what the Koran says, but people could and did have multiple names in ancient civilizations. There is a lot of research that goes into just finding out who a person actually is, in spite of differences in names. Think of it as the RCC pope who takes a new name upon assumption of the position, only ten times more complicated as names could be changed according to other deeds, other positions, changes in rulers, etc.

    I have no idea (because I can’t find any #%$&^*@! original info on this topic) how they determined this person is Joseph of Israelite fame. I don’t doubt that they have, but I don’t know how.

  • WebMonk

    Jon, I’m not sure about what the Koran says, but people could and did have multiple names in ancient civilizations. There is a lot of research that goes into just finding out who a person actually is, in spite of differences in names. Think of it as the RCC pope who takes a new name upon assumption of the position, only ten times more complicated as names could be changed according to other deeds, other positions, changes in rulers, etc.

    I have no idea (because I can’t find any #%$&^*@! original info on this topic) how they determined this person is Joseph of Israelite fame. I don’t doubt that they have, but I don’t know how.

  • Bruce Gee

    With regard to what major Biblical figures looked like, FF Bruce, in his book The New Testament Documents, has a footnote somewhere about St. Paul. (Drat! Can’t find my copy. This comes from memory, then). It cites a something-like 4th century painting of what is believed to be St. Paul, described in the footnote as a balding, potbellied, bow-legged, long-nosed short guy. I’ve always liked that description (with my penchant for embellishment, I probably have added to the footnote, but so it goes), and for some reason it has added to my fondness for the old saint.

    To the point of the post, however: besides our unquenchable thirst for actual historic proofs of the existence of Jesus and his kinsmen–a thirst that will last to the sound of the trumpets IMO, what benefit is there to being sure that this coin is of St. Joe?

  • Bruce Gee

    With regard to what major Biblical figures looked like, FF Bruce, in his book The New Testament Documents, has a footnote somewhere about St. Paul. (Drat! Can’t find my copy. This comes from memory, then). It cites a something-like 4th century painting of what is believed to be St. Paul, described in the footnote as a balding, potbellied, bow-legged, long-nosed short guy. I’ve always liked that description (with my penchant for embellishment, I probably have added to the footnote, but so it goes), and for some reason it has added to my fondness for the old saint.

    To the point of the post, however: besides our unquenchable thirst for actual historic proofs of the existence of Jesus and his kinsmen–a thirst that will last to the sound of the trumpets IMO, what benefit is there to being sure that this coin is of St. Joe?

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Given that Abraham and Joseph did transactions in silver and gold, I’m having trouble believing that nobody figured it might be a good idea for a stamp to vouch for the metal’s authenticity until a millenium or two later. Perhaps we simply haven’t found them because they’re hard to date, or simply rust away?

    On the other hand, how do you vouch for the authenticity of a coin that was found simply in a heap of other artifacts?

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Given that Abraham and Joseph did transactions in silver and gold, I’m having trouble believing that nobody figured it might be a good idea for a stamp to vouch for the metal’s authenticity until a millenium or two later. Perhaps we simply haven’t found them because they’re hard to date, or simply rust away?

    On the other hand, how do you vouch for the authenticity of a coin that was found simply in a heap of other artifacts?

  • http://getrarecoins.com/ Bike Bubba

    Given that Abraham and Joseph did transactions in silver and gold, I’m having trouble believing that nobody figured it might be a good idea for a stamp to vouch for the metal’s authenticity until a millenium or two later. Perhaps we simply haven’t found them because they’re hard to date, or simply rust away?

    On the other hand, how do you vouch for the authenticity of a coin that was found simply in a heap of other artifacts?
    Forgot to say great post! Looking forward to reading the next post!

  • http://getrarecoins.com/ Bike Bubba

    Given that Abraham and Joseph did transactions in silver and gold, I’m having trouble believing that nobody figured it might be a good idea for a stamp to vouch for the metal’s authenticity until a millenium or two later. Perhaps we simply haven’t found them because they’re hard to date, or simply rust away?

    On the other hand, how do you vouch for the authenticity of a coin that was found simply in a heap of other artifacts?
    Forgot to say great post! Looking forward to reading the next post!

  • http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/ Justin Taylor

    Todd Bolen has some good cautions here:

    http://blog.bibleplaces.com/2009/09/josephs-coins.html

  • http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/ Justin Taylor

    Todd Bolen has some good cautions here:

    http://blog.bibleplaces.com/2009/09/josephs-coins.html

  • MarkB

    “It cites a something-like 4th century painting of what is believed to be St. Paul, described in the footnote as a balding, potbellied, bow-legged, long-nosed short guy. I’ve always liked that description (with my penchant for embellishment, I probably have added to the footnote, but so it goes), and for some reason it has added to my fondness for the old saint.”

    Sounds like the Penguin in the Bat Man Movies.

  • MarkB

    “It cites a something-like 4th century painting of what is believed to be St. Paul, described in the footnote as a balding, potbellied, bow-legged, long-nosed short guy. I’ve always liked that description (with my penchant for embellishment, I probably have added to the footnote, but so it goes), and for some reason it has added to my fondness for the old saint.”

    Sounds like the Penguin in the Bat Man Movies.

  • Z

    MarkB! I knew there was a likeness of Paul somewhere..thanks for that. I’d heard that. But I hadn’t heard all the details of long noses and potbellies and bow-legs! NOT MY PAUL :-)!!

  • Z

    MarkB! I knew there was a likeness of Paul somewhere..thanks for that. I’d heard that. But I hadn’t heard all the details of long noses and potbellies and bow-legs! NOT MY PAUL :-)!!

  • MarkB

    Z, I wish I could take credit for that but it was quote from #10′s Bruce Gee. All I added was the part about it sounds like the Penguin.

  • MarkB

    Z, I wish I could take credit for that but it was quote from #10′s Bruce Gee. All I added was the part about it sounds like the Penguin.

  • Z

    Oh, thanks MarkB, I hadn’t realized that!
    You’re a good guy for setting me straight..thanks.

  • Z

    Oh, thanks MarkB, I hadn’t realized that!
    You’re a good guy for setting me straight..thanks.

  • md barnes

    Whether they are coins or not isn’t that important to me. But having true historical evidence for Joseph is important. If a date and associated Pharaoh can be matched with Joseph’s life in Eygpt, that would be amazing. If true this would be a fantastic find. The time of the Exodus might be determined as well to say within 50 years.

  • md barnes

    Whether they are coins or not isn’t that important to me. But having true historical evidence for Joseph is important. If a date and associated Pharaoh can be matched with Joseph’s life in Eygpt, that would be amazing. If true this would be a fantastic find. The time of the Exodus might be determined as well to say within 50 years.

  • Butterfly

    I find it rather interesting that they found coins of Joseph. This is a strong case showing that he was real and I hope this sheds light onto other non believers that God and the Bible are real!
    But on the topic of “if coins were in fact made at that time.” Perhaps coins are so hard to find at that time because grave robbers would melt the precious metals and forge them into something else. Isn’t that why our coins are now mixed with other metals to make it harder to melt and forge??

  • Butterfly

    I find it rather interesting that they found coins of Joseph. This is a strong case showing that he was real and I hope this sheds light onto other non believers that God and the Bible are real!
    But on the topic of “if coins were in fact made at that time.” Perhaps coins are so hard to find at that time because grave robbers would melt the precious metals and forge them into something else. Isn’t that why our coins are now mixed with other metals to make it harder to melt and forge??

  • Arnetta from Atlanta

    Scientist and Archeologist have proven that the Bible, Talmud, nor the Qur’an are HISYORICAL documents. They are a collections of Ancient Egyptian folklore, myth and Astrotheology, that is nor of the stories in these books are true. Abraham did not exist. The J was not added to the alphabet until the 16th century A.D. therefore there would not be a Joseph, Jonah nor a Jesus. Please learn the truth.

  • Arnetta from Atlanta

    Scientist and Archeologist have proven that the Bible, Talmud, nor the Qur’an are HISYORICAL documents. They are a collections of Ancient Egyptian folklore, myth and Astrotheology, that is nor of the stories in these books are true. Abraham did not exist. The J was not added to the alphabet until the 16th century A.D. therefore there would not be a Joseph, Jonah nor a Jesus. Please learn the truth.

  • Arnetta from Atlanta

    Scientist and Archeologist have proven that the Bible, Talmud, nor the Qur’an are HISYORICAL documents. They are a collections of Ancient Egyptian folklore, myth and Astrotheology, that is nor of the stories in these books are true. Abraham did not exist. The J was not added to the alphabet until the 16th century A.D. therefore there would not be a Joseph, Jonah nor a Jesus. Please learn the truth.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    Arnetta, the lack of a “J” in English does not prove what you say it does. In the original languages of the Bible, “Jesus” would have been ‘Yeshua,” but it means the same thing: God saves. And scientists and archeologists have not proven that the Bible is not true and the people it describes are not historical. Please look deeper into this, and I think you will be surprised. So who do you think came up with the Sermon on the Mount and other discourses of the gospels in the New Testament if not Jesus? Surely some historical figure. They are not Ancient Egyptian nor astrotheology. What about the content of those teachings?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    Arnetta, the lack of a “J” in English does not prove what you say it does. In the original languages of the Bible, “Jesus” would have been ‘Yeshua,” but it means the same thing: God saves. And scientists and archeologists have not proven that the Bible is not true and the people it describes are not historical. Please look deeper into this, and I think you will be surprised. So who do you think came up with the Sermon on the Mount and other discourses of the gospels in the New Testament if not Jesus? Surely some historical figure. They are not Ancient Egyptian nor astrotheology. What about the content of those teachings?

  • Nicole

    Arnette from Atlanta. You do realize..that the names Jacob, Jesus and Jonah..are english translations right? that their real names in their original language are as follows:
    Jacob= Yacob..Yakuv, Yacov, Yucub, etc etc
    Jonah= Yonah, Yohanah, Yohan, etc etc
    Jesus= Yesua, Yeshua, Yahushua, etc etc etc

    So..please follow your own advice and learn the truth of what you yourself speak. These are english translation of names from their original language. And just about most everyone knows this already. If there are any actual coins, scarabs, what have you containing the name..then the Jacob name they would find in their original language would be Yakob…possibly that of Yakob Har..a pharaoh dating to the time of the Hyksos..whom Josephus, Manetho and Aristobulous all conclude was the actual name of the Israelites of the time. The Egyptians called them Amu, or Amo. Josephus himself names the princess who took Moses from the river as being Thutmosis…or …Thuthmoses…if you look into the whole 18th dynasty of egypt you will see the entire family contains the name Moses..Kamoses, Ramoses, Ahmoses, Thuthmoses, Nefertiti Moses,…etc etc etc. this is the exact time of the Hyksos expulsion from Egypt. At the same time we have Yakob-Har. Of course its just coincidence and the dating is off by about 100 years..and as we all know…Science is always 100 percent correct in dating methods and coincidences are always just coincidences.

  • Nicole

    Arnette from Atlanta. You do realize..that the names Jacob, Jesus and Jonah..are english translations right? that their real names in their original language are as follows:
    Jacob= Yacob..Yakuv, Yacov, Yucub, etc etc
    Jonah= Yonah, Yohanah, Yohan, etc etc
    Jesus= Yesua, Yeshua, Yahushua, etc etc etc

    So..please follow your own advice and learn the truth of what you yourself speak. These are english translation of names from their original language. And just about most everyone knows this already. If there are any actual coins, scarabs, what have you containing the name..then the Jacob name they would find in their original language would be Yakob…possibly that of Yakob Har..a pharaoh dating to the time of the Hyksos..whom Josephus, Manetho and Aristobulous all conclude was the actual name of the Israelites of the time. The Egyptians called them Amu, or Amo. Josephus himself names the princess who took Moses from the river as being Thutmosis…or …Thuthmoses…if you look into the whole 18th dynasty of egypt you will see the entire family contains the name Moses..Kamoses, Ramoses, Ahmoses, Thuthmoses, Nefertiti Moses,…etc etc etc. this is the exact time of the Hyksos expulsion from Egypt. At the same time we have Yakob-Har. Of course its just coincidence and the dating is off by about 100 years..and as we all know…Science is always 100 percent correct in dating methods and coincidences are always just coincidences.

  • Rick

    1. The statement that no coins existed at the Joseph is questionable because of Genesis 44:1 where the grain “money” was placed in the mouth of their sacks. Rather than speculate on what was true by way of the evidence you don’t have, refer to the reliable text itself to establish your working hypothesis. If the text says, “money,” does that mean money might mean coins? Likely. Now we just need the dates on these coins to corroborate the documentation.
    2. No “J” in the alfabet? Fine. Try IHOSEP or IHOTEP alternative spellings for IMHOTEP the only figure in all Egyptian history who correlates about 100% with Joseph.
    3. The mystery of why dates are withheld can only be explained by conflict with the egos or professional careers of those who maintain a chronology centuries out of sync with the Bible and reality. Start with the Bible record and time line as a hypothesis and investigate whether IHOSEP was an Asiatic, son of Ptah (the creator of all), interpreted dreams, presided over the salvation of Egypt from 7 years famine, married Asenath daughter of the priest of ON, administrated from Sakkara, built the step pyramid under Djoser, invented building with cut stone and administrated succeeding pyramids, built the Baher Youssouf (Joseph canal), died at 110 years of age, and other correlations.
    4. Date the Exodus within 50 years? We can do that within a handful of years, Solomon’s temple dedication being 480 years from the Exodus. Again, the problem is not the Bible’s accuracy. Remember, the Jews handed over the Septaguint which was pretty accurate (even if it was a quick and dirty translation to satisfy political expediency and not religious precision) to the Greeks who demanded the history of the people they were to rule. The Egyptians handed over a very inexact history and chronology that has Egyptologists disagreeing among themselves about as much as a thousand years. Things fall pretty much into place if you simply start with a good hypothesis. On the basis of Biblical chronology I would suspect those coins to be dated around 1700BCE. Now, wouldn’t that be a problem for some?

  • Rick

    1. The statement that no coins existed at the Joseph is questionable because of Genesis 44:1 where the grain “money” was placed in the mouth of their sacks. Rather than speculate on what was true by way of the evidence you don’t have, refer to the reliable text itself to establish your working hypothesis. If the text says, “money,” does that mean money might mean coins? Likely. Now we just need the dates on these coins to corroborate the documentation.
    2. No “J” in the alfabet? Fine. Try IHOSEP or IHOTEP alternative spellings for IMHOTEP the only figure in all Egyptian history who correlates about 100% with Joseph.
    3. The mystery of why dates are withheld can only be explained by conflict with the egos or professional careers of those who maintain a chronology centuries out of sync with the Bible and reality. Start with the Bible record and time line as a hypothesis and investigate whether IHOSEP was an Asiatic, son of Ptah (the creator of all), interpreted dreams, presided over the salvation of Egypt from 7 years famine, married Asenath daughter of the priest of ON, administrated from Sakkara, built the step pyramid under Djoser, invented building with cut stone and administrated succeeding pyramids, built the Baher Youssouf (Joseph canal), died at 110 years of age, and other correlations.
    4. Date the Exodus within 50 years? We can do that within a handful of years, Solomon’s temple dedication being 480 years from the Exodus. Again, the problem is not the Bible’s accuracy. Remember, the Jews handed over the Septaguint which was pretty accurate (even if it was a quick and dirty translation to satisfy political expediency and not religious precision) to the Greeks who demanded the history of the people they were to rule. The Egyptians handed over a very inexact history and chronology that has Egyptologists disagreeing among themselves about as much as a thousand years. Things fall pretty much into place if you simply start with a good hypothesis. On the basis of Biblical chronology I would suspect those coins to be dated around 1700BCE. Now, wouldn’t that be a problem for some?

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