India probe finds water on the moon

A lunar probe sent off by India has found evidence that the moon has water. That may make a moon colony possible. But it might not be an American colony. I wonder if this breakthrough may signal a shift away from American scientific and technological dominance to that of Asian countries that are doing a better job of educating their children in math and science than we are.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Carl Vehse

    “I wonder if this breakthrough may signal a shift away from American scientific and technological dominance”

    It was NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper, and a team headed by Dr. Carle Pieters, a planetary geologist from Brown University, who was principal investigator that made the discovery of water. Dr. Pieters and her team have a press conference at 2 PM today to provide more information on their discovery. The results will be publshed in Science Express Website (for those with subscriptions).

  • Carl Vehse

    “I wonder if this breakthrough may signal a shift away from American scientific and technological dominance”

    It was NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper, and a team headed by Dr. Carle Pieters, a planetary geologist from Brown University, who was principal investigator that made the discovery of water. Dr. Pieters and her team have a press conference at 2 PM today to provide more information on their discovery. The results will be publshed in Science Express Website (for those with subscriptions).

  • Carl Vehse

    For more information on this afternoon’s NASA conference, check http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/sep/HQ_M09_183_Moon_Science_Findings.html.

    BTW, if the water that was discovered is tied up in minerals (rather then ice trapped in the rocks, it will take lots of energy to separate meaningful quantities of water, then to break it up into usable hydrogen (for fuel) and oxygen. Lunar explorers will need even more energy for mining the minerals.

  • Carl Vehse

    For more information on this afternoon’s NASA conference, check http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/sep/HQ_M09_183_Moon_Science_Findings.html.

    BTW, if the water that was discovered is tied up in minerals (rather then ice trapped in the rocks, it will take lots of energy to separate meaningful quantities of water, then to break it up into usable hydrogen (for fuel) and oxygen. Lunar explorers will need even more energy for mining the minerals.

  • Ryan

    “I wonder if this breakthrough may signal a shift away from American scientific and technological dominance to that of Asian countries that are doing a better job of educating their children in math and science than we are.”

    That may be part of it, but there is also the hunger and desire to do these things. For some reason we have lost some of that adventurous, engaging spirit in our country.

  • Ryan

    “I wonder if this breakthrough may signal a shift away from American scientific and technological dominance to that of Asian countries that are doing a better job of educating their children in math and science than we are.”

    That may be part of it, but there is also the hunger and desire to do these things. For some reason we have lost some of that adventurous, engaging spirit in our country.

  • scots

    This begs the question: Why would anyone want to live on the moon? Have you seen the moon? Hello?

  • scots

    This begs the question: Why would anyone want to live on the moon? Have you seen the moon? Hello?

  • Jonathan

    If I get to visit the Indian colony up there, I do so hope they have a good take-away shop. Yum–chicken tikka in 1/6th gravity.

  • Jonathan

    If I get to visit the Indian colony up there, I do so hope they have a good take-away shop. Yum–chicken tikka in 1/6th gravity.

  • Bruce Gee

    Moonbats. Will there be moonbats?

    I’m with Scots, I like the moon right where it is, up there nicely affecting the tides, and appearing to silently glide through the night sky.

  • Bruce Gee

    Moonbats. Will there be moonbats?

    I’m with Scots, I like the moon right where it is, up there nicely affecting the tides, and appearing to silently glide through the night sky.

  • Cincinnatus

    I don’t care how much water they find on the moon. I’m not going there until they find cheese.

  • Cincinnatus

    I don’t care how much water they find on the moon. I’m not going there until they find cheese.

  • Doug

    A moon colony is unlikely any time soon.

    The colony would require expensive and continual resupply from the Earth.

    I’m not aware of how a lunar colony could economically sustain that sort of expenditure.

  • Doug

    A moon colony is unlikely any time soon.

    The colony would require expensive and continual resupply from the Earth.

    I’m not aware of how a lunar colony could economically sustain that sort of expenditure.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Perhaps the moon is made of paneer?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Perhaps the moon is made of paneer?

  • Jonathan

    Doug @8,

    Maybe we should contract out our space program to the Indians as well–the can probably do it cheaper. (Hey, if it works for Microsoft, why not?)

  • Jonathan

    Doug @8,

    Maybe we should contract out our space program to the Indians as well–the can probably do it cheaper. (Hey, if it works for Microsoft, why not?)

  • WebMonk

    Guys, there was a discussion of the moon base topic a while back. Basically, it’s a great place for low-gravity research, it’s wonderful place for launching satellites, and it’s an absolutely fantastic base for placing all sorts of telescopes and other sensors of various types. With a moon-based telescope, we could have the Hubble telescope’s view but with a thousand times better resolution.

    Cost effectiveness is a major issue, but there are some marvelous advantages if the costs can be handled. (and I think they can, eventually)

  • WebMonk

    Guys, there was a discussion of the moon base topic a while back. Basically, it’s a great place for low-gravity research, it’s wonderful place for launching satellites, and it’s an absolutely fantastic base for placing all sorts of telescopes and other sensors of various types. With a moon-based telescope, we could have the Hubble telescope’s view but with a thousand times better resolution.

    Cost effectiveness is a major issue, but there are some marvelous advantages if the costs can be handled. (and I think they can, eventually)

  • Reg Schofield

    Ok whoopee….If this gets agencies to waste billions of dollars in trying to get to the moon while 16000 children die everyday of diseases that can be stopped , someone deserves a kick in the head .

  • Reg Schofield

    Ok whoopee….If this gets agencies to waste billions of dollars in trying to get to the moon while 16000 children die everyday of diseases that can be stopped , someone deserves a kick in the head .


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