The vocation of an astronaut

Astronaut Jeff Williams is blasting off into space today on a Russian rocket, headed to the International Space Station where he will spend 6 months. This will be his third space voyage and his second 6 month stint on the space station. He will be among the leaders in time spent in outer space.

He is a devout Christian and a Missouri Synod Lutheran. Our paths have crossed several times–he is a fan of my book on vocation!–and I have gotten to know him. Pray for a safe blastoff today. And pray for him from time to time on his long, long mission away from his family. (He’s also written a book that I wrote an introduction for. Stay tuned for news about that.)

So let’s consider the vocation of an astronaut. How can a space traveller live out his faith in that particular line of work? How can he love and serve his neighbor?

UPDATE: The launch went well, and he’s in orbit. Thanks to Paul McCain at Cyberbrethren for posting a video of the launch, which includes both the blastoff and shots inside the capsule. (Jeff is the astronaut above and to the right.) Paul also posts some more details, including how to sign up to get Jeff’s twitter feed from orbit. His last message closed with “sdg,” the same letters Bach used to conclude his musical compositions: “Soli Deo Gloria,” to God alone be the glory.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain
  • http://cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain
  • http://necessaryroughness.org Dan at Necessary Roughness

    Hmmm, let’s see, how can astronaut love and serve his neighbor:

    Perform his duties while taking care of his equipment
    Perform any experiments in space with integrity
    Use resources wisely — especially important on the ISS!

    Praying for him and his family. I’ve not stayed six months straight away from family, but two months was bad enough.

  • http://necessaryroughness.org Dan at Necessary Roughness

    Hmmm, let’s see, how can astronaut love and serve his neighbor:

    Perform his duties while taking care of his equipment
    Perform any experiments in space with integrity
    Use resources wisely — especially important on the ISS!

    Praying for him and his family. I’ve not stayed six months straight away from family, but two months was bad enough.

  • Mary Jack

    I think part of his vocation is showing how far hard work, education, and exploration of creation can take you. It’s such inspiring work.

  • Mary Jack

    I think part of his vocation is showing how far hard work, education, and exploration of creation can take you. It’s such inspiring work.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01763924682909630509 Orianna Laun

    Part of his vocation is serving those with whom he works at the space station (surely he’s not alone, right?).
    Wow, six months away, mostly cut off from everything, what a tough life. Perhaps that’s part of his vocation too–doing what most of us would not want to do for the sake of research and development, and sparing us from having to spend six months away from our families.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01763924682909630509 Orianna Laun

    Part of his vocation is serving those with whom he works at the space station (surely he’s not alone, right?).
    Wow, six months away, mostly cut off from everything, what a tough life. Perhaps that’s part of his vocation too–doing what most of us would not want to do for the sake of research and development, and sparing us from having to spend six months away from our families.

  • fws

    “How can a space traveller live out his faith in that particular line of work? How can he love and serve his neighbor?”

    I predict that our brother Jeff, having read your book and being Lutheran, will humbly immerse himself in the most mundane details of his work and try to master those, and that doing this will look every bit like what a skilled pagan would do.

    The difference will be that the failure and disappointments and imperfection he encounters here will drive him to rely more and more on Christ and seek His Lord where he tells us he can be found: in word and sacrament.

    hmmm.. 6 months with no holy communion. Now THAT must be hard for a Lutheran. Yes for sure he will be close to me in prayer now.

  • fws

    “How can a space traveller live out his faith in that particular line of work? How can he love and serve his neighbor?”

    I predict that our brother Jeff, having read your book and being Lutheran, will humbly immerse himself in the most mundane details of his work and try to master those, and that doing this will look every bit like what a skilled pagan would do.

    The difference will be that the failure and disappointments and imperfection he encounters here will drive him to rely more and more on Christ and seek His Lord where he tells us he can be found: in word and sacrament.

    hmmm.. 6 months with no holy communion. Now THAT must be hard for a Lutheran. Yes for sure he will be close to me in prayer now.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    Last time, he took up with him some bread and wine and, with the aid of high tech communication, tuned into a Sunday service at his church, during which the elements were consecrated.

    Now after he did that, it inspired a certain amount of controversy, with some saying he and his pastor shouldn’t have done that, and that the communion was invalid.

    I would think the “Word,” which can be transmitted electronically even into outer space, is still efficacious. And he was participating in the Divine Service with the rest of his congregation, even though he was circling the earth far above them. Maybe I’m missing something, being a mere humble layman like Jeff.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    Last time, he took up with him some bread and wine and, with the aid of high tech communication, tuned into a Sunday service at his church, during which the elements were consecrated.

    Now after he did that, it inspired a certain amount of controversy, with some saying he and his pastor shouldn’t have done that, and that the communion was invalid.

    I would think the “Word,” which can be transmitted electronically even into outer space, is still efficacious. And he was participating in the Divine Service with the rest of his congregation, even though he was circling the earth far above them. Maybe I’m missing something, being a mere humble layman like Jeff.

  • DonS

    I would imagine that there are few vocations in which you get a better sense of eternal perspective, and the magnitude and majesty of God’s creation, than as an astronaut in space. You also have a keen sense of man’s mortality.

    In addition to his service and witness to his fellow astronauts and technicians, which in his case is cross-cultural as well, he will have many unique opportunities upon his return to share his faith in settings where he, because of his vocation, will have the rapt attention of his audience.

  • DonS

    I would imagine that there are few vocations in which you get a better sense of eternal perspective, and the magnitude and majesty of God’s creation, than as an astronaut in space. You also have a keen sense of man’s mortality.

    In addition to his service and witness to his fellow astronauts and technicians, which in his case is cross-cultural as well, he will have many unique opportunities upon his return to share his faith in settings where he, because of his vocation, will have the rapt attention of his audience.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    By being the best astronaut he can be.

    I know of many Lutherans who are out in orbit, as we speak.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    By being the best astronaut he can be.

    I know of many Lutherans who are out in orbit, as we speak.

  • Carl Vehse

    In an April 19, 2006, LCMS News release, “Astronaut calls pastor to say he’s OK on space station” (reprinted in Spero News), LCMS reporter (but Roman Catholic convert) Paula Schlueter Ross stated: “Communion wafers and wine, consecrated during worship services at Gloria Dei, also are being sent to Williams periodically on the Russian Progress automated resupply vehicle so that he can share in the Lord’s Supper while in space.”

    Whether or not Williams’ Gloria Dei Lutheran Church-Houston pastor, Rev. John Kieschnick (a cousin of the synod’s president), telecommunicated the Verba via an audio/video feed at the time Jeff Williams used the wafers and wine in space, the issue of “remote consecration” was covered by the LCMS CTCR in addressing whether the use of a DVD-recorded or similar remote electronic consecration was “kosher.”

    The CTCR stated: “Whenever the actual words and actions of the celebrant in consecrating the elements are intentionally separated (by time, distance, or technological means) from the distribution and reception, no assurance can be given that our Lord’s instructions are being heeded and that the body and blood of Christ are actually being given and received for the forgiveness of sins and the strengthening of faith (cf. fn. 15 of the CTCR’s 1983 report Theology and Practice of the Lord’s Supper [TPLS]).” (www.lcms.org/graphics/assets/media/CTCR/DVD%20Communion%20Response%200206.pdf)

    This statement is in congruence with the Lutheran Confessions, Solid Declaration, VII.15 and VII.83-84.

    Subsequently, Paula wrote me that the particular paragraph on sending pre-consecrated communion elements up to Astronaut Jeff Williams had been deleted from The Reporter webpage (www.lcms.org/pages/rpage.asp?NavID=9851). I am reminded of the Cold War days when Pravda would publish pictures of gathered Soviet leaders, with those who had since fallen out of favor airbrushed out.

  • Carl Vehse

    In an April 19, 2006, LCMS News release, “Astronaut calls pastor to say he’s OK on space station” (reprinted in Spero News), LCMS reporter (but Roman Catholic convert) Paula Schlueter Ross stated: “Communion wafers and wine, consecrated during worship services at Gloria Dei, also are being sent to Williams periodically on the Russian Progress automated resupply vehicle so that he can share in the Lord’s Supper while in space.”

    Whether or not Williams’ Gloria Dei Lutheran Church-Houston pastor, Rev. John Kieschnick (a cousin of the synod’s president), telecommunicated the Verba via an audio/video feed at the time Jeff Williams used the wafers and wine in space, the issue of “remote consecration” was covered by the LCMS CTCR in addressing whether the use of a DVD-recorded or similar remote electronic consecration was “kosher.”

    The CTCR stated: “Whenever the actual words and actions of the celebrant in consecrating the elements are intentionally separated (by time, distance, or technological means) from the distribution and reception, no assurance can be given that our Lord’s instructions are being heeded and that the body and blood of Christ are actually being given and received for the forgiveness of sins and the strengthening of faith (cf. fn. 15 of the CTCR’s 1983 report Theology and Practice of the Lord’s Supper [TPLS]).” (www.lcms.org/graphics/assets/media/CTCR/DVD%20Communion%20Response%200206.pdf)

    This statement is in congruence with the Lutheran Confessions, Solid Declaration, VII.15 and VII.83-84.

    Subsequently, Paula wrote me that the particular paragraph on sending pre-consecrated communion elements up to Astronaut Jeff Williams had been deleted from The Reporter webpage (www.lcms.org/pages/rpage.asp?NavID=9851). I am reminded of the Cold War days when Pravda would publish pictures of gathered Soviet leaders, with those who had since fallen out of favor airbrushed out.

  • Jonathan

    Hmmm. Raises an question of personal interest. Could a deployed military member who has no available Lutheran chaplain (even assuming the shared Lutheran chaplaincy is still kosher nowadays) do likewise with the sacrament and be meet, right and salutary?

  • Jonathan

    Hmmm. Raises an question of personal interest. Could a deployed military member who has no available Lutheran chaplain (even assuming the shared Lutheran chaplaincy is still kosher nowadays) do likewise with the sacrament and be meet, right and salutary?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    It may have been deleted from the Reporter because it was not true. I have it on good authority that the wafers and wine were not consecrated ahead of time, but that Williams linked into an actual service where the words of institution were spoken over the elements, including those in the space ship. That is not the same as the Roman Catholic practice of “reserving the consecrated elements.” The question is, would THAT be valid? The actual words were not, in that case, separated from the reception.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    It may have been deleted from the Reporter because it was not true. I have it on good authority that the wafers and wine were not consecrated ahead of time, but that Williams linked into an actual service where the words of institution were spoken over the elements, including those in the space ship. That is not the same as the Roman Catholic practice of “reserving the consecrated elements.” The question is, would THAT be valid? The actual words were not, in that case, separated from the reception.

  • fws

    #11 veith

    interesting question. I am feeling we are all missing something very basic that I cannot put my finger on that would resolve this….

    could a shutin watch a tv program of a divine service with bread and wine on a tv tray and then consider that bread and wine consecrated?

    I feel like there is a legalism in one direction and feel uncertainty in the other direction. a good rule: if in doubt, do nothing. the blessed sacrament is meant to be a certain object that faith and trust can cling to.

    so I am thinking that it would be best to forgoe the holy supper if there is any doubt at all as to it being done according to christ´s institution. We can trust that Christ is with us when we are not where the holy supper can be taken in a most certain way.

    This is also why I think the practice is unwise of providing grape juice to alcoholics in a congregation. probably better for them to take the wine and trust Jesus or commune in one kind if that is what their conscience dictates.

    I understand that the salzburg lutherans denied themselves the sacrament rather than taking it at a roman church for years, and when they finally were allowed to immigrate to lutheran lands, there were tears of joy at once again being able to partake. anyone know more about this here?

  • fws

    #11 veith

    interesting question. I am feeling we are all missing something very basic that I cannot put my finger on that would resolve this….

    could a shutin watch a tv program of a divine service with bread and wine on a tv tray and then consider that bread and wine consecrated?

    I feel like there is a legalism in one direction and feel uncertainty in the other direction. a good rule: if in doubt, do nothing. the blessed sacrament is meant to be a certain object that faith and trust can cling to.

    so I am thinking that it would be best to forgoe the holy supper if there is any doubt at all as to it being done according to christ´s institution. We can trust that Christ is with us when we are not where the holy supper can be taken in a most certain way.

    This is also why I think the practice is unwise of providing grape juice to alcoholics in a congregation. probably better for them to take the wine and trust Jesus or commune in one kind if that is what their conscience dictates.

    I understand that the salzburg lutherans denied themselves the sacrament rather than taking it at a roman church for years, and when they finally were allowed to immigrate to lutheran lands, there were tears of joy at once again being able to partake. anyone know more about this here?

  • Carl Vehse

    According to Paula Schlueter Ross, the news story about communion wafers and wine, consecrated during worship services at Gloria Dei and taken to the space station, was accurate, but she said that part was removed from the LCMS article anyway.

    In any case, a consecration anywhere between 220 and 25,000 miles away via a “live” audio/video telecommunication feed would still be problemmatic according to the CTCR when “actual words and actions of the celebrant in consecrating the elements are intentionally separated (by time, distance, or technological means) from the distribution and reception.”

    If such separations between consecration, distribution, and reception were not significant, then an absent LCMS member conceivably could participate in the Lord’s Supper at a distant location after watching a consecration by an LCMS pastor on YouTube.

  • Carl Vehse

    According to Paula Schlueter Ross, the news story about communion wafers and wine, consecrated during worship services at Gloria Dei and taken to the space station, was accurate, but she said that part was removed from the LCMS article anyway.

    In any case, a consecration anywhere between 220 and 25,000 miles away via a “live” audio/video telecommunication feed would still be problemmatic according to the CTCR when “actual words and actions of the celebrant in consecrating the elements are intentionally separated (by time, distance, or technological means) from the distribution and reception.”

    If such separations between consecration, distribution, and reception were not significant, then an absent LCMS member conceivably could participate in the Lord’s Supper at a distant location after watching a consecration by an LCMS pastor on YouTube.

  • Carl Vehse

    Oops. The Space Station would actually be anywhere between 220 and 8,000 miles away.

  • Carl Vehse

    Oops. The Space Station would actually be anywhere between 220 and 8,000 miles away.

  • Husker Lutheran

    I’ve heard Astronaut Williams speak at our LCMS church in Nebraska. No doubt that viewing earth from space only confirms the presence of our Creator. There’s a tad bit of “shepherd” element to being an astronaut. You are really out there–all by yourself (or with a few other sheep, er, humans) and our Lord. How could one not grow stronger in their faith?

    Praise God for a safe launch and may God give Jeff safety and comfort during his orbit and return.

  • Husker Lutheran

    I’ve heard Astronaut Williams speak at our LCMS church in Nebraska. No doubt that viewing earth from space only confirms the presence of our Creator. There’s a tad bit of “shepherd” element to being an astronaut. You are really out there–all by yourself (or with a few other sheep, er, humans) and our Lord. How could one not grow stronger in their faith?

    Praise God for a safe launch and may God give Jeff safety and comfort during his orbit and return.

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    AWESOME-thank you for the link to cyberbrethren–
    and for the info on Astronaut Jeff Williams…

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    AWESOME-thank you for the link to cyberbrethren–
    and for the info on Astronaut Jeff Williams…

  • Z

    “So let’s consider the vocation of an astronaut. How can a space traveller live out his faith in that particular line of work? How can he love and serve his neighbor?”

    Well, HECK…he won’t be up there his whole LIFE, will he? :-) (sorry, couldn’t resist!)
    I have to admit, may God forgive me, I feel a little proud of having an LCMS astronaut up there!!

  • Z

    “So let’s consider the vocation of an astronaut. How can a space traveller live out his faith in that particular line of work? How can he love and serve his neighbor?”

    Well, HECK…he won’t be up there his whole LIFE, will he? :-) (sorry, couldn’t resist!)
    I have to admit, may God forgive me, I feel a little proud of having an LCMS astronaut up there!!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    No, a recording on YouTube would not be a simultaneous event with the reception. The confessions were dealing with the problem of reserving the consecrated hosts and separating the sacrament from the congregation that “holds the keys.” Obviously, they weren’t thinking of electronic communications. But I admit the problem: Could a pastor consecrate the elements over a live television feed, to use FWS’s example? I think not, but it’s complicated. If the Russian cosmonaut, trained in Soviet atheism, heard the Word being preached in a broadcast service, I would think that he could be converted. That would show that the Word is efficacious when electronically transmitted. Why would it not be efficacious in the sacrament? (I’m not saying that it is, or that it is good practice, or confessionally allowed. I’m curious about the reasoning. Why wouldn’t it be?)

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    No, a recording on YouTube would not be a simultaneous event with the reception. The confessions were dealing with the problem of reserving the consecrated hosts and separating the sacrament from the congregation that “holds the keys.” Obviously, they weren’t thinking of electronic communications. But I admit the problem: Could a pastor consecrate the elements over a live television feed, to use FWS’s example? I think not, but it’s complicated. If the Russian cosmonaut, trained in Soviet atheism, heard the Word being preached in a broadcast service, I would think that he could be converted. That would show that the Word is efficacious when electronically transmitted. Why would it not be efficacious in the sacrament? (I’m not saying that it is, or that it is good practice, or confessionally allowed. I’m curious about the reasoning. Why wouldn’t it be?)

  • Carl Vehse

    Jeff Williams’ stint in space will be busy… and perhaps entertaining for at least some of the time, given his fellow astronaut, Cirque du Soleil founder and billionaire, Guy Laliberte, on his $35M-ticketed flight.

    I wonder if Laliberte had to pay an extra fee for his luggage, and whether he gets frequent flyer miles?

  • Carl Vehse

    Jeff Williams’ stint in space will be busy… and perhaps entertaining for at least some of the time, given his fellow astronaut, Cirque du Soleil founder and billionaire, Guy Laliberte, on his $35M-ticketed flight.

    I wonder if Laliberte had to pay an extra fee for his luggage, and whether he gets frequent flyer miles?

  • fws

    “That would show that the Word is efficacious when electronically transmitted. Why would it not be efficacious in the sacrament? (I’m not saying that it is, or that it is good practice, or confessionally allowed. I’m curious about the reasoning. Why wouldn’t it be?)”

    I am catching from my current re-reading of the Lutheran Confessions, that EVERYTHING is said and done with the constant reference to how “terrified consciences” are comforted and confirmed by the Holy Gospel.

    The question is not “could it work” or even “would it work”. The question is “is this practice driving in the direction of certainty” and “is it about that certainty that comes from faith in things that in NO WAY DEPENDS on what we do or how we do them?” We can freely refrain from partaking of the Holy Supper when circumstances (rarely) make that necessary, knowing that it is God´s Work and not a requirement or something we must do (ie the Law).

    The rule “If in doubt, do nothing.” is a great rule to follow that expresses the christian attitude quite nicely.

    I believe that the fact that there is doubt or question here can mean that Our brother astronaut could have forgone the holy supper for 6 months in the quiet confidence of faith.

    You are right that the word converts. This does not mean that that word has to or even properly should be manifest in the form of holy communion in ways that breed uncertainty in any way.

  • fws

    “That would show that the Word is efficacious when electronically transmitted. Why would it not be efficacious in the sacrament? (I’m not saying that it is, or that it is good practice, or confessionally allowed. I’m curious about the reasoning. Why wouldn’t it be?)”

    I am catching from my current re-reading of the Lutheran Confessions, that EVERYTHING is said and done with the constant reference to how “terrified consciences” are comforted and confirmed by the Holy Gospel.

    The question is not “could it work” or even “would it work”. The question is “is this practice driving in the direction of certainty” and “is it about that certainty that comes from faith in things that in NO WAY DEPENDS on what we do or how we do them?” We can freely refrain from partaking of the Holy Supper when circumstances (rarely) make that necessary, knowing that it is God´s Work and not a requirement or something we must do (ie the Law).

    The rule “If in doubt, do nothing.” is a great rule to follow that expresses the christian attitude quite nicely.

    I believe that the fact that there is doubt or question here can mean that Our brother astronaut could have forgone the holy supper for 6 months in the quiet confidence of faith.

    You are right that the word converts. This does not mean that that word has to or even properly should be manifest in the form of holy communion in ways that breed uncertainty in any way.

  • fws

    The christian life is characterized by a seeking out freedom to live in and create structure rules and order, and show joy in this as demonstrated by care and reverence for standardization and structure and good form.

    contrarily the spirit of creative , extra-ordinary, extra-structural means implying that just ends are what matter most do not seem to fit the proper spirit of vocation.

    They seem instead to fit under the category of the will and desire of men rather than the discipline and submission of the will and obedience that the confessions and scriptures call the work of the law that the holy spirit works in christians and in pagan alike to make smooth the path for His proper work of creating trust in Christ having done all thinks well for us and outside of us.

  • fws

    The christian life is characterized by a seeking out freedom to live in and create structure rules and order, and show joy in this as demonstrated by care and reverence for standardization and structure and good form.

    contrarily the spirit of creative , extra-ordinary, extra-structural means implying that just ends are what matter most do not seem to fit the proper spirit of vocation.

    They seem instead to fit under the category of the will and desire of men rather than the discipline and submission of the will and obedience that the confessions and scriptures call the work of the law that the holy spirit works in christians and in pagan alike to make smooth the path for His proper work of creating trust in Christ having done all thinks well for us and outside of us.

  • Carl Vehse

    “Why would it not be efficacious in the sacrament? (I’m not saying that it is, or that it is good practice, or confessionally allowed. I’m curious about the reasoning. Why wouldn’t it be?)”

    The Commission on
    Theology and Church Relations (CTCR) response
    gave four concerns about the practice of relying on a pastor’s electronically recreated voice or image to consecrate communion elements at a remote location. Such CTCR “troubling” concerns are over raising “questions and doubts about whether Christ’s Supper was being celebrated in complete faithfulness to His own instructions and example.”

    Another question – Are such practices as DVD, YouTube, or radio/TV consecrations different from consecrations in which the pastor speaks in a different language than the congregant, or a consecration where a deaf congregant “hears” through a sign-language interpreter, or a consecration a elderly blind congregant hears through a hearing aid?

    And if a “live” television feed to an astronaut on the space station (or a soldier stationed in a remote camp in Afghanistan) is no problem, then would there be a problem in the future for a “live” televison feed of a consecration for an astronaut on Mars, where the signal won’t actually be seen until at least twenty minutes later?

  • Carl Vehse

    “Why would it not be efficacious in the sacrament? (I’m not saying that it is, or that it is good practice, or confessionally allowed. I’m curious about the reasoning. Why wouldn’t it be?)”

    The Commission on
    Theology and Church Relations (CTCR) response
    gave four concerns about the practice of relying on a pastor’s electronically recreated voice or image to consecrate communion elements at a remote location. Such CTCR “troubling” concerns are over raising “questions and doubts about whether Christ’s Supper was being celebrated in complete faithfulness to His own instructions and example.”

    Another question – Are such practices as DVD, YouTube, or radio/TV consecrations different from consecrations in which the pastor speaks in a different language than the congregant, or a consecration where a deaf congregant “hears” through a sign-language interpreter, or a consecration a elderly blind congregant hears through a hearing aid?

    And if a “live” television feed to an astronaut on the space station (or a soldier stationed in a remote camp in Afghanistan) is no problem, then would there be a problem in the future for a “live” televison feed of a consecration for an astronaut on Mars, where the signal won’t actually be seen until at least twenty minutes later?

  • fws

    #22 brother carl. There are two traps here. one is to not allow ourselves be captive to the word of God and pay attention to the “form of sound doctrine” the other is to parse things with ctcr documents and numbers of minutes.

    I am not disagreeing, I am just saying that our guide must be the holy Gospel ministered to terrified consciences needing certainty for faith to cling to.

    this must be overtly THE point of all our musings…

  • fws

    #22 brother carl. There are two traps here. one is to not allow ourselves be captive to the word of God and pay attention to the “form of sound doctrine” the other is to parse things with ctcr documents and numbers of minutes.

    I am not disagreeing, I am just saying that our guide must be the holy Gospel ministered to terrified consciences needing certainty for faith to cling to.

    this must be overtly THE point of all our musings…

  • Carl Vehse

    I am not disagreeing, I am just saying that our guide must be the holy Gospel ministered to terrified consciences needing certainty for faith to cling to.”

    This doesn’t seem to differ from what the CTCR said regarding the response’s purpose. The question is whether their distinction “by time, distance, or technological means” for the electronic and remote transmission (via a DVD) of a consecration correctly fulfills that purpose. Another question is whether the CTCR distinction also applies to an audio/video telecommunication of a pastor consecrating elements residing in an orbiting space station or in some other remote location.

  • Carl Vehse

    I am not disagreeing, I am just saying that our guide must be the holy Gospel ministered to terrified consciences needing certainty for faith to cling to.”

    This doesn’t seem to differ from what the CTCR said regarding the response’s purpose. The question is whether their distinction “by time, distance, or technological means” for the electronic and remote transmission (via a DVD) of a consecration correctly fulfills that purpose. Another question is whether the CTCR distinction also applies to an audio/video telecommunication of a pastor consecrating elements residing in an orbiting space station or in some other remote location.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    OK, my mind is reeling at these Martian time-lapses, but you two have convinced me. And I’m greatly impressed that Carl Vehse and FWS are agreeing on something!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Veith

    OK, my mind is reeling at these Martian time-lapses, but you two have convinced me. And I’m greatly impressed that Carl Vehse and FWS are agreeing on something!

  • Carl Vehse

    “And I’m greatly impressed that Carl Vehse and FWS are agreeing on something!”

    Will wonders never cease?!?

    BTW Gene, if your mind is reeling now about Earth/Mars telecommunicated consecration time delays, you don’t even want to think about how consecrationists and receptionists would try to explain this to each other.

  • Carl Vehse

    “And I’m greatly impressed that Carl Vehse and FWS are agreeing on something!”

    Will wonders never cease?!?

    BTW Gene, if your mind is reeling now about Earth/Mars telecommunicated consecration time delays, you don’t even want to think about how consecrationists and receptionists would try to explain this to each other.

  • http://www.hempelstudios.blogspot.com Sarah in Exile

    Either way, I think it’s AWESOME that he took Communion to space.

  • http://www.hempelstudios.blogspot.com Sarah in Exile

    Either way, I think it’s AWESOME that he took Communion to space.


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