Muhammad: The Movie

In the “you don’t know what you are getting into” department, one of the producers of The Lord of the Rings movies is planning on making a movie about the prophet Muhammad:

Producer Barrie Osborne cast Keanu Reeves as the messiah in The Matrix and helped defeat the dark lord Sauron in his record-breaking Lord of the Rings trilogy. Now the Oscar-winning American film-maker is set to embark on his most perilous quest to date: making a big-screen biopic of the prophet Muhammad.

Budgeted at around $150m (£91.5m), the film will chart Muhammad's life and examine his teachings. Osborne told Reuters that he envisages it as "an international epic production aimed at bridging cultures. The film will educate people about the true meaning of Islam".

Osborne's production will reportedly feature English-speaking Muslim actors. It is backed by the Qatar-based production company Alnoor Holdings, who have installed the Muslim scholar Sheikh Yusuf Al-Qaradawi to oversee all aspects of the shoot. In accordance with Islamic law, the prophet will not actually be depicted on screen. . . .

The as-yet-untitled picture is due to go before the cameras in 2011. It remains to be seen, however, whether it will be beaten to cinemas by another Muhammad-themed drama. Late last year, producer Oscar Zoghbi announced plans to remake The Message, his controversial 1976 drama that sparked a fatal siege by protesters in Washington DC. The new version, entitled The Messenger of Peace, is currently still in development.

A Hollywood non-Muslim is going to teach the world “the true meaning of Islam”? Either he will offend actual Muslims or he will present a white-washed version, one that possibly will inspire Westerners to embrace a new Westernized and sanitized form of the religion. (See what some Americans have done to Hinduism, Buddhism, and paganism [below--note the lack of sacrifices].)

The earlier movie “The Message” offended Muslims to the point of violence, but this remake looks like it will atone for that insensitivity by rendering the prophet as “The Messenger of Peace” for this religion of peace.

Shooting the movie without showing the main character, though, will be an interesting challenge. “Ben Hur” managed scenes with Jesus that never showed Him, but that was only for very short sequences. And the point of view shots that replaced the visual depictions of our Lord (which still bother some Christians to this day) show a degree of adoration that would probably also violate Islam.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Jonathan

    Jihad Watch has a good spin on this film project.

    Religion of peace. Tell that to Noor Almaleki of Phoenix AZ, the young woman who was murdered by her Muslim father in an ‘honor killing’ for living an apparently ‘apostate’ lifestyle.

  • Jonathan

    Jihad Watch has a good spin on this film project.

    Religion of peace. Tell that to Noor Almaleki of Phoenix AZ, the young woman who was murdered by her Muslim father in an ‘honor killing’ for living an apparently ‘apostate’ lifestyle.

  • Carl Vehse

    Regarding the Muslim-based murder in Phoenix –

    In a November 29, 2007, interview on Issues, Etc., discussing Muslim riots in Paris and the punishment of a British school teacher in Sudan for allowing students to name a teddy bear ‘Mohammed’, Dr. John Warwick Montgomery made a very good point:

    “You’ll pardon my opinion on this, but I would outlaw the Muslim religion on the very same basis that I would outlaw the Aztec religion. The Aztec religion holds to human sacrifice. I would not allow that religion to prevail, nor would I allow Islam to prevail, because the moment that they get into any situation of power, the result is this kind of thing, which is against human rights and against human civilization. And I don’t care that there’s some lovely Muslims around. I’m sure there were some very fine Aztecs as well.”

  • Carl Vehse

    Regarding the Muslim-based murder in Phoenix –

    In a November 29, 2007, interview on Issues, Etc., discussing Muslim riots in Paris and the punishment of a British school teacher in Sudan for allowing students to name a teddy bear ‘Mohammed’, Dr. John Warwick Montgomery made a very good point:

    “You’ll pardon my opinion on this, but I would outlaw the Muslim religion on the very same basis that I would outlaw the Aztec religion. The Aztec religion holds to human sacrifice. I would not allow that religion to prevail, nor would I allow Islam to prevail, because the moment that they get into any situation of power, the result is this kind of thing, which is against human rights and against human civilization. And I don’t care that there’s some lovely Muslims around. I’m sure there were some very fine Aztecs as well.”

  • rlewer

    A moslem scholar will oversee the film. That tells us what the film will be like.

  • rlewer

    A moslem scholar will oversee the film. That tells us what the film will be like.

  • Tom Hering

    Why Muhammad? (1.) Producers still want to tap into the sort of religious enthusiasm that made The Passion of the Christ hugely profitable. There is the potential in Islam to make the right kind of Muhammad film a blockbuster. (2.) Some Hollywood movies make a lot more money overseas than they do in the United States, and so some movies are made with overseas markets in mind.

  • Tom Hering

    Why Muhammad? (1.) Producers still want to tap into the sort of religious enthusiasm that made The Passion of the Christ hugely profitable. There is the potential in Islam to make the right kind of Muhammad film a blockbuster. (2.) Some Hollywood movies make a lot more money overseas than they do in the United States, and so some movies are made with overseas markets in mind.

  • http://www.utah-luthetran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Yes I always marvel when I see a westerner that doesn’t even know his own professed religion well, or the roots and influences on his own culture, telling people about “true Islam” and how peaceful it is, if it wasn’t hijacked by the radicals that take it so seriously.
    Listen if you have to tell people not to take their religion seriously in order to get them to be peaceful, maybe, just maybe, it is the religion that is the problem.

  • http://www.utah-luthetran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Yes I always marvel when I see a westerner that doesn’t even know his own professed religion well, or the roots and influences on his own culture, telling people about “true Islam” and how peaceful it is, if it wasn’t hijacked by the radicals that take it so seriously.
    Listen if you have to tell people not to take their religion seriously in order to get them to be peaceful, maybe, just maybe, it is the religion that is the problem.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Well, I cringe: Would the scholar be a Sunni or a Shia? Would he represent a Senegalese, Saudi, Kashmiri or Malay Islamic culture? Islam is no monolith. And the world certainly doesn’t need some Hollywood version of it to complicate things further.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Well, I cringe: Would the scholar be a Sunni or a Shia? Would he represent a Senegalese, Saudi, Kashmiri or Malay Islamic culture? Islam is no monolith. And the world certainly doesn’t need some Hollywood version of it to complicate things further.

  • Carl Vehse

    What theater owner would dare show the film, with concerns that Muhammadeans would burn the place down if their Iman didn’t like the movie… or found out their buttered popcorn had pig fat in it?

  • Carl Vehse

    What theater owner would dare show the film, with concerns that Muhammadeans would burn the place down if their Iman didn’t like the movie… or found out their buttered popcorn had pig fat in it?

  • Bonnie Foxx

    When I first skimmed over this post, the things that stuck out to me were “…a movie about the prophet Muhammad.” and “Producer Barrie Osborne cast Keanu Reeves…” I’ll tell you what, that produced quite an image in my head, especially after watching Branagh’s “Much Ado About Nothing” over the weekend & noting Reeves’ lousy acting.

  • Bonnie Foxx

    When I first skimmed over this post, the things that stuck out to me were “…a movie about the prophet Muhammad.” and “Producer Barrie Osborne cast Keanu Reeves…” I’ll tell you what, that produced quite an image in my head, especially after watching Branagh’s “Much Ado About Nothing” over the weekend & noting Reeves’ lousy acting.

  • Kirk

    @2 and 7 Seriously Carl? So much anger. What ever happened to loving your neighbor, speaking the truth in love, gentle answers, praying for those who persecute you, bearing your suffering and living above reproach? A little less vitriol might do you good.

  • Kirk

    @2 and 7 Seriously Carl? So much anger. What ever happened to loving your neighbor, speaking the truth in love, gentle answers, praying for those who persecute you, bearing your suffering and living above reproach? A little less vitriol might do you good.

  • Shai

    Sad that you all assume Muslims will react violently to this film. The media always focuses on the negative which is why you all have a distorted view, or perhaps its easier to hate something you aren’t sure of. Why not make your judgments after the film is released?

    If you want to see another side of Muslims, you should follow Beauty and the East TV – beautyandtheeast.tv.

  • Shai

    Sad that you all assume Muslims will react violently to this film. The media always focuses on the negative which is why you all have a distorted view, or perhaps its easier to hate something you aren’t sure of. Why not make your judgments after the film is released?

    If you want to see another side of Muslims, you should follow Beauty and the East TV – beautyandtheeast.tv.

  • Carl Vehse

    @9 and @10, send your whining to Amal Edan Khalaf and Noor Faleh Almaleki.

    For the latter, try the morgue.

  • Carl Vehse

    @9 and @10, send your whining to Amal Edan Khalaf and Noor Faleh Almaleki.

    For the latter, try the morgue.

  • Kirk

    @11: I’m sorry, I missed the part where scripture makes exceptions that allow you to hate people that you really, really disagree with.

  • Kirk

    @11: I’m sorry, I missed the part where scripture makes exceptions that allow you to hate people that you really, really disagree with.

  • Kirk

    More to the actual film, though, I’m generally opposed to movies about religious figures. All they ever really seem to do is tick off everyone, believer and non-believer alike. One group thinks the film is too critical, another thinks it isn’t critical enough. Some feel it gets bogged down in nuances and technicalities, while others feel that it fails to capture the subtleties of the individual of their beliefs. Then, of course, there’s the exploitative nature of profiting off of a group of people’s belief in the divine. All in all, it generally seems like a genre worth avoiding.

  • Kirk

    More to the actual film, though, I’m generally opposed to movies about religious figures. All they ever really seem to do is tick off everyone, believer and non-believer alike. One group thinks the film is too critical, another thinks it isn’t critical enough. Some feel it gets bogged down in nuances and technicalities, while others feel that it fails to capture the subtleties of the individual of their beliefs. Then, of course, there’s the exploitative nature of profiting off of a group of people’s belief in the divine. All in all, it generally seems like a genre worth avoiding.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Carl, your vitriolic hatred against Moslems doesn’t help at all. I’m with Kirk here.

    Love your enemies, you know.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Carl, your vitriolic hatred against Moslems doesn’t help at all. I’m with Kirk here.

    Love your enemies, you know.

  • Carl Vehse

    @12: I’m sorry, I missed the part where scripture makes exceptions that allow you to hate people that you really, really disagree with.

    You’re making these unsubstantiated assumptions and implications about what?!?

  • Carl Vehse

    @12: I’m sorry, I missed the part where scripture makes exceptions that allow you to hate people that you really, really disagree with.

    You’re making these unsubstantiated assumptions and implications about what?!?

  • DonS

    I can’t imagine a film company financing a venture like this. It wouldn’t seem to have that much upside box office potential, and the downside risk is incredible, especially when $150 million is at stake. Maybe it’s a self-funded vanity project?

  • DonS

    I can’t imagine a film company financing a venture like this. It wouldn’t seem to have that much upside box office potential, and the downside risk is incredible, especially when $150 million is at stake. Maybe it’s a self-funded vanity project?

  • Kirk

    @Carl,

    Ok, you’re right. The assumption that you hate Muslims is unsubstantiated. You may very well love Muslims, for all I know. But, if you do love them, you’re outstanding at hiding it.

  • Kirk

    @Carl,

    Ok, you’re right. The assumption that you hate Muslims is unsubstantiated. You may very well love Muslims, for all I know. But, if you do love them, you’re outstanding at hiding it.

  • William

    Leave Carl alone.
    He’s the most authentic voice of American Lutheranism that I know.

  • William

    Leave Carl alone.
    He’s the most authentic voice of American Lutheranism that I know.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Here is the thing, I often find Carl Vehse to be lacking depth of thought in his comments. But I do kind of think you guys are reading hate into his comments. I read them and found them quite benign, except for his quote of John Warwick Montgomery, which I tend to agree with.
    I don’t see hate for Muslims here. Maybe a distaste for Islam. Perhaps we can separate the sin from the sinner there. And I don’t know, I think that if I was a movie house owner, I might be just a bit concerned about that sort of thing happening. It isn’t like it is an unprecedented fear. I think Salman Rushdie might be able to attest that it is quite well founded. As might Cat Stevens, or Yusuf Islam, attest for that matter.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Here is the thing, I often find Carl Vehse to be lacking depth of thought in his comments. But I do kind of think you guys are reading hate into his comments. I read them and found them quite benign, except for his quote of John Warwick Montgomery, which I tend to agree with.
    I don’t see hate for Muslims here. Maybe a distaste for Islam. Perhaps we can separate the sin from the sinner there. And I don’t know, I think that if I was a movie house owner, I might be just a bit concerned about that sort of thing happening. It isn’t like it is an unprecedented fear. I think Salman Rushdie might be able to attest that it is quite well founded. As might Cat Stevens, or Yusuf Islam, attest for that matter.

  • http://thejcalebjones.tumblr.com The Jones

    Well, it’s a good thing that this producer worked on The Matrix, because that will probably help his ability to move like Neo and dodge bullets, a skill he may find valuable in the near future.

    And Kirk, come on. It’s not a deep seated hatred of Muslims that creates the assumption that they will react violently. It’s seeing similar situations play out over decades. Look at the Satanic Verses and the Dutch Muslim Cartoons. I may be a little nutty to think that Islamic Terrorists will storm MY local 8 screen movie theater, but I think you would be a little nutty to think that no Muslims in the world are going to get mad and violent about a biopic of the prophet being produced and filmed (I’m guessing) by Christian infidels in the United States. Are you really going to make the case that we should expect universal rational and peaceful criticism about Muslim disagreements on a depiction of The Prophet, especially such a powerful depiction as a biopic? Think about the almost 2 Billion Muslims in the world, and then think that it only takes about 50 of them to plan something catastrophic.

  • http://thejcalebjones.tumblr.com The Jones

    Well, it’s a good thing that this producer worked on The Matrix, because that will probably help his ability to move like Neo and dodge bullets, a skill he may find valuable in the near future.

    And Kirk, come on. It’s not a deep seated hatred of Muslims that creates the assumption that they will react violently. It’s seeing similar situations play out over decades. Look at the Satanic Verses and the Dutch Muslim Cartoons. I may be a little nutty to think that Islamic Terrorists will storm MY local 8 screen movie theater, but I think you would be a little nutty to think that no Muslims in the world are going to get mad and violent about a biopic of the prophet being produced and filmed (I’m guessing) by Christian infidels in the United States. Are you really going to make the case that we should expect universal rational and peaceful criticism about Muslim disagreements on a depiction of The Prophet, especially such a powerful depiction as a biopic? Think about the almost 2 Billion Muslims in the world, and then think that it only takes about 50 of them to plan something catastrophic.

  • William

    Bror, don’t try to dilute Carl’s words. His meaning is crystal clear. That’s why I say he’s Amer. Lutheranism’s most authentic voice today.

  • William

    Bror, don’t try to dilute Carl’s words. His meaning is crystal clear. That’s why I say he’s Amer. Lutheranism’s most authentic voice today.

  • Kirk

    @Bror and Jones,

    Personally, I find it exceptionally distasteful when Christianity is labeled a violent religion in light of the crusades. Or when I’m lumped into the same group as Christ professing neo-Nazis. Of course there are violent, misguided Christians, but that doesn’t make them the definition of my religion. Frankly, I find the assertion (and it is an assertion that many atheists make) ignorant, foolish, insulting, and born out of a burning hatred for religious people. Accordingly, I apply the same standard to people who label Muslims as a horrible violent group, based on the actions of a few extremists. I know, I know, there are verses in the Koran about killing infidels and people who fall away from Islam, but, by in large (and I’m talking about a huge margin, here) peaceful Muslims outnumber violent extremists. Yes, extremists are a threat to our nation, but they do not constitute the whole, or even a significant part, of Islam, particularly American Islam. Anyone who knows Muslim people knows this. Anyone who has lived in Muslims countries knows this. It’s not hard to figure out, and frankly, takes a willful ignorance to disbelieve.

    I’m not denying that some Muslims will take violent offense to the film. It will almost certainly happen. At them same time, saying that theater owners should be concerned about their multiplexes being burned down, talking about banning Islam, and mocking Muslim dietary restrictions smacks of something greater than a simple preferential distaste for Islam.

  • Kirk

    @Bror and Jones,

    Personally, I find it exceptionally distasteful when Christianity is labeled a violent religion in light of the crusades. Or when I’m lumped into the same group as Christ professing neo-Nazis. Of course there are violent, misguided Christians, but that doesn’t make them the definition of my religion. Frankly, I find the assertion (and it is an assertion that many atheists make) ignorant, foolish, insulting, and born out of a burning hatred for religious people. Accordingly, I apply the same standard to people who label Muslims as a horrible violent group, based on the actions of a few extremists. I know, I know, there are verses in the Koran about killing infidels and people who fall away from Islam, but, by in large (and I’m talking about a huge margin, here) peaceful Muslims outnumber violent extremists. Yes, extremists are a threat to our nation, but they do not constitute the whole, or even a significant part, of Islam, particularly American Islam. Anyone who knows Muslim people knows this. Anyone who has lived in Muslims countries knows this. It’s not hard to figure out, and frankly, takes a willful ignorance to disbelieve.

    I’m not denying that some Muslims will take violent offense to the film. It will almost certainly happen. At them same time, saying that theater owners should be concerned about their multiplexes being burned down, talking about banning Islam, and mocking Muslim dietary restrictions smacks of something greater than a simple preferential distaste for Islam.

  • Carl Vehse
  • Carl Vehse
  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Islam is no monolith – that suggestion is media-fuelled ignorance at best. That was my point.

    Sure, there are many now who interpret it in a violent, fundamentalistic fashion. And absolutely, as a Lutheran I am no pluralist. But I have had Moslem colleagues. In fact, one of them visited me in hospital. Gave me lifts to work. Had open discussions with me about our religious differences.

    At the same time, there are those in the Moslem world that support (a specific interpretation of) Jihad. Of Sharia law. etc etc.

    It is interesting to talk to people from that worldview. They also think of Christianity as a monolith, and view us Confessional Lutherans in the same light as Gene Robinson, or Billy Graham, or Jimmy Swaggart, or Benedict XVI. These misrepresentations are evidently a two-way street. But there is more than just the two opposites of virulent outbursts or McClaren-style syncretism.

    As Kirk said, we should still love our neighbour. Even if a particular reading of his holy book tells him to annihilate me. And lets be honest, there are some in the Christian world that, though not openly, itch to do the same to his world. But again, we should love our neighbour.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Islam is no monolith – that suggestion is media-fuelled ignorance at best. That was my point.

    Sure, there are many now who interpret it in a violent, fundamentalistic fashion. And absolutely, as a Lutheran I am no pluralist. But I have had Moslem colleagues. In fact, one of them visited me in hospital. Gave me lifts to work. Had open discussions with me about our religious differences.

    At the same time, there are those in the Moslem world that support (a specific interpretation of) Jihad. Of Sharia law. etc etc.

    It is interesting to talk to people from that worldview. They also think of Christianity as a monolith, and view us Confessional Lutherans in the same light as Gene Robinson, or Billy Graham, or Jimmy Swaggart, or Benedict XVI. These misrepresentations are evidently a two-way street. But there is more than just the two opposites of virulent outbursts or McClaren-style syncretism.

    As Kirk said, we should still love our neighbour. Even if a particular reading of his holy book tells him to annihilate me. And lets be honest, there are some in the Christian world that, though not openly, itch to do the same to his world. But again, we should love our neighbour.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Kirk,
    Listen I know peaceful muslims too, one gave me his car.
    I know the grand majority of them are “peaceful.”
    Yet I do not disregard their history, something I have studied quite closely. Neither do I desregard those violent passages in the Koran, as if they didn’t mean exactly what they say. And yes I have read the Koran, though not in Arabic.
    The fact that there is not one area in the Muslim world that converted peacefuly to Islam, Mecca included. Even Mecca was converted by the Sword! Leads me to believe this new push to regard Islam as a peaceful religion is a lot of hot air.
    And I support the crusades. Only problem with them is they failed, well that and some bad theology, but the general idea of putting a stop gap between Muslim agression and the west, I kind of like.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Kirk,
    Listen I know peaceful muslims too, one gave me his car.
    I know the grand majority of them are “peaceful.”
    Yet I do not disregard their history, something I have studied quite closely. Neither do I desregard those violent passages in the Koran, as if they didn’t mean exactly what they say. And yes I have read the Koran, though not in Arabic.
    The fact that there is not one area in the Muslim world that converted peacefuly to Islam, Mecca included. Even Mecca was converted by the Sword! Leads me to believe this new push to regard Islam as a peaceful religion is a lot of hot air.
    And I support the crusades. Only problem with them is they failed, well that and some bad theology, but the general idea of putting a stop gap between Muslim agression and the west, I kind of like.

  • Carl Vehse

    As John Warwick Montgomery noted, “I’m sure there were some very fine Aztecs as well.”

  • Carl Vehse

    As John Warwick Montgomery noted, “I’m sure there were some very fine Aztecs as well.”

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    And I’m sure there are some very fine Americans too :) :)

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    And I’m sure there are some very fine Americans too :) :)

  • Wyldeirishman

    I’m not even going to attempt to add anything, except to say that I shall now enjoy a pulled pork sandwich, down a pint or two of Guinness, and read from Scripture.

    Infidelity at it’s finest. :)

  • Wyldeirishman

    I’m not even going to attempt to add anything, except to say that I shall now enjoy a pulled pork sandwich, down a pint or two of Guinness, and read from Scripture.

    Infidelity at it’s finest. :)

  • http://thejcalebjones.tumblr.com The Jones

    Kirk,

    I don’t believe I made any judgments on the religion of Islam, or on Muslims as a whole. Some may go further, as it appeared the Dr. Montgomery quote did, but I have nothing to say about the peacefulness of the religion of Islam or whether or not Muslims are good or bad people. I’m talking about the safety of the people who are making this picture, and my point is that when some depiction of Muhammad or some critical opinion of Islam is published or distributed, bad stuff usually ensues. It is not unreasonable or mean to expect it again.

    It’s called looking at the facts, and making a reasonable prediction based on those facts. If this thing really goes through, do you actually expect that NOTHING will happen?

    Sure we should love our neighbor. But that involves extending a kind hand to Muslim people. It does not mean ignoring history and pretending that everything is going to be rosy when you paint a fundamentalist bullseye on your forehead by making a biopic of the Prophet. Expecting violence in this instance is not mean, it is reasonable.

  • http://thejcalebjones.tumblr.com The Jones

    Kirk,

    I don’t believe I made any judgments on the religion of Islam, or on Muslims as a whole. Some may go further, as it appeared the Dr. Montgomery quote did, but I have nothing to say about the peacefulness of the religion of Islam or whether or not Muslims are good or bad people. I’m talking about the safety of the people who are making this picture, and my point is that when some depiction of Muhammad or some critical opinion of Islam is published or distributed, bad stuff usually ensues. It is not unreasonable or mean to expect it again.

    It’s called looking at the facts, and making a reasonable prediction based on those facts. If this thing really goes through, do you actually expect that NOTHING will happen?

    Sure we should love our neighbor. But that involves extending a kind hand to Muslim people. It does not mean ignoring history and pretending that everything is going to be rosy when you paint a fundamentalist bullseye on your forehead by making a biopic of the Prophet. Expecting violence in this instance is not mean, it is reasonable.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Wyldeirishman – what coincidence! I finished my Guiness about 10 mins ago. Was a good one too – one of the 250th anniversary bottles, made exactly according to Arthur’s original recipe. Have some before they dissappear off the shelves.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    Wyldeirishman – what coincidence! I finished my Guiness about 10 mins ago. Was a good one too – one of the 250th anniversary bottles, made exactly according to Arthur’s original recipe. Have some before they dissappear off the shelves.

  • CRB

    Whether we like it or not, I think that
    many of the signs in our culture are pointing to “the end of all things.”
    How Muslims in power view their own religion is going tobe THE story of the next decade, particularly in relations
    to Christianity.
    It would not be, IMO, too far-fetched
    to predict that the ascendance of Islam will result in the last scourge on Christianity.
    “Love your enemies, yes and pray for
    those who persecute you,” yes, but
    also, pray that the Lord Jesus Christ returns soon!

  • CRB

    Whether we like it or not, I think that
    many of the signs in our culture are pointing to “the end of all things.”
    How Muslims in power view their own religion is going tobe THE story of the next decade, particularly in relations
    to Christianity.
    It would not be, IMO, too far-fetched
    to predict that the ascendance of Islam will result in the last scourge on Christianity.
    “Love your enemies, yes and pray for
    those who persecute you,” yes, but
    also, pray that the Lord Jesus Christ returns soon!

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Yes CRB,
    Then you also have to wrestle with the conundrum that while loving your enemies is commanded, you may have to do it while at the same time shooting them out of love for your neighbor.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Yes CRB,
    Then you also have to wrestle with the conundrum that while loving your enemies is commanded, you may have to do it while at the same time shooting them out of love for your neighbor.

  • A Friend

    Making this movie is a great idea. It will surely help the average viewer understand Islam and the great personality of Prophet Muhammad who is greatly misunderstood in the West. Even if your an anti-islamist, surely no reasonable person can deny that Muhammad is arguably the greatest influencial man that has ever lived. He cannot be ignored, whether your perceptions of Islam are positive or negative. Great move by Hollywood, I wish you every success

  • A Friend

    Making this movie is a great idea. It will surely help the average viewer understand Islam and the great personality of Prophet Muhammad who is greatly misunderstood in the West. Even if your an anti-islamist, surely no reasonable person can deny that Muhammad is arguably the greatest influencial man that has ever lived. He cannot be ignored, whether your perceptions of Islam are positive or negative. Great move by Hollywood, I wish you every success


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