Veterans Day salutes

Today is Veterans Day. Why today? Because the fighting in World War I ended, according to the terms of the armistice of 1918, on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

I salute all of you veterans today. Specifically, I would like to honor my father-in-law, who was one of the few survivors of his unit on Iwo Jima (and if he didn’t make it, my wife and thus my children and grandchildren would cease to exist); my father, in the occupation forces in Germany; my wife’s uncle, who fought in Korea; my brother-in-law, a Viet Nam vet; one of my students who has already fought in Iraq.

Feel free to use this space to comment on veterans you would like to give a special tribute to today.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Tom Hering

    In memory of my father, Alfons Hering, who served as a lieutenant in the Polish Army after Germany invaded in 1939. He was a prisoner of war from 1939 to 1945. After being liberated by U.S. troops, he served with a U.S. Army guard unit, on the staff of the Polish Liaison Mission for the French Zone of occupied Germany. From 1953 to 1985 he was an editor and then editor-in-chief of the Polish language weekly, Gwiazda Polarna – where he championed the cause of Polish freedom from the Soviet Union.

    He is missed.

  • Tom Hering

    In memory of my father, Alfons Hering, who served as a lieutenant in the Polish Army after Germany invaded in 1939. He was a prisoner of war from 1939 to 1945. After being liberated by U.S. troops, he served with a U.S. Army guard unit, on the staff of the Polish Liaison Mission for the French Zone of occupied Germany. From 1953 to 1985 he was an editor and then editor-in-chief of the Polish language weekly, Gwiazda Polarna – where he championed the cause of Polish freedom from the Soviet Union.

    He is missed.

  • Joe

    My Grandfather a Ukrainian who fled the Soviet Union only to arrive in Austria weeks before Hitler took it. He fought with the Polish resistance, was captured and experienced Auschwitz first hand.

  • Joe

    My Grandfather a Ukrainian who fled the Soviet Union only to arrive in Austria weeks before Hitler took it. He fought with the Polish resistance, was captured and experienced Auschwitz first hand.

  • Joe

    And my cousin Roger Erikson who was a sniper in Korea.

  • Joe

    And my cousin Roger Erikson who was a sniper in Korea.

  • Sharon Philp

    In memory of my great-uncle Rudolph Meier who served in the army air corp during WWII, my uncle Donald Meier who served in the air force, and relatives on my husband’s side who served in the military (I don’t recall which branch); one of whom was killed in Vietnam.
    I also would like to give a tribute to my brother Scott who is currently serving his country as a marine.

  • Sharon Philp

    In memory of my great-uncle Rudolph Meier who served in the army air corp during WWII, my uncle Donald Meier who served in the air force, and relatives on my husband’s side who served in the military (I don’t recall which branch); one of whom was killed in Vietnam.
    I also would like to give a tribute to my brother Scott who is currently serving his country as a marine.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    God bless all veterans who have served in the U.S. military.

    I thank the Lord for men and women willing to put their lives on the line for this country and to help preserve our freedom aginst those who would take it.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    God bless all veterans who have served in the U.S. military.

    I thank the Lord for men and women willing to put their lives on the line for this country and to help preserve our freedom aginst those who would take it.

  • Dan Kempin

    Bardzo dobje, Tom, and dziekuje to your father.

  • Dan Kempin

    Bardzo dobje, Tom, and dziekuje to your father.

  • Brenda Bomberger

    My father, son of Russian German imigrants, went as a SeaBee to the African theater of WW2. He then went North into Europe. He didn’t speak much about it to me and sadly, as a girl I didn’t know the questions to ask. I miss the knowing of it.

    My father-in-law served in the Korean conflict. He is a Navy man, from Nebraska. He raised good sons. We enjoy the stories he relates to us about his time of service.

    May God bless those who serve us in this way.

  • Brenda Bomberger

    My father, son of Russian German imigrants, went as a SeaBee to the African theater of WW2. He then went North into Europe. He didn’t speak much about it to me and sadly, as a girl I didn’t know the questions to ask. I miss the knowing of it.

    My father-in-law served in the Korean conflict. He is a Navy man, from Nebraska. He raised good sons. We enjoy the stories he relates to us about his time of service.

    May God bless those who serve us in this way.

  • Pastor Fred Bischoff

    My father, Ellsworth “Bud” Bischoff, who served under Geo. Patton in WW2′s Battle of the Bulge, and who never talked about his experiences in the war. When I was a child my mother once told me, “Don’t ask him.” I never did. He died 20 years ago at the age of 67.

  • Pastor Fred Bischoff

    My father, Ellsworth “Bud” Bischoff, who served under Geo. Patton in WW2′s Battle of the Bulge, and who never talked about his experiences in the war. When I was a child my mother once told me, “Don’t ask him.” I never did. He died 20 years ago at the age of 67.

  • Sam

    I’m a veteran – honorably discharged, USMC, many years ago.
    I want to pay tribute to the 2,266 veterans under the age of 65 who died last year because they didn’t have health insurance.

  • Sam

    I’m a veteran – honorably discharged, USMC, many years ago.
    I want to pay tribute to the 2,266 veterans under the age of 65 who died last year because they didn’t have health insurance.

  • bdozer

    This response is for Sam #9. There are as many reasons why a person does not have health insurance as there are persons who do not have health insurance! As a U.S. Navy “Vietnam Era” veteran who served “in country,” I cannot believe that the VA would not provide some basic care to most if not all of those 2,266 veterans. I have used VA health care for the past 10 years, it obviously is NOT the “Cadillac” of health care in America however, I refuse to believe that ALL those 2,266 veterans died for lack of health care, and on this Veterans Day, I earnestly thank YOU for your service.

  • bdozer

    This response is for Sam #9. There are as many reasons why a person does not have health insurance as there are persons who do not have health insurance! As a U.S. Navy “Vietnam Era” veteran who served “in country,” I cannot believe that the VA would not provide some basic care to most if not all of those 2,266 veterans. I have used VA health care for the past 10 years, it obviously is NOT the “Cadillac” of health care in America however, I refuse to believe that ALL those 2,266 veterans died for lack of health care, and on this Veterans Day, I earnestly thank YOU for your service.

  • Larry Devich

    I was in the United States Army (1/11th Field Artillery 9th ID) 1973-1976. I never went overseas so my service was pretty safe. :-)

    I want to especially honor my father, Wayne Devich, who was wounded during the Korean war while in the navy, my uncle Wendel Miller a Marine Corps Sergeant Major who served in WWII, Korea and multiple tours in Vietnam and taught me the Marine Corps Hymn and close order drill and bought me my first combat boots and bb rifle when I was in kindergarten. Also, my nephew Jasen who served in the Marines and my nephew Philip who is currently a Marine Corps Staff Sergeant. Also my cousin and room mate Mike who is now a Lt. Colonel in the United States Army Reserve and has been on active duty since 2003. Going way back members of our family served in the Civil war, Spanish American war (Great Grandfather Hans) and WWI (Grandfather) A great-great grandfather who fought with militia against the Nez Perce indians in Idaho as settlers, in fact we have tales of our family in nearly every war America has fought since the revolution.

    And I still didn’t get the day off! :-(

  • Larry Devich

    I was in the United States Army (1/11th Field Artillery 9th ID) 1973-1976. I never went overseas so my service was pretty safe. :-)

    I want to especially honor my father, Wayne Devich, who was wounded during the Korean war while in the navy, my uncle Wendel Miller a Marine Corps Sergeant Major who served in WWII, Korea and multiple tours in Vietnam and taught me the Marine Corps Hymn and close order drill and bought me my first combat boots and bb rifle when I was in kindergarten. Also, my nephew Jasen who served in the Marines and my nephew Philip who is currently a Marine Corps Staff Sergeant. Also my cousin and room mate Mike who is now a Lt. Colonel in the United States Army Reserve and has been on active duty since 2003. Going way back members of our family served in the Civil war, Spanish American war (Great Grandfather Hans) and WWI (Grandfather) A great-great grandfather who fought with militia against the Nez Perce indians in Idaho as settlers, in fact we have tales of our family in nearly every war America has fought since the revolution.

    And I still didn’t get the day off! :-(

  • EGK

    In Canada it is Remembrance Day, and I am remembering particularly my wife’s uncle, Dan Means, a bomber pilot who died in a raid over Hamm, Germany, in WWII. My daughter just visited his grave in Ardennes, Belgium, earlier this year, the first family member to do so. As my wife sought more information about his crew, she found out that the people of Europe still express great gratitude for this sacrifice. As a result of her enquiries, a couple from the Netherlands adopted Dan’s grave and that of his crewmen who are buried there. As far as these people are concerned, these men are still on duty, still doing their jobs.

  • EGK

    In Canada it is Remembrance Day, and I am remembering particularly my wife’s uncle, Dan Means, a bomber pilot who died in a raid over Hamm, Germany, in WWII. My daughter just visited his grave in Ardennes, Belgium, earlier this year, the first family member to do so. As my wife sought more information about his crew, she found out that the people of Europe still express great gratitude for this sacrifice. As a result of her enquiries, a couple from the Netherlands adopted Dan’s grave and that of his crewmen who are buried there. As far as these people are concerned, these men are still on duty, still doing their jobs.

  • DonS

    Thank you for your service, Sam. Regardless of our political disagreements which surface from time to time on this blog, I very much appreciate the sacrifice that you made to fight for our rights and freedoms. And, yes, that includes our right to peaceably disagree. God bless you and we honor your service to our great country.

  • DonS

    Thank you for your service, Sam. Regardless of our political disagreements which surface from time to time on this blog, I very much appreciate the sacrifice that you made to fight for our rights and freedoms. And, yes, that includes our right to peaceably disagree. God bless you and we honor your service to our great country.

  • http://www.powerlineblog.com Carl Vehse

    For those wondering, the “2,266″ number Sam (@9) posted was promoted by proponents of a nationalized health program from a Harvard statistical study, which, using a March, 2009, U.S. Census Bureau survey, estimated (!) that “1,461,615 veterans” between the ages of 18 (!) and 64 neither had health insurance nor received ongoing care at Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals or clinics.

    The Harvard team then used a caveat-ladened estimation from another of their reports that claimed a 40% increased “odds of dying” (with a 95% confidence interval between 6% and 84%) for those who were classified as uninsured, from which the study then calculated that of all the veterans who died in 2008, 2,266 died because of “our broken health insurance system.”

  • http://www.powerlineblog.com Carl Vehse

    For those wondering, the “2,266″ number Sam (@9) posted was promoted by proponents of a nationalized health program from a Harvard statistical study, which, using a March, 2009, U.S. Census Bureau survey, estimated (!) that “1,461,615 veterans” between the ages of 18 (!) and 64 neither had health insurance nor received ongoing care at Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals or clinics.

    The Harvard team then used a caveat-ladened estimation from another of their reports that claimed a 40% increased “odds of dying” (with a 95% confidence interval between 6% and 84%) for those who were classified as uninsured, from which the study then calculated that of all the veterans who died in 2008, 2,266 died because of “our broken health insurance system.”

  • George A. Marquart

    Two days ago I got a Buddy Poppy from a veteran who dropped bombs on me when I was a child in Vienna. I thanked him for his service.

    Peace and Joy,
    George A. Marquart

  • George A. Marquart

    Two days ago I got a Buddy Poppy from a veteran who dropped bombs on me when I was a child in Vienna. I thanked him for his service.

    Peace and Joy,
    George A. Marquart

  • Sharon Philp

    I completely neglected my father-in-law, who served in the navy in Vietnam. He had a fairly safe tour of duty, but never spent any time on a ship.

  • Sharon Philp

    I completely neglected my father-in-law, who served in the navy in Vietnam. He had a fairly safe tour of duty, but never spent any time on a ship.

  • http://www.powerlineblog.com Carl Vehse

    George Marquart: “Two days ago I got a Buddy Poppy from a veteran who dropped bombs on me when I was a child in Vienna.”

    Having been to (and enjoyed tours, music and food of) Vienna and the surrounding area numerous times while on business during the 1990s (including the ’99 eclipse), I am surprised in checking to find out that Vienna was bombed heavily by the Allies from 1944 until the city was “liberated” (read “raped and pillaged”) by the Red Army in April, 1945.

  • http://www.powerlineblog.com Carl Vehse

    George Marquart: “Two days ago I got a Buddy Poppy from a veteran who dropped bombs on me when I was a child in Vienna.”

    Having been to (and enjoyed tours, music and food of) Vienna and the surrounding area numerous times while on business during the 1990s (including the ’99 eclipse), I am surprised in checking to find out that Vienna was bombed heavily by the Allies from 1944 until the city was “liberated” (read “raped and pillaged”) by the Red Army in April, 1945.

  • John K

    My nephew Aaron, who earns the honor of being called a United States Marine when he graduates from basic this weekend at Camp Pendelton.

  • John K

    My nephew Aaron, who earns the honor of being called a United States Marine when he graduates from basic this weekend at Camp Pendelton.

  • George A. Marquart

    To Carl Vehse: We left Vienna on 1 March 1945, about a month ahead of the Soviets. I have reason to believe that my mother’s cousin, a descendant of the Saxon farmers who emigrated to Russa during the reign of Catherine the Great, was the first Soviet soldier to enter the city. I met him in Moscow in Sepetember of 1978. History can be convoluted, yet “though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death …”

    Peace and Joy,
    George A. Marquart

  • George A. Marquart

    To Carl Vehse: We left Vienna on 1 March 1945, about a month ahead of the Soviets. I have reason to believe that my mother’s cousin, a descendant of the Saxon farmers who emigrated to Russa during the reign of Catherine the Great, was the first Soviet soldier to enter the city. I met him in Moscow in Sepetember of 1978. History can be convoluted, yet “though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death …”

    Peace and Joy,
    George A. Marquart

  • Sam

    Carl, tell us how to ignore this.

    “FACT
    260,000 veterans will be homeless this year.

    WHO IS DOING SOMETHING ABOUT IT
    The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans offers resources and technical assistance for a national network of community-based service providers and agencies that provide emergency and supportive housing, food, health services, job training and placement assistance, legal aid and case management support for hundreds of thousands of homeless veterans each year. Over the past six years, the NCHV and their partner organizations have collaborated with the Department of Veteran Affairs to halve the number of homeless veterans in America.”

  • Sam

    Carl, tell us how to ignore this.

    “FACT
    260,000 veterans will be homeless this year.

    WHO IS DOING SOMETHING ABOUT IT
    The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans offers resources and technical assistance for a national network of community-based service providers and agencies that provide emergency and supportive housing, food, health services, job training and placement assistance, legal aid and case management support for hundreds of thousands of homeless veterans each year. Over the past six years, the NCHV and their partner organizations have collaborated with the Department of Veteran Affairs to halve the number of homeless veterans in America.”

  • Joe

    I would also like to thank my college roommate Geoffery T. Gorsuch. Geoff is not quite a vet yet – he’s still in. Two tours in Iraq and one in the ‘Stan. Both of his kids were born while he was overseas. Third one is on the way, hopefully he’ll be stateside for this one.

  • Joe

    I would also like to thank my college roommate Geoffery T. Gorsuch. Geoff is not quite a vet yet – he’s still in. Two tours in Iraq and one in the ‘Stan. Both of his kids were born while he was overseas. Third one is on the way, hopefully he’ll be stateside for this one.

  • wayne pelling

    In memory of all the soldiers of the First Australian Imperial Force in World War one who have now passed into history.
    327,000 volunteered-not conscripted.
    approximately 68,000 lie buried on foreign fields that are forever Australia
    over 165,000 affected by their experiences post war . 5000 killed in one day at the Battle of Fromelles July 1916.
    My wife’s great uncle was killed in action at the Battle of Moquet farm-his body never found.He perhaps lies buried with the epitaph ” An australian soldier of the Great War,known unto God”
    This year was the first Remembrance Day when we had no veterans-ANZACS-from World War One. Thank God for their call to duty

  • wayne pelling

    In memory of all the soldiers of the First Australian Imperial Force in World War one who have now passed into history.
    327,000 volunteered-not conscripted.
    approximately 68,000 lie buried on foreign fields that are forever Australia
    over 165,000 affected by their experiences post war . 5000 killed in one day at the Battle of Fromelles July 1916.
    My wife’s great uncle was killed in action at the Battle of Moquet farm-his body never found.He perhaps lies buried with the epitaph ” An australian soldier of the Great War,known unto God”
    This year was the first Remembrance Day when we had no veterans-ANZACS-from World War One. Thank God for their call to duty

  • http://www.powerlineblog.com Carl Vehse

    “260,000 veterans will be homeless this year.”

    Sam, do you have a link or publication reference to the statistical data source for this statement?

  • http://www.powerlineblog.com Carl Vehse

    “260,000 veterans will be homeless this year.”

    Sam, do you have a link or publication reference to the statistical data source for this statement?

  • ELB

    I honor…
    My father, a fighter pilot in the Pacific in WWII.
    My son, who now wears his wings, and his patient wife.
    My son-in-law, married 8 weeks to my daughter, then gone 22 months in training and in Iraq.
    My daughter, who waited.
    My second son, in training as a flight nurse.
    All who with their lives honor their oath to preserve and protect the Constitution of the United States.

  • ELB

    I honor…
    My father, a fighter pilot in the Pacific in WWII.
    My son, who now wears his wings, and his patient wife.
    My son-in-law, married 8 weeks to my daughter, then gone 22 months in training and in Iraq.
    My daughter, who waited.
    My second son, in training as a flight nurse.
    All who with their lives honor their oath to preserve and protect the Constitution of the United States.

  • http://puttingoutthefire.blogspot.com/ Frank Gillespie

    My dad, Frank Sr., who served in the US Army during the Korean War.

  • http://puttingoutthefire.blogspot.com/ Frank Gillespie

    My dad, Frank Sr., who served in the US Army during the Korean War.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    This one is late, owing to the fact that I had flu last week (not That flu!). Anyway, this is for my great-grandfather, who fought the Germans in German South – West Africa (Namibia) in 1914, my great-uncle who fought the Nazi’s in North-Africa, and my brother, who fought in the “Border War” in Namibia & Angola.

  • http://www.scyldingsinthemeadhall.blogspot.com The Scylding

    This one is late, owing to the fact that I had flu last week (not That flu!). Anyway, this is for my great-grandfather, who fought the Germans in German South – West Africa (Namibia) in 1914, my great-uncle who fought the Nazi’s in North-Africa, and my brother, who fought in the “Border War” in Namibia & Angola.


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