Safe topic

Snowed in this weekend. Again. We are supposed to get from 20 to 30 or more inches here around your nation’s capital. Last weekend we had 6 inches or so, and a few weeks before that we had 12 inches. Just before it hit, a book I had ordered came in from Amazon. We are all stocked with provisions. We brought in a big supply of wood for the fireplace. We are all set. I will do nothing and not feel guilty about it because I can’t even get out of the house.

I blame President Obama for all of this winter weather. Once he got elected, the oceans stopped rising and global warming ground to a halt. Actually, though, I should give him credit, since I consider the snow a good thing, as long as I’m not shoveling it or driving in it.

Normally, at this blog we talk about the two things that we are warned to NOT talk about, namely, politics and religion. So in our new Saturday edition today we will try to be more social. The safe topic, in contradistinction to those bad ones, is the weather. Is it possible to carry on an interesting conversation about the weather? Let’s try.

Do you have any weather stories? What was the hottest you’ve ever been? Has anyone drug through a desert under the hot sun as you were running out of water? What was the coldest? Has anyone endured anything like what Laura Ingalls Wilder’s father did in “The Long Winter,” where he went outside in a blizzard, got lost, couldn’t find the house, fell into a drift, and survived on the oyster crackers he had brought the family for Christmas? (If I’m remembering that right.) Have you tried to drive on the highway during an ice storm and spun out of control, barely escaping with your life? (I’ve done that.) Was the weather worse or better when you were a kid? Tell us your meteorology tales.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • theresa k

    Wow! You guys in DC really ARE getting hit hard this winter. And you thought you might miss Wisconsin?!? :) As long as everyone is safe, warm and fed, I LOVE blizzards! I’m actually a bit jealous. We’ve also had a heavy winter and expect 10″+ on Sunday night/ Monday. Living in the Twin Cities, things rarely shut down. One of my very best memories of a blizzard is living near Duluth in the unexpected Halloween Blizzard of 1991. I was 6mo pregnant and our daughter was 2 yrs old. We took some great family photos; we were so bored we got completely dressed up in fancy outfits and started posing! When the snow stopped 3 days later, we opened our front door to a wall of snow. We had to open the garage door and start shoveling. I was so warm, being so pregnant, that I stood outside with my coat wide open …shoveling alongside my husband! I thought surely someone would take pity and blow out our driveway, but no such luck! No harm done and it remains a wonderful memory.

    Sounds like you are well-stocked, my friend. Enjoy!!!

  • theresa k

    Wow! You guys in DC really ARE getting hit hard this winter. And you thought you might miss Wisconsin?!? :) As long as everyone is safe, warm and fed, I LOVE blizzards! I’m actually a bit jealous. We’ve also had a heavy winter and expect 10″+ on Sunday night/ Monday. Living in the Twin Cities, things rarely shut down. One of my very best memories of a blizzard is living near Duluth in the unexpected Halloween Blizzard of 1991. I was 6mo pregnant and our daughter was 2 yrs old. We took some great family photos; we were so bored we got completely dressed up in fancy outfits and started posing! When the snow stopped 3 days later, we opened our front door to a wall of snow. We had to open the garage door and start shoveling. I was so warm, being so pregnant, that I stood outside with my coat wide open …shoveling alongside my husband! I thought surely someone would take pity and blow out our driveway, but no such luck! No harm done and it remains a wonderful memory.

    Sounds like you are well-stocked, my friend. Enjoy!!!

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    Last year on January 15 my son was born. Between January 16-18, the temperatures outside (here in Indianapolis) averaged about -10 degrees F, with an absolute low of -17 at one point. What makes this stand out was that the hospital where my wife gave birth was undergoing construction of a major new wing, and the construction site and equipment took over the entire parking lot. So to get back and forth from the car to the hospital — something I had to do multiple times a day, since we have two other kids at home — required trekking about 300 yards to an alternate parking lot, in sub-zero temps with sub-sub-sub-zero wind chills. And ironically, the hospital called off its usual courtesy shuttles to and from the parking lot because it was too cold outside!

    That experience is my life-long benchmark for how cold a person can possibly be. I feel blessed that the baby didn’t die from exposure before making it home from the hospital.

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    Last year on January 15 my son was born. Between January 16-18, the temperatures outside (here in Indianapolis) averaged about -10 degrees F, with an absolute low of -17 at one point. What makes this stand out was that the hospital where my wife gave birth was undergoing construction of a major new wing, and the construction site and equipment took over the entire parking lot. So to get back and forth from the car to the hospital — something I had to do multiple times a day, since we have two other kids at home — required trekking about 300 yards to an alternate parking lot, in sub-zero temps with sub-sub-sub-zero wind chills. And ironically, the hospital called off its usual courtesy shuttles to and from the parking lot because it was too cold outside!

    That experience is my life-long benchmark for how cold a person can possibly be. I feel blessed that the baby didn’t die from exposure before making it home from the hospital.

  • http://RoseFremer@yahoo.com Rose

    During the Chicago blizzard of 1979, we had 40″ of snow, subzero temperatures, a new house and a newborn son. My husband bought a snowblower to get the snow off the roof. I felt ineffable gratitude that he kept us warm and safe. The vocation of father surely shows us the Christ.
    Enjoy your global warming in Virginia.

  • http://RoseFremer@yahoo.com Rose

    During the Chicago blizzard of 1979, we had 40″ of snow, subzero temperatures, a new house and a newborn son. My husband bought a snowblower to get the snow off the roof. I felt ineffable gratitude that he kept us warm and safe. The vocation of father surely shows us the Christ.
    Enjoy your global warming in Virginia.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    This last summer I was rockhounding with my son in Utah’s west desert. We went and picked up trilobytes about 150 -200 miles out in the desert, right on the Nevada border, 50 miles from the world’s loneliest highway. Temperature there in mid August was about 105-110. Sun was bright. We left there and were going to take some back roads and camp at Topaz Mountain.
    Turning a corner, I encountered an unexpected dip, with a rock in the road bed, it took out the oil pan. When the car stopped and I figured out what had happened. I began to set up camp, and expected to be there for five days or so. luckily I had enough food and water, if rationed carefully for that. But as I was setting up my tent some cowboy’s happened to drive by in a pick up.
    I went home and bought a Jeep.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    This last summer I was rockhounding with my son in Utah’s west desert. We went and picked up trilobytes about 150 -200 miles out in the desert, right on the Nevada border, 50 miles from the world’s loneliest highway. Temperature there in mid August was about 105-110. Sun was bright. We left there and were going to take some back roads and camp at Topaz Mountain.
    Turning a corner, I encountered an unexpected dip, with a rock in the road bed, it took out the oil pan. When the car stopped and I figured out what had happened. I began to set up camp, and expected to be there for five days or so. luckily I had enough food and water, if rationed carefully for that. But as I was setting up my tent some cowboy’s happened to drive by in a pick up.
    I went home and bought a Jeep.

  • http://insidepastorkevinshead.blogspot.com Kevin Sorensen

    We lived in Fargo, ND for four years, while serving in a church there. During the winters of ’88 and ’89, there were records set for the most numbers of consecutive days without getting above 0º and for coldest temp (without measuring the windchill) – -41º. During one of those winters (1988, if memory serves correctly), the area Evangelical Free Church youth groups were having their Winter Retreat. Waking up on morning and finding the temp at -40º, I began a new tradition (which I’m told thy still carry on): all the boys, wearing nothing but gym shorts, ran outside, had one of the thoroughly bundled girls take our picture on the front steps of the lodge and then raced back inside to thaw out. Great memories!

  • http://insidepastorkevinshead.blogspot.com Kevin Sorensen

    We lived in Fargo, ND for four years, while serving in a church there. During the winters of ’88 and ’89, there were records set for the most numbers of consecutive days without getting above 0º and for coldest temp (without measuring the windchill) – -41º. During one of those winters (1988, if memory serves correctly), the area Evangelical Free Church youth groups were having their Winter Retreat. Waking up on morning and finding the temp at -40º, I began a new tradition (which I’m told thy still carry on): all the boys, wearing nothing but gym shorts, ran outside, had one of the thoroughly bundled girls take our picture on the front steps of the lodge and then raced back inside to thaw out. Great memories!

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Two winters ago I was doing pulit supply for a couple congregations 4 and 5 hours away, in Vernal and Rangely. I would spend the night in Colorado, and head back home in the morning. Well Monday morning came a long and I headed out from Rangely. Turned right on 40 at Dinosaur and 10 minutes out of town encountered a white out blizzard. The cars started carravaning at about 15 miles an hour. At Jenson we were held up a while. Then we saw that the snow plow had run into the ditch!
    Making it into Vernal I thought the snow had let up, because it was nice there. I decided to continue on as I had nothing else to do. Again about 10 minutes out of town, visibility went to naught. I slowed down to about 20 miles an hour. Coming up over a ridge, I could make out flashing lights about half way down the hill. I started pumping my breaks to slow down, assuming someone was already in the ditch. then it became obvious. 2 highway patrol cars upon seeing 3 cars in the ditch decided to park in the middle of my lane half way up a hill. The road was ice and as much as I tried going down was not conducive to stopping. Seeing that I was about to slam into a patrol car I gently slid over into the other lane, and oncoming traffic. They were able to stop and give me just enough room to slip between them and the patrol cars. It was slow going till Daniels summit, but there weren’t anymore incidents.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Two winters ago I was doing pulit supply for a couple congregations 4 and 5 hours away, in Vernal and Rangely. I would spend the night in Colorado, and head back home in the morning. Well Monday morning came a long and I headed out from Rangely. Turned right on 40 at Dinosaur and 10 minutes out of town encountered a white out blizzard. The cars started carravaning at about 15 miles an hour. At Jenson we were held up a while. Then we saw that the snow plow had run into the ditch!
    Making it into Vernal I thought the snow had let up, because it was nice there. I decided to continue on as I had nothing else to do. Again about 10 minutes out of town, visibility went to naught. I slowed down to about 20 miles an hour. Coming up over a ridge, I could make out flashing lights about half way down the hill. I started pumping my breaks to slow down, assuming someone was already in the ditch. then it became obvious. 2 highway patrol cars upon seeing 3 cars in the ditch decided to park in the middle of my lane half way up a hill. The road was ice and as much as I tried going down was not conducive to stopping. Seeing that I was about to slam into a patrol car I gently slid over into the other lane, and oncoming traffic. They were able to stop and give me just enough room to slip between them and the patrol cars. It was slow going till Daniels summit, but there weren’t anymore incidents.

  • David T.

    When I was young and foolish I slept outside in northern MN when it was -27. No tent or shelter; just a sleeping pad underneath a down sleeping bag. And yes, I did get frostbite. I also regularly slept in my treehouse all year long for about 2 years. The only stipulation my parents made was that if got colder than -10 or if there were tornado warnings I had to sleep indoors. It was quite fun to be rocked to sleep by the wind or to wake up on a winter morning and climb down the rope into a foot of new snow.

  • David T.

    When I was young and foolish I slept outside in northern MN when it was -27. No tent or shelter; just a sleeping pad underneath a down sleeping bag. And yes, I did get frostbite. I also regularly slept in my treehouse all year long for about 2 years. The only stipulation my parents made was that if got colder than -10 or if there were tornado warnings I had to sleep indoors. It was quite fun to be rocked to sleep by the wind or to wake up on a winter morning and climb down the rope into a foot of new snow.

  • trotk

    My family and I got caught in a tropical storm off the coast of Alabama in two too small boats. All the lights on the shore were out because of the storm, and for four hours we were thrown about by the wind and the waves with no idea where we were.
    The waves were so large that they were coming all the way over the boats, which were 16 and 24 feet long. At one point, the waves picked up the two boats and smashed them together at the crest. We all legitimately thought that we would die.
    After for hours, we were able to locate a flashing radio tower that enabled us to figure out our location, and we made our way slowly back to the boathouse, which was on a small creek. As we reached the mouth of the creek and entered it, the tranquility of the protected water caused us all to think about what entering heaven might be like.
    My father and my uncle got us out of the boats and onto the dock where we knelt to pray.

  • trotk

    My family and I got caught in a tropical storm off the coast of Alabama in two too small boats. All the lights on the shore were out because of the storm, and for four hours we were thrown about by the wind and the waves with no idea where we were.
    The waves were so large that they were coming all the way over the boats, which were 16 and 24 feet long. At one point, the waves picked up the two boats and smashed them together at the crest. We all legitimately thought that we would die.
    After for hours, we were able to locate a flashing radio tower that enabled us to figure out our location, and we made our way slowly back to the boathouse, which was on a small creek. As we reached the mouth of the creek and entered it, the tranquility of the protected water caused us all to think about what entering heaven might be like.
    My father and my uncle got us out of the boats and onto the dock where we knelt to pray.

  • Brenda

    When my husband was a new hire with the OR Dept of Transportation he spent many hours plowing snow… One memorable year he worked 21days straight with shifts as long as 14 hours. It wasn’t that all those days were bad enough to warrant working so long… it was just that the bad blizzards came on his regular days off. We were able to have a nice Christmas with all the over time.

  • Brenda

    When my husband was a new hire with the OR Dept of Transportation he spent many hours plowing snow… One memorable year he worked 21days straight with shifts as long as 14 hours. It wasn’t that all those days were bad enough to warrant working so long… it was just that the bad blizzards came on his regular days off. We were able to have a nice Christmas with all the over time.

  • fws

    it has been over 40 degrees centigrade in rio for the past week. I do not have air conditioning. i am told that the “body feel” is more like 52 degrees centegrade…..

    Let me see what that is in farenheit…

    ah. 40 centigrade = 104 farenheit… 52 c = 125 f.

    I THOUGHT it felt warm…… yikes… I bought an 21000 btu air conditioner yesterday. it weighs 60 kilos. it cost me $US1,400.

    worth.every.penny.

  • fws

    it has been over 40 degrees centigrade in rio for the past week. I do not have air conditioning. i am told that the “body feel” is more like 52 degrees centegrade…..

    Let me see what that is in farenheit…

    ah. 40 centigrade = 104 farenheit… 52 c = 125 f.

    I THOUGHT it felt warm…… yikes… I bought an 21000 btu air conditioner yesterday. it weighs 60 kilos. it cost me $US1,400.

    worth.every.penny.

  • Dan Kempin

    Kevin #5,

    I remember those years! I remember working in Minneapolis over Christmas break with daytime temps of -20 for most of a week. I was beginning to think I had magnified it in my memory. That was freaking cold!

  • Dan Kempin

    Kevin #5,

    I remember those years! I remember working in Minneapolis over Christmas break with daytime temps of -20 for most of a week. I was beginning to think I had magnified it in my memory. That was freaking cold!

  • EGK

    You can’t live in Edmonton and not have winter stories. The year we arrived (1985, from St. Louis) the temperature approached -40 (you choose the scale: at -40 they meet) by American Thanksgiving. We have had snow in the last half of May, snow in August (an Australian professor arrived at the end of August for a semester’s stay and was greeted with a snowstorm), so everyone has stories to tell.

  • EGK

    You can’t live in Edmonton and not have winter stories. The year we arrived (1985, from St. Louis) the temperature approached -40 (you choose the scale: at -40 they meet) by American Thanksgiving. We have had snow in the last half of May, snow in August (an Australian professor arrived at the end of August for a semester’s stay and was greeted with a snowstorm), so everyone has stories to tell.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Very disappointingly low level of snowfall in Salt Lake City this year. I like shoveling snow, so have not gotten my usual share. In college at Concordia River Forest, I was on the snow crew. It was frozen-nose-hair-cold most mornings in the winter and it really did snow a fair share, but I sure enjoyed that job. After clearing the paths early in the morning, breakfast always tasted so fine – even in the cafeteria!

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Very disappointingly low level of snowfall in Salt Lake City this year. I like shoveling snow, so have not gotten my usual share. In college at Concordia River Forest, I was on the snow crew. It was frozen-nose-hair-cold most mornings in the winter and it really did snow a fair share, but I sure enjoyed that job. After clearing the paths early in the morning, breakfast always tasted so fine – even in the cafeteria!

  • Orianna Laun

    Actually, Pa got lost in a blizzard and ate the oyster crackers in “On the Banks of Plum Creek.”
    Twice trying to return to college in Seward, NE, after Thanksgiving I had bad weather trouble. Once I was riding with a friend from Luverne, MN, back to Seward and drove through snow into Iowa and ice from north of Omaha the rest of the way. A 5 hour trip took about 8 hours. The second I had was flying from Minneapolis, MN, to Lincoln, NE, on a snowy night. I was on a small aircraft (a flying lawn dart) during a heavy storm and as much as I like roller coasters, I do not like them with nothing underneath.
    Also, here’s a hint: do not try to travel with an infant under 1 month during a snowstorm. We drove from Chicago to northern Michigan recently and the 5 hour trip took about 10 between the weather and feeding stops. I thought we’d never get there!

  • Orianna Laun

    Actually, Pa got lost in a blizzard and ate the oyster crackers in “On the Banks of Plum Creek.”
    Twice trying to return to college in Seward, NE, after Thanksgiving I had bad weather trouble. Once I was riding with a friend from Luverne, MN, back to Seward and drove through snow into Iowa and ice from north of Omaha the rest of the way. A 5 hour trip took about 8 hours. The second I had was flying from Minneapolis, MN, to Lincoln, NE, on a snowy night. I was on a small aircraft (a flying lawn dart) during a heavy storm and as much as I like roller coasters, I do not like them with nothing underneath.
    Also, here’s a hint: do not try to travel with an infant under 1 month during a snowstorm. We drove from Chicago to northern Michigan recently and the 5 hour trip took about 10 between the weather and feeding stops. I thought we’d never get there!

  • Bob

    From my years in northern MN I learned the difference between -30 and -40. (Yes, it is 10 degrees!) At -30 the loggers would still skid lumber out. At -40 they would stay in — the metal became too brittle.

    I believe that it was Mark Twain who said, “God gave us weather, so we would have something to talk about.”

  • Bob

    From my years in northern MN I learned the difference between -30 and -40. (Yes, it is 10 degrees!) At -30 the loggers would still skid lumber out. At -40 they would stay in — the metal became too brittle.

    I believe that it was Mark Twain who said, “God gave us weather, so we would have something to talk about.”

  • http://barrybishop.blogspot.com/ Barry D. Bishop

    In the summer of 2008, I was traveling back home to Texas from Wamsutter, Wyoming. Early in the morning the winds were unbelievably strong as we drove on the highway towards Laramie, WY. I noticed a group of pronghorn antelope laying down on the side of the road with their ears pinned back. But high winds were not uncommon for this area of the plains so I kept driving. Then I saw tall, black rainclouds above Laramie when we were just outside of town. “Great now, there is going to be rain.” The weather just got worse and worse and now we were rapidly climbing up in elevation as we traveled into the mountains between Laramie and Cheyenne. High winds, rain, and impenetrable fog was combined with mountain driving. I gripped the wheel and kept saying to my wife, “this is bad, honey, pray for us.” It was not until a couple of hours later that we got into clearer whether in norther Colorado.
    After we pulled over to stop for a break we learned that a tornado had been in Laramie at the same time we were there and in the same parts of Wyoming an northern Colorado that we had just traveled.
    To this day I wonder if we had driven through or above a tornado as we ascended into the mountains. I am thankful for God’s protection and also surprised that the closest I have been to a tornado was in Wyoming and not Texas where I have lived my whole life.

  • http://barrybishop.blogspot.com/ Barry D. Bishop

    In the summer of 2008, I was traveling back home to Texas from Wamsutter, Wyoming. Early in the morning the winds were unbelievably strong as we drove on the highway towards Laramie, WY. I noticed a group of pronghorn antelope laying down on the side of the road with their ears pinned back. But high winds were not uncommon for this area of the plains so I kept driving. Then I saw tall, black rainclouds above Laramie when we were just outside of town. “Great now, there is going to be rain.” The weather just got worse and worse and now we were rapidly climbing up in elevation as we traveled into the mountains between Laramie and Cheyenne. High winds, rain, and impenetrable fog was combined with mountain driving. I gripped the wheel and kept saying to my wife, “this is bad, honey, pray for us.” It was not until a couple of hours later that we got into clearer whether in norther Colorado.
    After we pulled over to stop for a break we learned that a tornado had been in Laramie at the same time we were there and in the same parts of Wyoming an northern Colorado that we had just traveled.
    To this day I wonder if we had driven through or above a tornado as we ascended into the mountains. I am thankful for God’s protection and also surprised that the closest I have been to a tornado was in Wyoming and not Texas where I have lived my whole life.

  • NavyMom

    Living in South Florida, we’ve been through umpteen tropical storms, tropical waves, and of course, the awful hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005. We lost our roof, our central air conditioning, our refrigerator, and washer/dryer! No injuries, though, thankfully. God is always good.

  • NavyMom

    Living in South Florida, we’ve been through umpteen tropical storms, tropical waves, and of course, the awful hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005. We lost our roof, our central air conditioning, our refrigerator, and washer/dryer! No injuries, though, thankfully. God is always good.

  • Booklover

    I spent my summers thinning, hoeing, and weeding sugar beets in Montana. On our days off, Mom planned other chores because it was sinful for us 5 children not to be working. (Our religion, besides German Lutheranism, was work.) She set us to work painting a looonnng white corral fence. It was 102 degrees that afternoon, but next to the white fence it was much hotter. If we finished the job, we got to attend the movie that was newly out. I watched the Poseidon Adventure that night with a blazing headache.

    I later travelled through eastern Oregon (The Dalles, etc.) in 112 degree weather in a non-air-conditioned car, but that wasn’t as hot as it was while painting the fence. It was actually quite enjoyable since I wasn’t doing any labor.

    Speaking of labor, I gave birth to my first son on Christmas Eve, 1983. It was 60 degrees below 0 with the wind chill factor. We left the hospital a couple of days later and it was 40 degrees fahrenheit—a difference of 100 degrees. That’s Montana. :-)

  • Booklover

    I spent my summers thinning, hoeing, and weeding sugar beets in Montana. On our days off, Mom planned other chores because it was sinful for us 5 children not to be working. (Our religion, besides German Lutheranism, was work.) She set us to work painting a looonnng white corral fence. It was 102 degrees that afternoon, but next to the white fence it was much hotter. If we finished the job, we got to attend the movie that was newly out. I watched the Poseidon Adventure that night with a blazing headache.

    I later travelled through eastern Oregon (The Dalles, etc.) in 112 degree weather in a non-air-conditioned car, but that wasn’t as hot as it was while painting the fence. It was actually quite enjoyable since I wasn’t doing any labor.

    Speaking of labor, I gave birth to my first son on Christmas Eve, 1983. It was 60 degrees below 0 with the wind chill factor. We left the hospital a couple of days later and it was 40 degrees fahrenheit—a difference of 100 degrees. That’s Montana. :-)

  • kerner

    Sorry Dr. Veith, but this topic is not as safe as you think.  Every time I hear about unusually bitter winter weather, I think of our fearless leaders in Washington, who are constantly telling us that it is too HOT.  We need to triple our fuel costs as an incentinve to make it COLDER!  So, then we can be both poor and cold.  This will give us a better world.Of all the absurdities that come out of Washington, this is the worst.

  • kerner

    Sorry Dr. Veith, but this topic is not as safe as you think.  Every time I hear about unusually bitter winter weather, I think of our fearless leaders in Washington, who are constantly telling us that it is too HOT.  We need to triple our fuel costs as an incentinve to make it COLDER!  So, then we can be both poor and cold.  This will give us a better world.Of all the absurdities that come out of Washington, this is the worst.

  • http://blog.captainthin.net/ Captain Thin

    I live in Saskatchewan, Canada. ‘Nuff said.

  • http://blog.captainthin.net/ Captain Thin

    I live in Saskatchewan, Canada. ‘Nuff said.

  • Susan

    We haven’t seen the sun for more than a few days since Christmas. It’s cold, gray, and spittin’ snow. Normally it’s cold and gray anyway, but we’ve had more snow this year and last than we have in twenty-plus years, and our second snow day in two years. At least this time it’s wet so isn’t sticking. Phooey 0n that stupid groundhog, it’s about six weeks to Spring any way you slice it.

    But the woodstove is going, our three cats are sprawled everywhere and I can look forward to a flannel-sheeted bed that has a down comforter on it, and some new books I got for Christmas beside it.

  • Susan

    We haven’t seen the sun for more than a few days since Christmas. It’s cold, gray, and spittin’ snow. Normally it’s cold and gray anyway, but we’ve had more snow this year and last than we have in twenty-plus years, and our second snow day in two years. At least this time it’s wet so isn’t sticking. Phooey 0n that stupid groundhog, it’s about six weeks to Spring any way you slice it.

    But the woodstove is going, our three cats are sprawled everywhere and I can look forward to a flannel-sheeted bed that has a down comforter on it, and some new books I got for Christmas beside it.

  • http://mesamike.org Mike Westfall

    My extreme weather story happened in Redlands, CA on the day that my wife and I got married. It was 115 degreees that day in August, and the wedding reception was held outside. The wedding cake morphed into something less than elegant before it could be served….

  • http://mesamike.org Mike Westfall

    My extreme weather story happened in Redlands, CA on the day that my wife and I got married. It was 115 degreees that day in August, and the wedding reception was held outside. The wedding cake morphed into something less than elegant before it could be served….

  • http://snafman.blogspot.com Snafu

    A couple of years ago I was sking on Christams holiday in eastern Finland. The temperature fell about -30 degrees Celsius, which in Fahrenheits is pretty cold as well, I guess. I had bought expensive tickets so I wasn’t going to skip even one day of sking, the weather’s not stopping me, I’ve seen worse, I thought. I skipped shower in the morning, because water wipes away the skin grease that keeps you warm(or less frozen) in cold breeze. I put on warm clothes and that sort of hood that commandos wear, you know, those that show only your eyes and mouth.

    Sking went well, but had to stop by in a cafe every half an hour to melt my eyebrows. Frozen sweat was blocking the view!

  • http://snafman.blogspot.com Snafu

    A couple of years ago I was sking on Christams holiday in eastern Finland. The temperature fell about -30 degrees Celsius, which in Fahrenheits is pretty cold as well, I guess. I had bought expensive tickets so I wasn’t going to skip even one day of sking, the weather’s not stopping me, I’ve seen worse, I thought. I skipped shower in the morning, because water wipes away the skin grease that keeps you warm(or less frozen) in cold breeze. I put on warm clothes and that sort of hood that commandos wear, you know, those that show only your eyes and mouth.

    Sking went well, but had to stop by in a cafe every half an hour to melt my eyebrows. Frozen sweat was blocking the view!

  • Rhonda

    My husband and I have hosted 8 exchange students over the years. They never understood our obsession with watching the weather on the news programs at first. By the time they left, the weather was one of their main topics of conversation also. When we contact eachother now the first question they ask is about the weather. Oh yeah, we live in Minnesota.

  • Rhonda

    My husband and I have hosted 8 exchange students over the years. They never understood our obsession with watching the weather on the news programs at first. By the time they left, the weather was one of their main topics of conversation also. When we contact eachother now the first question they ask is about the weather. Oh yeah, we live in Minnesota.

  • Booklover

    I forgot to tell about the day I was confirmed into the faith in 1973. We had a huge spring blizzard which took out our electricity for three days. We were dairy farmers and milked our cows twice daily at 2 hours each time. With no electricity, we could only milk them once, and it took us all day to do it manually. Yet we took time out for my confirmation, and Mom cooked for the relatives with no electricity. She was a superwoman.

    Between the cows, and all the curlers getting stuck in my baby-fine hair, I made it to church on time for confirmation questioning.

  • Booklover

    I forgot to tell about the day I was confirmed into the faith in 1973. We had a huge spring blizzard which took out our electricity for three days. We were dairy farmers and milked our cows twice daily at 2 hours each time. With no electricity, we could only milk them once, and it took us all day to do it manually. Yet we took time out for my confirmation, and Mom cooked for the relatives with no electricity. She was a superwoman.

    Between the cows, and all the curlers getting stuck in my baby-fine hair, I made it to church on time for confirmation questioning.

  • Booklover

    I apologize ahead of time for posting three times, but this is Montana and we do have weather.

    I can’t count the number of times we spun 360′s on icy roads on the way to college between Billings and Bozeman. Sometimes we landed in the ditch, sometimes we didn’t. One time I drove that road in a blizzard with no visibility just by following the red “Coors” sign on the back of a tall semi. When I could finally see, I found myself in Livingston, off the highway and not in Bozeman at all.

    You asked, “Was the weather worse or better when you were a kid?”
    I remember several winters as a child with snow cover all winter long. That hasn’t happened as an adult, and I live in the same area. We usually have a storm in October and then not again until spring, with some fairly warm winter months. This is the first year in a long time that we’ve had a good snow cover for a reasonable length of time, as when I was a child.

  • Booklover

    I apologize ahead of time for posting three times, but this is Montana and we do have weather.

    I can’t count the number of times we spun 360′s on icy roads on the way to college between Billings and Bozeman. Sometimes we landed in the ditch, sometimes we didn’t. One time I drove that road in a blizzard with no visibility just by following the red “Coors” sign on the back of a tall semi. When I could finally see, I found myself in Livingston, off the highway and not in Bozeman at all.

    You asked, “Was the weather worse or better when you were a kid?”
    I remember several winters as a child with snow cover all winter long. That hasn’t happened as an adult, and I live in the same area. We usually have a storm in October and then not again until spring, with some fairly warm winter months. This is the first year in a long time that we’ve had a good snow cover for a reasonable length of time, as when I was a child.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    The weather here in So. Cal. is about the same as when I was a kid 40 years ago.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    The weather here in So. Cal. is about the same as when I was a kid 40 years ago.

  • http://mesamike.org Mike Westfall

    > The weather here in So. Cal. is about the same as when I was a kid
    > 40 years ago.

    That’s because of Global Warming. Imagine how much more pleasant the weather would be in summer if it weren’t for that…

  • http://mesamike.org Mike Westfall

    > The weather here in So. Cal. is about the same as when I was a kid
    > 40 years ago.

    That’s because of Global Warming. Imagine how much more pleasant the weather would be in summer if it weren’t for that…

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    We’ve just had a couple really cool Summers. And now a very cool and rainy Winter. Maybe he thermostat (of the earth) is broken.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com/ Steve Martin

    We’ve just had a couple really cool Summers. And now a very cool and rainy Winter. Maybe he thermostat (of the earth) is broken.

  • Joe

    I grew up about 40 miles north of Green Bay. We drive in everything. If you go in the ditch you just walk to the nearest farm and borrow a tractor, pull you truck out of the ditch and keep going where you were headed. I got stuck in the ditch on the way to grandma’s one thanksgiving.

    I put my Jeep C-J 7 in a ditch during the November deer hunt one year. Roads had about an inch of ice on them. The buggy (as my grandma called it) didn’t have enough to get back on the road but I drove through the ditch at about a 45 degree slant for about 5 miles to the next farm. It was actually easer to drive in the ditch than on the roads, so on the way home I stuck to the off road trails for safety.

    I also used to drive a propane truck (a bobtail with a 3,000 gallon tank on the back for delivering LP used for home delivery). One winter while I was on the truck, we had about a two week stretch where the wind chill was around – 60. Standing outside for filling those tanks was the coldest I have ever been. Colder than the two times I have fallen through the ice while ice-fishing.

  • Joe

    I grew up about 40 miles north of Green Bay. We drive in everything. If you go in the ditch you just walk to the nearest farm and borrow a tractor, pull you truck out of the ditch and keep going where you were headed. I got stuck in the ditch on the way to grandma’s one thanksgiving.

    I put my Jeep C-J 7 in a ditch during the November deer hunt one year. Roads had about an inch of ice on them. The buggy (as my grandma called it) didn’t have enough to get back on the road but I drove through the ditch at about a 45 degree slant for about 5 miles to the next farm. It was actually easer to drive in the ditch than on the roads, so on the way home I stuck to the off road trails for safety.

    I also used to drive a propane truck (a bobtail with a 3,000 gallon tank on the back for delivering LP used for home delivery). One winter while I was on the truck, we had about a two week stretch where the wind chill was around – 60. Standing outside for filling those tanks was the coldest I have ever been. Colder than the two times I have fallen through the ice while ice-fishing.

  • http://snindpync@gawab.com MatryErrody

    Hi,

    My first time here. Need some help Well, actually Ms. Boots had five kittens.

    My wife gave all except one of them away. She says she gets to name it, I say I do because I take care of all the others. haha

    Any good websites for finding cat names?

    thank you

  • http://snindpync@gawab.com MatryErrody

    Hi,

    My first time here. Need some help Well, actually Ms. Boots had five kittens.

    My wife gave all except one of them away. She says she gets to name it, I say I do because I take care of all the others. haha

    Any good websites for finding cat names?

    thank you


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