A book that changed your life

Booklover raised the ante on yesterday’s post about books that have influenced your political beliefs, asking if a book CHANGED your views, or just confirmed what you already believed. Let’s ramp it up even more: Has there been a book that changed your life in some way? Let’s not limit it to politics or ideology. Has a book changed your faith or your theology? Your approach to your family, your work, your everyday life? Not counting the Bible.

I’ll go first. C. S. Lewis’s “Mere Christianity,” which I read as a high schooler, made me realize that maybe there is something to this Christianity. Having grown up in mainline liberal Protestantism, I had never even heard that Jesus was God in the flesh. Nor did I know of any other historic Christian doctrines. That book started me on a long road.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Conor

    Michael Horton’s Putting Amazing Back in Grace. Such an eye-opener on the doctrines of grace. As I read it I remember thinking, ‘Christianity can be this good’. But it is. Thanks, Mike.

  • Conor

    Michael Horton’s Putting Amazing Back in Grace. Such an eye-opener on the doctrines of grace. As I read it I remember thinking, ‘Christianity can be this good’. But it is. Thanks, Mike.

  • http://www.cumberlandisland.blogspot.com Adrian Keister

    I’ve long been prone to say stupid things – things that hurt other people, or don’t help them. It was often truth without love. One book that really helped me was Andrew Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People. Some might think that book is manipulative, but I think not if you recognize that his idea includes the concept of actually loving your neighbor.

  • http://www.cumberlandisland.blogspot.com Adrian Keister

    I’ve long been prone to say stupid things – things that hurt other people, or don’t help them. It was often truth without love. One book that really helped me was Andrew Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People. Some might think that book is manipulative, but I think not if you recognize that his idea includes the concept of actually loving your neighbor.

  • http://deekdubberly.com/ Deek Dubberly

    John Piper’s, Desiring God. Found it in a Barnes and Noble in my first week of college. The phrase ‘Christian hedonism’ caught my eye. This book introduced me to Reformed theology.

  • http://deekdubberly.com/ Deek Dubberly

    John Piper’s, Desiring God. Found it in a Barnes and Noble in my first week of college. The phrase ‘Christian hedonism’ caught my eye. This book introduced me to Reformed theology.

  • Doug

    The Pursuit of God, A. W. Tozer I went through it with a college Bible study. It started to show me how deep the rabbit hole really is.

  • Doug

    The Pursuit of God, A. W. Tozer I went through it with a college Bible study. It started to show me how deep the rabbit hole really is.

  • http://philippians314.squarespace.com Kim in ON

    Well, I’m not really saying this to sound like I’m a flatter by any means, Dr. Veith, but your book The Spirituality of the Cross changed my life because it caused me to re-evaluate what I understood evangelicalism to mean; I’m still re-evaluating, seven years later.

  • http://philippians314.squarespace.com Kim in ON

    Well, I’m not really saying this to sound like I’m a flatter by any means, Dr. Veith, but your book The Spirituality of the Cross changed my life because it caused me to re-evaluate what I understood evangelicalism to mean; I’m still re-evaluating, seven years later.

  • Sandi

    The Hiding Place, Corrie Ten Boom-read in high school it opened my eyes to the reality that God can change us-for real, and that He still works into this world. Also read in high school,Schaeffers, Escape from Reason,;opened the door to idea that the truth of Christianity affects everything.

  • Sandi

    The Hiding Place, Corrie Ten Boom-read in high school it opened my eyes to the reality that God can change us-for real, and that He still works into this world. Also read in high school,Schaeffers, Escape from Reason,;opened the door to idea that the truth of Christianity affects everything.

  • http://wmarkwhitlock@comcast.net W. Mark Whitlock

    I would’ve never thought of myself as having any racist tendancies…until I read Randy Alcorn’s DOMINION. The novel shows the subtle ways we express our deep prejudices. It convicted me and has changed the way I behave. The characters’ struggles also changed some of the faulty thinking I didn’t know I possessed.

  • http://wmarkwhitlock@comcast.net W. Mark Whitlock

    I would’ve never thought of myself as having any racist tendancies…until I read Randy Alcorn’s DOMINION. The novel shows the subtle ways we express our deep prejudices. It convicted me and has changed the way I behave. The characters’ struggles also changed some of the faulty thinking I didn’t know I possessed.

  • J. Gutz

    The Hammer of God by Bo Giertz. Grounded me in something solid when I was flailing and wasting away.

  • J. Gutz

    The Hammer of God by Bo Giertz. Grounded me in something solid when I was flailing and wasting away.

  • http://acroamaticus.blogspot.com Mark Henderson

    A Faber and Faber dark green coloured paperback edition of ‘The Wasteland and other poems’ by T.S. Eliot opened up a whole new world for me as a 17 year old.

  • http://acroamaticus.blogspot.com Mark Henderson

    A Faber and Faber dark green coloured paperback edition of ‘The Wasteland and other poems’ by T.S. Eliot opened up a whole new world for me as a 17 year old.

  • Andy Adams

    Augustine’s Confessions . . . Tole lege, tole lege! Of course, I would have never cracked the cover had it not been assigned in a Medieval Philosophy course taught at University of St. Thomas.

  • Andy Adams

    Augustine’s Confessions . . . Tole lege, tole lege! Of course, I would have never cracked the cover had it not been assigned in a Medieval Philosophy course taught at University of St. Thomas.

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    I read Siegbert Becker’s “The Foolishness of God: The Place of Reason in the Theology of Martin Luther” (Northwestern Publishing House) while in college and being very attracted to the non- and inter-denominational emphases and practices of my non-Lutheran friends. Reading it (which I highly recommend) really helped convince me that to leave my Lutheran doctrinal heritage behind would be faithlessness and a huge mistake.

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    I read Siegbert Becker’s “The Foolishness of God: The Place of Reason in the Theology of Martin Luther” (Northwestern Publishing House) while in college and being very attracted to the non- and inter-denominational emphases and practices of my non-Lutheran friends. Reading it (which I highly recommend) really helped convince me that to leave my Lutheran doctrinal heritage behind would be faithlessness and a huge mistake.

  • Richard

    Michael Horton’s works. I remember reading a book he wrote, “Too Good to be True,” dealing with suffering as I waited for my wife in the hospital as she went through cancer surgery. His emphasis on Luther’s theology of the Cross vs. theology of glory (which prompted me to go to Forde and others on this) turned my world upside down. Horton has a habit of doing this–another “Thank you, Michael.”

  • Richard

    Michael Horton’s works. I remember reading a book he wrote, “Too Good to be True,” dealing with suffering as I waited for my wife in the hospital as she went through cancer surgery. His emphasis on Luther’s theology of the Cross vs. theology of glory (which prompted me to go to Forde and others on this) turned my world upside down. Horton has a habit of doing this–another “Thank you, Michael.”

  • Orianna Laun

    I can’t say as my whole ideology was changed by a book, per se, but my weltanschaaung (outlook) has been honed by by books such as “The Spiritual Society” by Baue and “Modern Fascism” by Veith. “The First Days of School” by Harry Wong and some of the Love and Logic materials did change how I approached teaching. I guess one could say that reading the three Humanist Manifestos (not technically a book) highly influenced me and made me evaluate my public education and society and culture.

  • Orianna Laun

    I can’t say as my whole ideology was changed by a book, per se, but my weltanschaaung (outlook) has been honed by by books such as “The Spiritual Society” by Baue and “Modern Fascism” by Veith. “The First Days of School” by Harry Wong and some of the Love and Logic materials did change how I approached teaching. I guess one could say that reading the three Humanist Manifestos (not technically a book) highly influenced me and made me evaluate my public education and society and culture.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Anything by C.S. Lewis, Watts’ book on logic, Bastiat’s commentaries on economics, “Pilgrim’s Progress,” Piper’s “Don’t Waste Your Life.” Also, reading those yellow magazines from DC puts a lot of modern life in perspective. Milton didn’t make a huge impression, though.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Anything by C.S. Lewis, Watts’ book on logic, Bastiat’s commentaries on economics, “Pilgrim’s Progress,” Piper’s “Don’t Waste Your Life.” Also, reading those yellow magazines from DC puts a lot of modern life in perspective. Milton didn’t make a huge impression, though.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I think C.S. Lewis’ The Screwtape Letters, which I read in high school, was actually the first book that helped me fall in love with orthodoxy. “God is in favor of pleasure? The body isn’t evil? Who knew?” Later, in college, Mere Christianity nailed down the truth that there’s a place for reason in faith, and that’s been my intellectual pole star ever since.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I think C.S. Lewis’ The Screwtape Letters, which I read in high school, was actually the first book that helped me fall in love with orthodoxy. “God is in favor of pleasure? The body isn’t evil? Who knew?” Later, in college, Mere Christianity nailed down the truth that there’s a place for reason in faith, and that’s been my intellectual pole star ever since.

  • Manxman

    The Francis Schaeffer Trilogy

  • Manxman

    The Francis Schaeffer Trilogy

  • Darren

    “The Younger Evangelicals” by Robert Webber. I had been going through a crisis, not of faith, but of noticing that the roots of modern evangelicalism seemed pretty shallow. I was feeling very alone in my questioning, and this book showed me that I wasn’t the only one with these questions.

  • Darren

    “The Younger Evangelicals” by Robert Webber. I had been going through a crisis, not of faith, but of noticing that the roots of modern evangelicalism seemed pretty shallow. I was feeling very alone in my questioning, and this book showed me that I wasn’t the only one with these questions.

  • cruxsola

    “On Being A Theologian of the Cross” Gerhard Forde
    To hear that the problem wan’t my badness but my goodness, that my best was sin….that launched me towards Luther and things have never been the same since!

  • cruxsola

    “On Being A Theologian of the Cross” Gerhard Forde
    To hear that the problem wan’t my badness but my goodness, that my best was sin….that launched me towards Luther and things have never been the same since!

  • http://dailyonmywaytoheaven.com Becky

    After growing in a typical Evangelical Arminian church, encountering A.W Pink’s book the Sovereignity of God opened my eyes to the Reformed Theology…and from there on, the books of J.C Ryle have been my companions, always challenging me.

  • http://dailyonmywaytoheaven.com Becky

    After growing in a typical Evangelical Arminian church, encountering A.W Pink’s book the Sovereignity of God opened my eyes to the Reformed Theology…and from there on, the books of J.C Ryle have been my companions, always challenging me.

  • http://lhpqbr.blogspot.com Rev. Paul J Cain

    In 1996, reading Dr. A. L. Barry’s The Unchanging Feast radically realigned my view of Christian worship in the Lutheran tradition. That led to other great books, but this one turned me back to my roots. It is now available for free in pdf form online. One source: http://wy.lcms.org/lhp/Other/unchangingfeast.pdf

  • http://lhpqbr.blogspot.com Rev. Paul J Cain

    In 1996, reading Dr. A. L. Barry’s The Unchanging Feast radically realigned my view of Christian worship in the Lutheran tradition. That led to other great books, but this one turned me back to my roots. It is now available for free in pdf form online. One source: http://wy.lcms.org/lhp/Other/unchangingfeast.pdf

  • CRB

    Most any volume by Luther, but I think what reinforced
    for me what Luther wrote was a book by the sainted
    Dr Robert Preus, “Doctrine is Life.” It’s part of a two
    volume set put out by Concordia Publishing House, not
    large in page numbers, but quite large in wisdom set forth
    by, in my opinion, our greatest modern day theologian.

  • CRB

    Most any volume by Luther, but I think what reinforced
    for me what Luther wrote was a book by the sainted
    Dr Robert Preus, “Doctrine is Life.” It’s part of a two
    volume set put out by Concordia Publishing House, not
    large in page numbers, but quite large in wisdom set forth
    by, in my opinion, our greatest modern day theologian.

  • Steven

    For me, it was Bonhoeffer’s “Cost of Discipleship” a book I have reread profitably several times.

  • Steven

    For me, it was Bonhoeffer’s “Cost of Discipleship” a book I have reread profitably several times.

  • Brenda

    As a sixth grader I read the _Last Battle_, finishing rather late at night. I was so caught up in the wonderful imagery, I wanted to be there… to go to Aslan’s Country. I was not aware of Lewis’ Christianity, I only knew this was true. I knew that it would happen someday and that I wanted to be there.

  • Brenda

    As a sixth grader I read the _Last Battle_, finishing rather late at night. I was so caught up in the wonderful imagery, I wanted to be there… to go to Aslan’s Country. I was not aware of Lewis’ Christianity, I only knew this was true. I knew that it would happen someday and that I wanted to be there.

  • http://www.decormis.com Stewart Lundy

    The Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu, which opened me up to a purer vision of the world.

  • http://www.decormis.com Stewart Lundy

    The Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu, which opened me up to a purer vision of the world.

  • Tom Hering

    The books that have changed my life haven’t been the usual suspects.

    1984: Colin Turnbull’s “The Human Cycle” (a work of cultural anthropology) revealed how dependent other religions are on their cultures of origin, and this revelation caused me (a neo-pagan) to think seriously about Christianity for the first time in my adult life.

    1985: Dennis and Rita Bennett’s “The Holy Spirit and You” (a book from the charismatic movement) presented basic Law and Gospel in it’s first few chapters – and opened my eyes to trust in Christ and His saving work (the very night I first opened the book).

    1995: Russell Chandler’s “Doomsday: The End of the World – A View Through Time” contained a short discussion of amillenialism, and this inspired me to finally put Evangelicalism/Pentecostalism behind me, and to embrace the Reformation and the Lutheran tradition.

  • Tom Hering

    The books that have changed my life haven’t been the usual suspects.

    1984: Colin Turnbull’s “The Human Cycle” (a work of cultural anthropology) revealed how dependent other religions are on their cultures of origin, and this revelation caused me (a neo-pagan) to think seriously about Christianity for the first time in my adult life.

    1985: Dennis and Rita Bennett’s “The Holy Spirit and You” (a book from the charismatic movement) presented basic Law and Gospel in it’s first few chapters – and opened my eyes to trust in Christ and His saving work (the very night I first opened the book).

    1995: Russell Chandler’s “Doomsday: The End of the World – A View Through Time” contained a short discussion of amillenialism, and this inspired me to finally put Evangelicalism/Pentecostalism behind me, and to embrace the Reformation and the Lutheran tradition.

  • A.D.P.

    I’ll cite C.S. Lewis as well – “A Hideous Strength”, the last of his space trilogy, helped me finally get my head around the orthodox Christian view of gender roles.

  • A.D.P.

    I’ll cite C.S. Lewis as well – “A Hideous Strength”, the last of his space trilogy, helped me finally get my head around the orthodox Christian view of gender roles.

  • Louis

    The Pilgrim’s Regress – CS Lewis.
    Manalive – Chesterton.

  • Louis

    The Pilgrim’s Regress – CS Lewis.
    Manalive – Chesterton.

  • Eric R.

    William Placher’s The Domestication of Transcendence: How Modern Thinking about God Went Wrong. The title sounds complicated, but it’s not too bad. Placher made me rethink everything.

  • Eric R.

    William Placher’s The Domestication of Transcendence: How Modern Thinking about God Went Wrong. The title sounds complicated, but it’s not too bad. Placher made me rethink everything.

  • Jerry

    Bo Giertz, Hammer of God — even inspired me to plant linden trees

  • Jerry

    Bo Giertz, Hammer of God — even inspired me to plant linden trees

  • James Hageman

    Different books, different times: Bible, Bhagavad Gita, Tao Te Ching, Book of Concord, Abolition of Man, Orthodoxy, In Tune with the World (Josef Pieper), From Dawn to Decadence (Barzun). More than just great books–they each changed me significantly.

  • James Hageman

    Different books, different times: Bible, Bhagavad Gita, Tao Te Ching, Book of Concord, Abolition of Man, Orthodoxy, In Tune with the World (Josef Pieper), From Dawn to Decadence (Barzun). More than just great books–they each changed me significantly.

  • Kandyce

    Books that have changed my views or my life.
    I have to start with L.M. Montgomery’s “Anne of Green Gables”. It might be a strange choice to others, but for me, it broke open the dam of whimsy and dreaming, and I haved used those things to construct who I am.
    In high school I read “Anna Karenina” and as a young 17 year old, it really impressed into me the constancy of human nature toward evil. I remember thinking that people hadn’t changed at all in their nature in the last hundred years, a powerful realization for someone steeped in a future utopia “Star Trek” mentality.
    C.S. Lewis’ “Screwtape Letters” changed how I viewed worship (along with Dr. Maschke’s Lutheran Worship class, but that is for another day).
    The most powerful books of my adult life have been Bonhoeffer’s “Life Together”, which really brought together my view of Christian fellowship, and seriously, Veith’s “God at Work”, because for a very long time I struggled with understanding how I could serve God as a ‘civilian’.
    I will never forget those words spoken over 10 years ago in some class by Dr. Tomesch, “We are only changed by the people that we meet and the books that we read.”

  • Kandyce

    Books that have changed my views or my life.
    I have to start with L.M. Montgomery’s “Anne of Green Gables”. It might be a strange choice to others, but for me, it broke open the dam of whimsy and dreaming, and I haved used those things to construct who I am.
    In high school I read “Anna Karenina” and as a young 17 year old, it really impressed into me the constancy of human nature toward evil. I remember thinking that people hadn’t changed at all in their nature in the last hundred years, a powerful realization for someone steeped in a future utopia “Star Trek” mentality.
    C.S. Lewis’ “Screwtape Letters” changed how I viewed worship (along with Dr. Maschke’s Lutheran Worship class, but that is for another day).
    The most powerful books of my adult life have been Bonhoeffer’s “Life Together”, which really brought together my view of Christian fellowship, and seriously, Veith’s “God at Work”, because for a very long time I struggled with understanding how I could serve God as a ‘civilian’.
    I will never forget those words spoken over 10 years ago in some class by Dr. Tomesch, “We are only changed by the people that we meet and the books that we read.”

  • kerner

    I don’t know if these are life changers, and maybe I should have commented on the earlier post. Maybe the best fit for this post has been the Book of Concord, to which I have been paying a lot more attention in for the past few years. But I’m pretty sure at this point that the principles articulated in it have guided my journey for a long time.

    Nobody else has mentioned the work of P.J. O’Rourke, so I commend it to you. I am particularly fond of his book on economics, “Eat the Rich”, which is somewhat dated now, having been first published in 1996. I also enjoyed, and learned from, “All the Trouble in the World”, which examines world wide problems and our assumptions about why they exist. What I really like about O’Rourke’s books is his approach. For example, in Eat the Rich, he asks the question, “Why are some places rich while others are poor?” Rather than rely on pure theory, O’Rourke visited Wall Street, Albania, Sweden, Cuba, Russia, Tanzania, Hong Kong, and Shanghai, and then attemped to analyse the reasons why the economies of these places work (or don’t work) the way the do. P.J. O’Rourke does not strike me as a religious man. He wrote for National Lampoon and Rolling Stone. Some of you may not like his manner. But I used eat the rich to explain economics to my children in their teen years, and they remember the principles they learned in it. Maybe they’ll get around to Hayek and Von Mises someday, but for now, O’Rourke is a great read and it’ll do.

    I also have been guided throughout life by the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams. Its two word credo “Don’t Panic”, has saved me in many a situation. (Not quite as dignified as the Angelic direction, “Fear Not” perhaps, but it’s basicly the same thing.)

  • kerner

    I don’t know if these are life changers, and maybe I should have commented on the earlier post. Maybe the best fit for this post has been the Book of Concord, to which I have been paying a lot more attention in for the past few years. But I’m pretty sure at this point that the principles articulated in it have guided my journey for a long time.

    Nobody else has mentioned the work of P.J. O’Rourke, so I commend it to you. I am particularly fond of his book on economics, “Eat the Rich”, which is somewhat dated now, having been first published in 1996. I also enjoyed, and learned from, “All the Trouble in the World”, which examines world wide problems and our assumptions about why they exist. What I really like about O’Rourke’s books is his approach. For example, in Eat the Rich, he asks the question, “Why are some places rich while others are poor?” Rather than rely on pure theory, O’Rourke visited Wall Street, Albania, Sweden, Cuba, Russia, Tanzania, Hong Kong, and Shanghai, and then attemped to analyse the reasons why the economies of these places work (or don’t work) the way the do. P.J. O’Rourke does not strike me as a religious man. He wrote for National Lampoon and Rolling Stone. Some of you may not like his manner. But I used eat the rich to explain economics to my children in their teen years, and they remember the principles they learned in it. Maybe they’ll get around to Hayek and Von Mises someday, but for now, O’Rourke is a great read and it’ll do.

    I also have been guided throughout life by the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams. Its two word credo “Don’t Panic”, has saved me in many a situation. (Not quite as dignified as the Angelic direction, “Fear Not” perhaps, but it’s basicly the same thing.)

  • Dan Kempin

    I’m a little surprised no one has included it yet, but “Law and Gospel” by C.F.W. Walther was certainly a formative book for me. I’ve read and loved many books, but very few that actually changed my perspective.

    Btw, I would include “Modern Fascism” in that category as well. It has shaped my approach to theology and culture. Can’t remember the author at the moment . . .

  • Dan Kempin

    I’m a little surprised no one has included it yet, but “Law and Gospel” by C.F.W. Walther was certainly a formative book for me. I’ve read and loved many books, but very few that actually changed my perspective.

    Btw, I would include “Modern Fascism” in that category as well. It has shaped my approach to theology and culture. Can’t remember the author at the moment . . .

  • Eric

    The Spirituality of the Cross is largely why I am a Lutheran today. While reading your book, all the “pieces fell into place”. I started the book on the fence and finished with my feet firmly planted in Wittenberg :)

  • Eric

    The Spirituality of the Cross is largely why I am a Lutheran today. While reading your book, all the “pieces fell into place”. I started the book on the fence and finished with my feet firmly planted in Wittenberg :)

  • Paul

    “Barabbas” – Par Lagerkvist
    “Bread and Wine” – Ignazio Silone
    “A Canticle for Lebowitz” – Walter Miller
    “Darkness at Noon” – Arthur Koestler
    “Teaching Character Through Sport: Developing a Positive Coaching Legacy” – Bruce Brown

  • Paul

    “Barabbas” – Par Lagerkvist
    “Bread and Wine” – Ignazio Silone
    “A Canticle for Lebowitz” – Walter Miller
    “Darkness at Noon” – Arthur Koestler
    “Teaching Character Through Sport: Developing a Positive Coaching Legacy” – Bruce Brown

  • Dan Kempin

    Orianna, #13,

    I just noticed that you beat me to “Modern Fascism.” I missed it on the first read through.

    Kerner, #32,

    Sounds like you know where your towel is.

  • Dan Kempin

    Orianna, #13,

    I just noticed that you beat me to “Modern Fascism.” I missed it on the first read through.

    Kerner, #32,

    Sounds like you know where your towel is.

  • BradS

    I’m surprised no one has mentioned Martin Luther’s Small Catechism yet, maybe that’s because the catechism itself is so concise that it’s really more of a pamphlet than a book? Anyway, it made (and is still making) a difference to me.

  • BradS

    I’m surprised no one has mentioned Martin Luther’s Small Catechism yet, maybe that’s because the catechism itself is so concise that it’s really more of a pamphlet than a book? Anyway, it made (and is still making) a difference to me.

  • scots

    The Iliad – I first read it when I was 11 years old in poetic form – I am still, to this day, in awe of it’s magnificence and age-old themes

    LOTR – also when I was very young – helped to form my imagination

    The Pursuit of Holiness – Jerry Bridges – helped me to understand the most influential passage of Scripture in my life – Romans 6 “Count yourself dead to sin and alive to Christ” – there you have it!

  • scots

    The Iliad – I first read it when I was 11 years old in poetic form – I am still, to this day, in awe of it’s magnificence and age-old themes

    LOTR – also when I was very young – helped to form my imagination

    The Pursuit of Holiness – Jerry Bridges – helped me to understand the most influential passage of Scripture in my life – Romans 6 “Count yourself dead to sin and alive to Christ” – there you have it!

  • toshiro

    City of God and Confessions by St Augustine, Suma Theologica by St Thomas Aquinas.

    LOTR by JRR Tolkien.

  • toshiro

    City of God and Confessions by St Augustine, Suma Theologica by St Thomas Aquinas.

    LOTR by JRR Tolkien.

  • http://thoughts-brigitte.blogspot.com Brigitte

    Luther’s commentary on Galatians. I picked it up at the University of Alberta book store. It’s the first and only time I’ve come across a book by Luther in any bookstore, and that still really bothers me. Why can’t you find a book by Time magazine’s “man of the millennium” ?

  • http://thoughts-brigitte.blogspot.com Brigitte

    Luther’s commentary on Galatians. I picked it up at the University of Alberta book store. It’s the first and only time I’ve come across a book by Luther in any bookstore, and that still really bothers me. Why can’t you find a book by Time magazine’s “man of the millennium” ?

  • saddler

    My pastor handed me “Modern Fascism” over ten years ago. I’m still not sure what prompted him to pick that time and place to lend me that book, but it happened to be on the heels of reading “The Story of B” by Daniel Quinn (given to me by a non-believing friend). Dr. Veith dismantled Quinn’s arguments with incisive wisdom. This set me on a course of new appreciation for confessional Lutheranism.

  • saddler

    My pastor handed me “Modern Fascism” over ten years ago. I’m still not sure what prompted him to pick that time and place to lend me that book, but it happened to be on the heels of reading “The Story of B” by Daniel Quinn (given to me by a non-believing friend). Dr. Veith dismantled Quinn’s arguments with incisive wisdom. This set me on a course of new appreciation for confessional Lutheranism.

  • http://yellingstop.wordpress.com Matthew Stokes

    Could name several, but I’ll go with one.

    Whittaker Chambers – Witness

  • http://yellingstop.wordpress.com Matthew Stokes

    Could name several, but I’ll go with one.

    Whittaker Chambers – Witness

  • Fr. Gregory Hogg

    Without question, the book most influential for me was Dostoyevsky’s “The Brothers Karamazov.” The reflections from Elder Zosima first aroused in me the thoughts which eventually led me to Orthodoxy.

  • Fr. Gregory Hogg

    Without question, the book most influential for me was Dostoyevsky’s “The Brothers Karamazov.” The reflections from Elder Zosima first aroused in me the thoughts which eventually led me to Orthodoxy.

  • Ken Humphrey

    Walther’s “Law & Gospel” & Giertz’ “The Hammer of God”

  • Ken Humphrey

    Walther’s “Law & Gospel” & Giertz’ “The Hammer of God”

  • David

    Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis
    He Is There and He Is Not Silent by Francis Schaeffer
    God In The Dark by Os Guinness

  • David

    Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis
    He Is There and He Is Not Silent by Francis Schaeffer
    God In The Dark by Os Guinness

  • D S

    Without a doubt: The Bible. After all these years, I finally read it. Amazing, life-changing stuff.

  • D S

    Without a doubt: The Bible. After all these years, I finally read it. Amazing, life-changing stuff.

  • Booklover

    I can’t say that a book has really changed my life (Lord knows it still needs changing) but some have influenced me:

    Faith:
    all of Francis Schaeffer’s works
    Putting Amazing Back Into Grace – Michael Horton
    The Spirituality of the Cross – Blog Owner
    The Defense Never Rests – Craig Parton
    The Divine Hours prayers – Phyllis Tickle

    Work:
    Piano Playing with piano questions answered – Josef Hofmann
    Great Pianists on Piano Playing – James Francis Cooke

    Homeschooling:
    Charlotte Mason’s Home Schooling Series
    You Can Teach Your Child Successfully – Ruth Beechick
    Marva Collins’ Way – Marva Collins
    Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum – Laura Berquist

    And for the latest crisis, in which the youngest son is deeply involved with pot, which messes with every area of his life, which causes depression in everyone else’s:
    The Wounded Parent – Guy Greenfield, with special attention paid to Chapter 5–”When Other People’s Children Turn Out Well”–to battle the evil of envy

  • Booklover

    I can’t say that a book has really changed my life (Lord knows it still needs changing) but some have influenced me:

    Faith:
    all of Francis Schaeffer’s works
    Putting Amazing Back Into Grace – Michael Horton
    The Spirituality of the Cross – Blog Owner
    The Defense Never Rests – Craig Parton
    The Divine Hours prayers – Phyllis Tickle

    Work:
    Piano Playing with piano questions answered – Josef Hofmann
    Great Pianists on Piano Playing – James Francis Cooke

    Homeschooling:
    Charlotte Mason’s Home Schooling Series
    You Can Teach Your Child Successfully – Ruth Beechick
    Marva Collins’ Way – Marva Collins
    Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum – Laura Berquist

    And for the latest crisis, in which the youngest son is deeply involved with pot, which messes with every area of his life, which causes depression in everyone else’s:
    The Wounded Parent – Guy Greenfield, with special attention paid to Chapter 5–”When Other People’s Children Turn Out Well”–to battle the evil of envy

  • LAJ

    Spirituality of the Cross gave me an orthodox book to enjoy recommending at my job and led me into reading other Lutheran books, most of which I enjoy selling also. It also showed me the treasure we have as Lutherans and why it is a treasure. Reading Between the Lines and State of the Arts were very influential. Many years ago, David Copperfield by Dickens. And I second the Anne books by Montgomery.

    Right now, it’s Grace Upon Grace by Kleinig and Laache’s Book of Family Prayer.

  • LAJ

    Spirituality of the Cross gave me an orthodox book to enjoy recommending at my job and led me into reading other Lutheran books, most of which I enjoy selling also. It also showed me the treasure we have as Lutherans and why it is a treasure. Reading Between the Lines and State of the Arts were very influential. Many years ago, David Copperfield by Dickens. And I second the Anne books by Montgomery.

    Right now, it’s Grace Upon Grace by Kleinig and Laache’s Book of Family Prayer.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    First and foremost is the Bible.

    After I had entirely given up on attending church, the Pastor who had evangelized me into the faith, sent me a Book of Concord and made me promise to read it. (Neither of us were Lutheran at the time.) Two weeks after the book arrived he called and asked if I had read it. I told him, ‘No.’ He said ‘If you ever considered me to be a friend, you will read it…. you owe me your soul.’ I read it and my first reaction was ‘Why aren’t people shouting this doctrine from the house tops?’

    ‘Modern Facism’ written by our gracious host and the booklet ‘Christ Alone’ by Rod Rosenbladt, have also been very influential in my life

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    First and foremost is the Bible.

    After I had entirely given up on attending church, the Pastor who had evangelized me into the faith, sent me a Book of Concord and made me promise to read it. (Neither of us were Lutheran at the time.) Two weeks after the book arrived he called and asked if I had read it. I told him, ‘No.’ He said ‘If you ever considered me to be a friend, you will read it…. you owe me your soul.’ I read it and my first reaction was ‘Why aren’t people shouting this doctrine from the house tops?’

    ‘Modern Facism’ written by our gracious host and the booklet ‘Christ Alone’ by Rod Rosenbladt, have also been very influential in my life

  • katy

    I would claim many already mentioned here (especially Lewis’ Space Trilogy and Chesterton’s Orthodoxy–both taught me a lot about the Church and sacramental theology).

    Thompson’s Hound of Heaven and Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited showed me God’s sovereignty in the salvation of his people.

    And Hammer of God fit all the pieces together.

    Most recently, Walter Wangerin’s As For Me And My House has taught me a whole lot about forgiveness and how to forgive (not just in a marriage, but in any relationship–I highly recommend the book)

  • katy

    I would claim many already mentioned here (especially Lewis’ Space Trilogy and Chesterton’s Orthodoxy–both taught me a lot about the Church and sacramental theology).

    Thompson’s Hound of Heaven and Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited showed me God’s sovereignty in the salvation of his people.

    And Hammer of God fit all the pieces together.

    Most recently, Walter Wangerin’s As For Me And My House has taught me a whole lot about forgiveness and how to forgive (not just in a marriage, but in any relationship–I highly recommend the book)

  • Trey

    CFW Walther’s Law and Gospel and his Church and Ministry. Other books would be the Defense Never Rests: A Lawyers Quest for the Gospel by Craig Parton. Faith Founded on Fact by John Warwick Montgomery.

    Politics -
    A Patriot’s Historyof the Unites States by Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen.
    Veith’s Modern Facism is great as is his Post Modern Times. If it wasn’t for these two books, I doubt I would ever be on the blog.

    These books have shaped my ideology without a doubt.

  • Trey

    CFW Walther’s Law and Gospel and his Church and Ministry. Other books would be the Defense Never Rests: A Lawyers Quest for the Gospel by Craig Parton. Faith Founded on Fact by John Warwick Montgomery.

    Politics -
    A Patriot’s Historyof the Unites States by Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen.
    Veith’s Modern Facism is great as is his Post Modern Times. If it wasn’t for these two books, I doubt I would ever be on the blog.

    These books have shaped my ideology without a doubt.

  • Caleb

    Without a doubt The Everlasting Man by G.K. Chesterton.

  • Caleb

    Without a doubt The Everlasting Man by G.K. Chesterton.

  • http://freddyfinkelstein.blogspot.com Freddy Finkelstein

    In terms of faith, my own “Journey to Wittenberg” was effected by an old dry book that brought me tears, after having wallowed for half a lifetime in the murky waters of modern Evangelical doctrinal ambivalence: Doctrinal Theology of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, by Dr. Heinrich Schmid (1889, 2nd ed.). I discovered it in the basement of a used book store at a time when I had no idea that there was such a thing as Lutherans who were Evangelical, and that they had actually worked out a theology for their evangelicalism!

    In terms of my political and economic convictions, one book stands above them all: The LAW by Frederic Bastiat (1850). I discovered this dusty old book in my college library when I was an undergraduate, thinking it was a brief text on legal theory. Instead, I found in it the most effective anti-Socialist polemic I think I have ever read.

  • http://freddyfinkelstein.blogspot.com Freddy Finkelstein

    In terms of faith, my own “Journey to Wittenberg” was effected by an old dry book that brought me tears, after having wallowed for half a lifetime in the murky waters of modern Evangelical doctrinal ambivalence: Doctrinal Theology of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, by Dr. Heinrich Schmid (1889, 2nd ed.). I discovered it in the basement of a used book store at a time when I had no idea that there was such a thing as Lutherans who were Evangelical, and that they had actually worked out a theology for their evangelicalism!

    In terms of my political and economic convictions, one book stands above them all: The LAW by Frederic Bastiat (1850). I discovered this dusty old book in my college library when I was an undergraduate, thinking it was a brief text on legal theory. Instead, I found in it the most effective anti-Socialist polemic I think I have ever read.

  • Meredith Schultz

    Most certainly The Great Divorce, by C.S. Lewis. The parable of Sarah Smith deeply affected my concept of calling, and what it means to lead a life of significance.

  • Meredith Schultz

    Most certainly The Great Divorce, by C.S. Lewis. The parable of Sarah Smith deeply affected my concept of calling, and what it means to lead a life of significance.

  • Brigitte

    Not to forget the “Treasury of Daily Prayer”–the juxtaposition of texts with the “Writings” from Christians writers from throughout history, along with the prayers, etc. is quite ingenious and eye-opening. What do you mean someone in the 4th century could preach the gospel properly!

  • Brigitte

    Not to forget the “Treasury of Daily Prayer”–the juxtaposition of texts with the “Writings” from Christians writers from throughout history, along with the prayers, etc. is quite ingenious and eye-opening. What do you mean someone in the 4th century could preach the gospel properly!

  • Neil

    Man’s Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Dr. Frankl was a Jewish Viennese psychiatrist who writes about his experiences in Nazi death camps. In the second part of the book he explains logotherapy, which came out of his experiences. A truly profound, moving book.

    Evangelical is Not Enough, by Thomas Howard. I read this in the 80s when I was smack dab in the middle of low church evangelicalism. Howard explained why he became an Episcopalian after a lifetime in fundamentalist Presbyterianism (his dad was Philip Howard of The Sunday School Times and his sister is Elisabeth Elliot). This book planted the seeds for my becoming Lutheran later. He does a great job explaining symbolism and the liturgy.

    The Paradox of Choice: Why Less is More, by Barry Schwartz. Why more consumer choices leads to dissatisfaction and sometimes, even depression.

    Families Where Grace is in Place, by Jeff VanVonderen. We saw a lot of family ugliness when we were in evangelical circles. This book was very liberating and a great read for any Christian family.

    Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice, by Raymond Arsenault. A historian’s blow-by-blow account of the racial protests in the South. It’s been described as the definitive account.

    Grace in Practice: A Theology of Everyday Life, by Paul F.M. Zahl. This Anglican pastor, author and former seminary prof. is almost more Lutheran than Lutheran writers! A great read.

  • Neil

    Man’s Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Dr. Frankl was a Jewish Viennese psychiatrist who writes about his experiences in Nazi death camps. In the second part of the book he explains logotherapy, which came out of his experiences. A truly profound, moving book.

    Evangelical is Not Enough, by Thomas Howard. I read this in the 80s when I was smack dab in the middle of low church evangelicalism. Howard explained why he became an Episcopalian after a lifetime in fundamentalist Presbyterianism (his dad was Philip Howard of The Sunday School Times and his sister is Elisabeth Elliot). This book planted the seeds for my becoming Lutheran later. He does a great job explaining symbolism and the liturgy.

    The Paradox of Choice: Why Less is More, by Barry Schwartz. Why more consumer choices leads to dissatisfaction and sometimes, even depression.

    Families Where Grace is in Place, by Jeff VanVonderen. We saw a lot of family ugliness when we were in evangelical circles. This book was very liberating and a great read for any Christian family.

    Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice, by Raymond Arsenault. A historian’s blow-by-blow account of the racial protests in the South. It’s been described as the definitive account.

    Grace in Practice: A Theology of Everyday Life, by Paul F.M. Zahl. This Anglican pastor, author and former seminary prof. is almost more Lutheran than Lutheran writers! A great read.

  • MikeD

    Gordon Clark’s A Christian View of Men and Things

  • MikeD

    Gordon Clark’s A Christian View of Men and Things

  • http://www.missyween.com missy

    A book that really changed my life was James Wilson’s book “How to be Free From Bitterness”…..I gained such a better understanding of what it means to really forgive from the heart, and also a better understanding of Christ’s redeeming work of forgiveness on the cross. I highly recommend this one!

  • http://www.missyween.com missy

    A book that really changed my life was James Wilson’s book “How to be Free From Bitterness”…..I gained such a better understanding of what it means to really forgive from the heart, and also a better understanding of Christ’s redeeming work of forgiveness on the cross. I highly recommend this one!

  • Another Kerner

    1.
    The Book of Concord.

    I am an adult convert…. not a “cradle” Lutheran… And I came very late to the vineyard. Naturally, I needed to read the Lutheran Confessions before joining a Lutheran congregation.
    (I love Luther’s Small Catechism with explanation by Joseph Stump).

    The road to becoming a confessional Lutheran was 14 years long….
    passing through Baptistic fundamental churches, (reading)Dispensational congregations (still reading) 5 Point Calvinistic churches, reading and listening to R.C. Sproul, admiring his body of work…..and finally, joyfully reading Luther.

    2. Walther’s Law and Gospel…. this book crystalizes the use of the Law and the Gospel throughout Scripture….

  • Another Kerner

    1.
    The Book of Concord.

    I am an adult convert…. not a “cradle” Lutheran… And I came very late to the vineyard. Naturally, I needed to read the Lutheran Confessions before joining a Lutheran congregation.
    (I love Luther’s Small Catechism with explanation by Joseph Stump).

    The road to becoming a confessional Lutheran was 14 years long….
    passing through Baptistic fundamental churches, (reading)Dispensational congregations (still reading) 5 Point Calvinistic churches, reading and listening to R.C. Sproul, admiring his body of work…..and finally, joyfully reading Luther.

    2. Walther’s Law and Gospel…. this book crystalizes the use of the Law and the Gospel throughout Scripture….

  • NavyMom

    Chris Braun’s outstanding book, “Unpacking Forgiveness”, delivered a karate chop to my fuzzy thinking on what true biblical forgiveness is. I had always approached forgiveness more from a pscyhological/therapeutic perspective, but Chris’ book very clearly lays out true biblical forgiveness — when and how to experience it. It was extremely helpful in delivering me from a life of bitterness and hatred for a man who molested my 9 year old daughter. (Note: If you think I’m wrong to forgive the man, you definitely need to read the book.)

  • NavyMom

    Chris Braun’s outstanding book, “Unpacking Forgiveness”, delivered a karate chop to my fuzzy thinking on what true biblical forgiveness is. I had always approached forgiveness more from a pscyhological/therapeutic perspective, but Chris’ book very clearly lays out true biblical forgiveness — when and how to experience it. It was extremely helpful in delivering me from a life of bitterness and hatred for a man who molested my 9 year old daughter. (Note: If you think I’m wrong to forgive the man, you definitely need to read the book.)

  • Booklover

    Is anyone else worried about Dr. V.? He writes every weekday, but not today. Did I miss an announcement? Perhaps the website is just down. . .

  • Booklover

    Is anyone else worried about Dr. V.? He writes every weekday, but not today. Did I miss an announcement? Perhaps the website is just down. . .

  • ptl

    and Peter Leavitt (sp?) too, haven’t heard from him lately :(

  • ptl

    and Peter Leavitt (sp?) too, haven’t heard from him lately :(

  • Louis

    ptl, Peter Leavitt recently announced his retreat from this site, after a particular intense discussion on Lutheranism – he said something like “he felt he was an irritant/distraction” here.

  • Louis

    ptl, Peter Leavitt recently announced his retreat from this site, after a particular intense discussion on Lutheranism – he said something like “he felt he was an irritant/distraction” here.

  • ptl

    thanks for the info Louis….very sorry to hear that, but sort of thought that might have been the case. it seems a few days ago or so there was a discussion on “truth” or even perhaps it started with the “yoga” one, but it seemed to me like the very tolerant and nice conservative loving folks on this site pretty well piled up on Peter. those Lutherans tend to do that and that is the one thing, a sort of arrogance about the purity of their doctrine, that has always bugged me….and grew up and still love orthodox (not conservative) Lutheranism, but it has it’s shall we say “marketing” issues. Have any of the good Christian folks who maybe offended Peter reached out to mend the tear? Would hope so as really liked his comments very much and miss his perspective…perhaps in time he will return and we can enjoy his “debates” with that snotty pants tODD :)

  • ptl

    thanks for the info Louis….very sorry to hear that, but sort of thought that might have been the case. it seems a few days ago or so there was a discussion on “truth” or even perhaps it started with the “yoga” one, but it seemed to me like the very tolerant and nice conservative loving folks on this site pretty well piled up on Peter. those Lutherans tend to do that and that is the one thing, a sort of arrogance about the purity of their doctrine, that has always bugged me….and grew up and still love orthodox (not conservative) Lutheranism, but it has it’s shall we say “marketing” issues. Have any of the good Christian folks who maybe offended Peter reached out to mend the tear? Would hope so as really liked his comments very much and miss his perspective…perhaps in time he will return and we can enjoy his “debates” with that snotty pants tODD :)

  • Booklover

    I’m sorry to hear that about Peter Leavitt. All of us are irritants/distractions at times. I think that is the point–to have good discussion from all viewpoints.

    Some of us are solidly Lutheran, some of us are “on a journey,” some of us are from other denominations. It is interesting that most of us are Bible-believers, yet our churches take many different forms; and for now, that is allowed in our country, as well as on this blog.

    Yet, it could be, that with our many varied denominational choices, some of us may be depressed, much like Neil (#55) describes in a book.

  • Booklover

    I’m sorry to hear that about Peter Leavitt. All of us are irritants/distractions at times. I think that is the point–to have good discussion from all viewpoints.

    Some of us are solidly Lutheran, some of us are “on a journey,” some of us are from other denominations. It is interesting that most of us are Bible-believers, yet our churches take many different forms; and for now, that is allowed in our country, as well as on this blog.

    Yet, it could be, that with our many varied denominational choices, some of us may be depressed, much like Neil (#55) describes in a book.

  • http://scottishlutheran.blogspot.com Mike Keith

    As one who did not grow up attending church – when as a 19 year old I read Luther’s Small Catechism in one afternoon – it rocked my world.

    Then very shortly after the Small Catechism I read C.S. Lewis’ Mere Christianity – it rocked my world.

    Shortly after I read Mere Christianity I read Screwtape Letters. Again – rocked my world.

  • http://scottishlutheran.blogspot.com Mike Keith

    As one who did not grow up attending church – when as a 19 year old I read Luther’s Small Catechism in one afternoon – it rocked my world.

    Then very shortly after the Small Catechism I read C.S. Lewis’ Mere Christianity – it rocked my world.

    Shortly after I read Mere Christianity I read Screwtape Letters. Again – rocked my world.

  • http://katiesbeer.piperblogs.org/ Theresa K.

    What’s Going on Among the Lutherans by Patsy Leppien and J. Kincaid Smith and The Defense Never Rests by Craig Parton opened my eyes, filled in so many missing pieces of information and led me to a church that preaches the complete gospel for what seemed to me to be the first time in my life. The resulting Bible Information Class led by our pastor changed the course of my life, faith and my family. My new religious “fad” has lasted 8 years, so far. ;)

  • http://katiesbeer.piperblogs.org/ Theresa K.

    What’s Going on Among the Lutherans by Patsy Leppien and J. Kincaid Smith and The Defense Never Rests by Craig Parton opened my eyes, filled in so many missing pieces of information and led me to a church that preaches the complete gospel for what seemed to me to be the first time in my life. The resulting Bible Information Class led by our pastor changed the course of my life, faith and my family. My new religious “fad” has lasted 8 years, so far. ;)

  • George A. Marquart

    On Christmas Eve, 1967, by the mercy and grace of God, my life took a dramatic turn because of a book. Earlier that year, LIFE magazine (the original one) began serializing Svetlana Alliluyeva’s, “Twenty Letters to a Friend.” I read the first installment and found it unbelievably dull and uninteresting. On Christmas Eve my parents visited, and towards the end of the evening my mother said, “George, I brought you a book. I think you will find it interesting.” She gave it to me. It was “Twenty Letters to a Friend” in Russian. (Because of a complicated family history, Russian was the language at home when I was growing up) I said, “Mom, I read the first chapter. The book is awful.” She responded, “Give it a try, you might like it.” When everyone had left, I picked up the book and started reading. I did not stop until I finished it. That evening, the power of the Russian language as a literary vehicle became apparent to me. What followed was an orgy of devouring Russian books for the next several years. Working in New York City gave me access to more than I could read: literature, concentration camp stories, biographies, memoirs, histories, and religious writing. Eight years later I was on my first visit to Moscow, gazing up at the Lyubjanka, the home of the KGB. More than twenty years later I retired from my job in Moscow.

    During my many visits and 10 years of living in Moscow, I earned my living working for two major American companies. But there was also a private life. I will not say that witnessing to my faith took up a major portion of my life there, but it did take place with some frequency with many Russians and various expatriates. Therefore, in retrospect, I cannot help but think that our heavenly Father used the writing of this unfortunate woman, who has to bear the unbearable burden of being Stalin’s daughter, to help bring His Gospel to the people her father murdered by the millions.

    Peace and Joy!
    George A. Marquart

  • George A. Marquart

    On Christmas Eve, 1967, by the mercy and grace of God, my life took a dramatic turn because of a book. Earlier that year, LIFE magazine (the original one) began serializing Svetlana Alliluyeva’s, “Twenty Letters to a Friend.” I read the first installment and found it unbelievably dull and uninteresting. On Christmas Eve my parents visited, and towards the end of the evening my mother said, “George, I brought you a book. I think you will find it interesting.” She gave it to me. It was “Twenty Letters to a Friend” in Russian. (Because of a complicated family history, Russian was the language at home when I was growing up) I said, “Mom, I read the first chapter. The book is awful.” She responded, “Give it a try, you might like it.” When everyone had left, I picked up the book and started reading. I did not stop until I finished it. That evening, the power of the Russian language as a literary vehicle became apparent to me. What followed was an orgy of devouring Russian books for the next several years. Working in New York City gave me access to more than I could read: literature, concentration camp stories, biographies, memoirs, histories, and religious writing. Eight years later I was on my first visit to Moscow, gazing up at the Lyubjanka, the home of the KGB. More than twenty years later I retired from my job in Moscow.

    During my many visits and 10 years of living in Moscow, I earned my living working for two major American companies. But there was also a private life. I will not say that witnessing to my faith took up a major portion of my life there, but it did take place with some frequency with many Russians and various expatriates. Therefore, in retrospect, I cannot help but think that our heavenly Father used the writing of this unfortunate woman, who has to bear the unbearable burden of being Stalin’s daughter, to help bring His Gospel to the people her father murdered by the millions.

    Peace and Joy!
    George A. Marquart

  • http://katiesbeer.piperblogs.org/ Theresa K.

    George,

    Wow! I have to read such a book. Thanks for sharing that.

  • http://katiesbeer.piperblogs.org/ Theresa K.

    George,

    Wow! I have to read such a book. Thanks for sharing that.

  • David Carver

    Augustine’s Confessions, specifically his commentary on creation. Probably the single most important book in my becoming on old-earth creationist.

  • David Carver

    Augustine’s Confessions, specifically his commentary on creation. Probably the single most important book in my becoming on old-earth creationist.

  • http://katiesbeer.piperblogs.org/ Theresa K.

    Svetlana Alliluyeva, aka Lana Peters, lives close to the Twin Cities and was written about in the Pioneer Press just this week: http://www.twincities.com/ci_14914677?IADID=Search-www.twincities.com-www.twincities.com. It is truly a small world.

  • http://katiesbeer.piperblogs.org/ Theresa K.

    Svetlana Alliluyeva, aka Lana Peters, lives close to the Twin Cities and was written about in the Pioneer Press just this week: http://www.twincities.com/ci_14914677?IADID=Search-www.twincities.com-www.twincities.com. It is truly a small world.

  • ptl

    thanks to George for the heads up on a great book…will try and find it and read it, most likely in English as never did learn Russian :)

    thanks also to Theresa K for the link to the article, and hope to find the dvd of the movie….here’s another article:

    http://www.examiner.com/a-2573341~Stalin_s_daughter_is_a_cheesehead__Yep__film_says.html

    Thanks also for the link to the late WebMonk site as the comments on your site re: Death and Dying really got my attention….who knows if a book can change a life, why not a blog site :)

  • ptl

    thanks to George for the heads up on a great book…will try and find it and read it, most likely in English as never did learn Russian :)

    thanks also to Theresa K for the link to the article, and hope to find the dvd of the movie….here’s another article:

    http://www.examiner.com/a-2573341~Stalin_s_daughter_is_a_cheesehead__Yep__film_says.html

    Thanks also for the link to the late WebMonk site as the comments on your site re: Death and Dying really got my attention….who knows if a book can change a life, why not a blog site :)

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ snotty pants tODD
  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ snotty pants tODD
  • http://thoughts-brigitte.blogspot.com Brigitte

    Peter, don’t be angry. We love you. Tell us your best books, pleeaaase.

  • http://thoughts-brigitte.blogspot.com Brigitte

    Peter, don’t be angry. We love you. Tell us your best books, pleeaaase.

  • Kelly

    A book that changed my life: The Ragamuffin Gospel. I read it when I was about 16 or 17, and it was the first big lurch towards Lutheranism for me, though I didn’t know it at the time. It made me realize that God’s grace to us, in Christ’s death for our sins, really is the center of our faith, and needs to be HEARD in our churches. It severely lessened my tolerance for stuff I found in church and in my own life that would try taking just a little bit of credit for my own Christian goodness; for those who tried to conduct “revival” by getting Christians to constantly doubt their salvation and turn them to their own works for analysis on whether their faith could be deemed sincere enough; for those who wanted to be the real “Christ-followers” by deeming others “nominal” Christians because they weren’t involved in enough church activities or doing their good works to be praised by men…. etc.

  • Kelly

    A book that changed my life: The Ragamuffin Gospel. I read it when I was about 16 or 17, and it was the first big lurch towards Lutheranism for me, though I didn’t know it at the time. It made me realize that God’s grace to us, in Christ’s death for our sins, really is the center of our faith, and needs to be HEARD in our churches. It severely lessened my tolerance for stuff I found in church and in my own life that would try taking just a little bit of credit for my own Christian goodness; for those who tried to conduct “revival” by getting Christians to constantly doubt their salvation and turn them to their own works for analysis on whether their faith could be deemed sincere enough; for those who wanted to be the real “Christ-followers” by deeming others “nominal” Christians because they weren’t involved in enough church activities or doing their good works to be praised by men…. etc.

  • Ellen

    Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman.

    I read it for a college sociology class. Kill your TV. :)

  • Ellen

    Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman.

    I read it for a college sociology class. Kill your TV. :)

  • Eric R.

    And right along those lines, The Medium is the Massage [sic] by Marshall McLuhan. I’m slowly making my way toward MacIntyre’s After Virtue, but I’m not quite there yet.

  • Eric R.

    And right along those lines, The Medium is the Massage [sic] by Marshall McLuhan. I’m slowly making my way toward MacIntyre’s After Virtue, but I’m not quite there yet.

  • http://geochristian.wordpress.com/ Kevin N

    One of the first Christian books I read wasKnowing God by J.I. Packer. It laid an excellent foundation for my life as a Christian.

    Two books by Bonhoeffer: The Cost of Discipleship and Life Together. Bonhoeffer may have been a bit liberal theologically, but it is hard to find more Christ-centered works on discipleship and Christian community.

    Perspectives on the World Christian Movement, edited by Ralph Winter, helped me to see that the Great Commission runs throughout the Scriptures from Genesis to Revelation.

    Pollution and the Death of Man by Francis Schaeffer showed me that one can be an environmentalist and a Christian. Sadly, this is one of Schaeffer’s most neglected works.

    Evolution: Nature and Scripture in Conflict? by Pattle Pun may have saved me from a crisis of faith when I was a geology undergraduate and figured out that young-Earth creationism doesn’t work.

  • http://geochristian.wordpress.com/ Kevin N

    One of the first Christian books I read wasKnowing God by J.I. Packer. It laid an excellent foundation for my life as a Christian.

    Two books by Bonhoeffer: The Cost of Discipleship and Life Together. Bonhoeffer may have been a bit liberal theologically, but it is hard to find more Christ-centered works on discipleship and Christian community.

    Perspectives on the World Christian Movement, edited by Ralph Winter, helped me to see that the Great Commission runs throughout the Scriptures from Genesis to Revelation.

    Pollution and the Death of Man by Francis Schaeffer showed me that one can be an environmentalist and a Christian. Sadly, this is one of Schaeffer’s most neglected works.

    Evolution: Nature and Scripture in Conflict? by Pattle Pun may have saved me from a crisis of faith when I was a geology undergraduate and figured out that young-Earth creationism doesn’t work.

  • David T.

    my sainted faither-in-law and one-time socialist/communist read Witness back in the 1950′s. He devoured it in one long night. Sin became real. So did the spiritual, God, Christ, etc. He then was handed the Book of Concord which also drastically changed his life and grounded him in Lutheran doctrine.

  • David T.

    my sainted faither-in-law and one-time socialist/communist read Witness back in the 1950′s. He devoured it in one long night. Sin became real. So did the spiritual, God, Christ, etc. He then was handed the Book of Concord which also drastically changed his life and grounded him in Lutheran doctrine.

  • David T.

    I suggest that Dr. Veith compile a list of “life changing” books from those that have been mentioned here. It would be a good resource for church libraries that are wanting to further their inventory for evangelism/apologetics purposes.

  • David T.

    I suggest that Dr. Veith compile a list of “life changing” books from those that have been mentioned here. It would be a good resource for church libraries that are wanting to further their inventory for evangelism/apologetics purposes.

  • Mrs Gregory

    Brideshead Revisited. It’s all gospel.

  • Mrs Gregory

    Brideshead Revisited. It’s all gospel.

  • CRB

    Mrs Gregory,
    I recently noticed at the video store a dvd by that title, but I was
    not sure about renting it. Are you familiar with it?

  • CRB

    Mrs Gregory,
    I recently noticed at the video store a dvd by that title, but I was
    not sure about renting it. Are you familiar with it?

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    The Pleasures of God. I actually listened to this in audiobook during my commute. It changed my entire perspective on God, especially God the Father.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    The Pleasures of God. I actually listened to this in audiobook during my commute. It changed my entire perspective on God, especially God the Father.

  • http://www.reformingmichigan.wordpress.com Jeremy Lee

    Dr. Garry Friessen’s book Decision Making and the Will of God rescued me from listening to subjective feelings (erroneously labeled the Holy Spirit) to listen to the voice of the Spirit in the Word.

    Martin Luther’s Commentary on Galatians

    Joel Beeke’s Living for the Glory of God Alone an Introduction to Calvinism.

  • http://www.reformingmichigan.wordpress.com Jeremy Lee

    Dr. Garry Friessen’s book Decision Making and the Will of God rescued me from listening to subjective feelings (erroneously labeled the Holy Spirit) to listen to the voice of the Spirit in the Word.

    Martin Luther’s Commentary on Galatians

    Joel Beeke’s Living for the Glory of God Alone an Introduction to Calvinism.

  • Mrs Gregory

    CRB: Under no circumstances should you rent the 2008 version of the movie: it’s all Hollywood and perverts the theme of the book. The 1981 11 hour mini-series (which my beloved just bought me for Christmas) is one of the best movies of all time. It has Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews and is an excellent film! (I’m really picky about movies.)

  • Mrs Gregory

    CRB: Under no circumstances should you rent the 2008 version of the movie: it’s all Hollywood and perverts the theme of the book. The 1981 11 hour mini-series (which my beloved just bought me for Christmas) is one of the best movies of all time. It has Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews and is an excellent film! (I’m really picky about movies.)

  • CRB

    Mrs Gregory,
    Thanks! I’ll ck. it out

  • CRB

    Mrs Gregory,
    Thanks! I’ll ck. it out

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ C-Christian Soldier

    The LIGHT and the GLORY by Peter Marshall and David Manuel—and-of course- the original documents of the Founding—
    C-CS

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ C-Christian Soldier

    The LIGHT and the GLORY by Peter Marshall and David Manuel—and-of course- the original documents of the Founding—
    C-CS

  • Mark Veenman

    The Bondage of the Will and The Well-Tempered Clavier

  • Mark Veenman

    The Bondage of the Will and The Well-Tempered Clavier

  • http://spaceagelutheran.blogspot.com/ SAL

    True Spirituality by Francis Schaeffer pointed me towards Christ’s work and not my own feelings for my relationship with God.

    Coming from a Methodist/Catholic background this idea was revolutionary.

  • http://spaceagelutheran.blogspot.com/ SAL

    True Spirituality by Francis Schaeffer pointed me towards Christ’s work and not my own feelings for my relationship with God.

    Coming from a Methodist/Catholic background this idea was revolutionary.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    “Sanctification Christ in Action” by Senkbeil, convinced me I needed to become a pastor, so that others might hear the gospel.
    “The Hammer of God” convinced me to find more works by Bo Giertz and translate them.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    “Sanctification Christ in Action” by Senkbeil, convinced me I needed to become a pastor, so that others might hear the gospel.
    “The Hammer of God” convinced me to find more works by Bo Giertz and translate them.

  • http://www.shempel.blogspot.com Sarah in Exile

    The “Kristen Lavransdatter” trilogy changed my life radically. It changed my paradigm completely in regards to love, romance and marriage. I ended a relationship that was eerily similar to a one in the book and began praying for a husband like one of the characters. Only a few years later was married to him. I now enjoy an exceptionally good marriage.

    Secondly, Dean Karnazes’ “Ultramarathon Man.” The book wasn’t exceptional, and it was not a book I’d usually read. I have always been way to egg-headed about books. This book got me off my high horse and outside running. I just completed my first 5K and am in much better physical shape than I’ve been in since my early 20s.

  • http://www.shempel.blogspot.com Sarah in Exile

    The “Kristen Lavransdatter” trilogy changed my life radically. It changed my paradigm completely in regards to love, romance and marriage. I ended a relationship that was eerily similar to a one in the book and began praying for a husband like one of the characters. Only a few years later was married to him. I now enjoy an exceptionally good marriage.

    Secondly, Dean Karnazes’ “Ultramarathon Man.” The book wasn’t exceptional, and it was not a book I’d usually read. I have always been way to egg-headed about books. This book got me off my high horse and outside running. I just completed my first 5K and am in much better physical shape than I’ve been in since my early 20s.

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Exile

    I forgot to mention “The Artist’s Way” by Julia Cameron. This book has been a great resource for when I get stuck creatively. She also introduced me to Morning Pages and the daily walk, which have been instrumental in keeping my inner artist alive.

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in Exile

    I forgot to mention “The Artist’s Way” by Julia Cameron. This book has been a great resource for when I get stuck creatively. She also introduced me to Morning Pages and the daily walk, which have been instrumental in keeping my inner artist alive.

  • Scott

    The most important one for me, in recent memory anyway, is “Death On A Friday Afternoon” by Richard John Neuhaus. Changed my life and I’d venture that it would do so for anyone who picks it up. I’ve made a practice of reading it every Lent. Powerful stuff.

  • Scott

    The most important one for me, in recent memory anyway, is “Death On A Friday Afternoon” by Richard John Neuhaus. Changed my life and I’d venture that it would do so for anyone who picks it up. I’ve made a practice of reading it every Lent. Powerful stuff.

  • Kyralessa

    N. T. Wright’s Jesus and the Victory of God. It was a breath of fresh air after all the higher criticism I’d read in college, and yet it was higher criticism, not “close your eyes and have faith” dreck. It made Jesus a believable character again, and made the resurrection a believable event in history.

  • Kyralessa

    N. T. Wright’s Jesus and the Victory of God. It was a breath of fresh air after all the higher criticism I’d read in college, and yet it was higher criticism, not “close your eyes and have faith” dreck. It made Jesus a believable character again, and made the resurrection a believable event in history.


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