Does PowerPoint make us stupid?

So claims some military experts:

Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, the leader of American and NATO forces in Afghanistan, was shown a PowerPoint slide in Kabul last summer that was meant to portray the complexity of American military strategy, but looked more like a bowl of spaghetti.

Power Point of our Strategy in Afghanistan

“When we understand that slide, we’ll have won the war,” General McChrystal dryly remarked, one of his advisers recalled, as the room erupted in laughter.

The slide has since bounced around the Internet as an example of a military tool that has spun out of control. Like an insurgency, PowerPoint has crept into the daily lives of military commanders and reached the level of near obsession. The amount of time expended on PowerPoint, the Microsoft presentation program of computer-generated charts, graphs and bullet points, has made it a running joke in the Pentagon and in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“PowerPoint makes us stupid,” Gen. James N. Mattis of the Marine Corps, the Joint Forces commander, said this month at a military conference in North Carolina. (He spoke without PowerPoint.) Brig. Gen. H. R. McMaster, who banned PowerPoint presentations when he led the successful effort to secure the northern Iraqi city of Tal Afar in 2005, followed up at the same conference by likening PowerPoint to an internal threat.

“It’s dangerous because it can create the illusion of understanding and the illusion of control,” General McMaster said in a telephone interview afterward. “Some problems in the world are not bullet-izable.”

via Enemy Lurks in Briefings on Afghan War – PowerPoint – NYTimes.com.

Drawing also on the PowerPoint vogue in business, education, and other fields, would you agree?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://www.cumberlandisland.blogspot.com Adrian Keister

    Most definitely agree. Not only does PowerPoint tend to tie presenters to simply reading the slides, but it distracts the audience from what the presenter is saying. Interesting that in musicology, for example, the standard is simply to read your paper verbatim at a conference. Much better! I think the math and science communities could benefit from that approach.

    Finally, if you’re not careful, you could blow up space shuttles from poorly-done presentations (Challenger).

  • http://www.cumberlandisland.blogspot.com Adrian Keister

    Most definitely agree. Not only does PowerPoint tend to tie presenters to simply reading the slides, but it distracts the audience from what the presenter is saying. Interesting that in musicology, for example, the standard is simply to read your paper verbatim at a conference. Much better! I think the math and science communities could benefit from that approach.

    Finally, if you’re not careful, you could blow up space shuttles from poorly-done presentations (Challenger).

  • Dan Kempin

    “The illusion of understanding and the illusion of control.”

    What a great phrase and a broader concept worthy of discussion.

  • Dan Kempin

    “The illusion of understanding and the illusion of control.”

    What a great phrase and a broader concept worthy of discussion.

  • http://necessaryroughness.org Dan at Necessary Roughness

    I use PowerPoint as an introduction to the class I teach, but I turn it off when it’s time to get to the material I want them to take home with them.

    Some things lend themselves to PowerPoint very well: a picture of a burst pipeline to warn people of the need for safety, for example. Lots of text thrown up on a slide tells the class not only that you don’t know what you’re trying to communicate but that you don’t believe it, either.

  • http://necessaryroughness.org Dan at Necessary Roughness

    I use PowerPoint as an introduction to the class I teach, but I turn it off when it’s time to get to the material I want them to take home with them.

    Some things lend themselves to PowerPoint very well: a picture of a burst pipeline to warn people of the need for safety, for example. Lots of text thrown up on a slide tells the class not only that you don’t know what you’re trying to communicate but that you don’t believe it, either.

  • PHW

    I’ve passed this around my unit…most people agree. Powerpoint is horrible and we’d like to ban it…we build a dozen briefings a week.

  • PHW

    I’ve passed this around my unit…most people agree. Powerpoint is horrible and we’d like to ban it…we build a dozen briefings a week.

  • Joe

    Most people do not use power point effectively. Your slides should never be the text of your presentation. It should supplement and reinforce what you are saying.

  • Joe

    Most people do not use power point effectively. Your slides should never be the text of your presentation. It should supplement and reinforce what you are saying.

  • Dave Sarafolean

    I agree – for the most part PowerPoint makes us stupid.

    You said, “Drawing also on the PowerPoint vogue in business, education, and other fields, would you agree?”

    Are you aware that it has become a staple in many churches? I don’t know if it has made much of an inroad into the LCMS but quite a few evangelical churches use it. Some of the worst sermons I’ve heard involved the pastor strolling around the platform reading his PowerPoint presentation.

  • Dave Sarafolean

    I agree – for the most part PowerPoint makes us stupid.

    You said, “Drawing also on the PowerPoint vogue in business, education, and other fields, would you agree?”

    Are you aware that it has become a staple in many churches? I don’t know if it has made much of an inroad into the LCMS but quite a few evangelical churches use it. Some of the worst sermons I’ve heard involved the pastor strolling around the platform reading his PowerPoint presentation.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    I read part of the book on this, and I’m not persuaded that Powerpoint is the problem–more like it is that people simply don’t know how to communicate anymore to begin with. In my employment, it’s very consistent that people simply insist on THEIR FORMAT for everything–and it differs group to group–and then they wonder why they’re not communicating well to other groups who use different formats and refuse to learn to read for understanding and ask questions.

    Powerpoint certainly enables this kind of nonsense, but it’s hardly the cause. 150 years of non-literary education…..now you’re getting more to the point.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    I read part of the book on this, and I’m not persuaded that Powerpoint is the problem–more like it is that people simply don’t know how to communicate anymore to begin with. In my employment, it’s very consistent that people simply insist on THEIR FORMAT for everything–and it differs group to group–and then they wonder why they’re not communicating well to other groups who use different formats and refuse to learn to read for understanding and ask questions.

    Powerpoint certainly enables this kind of nonsense, but it’s hardly the cause. 150 years of non-literary education…..now you’re getting more to the point.

  • Orianna Laun

    Power Point takes up a lot of time. Making them, showing them. They were helpful when I taught grammar because I didn’t have to spend so much time writing on and erasing the board, but the students merely stared. They were not as involved in the process.
    At conferences, Power Point presentations are used extensively, and I’ve found that most of the time when the slides are printed off as a handout, there is very little reason to stay for the presentation. It’s all there. I, personally, take notes during conferences (always have), but sometimes there isn’t much to add to the Power Point handout.
    On the other hand, I went to a Love and Logic workshop where there deliberately was no Power Point. He had a book containing the basic ideas, but skipped around in there. Attendees had to actually listen, process, and write down the information.

  • Orianna Laun

    Power Point takes up a lot of time. Making them, showing them. They were helpful when I taught grammar because I didn’t have to spend so much time writing on and erasing the board, but the students merely stared. They were not as involved in the process.
    At conferences, Power Point presentations are used extensively, and I’ve found that most of the time when the slides are printed off as a handout, there is very little reason to stay for the presentation. It’s all there. I, personally, take notes during conferences (always have), but sometimes there isn’t much to add to the Power Point handout.
    On the other hand, I went to a Love and Logic workshop where there deliberately was no Power Point. He had a book containing the basic ideas, but skipped around in there. Attendees had to actually listen, process, and write down the information.

  • Josh V

    How else would today’s student get through college course presentations? : )

    At my university where I attend classes, homework is dumbed down most of the time to simple multiple choice and true/false questions. The exams are that way, too. In fact, I have am shocked and have great respect for the rare professor who gives an exam with at least some short answer questions. Under multiple choice and true/false only exams, I find myself studying just enough to recognize and then I utilize the process of elimination in making my choice. For the questions that I have absolutely no idea about, I don’t worry. If they are multiple choice, I have about a 20 – 25 percent chance of guessing the right answer. If the questions are true/false, my odds just got better (50%). So, already, the homework and tests I receive have already dumbed down the process of showing that I understand the material.

    Now, as for giving presentations of class projects, it used to be that we couldn’t read off the screen. Now, it is so commonplace that people are simply reading the slides as they go. I am guilty of this one, too. There is no art to the presentation, anymore. Most of us probably put in an hour or so worth of work to prepare and then go through the motions.

    I do try to care. I do read the material. I do usually intend to put more effort into the work than I generally do. What happens though, is I get jaded. When I know that the professor is just going to generously curve final grades, anyways, to fit the standard distribution of grades, apathy sets in. On top of that, when professors are merely regurgitating the material of the textbooks from powerpoints that come with their instructor’s manual, I seriously question why I’m wasting my time in class. Of course, the professors start docking you points for missing class, so you simply print off the powerpoint presentation off the teacher’s website, and study those in lieu of thorough textbooks reading before you take the multiple choice-true/false exams. Really, I have felt for the past couple of years that my time, money and effort is wasted in school, since I seem to enjoy my reading and retain more knowledge when I am not under that mandatory mediocrity. Of course, then I rationalize that I’ve wasted this much money, already, and that piece of paper will provide me the foot in the door for a “real job.” Whatever that is?

    Perhaps, this is only limited to my university. I don’t know. Also, I know that not all my professors have been like this, just the great majority of them. While powerpoints are grossly abused in presentations, it really isn’t surprising to me to see that abuse become the norm. Yes, powerpoints, as they are currently used, do make us dumber, or they simply show how stupid we already are.

  • Josh V

    How else would today’s student get through college course presentations? : )

    At my university where I attend classes, homework is dumbed down most of the time to simple multiple choice and true/false questions. The exams are that way, too. In fact, I have am shocked and have great respect for the rare professor who gives an exam with at least some short answer questions. Under multiple choice and true/false only exams, I find myself studying just enough to recognize and then I utilize the process of elimination in making my choice. For the questions that I have absolutely no idea about, I don’t worry. If they are multiple choice, I have about a 20 – 25 percent chance of guessing the right answer. If the questions are true/false, my odds just got better (50%). So, already, the homework and tests I receive have already dumbed down the process of showing that I understand the material.

    Now, as for giving presentations of class projects, it used to be that we couldn’t read off the screen. Now, it is so commonplace that people are simply reading the slides as they go. I am guilty of this one, too. There is no art to the presentation, anymore. Most of us probably put in an hour or so worth of work to prepare and then go through the motions.

    I do try to care. I do read the material. I do usually intend to put more effort into the work than I generally do. What happens though, is I get jaded. When I know that the professor is just going to generously curve final grades, anyways, to fit the standard distribution of grades, apathy sets in. On top of that, when professors are merely regurgitating the material of the textbooks from powerpoints that come with their instructor’s manual, I seriously question why I’m wasting my time in class. Of course, the professors start docking you points for missing class, so you simply print off the powerpoint presentation off the teacher’s website, and study those in lieu of thorough textbooks reading before you take the multiple choice-true/false exams. Really, I have felt for the past couple of years that my time, money and effort is wasted in school, since I seem to enjoy my reading and retain more knowledge when I am not under that mandatory mediocrity. Of course, then I rationalize that I’ve wasted this much money, already, and that piece of paper will provide me the foot in the door for a “real job.” Whatever that is?

    Perhaps, this is only limited to my university. I don’t know. Also, I know that not all my professors have been like this, just the great majority of them. While powerpoints are grossly abused in presentations, it really isn’t surprising to me to see that abuse become the norm. Yes, powerpoints, as they are currently used, do make us dumber, or they simply show how stupid we already are.

  • Pete

    I think Joe’s got it right

  • Pete

    I think Joe’s got it right

  • Booklover

    Powerpoint has dumbed us down in singing at church. With no printed music, we can’t follow the line of the melody on our own; we have to trust the “leaders” up in front to feed us the melody. We (except for one or two) can’t sing in parts because there are no notes to read.

    But worst of all, there is no text to take home and ruminate over, to compare the doctrine of the song with our Bibles, or our old and unused hymnbooks.

  • Booklover

    Powerpoint has dumbed us down in singing at church. With no printed music, we can’t follow the line of the melody on our own; we have to trust the “leaders” up in front to feed us the melody. We (except for one or two) can’t sing in parts because there are no notes to read.

    But worst of all, there is no text to take home and ruminate over, to compare the doctrine of the song with our Bibles, or our old and unused hymnbooks.

  • Josie

    My husband had to spend an unbelievable amount of time as a Power-Point Ranger back when he was a 2nd LT. What a huge waste of time! And, yes, that fact is that many don’t understand how to use PP correctly, unfortunately many of those people are the ones in charge : )

  • Josie

    My husband had to spend an unbelievable amount of time as a Power-Point Ranger back when he was a 2nd LT. What a huge waste of time! And, yes, that fact is that many don’t understand how to use PP correctly, unfortunately many of those people are the ones in charge : )

  • Kandyce

    My husband, a “Power Point Ranger”, showed me this article a day or two ago and pointed out that while that particular slide was used in a Power Point presentation, it was not made in Power Point.
    I realize that was not the point of your question, but I guess I’m saying that Power Point is a tool which may enable laziness for some, but it may also aid learning for others. I perssonally find Power Point to be very useful during lectures when I inevitably miss part of what the speaker is saying after I get distracted at some point. It can help me get back on track. It also helps me formulate my presentations, just like an outline used to, but also by showing my audience what I consider are the main points.
    I personally don’t like PP in church, but I know seriously conservative older folks who appreciate not having to get out their reading glasses and squint over their bulletins.
    PP has done nothing negative or positive to us that we haven’t allowed and encouraged ourselves.

  • Kandyce

    My husband, a “Power Point Ranger”, showed me this article a day or two ago and pointed out that while that particular slide was used in a Power Point presentation, it was not made in Power Point.
    I realize that was not the point of your question, but I guess I’m saying that Power Point is a tool which may enable laziness for some, but it may also aid learning for others. I perssonally find Power Point to be very useful during lectures when I inevitably miss part of what the speaker is saying after I get distracted at some point. It can help me get back on track. It also helps me formulate my presentations, just like an outline used to, but also by showing my audience what I consider are the main points.
    I personally don’t like PP in church, but I know seriously conservative older folks who appreciate not having to get out their reading glasses and squint over their bulletins.
    PP has done nothing negative or positive to us that we haven’t allowed and encouraged ourselves.

  • DonS

    Booklover @ 11: Yes!!!! Bring back the hymnbooks. I learned to read music and sing harmony on Sunday morning, and it was great worship.

    Power Point is a tool, just an advanced chalkboard. It is neither evil nor good on its own — its fate is in the hands of the user.

    Joe pretty much has it right. The slides should be an outline, not a detailed presentation. Though when I attend legal CLE seminars, I do appreciate receiving a set of detailed Powerpoint slides afterward for my note file.

  • DonS

    Booklover @ 11: Yes!!!! Bring back the hymnbooks. I learned to read music and sing harmony on Sunday morning, and it was great worship.

    Power Point is a tool, just an advanced chalkboard. It is neither evil nor good on its own — its fate is in the hands of the user.

    Joe pretty much has it right. The slides should be an outline, not a detailed presentation. Though when I attend legal CLE seminars, I do appreciate receiving a set of detailed Powerpoint slides afterward for my note file.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    1. Powerpoint doesn’t make us stupid, it reveals our innate stupidity.
    2. Why use Powerpoint when you can use Numbers?

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    1. Powerpoint doesn’t make us stupid, it reveals our innate stupidity.
    2. Why use Powerpoint when you can use Numbers?

  • JonSLC

    Isn’t PowerPoint the same as so many other tools? It can be used well; it can be used poorly. I’ve seen both and I’ve done both.

    Three basic teaching methods are lecturing, questioning and discussing. It’s good to remember that PowerPoint just gives a visual dimension to lecturing. Same advantages and disadvantages still apply to PowerPoint as to lecturing. Advantage: you can cover lots of material in a short time. Disadvantage: it can happen that there’s little engagement with listeners.

    Some good PowerPoint advice that was passed on to me: Make every slide fight for its life. In other words, if your presentation can survive without a particular ppt slide, then leave it out.

  • JonSLC

    Isn’t PowerPoint the same as so many other tools? It can be used well; it can be used poorly. I’ve seen both and I’ve done both.

    Three basic teaching methods are lecturing, questioning and discussing. It’s good to remember that PowerPoint just gives a visual dimension to lecturing. Same advantages and disadvantages still apply to PowerPoint as to lecturing. Advantage: you can cover lots of material in a short time. Disadvantage: it can happen that there’s little engagement with listeners.

    Some good PowerPoint advice that was passed on to me: Make every slide fight for its life. In other words, if your presentation can survive without a particular ppt slide, then leave it out.

  • Rev. Alexander Ring

    I am on the same page (or slide) as Joe and JohnSLC. PowerPoint (or in my case, Keynote) is a tool, and like all tools can be used well or poorly. We don’t ban hymns because of the plethora of poor hymns written, we enourage the use of good hymns.

    I use Keynote all the time in confirmation, in classroom and in Bible classes, especially when a visual element will enhance what is said. For instance, it is one thing to tell people what the Tabernacle and its furnishings looked like, it is another to show them some pictures.

    So rather than ban this tool, I think a better approach is to teach people to use it effectively.

  • Rev. Alexander Ring

    I am on the same page (or slide) as Joe and JohnSLC. PowerPoint (or in my case, Keynote) is a tool, and like all tools can be used well or poorly. We don’t ban hymns because of the plethora of poor hymns written, we enourage the use of good hymns.

    I use Keynote all the time in confirmation, in classroom and in Bible classes, especially when a visual element will enhance what is said. For instance, it is one thing to tell people what the Tabernacle and its furnishings looked like, it is another to show them some pictures.

    So rather than ban this tool, I think a better approach is to teach people to use it effectively.

  • http://www.thinkingchristian.net Tom Gilson

    If you think that’s bad, check out the Gettysburg PowerPoint: http://norvig.com/Gettysburg/

    I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry.

  • http://www.thinkingchristian.net Tom Gilson

    If you think that’s bad, check out the Gettysburg PowerPoint: http://norvig.com/Gettysburg/

    I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry.

  • Janice

    I wouldn’t say it is PowerPoint per se, that is the problem. Any form of media can be misused. In this case I think it is the chart. Someone else commented on the idea of making bullets points. We have gotten used to the 30 second commercial, the sound bite that sometimes we force complex information into an inappropriate format.

    I use PPT in my omnibus class that combines history and English to show pictures of people we are studying or to show art work. I also have used it in my rhetoric class to show examines of good and bad visual rhetoric. This chart is a great example of how not to present information.

  • Janice

    I wouldn’t say it is PowerPoint per se, that is the problem. Any form of media can be misused. In this case I think it is the chart. Someone else commented on the idea of making bullets points. We have gotten used to the 30 second commercial, the sound bite that sometimes we force complex information into an inappropriate format.

    I use PPT in my omnibus class that combines history and English to show pictures of people we are studying or to show art work. I also have used it in my rhetoric class to show examines of good and bad visual rhetoric. This chart is a great example of how not to present information.

  • EBW

    The problem is that little in the real world that is worth teaching or learning is reducible to bulleted lists or translatable to PowerPoint, no? Yet we do it – every day – in our schools, churches, lodges, and for military briefings. Why? Bbecause this software tool practically forces us to do it.

  • EBW

    The problem is that little in the real world that is worth teaching or learning is reducible to bulleted lists or translatable to PowerPoint, no? Yet we do it – every day – in our schools, churches, lodges, and for military briefings. Why? Bbecause this software tool practically forces us to do it.

  • Philip A

    To Adrian Keister (and others):

    “Finally, if you’re not careful, you could blow up space shuttles from poorly-done presentations (Challenger).”

    It’s called powerpoint engineering, and NASA has in fact tied a number of its more recent failures to just that. We had them come through at my “company” a few years ago lecturing on the causes of failure, and that made the list.

    I still use it (and mandate that others use it) for engineering design reviews, but it is only a part of the design review package; spreadsheets, drawings, and other things are required.

    Put another way, we recognize its usefulness, and are wary of how we can misuse it.

  • Philip A

    To Adrian Keister (and others):

    “Finally, if you’re not careful, you could blow up space shuttles from poorly-done presentations (Challenger).”

    It’s called powerpoint engineering, and NASA has in fact tied a number of its more recent failures to just that. We had them come through at my “company” a few years ago lecturing on the causes of failure, and that made the list.

    I still use it (and mandate that others use it) for engineering design reviews, but it is only a part of the design review package; spreadsheets, drawings, and other things are required.

    Put another way, we recognize its usefulness, and are wary of how we can misuse it.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I think there’s a lot to be said about (read: against) PowerPoint, and, from what I’ve read of it, Edward Tufte has perhaps said it best (there’s a link there to a sample from that essay, which touches on what Philip @21 and Adrian @1 noted).

    That said, what’s terrible about PowerPoint is actually not well demonstrated by the image Veith posted. I try to stay away from PowerPoint at all costs, but that doesn’t look like a typical PowerPoint slide at all to me (as Kandyce noted @13). Frankly, it is far too visually interesting (if baffling).

    And while at some level, yes, PowerPoint is just a tool and can, in theory, be used well or poorly, it’s not true that all tools have the same strengths, make the same things easy or hard, and so on. PowerPoint makes certain assumptions about things, and it shapes the way people communicate with it. Consider: everything in PowerPoint is a slide. Your presentation must be broken down into slides. That alone makes different assumptions about your content than would, say, a paper or a speech. Can all content — good content, especially — be fitted appropriately into a series of PowerPoint slides? Especially with a headline and series of bullets (the native PowerPoint language)?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I think there’s a lot to be said about (read: against) PowerPoint, and, from what I’ve read of it, Edward Tufte has perhaps said it best (there’s a link there to a sample from that essay, which touches on what Philip @21 and Adrian @1 noted).

    That said, what’s terrible about PowerPoint is actually not well demonstrated by the image Veith posted. I try to stay away from PowerPoint at all costs, but that doesn’t look like a typical PowerPoint slide at all to me (as Kandyce noted @13). Frankly, it is far too visually interesting (if baffling).

    And while at some level, yes, PowerPoint is just a tool and can, in theory, be used well or poorly, it’s not true that all tools have the same strengths, make the same things easy or hard, and so on. PowerPoint makes certain assumptions about things, and it shapes the way people communicate with it. Consider: everything in PowerPoint is a slide. Your presentation must be broken down into slides. That alone makes different assumptions about your content than would, say, a paper or a speech. Can all content — good content, especially — be fitted appropriately into a series of PowerPoint slides? Especially with a headline and series of bullets (the native PowerPoint language)?

  • Jonathan

    My first reaction on seeing that slide was, “Wow–what was the guy who decided to show that to the boss THINKING?”

    I think PP just makes it easy to look stupid. Worst is when the presenter just reads the slides. Death by PP.

  • Jonathan

    My first reaction on seeing that slide was, “Wow–what was the guy who decided to show that to the boss THINKING?”

    I think PP just makes it easy to look stupid. Worst is when the presenter just reads the slides. Death by PP.

  • random professor

    I agree: PowerPoint makes us stupid. And, yet, I use it for virtually every class I teach at a small mid-western liberal arts college. Why? The students have come to expect visuals with every lecture to the point that even though the slides are not always helpful, if they are not up for viewing, I can just see them drift off. They are simply unable to maintain an attention span beyond 2 minutes without visuals. Such is the state of this generation. Does it help this state of affairs to feed them more visuals? No, it probably hurts them. But when your job is dependent on student evaluations, you need to do what will make them the happiest consumers, not necessarily what they need in terms of their education. It’s simply horrible and I feel awful about it daily, but there it is. Re: “Josh V.”: That’s why I don’t allow students to have access to the Power Point slides.

  • random professor

    I agree: PowerPoint makes us stupid. And, yet, I use it for virtually every class I teach at a small mid-western liberal arts college. Why? The students have come to expect visuals with every lecture to the point that even though the slides are not always helpful, if they are not up for viewing, I can just see them drift off. They are simply unable to maintain an attention span beyond 2 minutes without visuals. Such is the state of this generation. Does it help this state of affairs to feed them more visuals? No, it probably hurts them. But when your job is dependent on student evaluations, you need to do what will make them the happiest consumers, not necessarily what they need in terms of their education. It’s simply horrible and I feel awful about it daily, but there it is. Re: “Josh V.”: That’s why I don’t allow students to have access to the Power Point slides.

  • http://spaceagelutheran.blogspot.com/ SAL

    I’m sort of a PowerPoint Ranger (I spend 10-20 hours a week in PowerPoint and I work for the Army).

    PowerPoint is just a tool. It’s a tool that’s useful for taking information and simplifying it for senior leaders.

    “Death by PowerPoint” is common because so many people are abusing the tool.

  • http://spaceagelutheran.blogspot.com/ SAL

    I’m sort of a PowerPoint Ranger (I spend 10-20 hours a week in PowerPoint and I work for the Army).

    PowerPoint is just a tool. It’s a tool that’s useful for taking information and simplifying it for senior leaders.

    “Death by PowerPoint” is common because so many people are abusing the tool.


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