The site of the Resurrection

There is historical evidence to suggest that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem really was erected on the site of Christ’s Empty Tomb.  Go here for a series of panoramic 360-degree virtual tours of both the exterior and the interior of the church. (Be sure to click the smaller boxes for the various interior views.)

HT: David Mills

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • drjoan

    I was there in November 2008. These pictures must have been taken on an off day–where are all the tourists?
    It is a beautiful sight, definitely under the influence of the Orthodox Church with all the lamps and candles. I think I, too, agree this is the site of Jesus’ entombment and resurrection. The Garden Tomb is lovely but a little out of place. On the other hand, as the guide at the Garden Tomb kept repeating, “It doesn’t matter! He is risen!”

  • drjoan

    I was there in November 2008. These pictures must have been taken on an off day–where are all the tourists?
    It is a beautiful sight, definitely under the influence of the Orthodox Church with all the lamps and candles. I think I, too, agree this is the site of Jesus’ entombment and resurrection. The Garden Tomb is lovely but a little out of place. On the other hand, as the guide at the Garden Tomb kept repeating, “It doesn’t matter! He is risen!”

  • Bruce Gee

    Wasn’t it Constantine’s mother who travelled throughout the Holy Land, building churches on what were then identified as locations of important sites in Christ’s ministry? Capernaum and Bethlehem come to mind, but would this also have been a part of her efforts?

  • Bruce Gee

    Wasn’t it Constantine’s mother who travelled throughout the Holy Land, building churches on what were then identified as locations of important sites in Christ’s ministry? Capernaum and Bethlehem come to mind, but would this also have been a part of her efforts?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Yes, Bruce. The church of the Holy Sepulchre was Constantine’s mother’s big find. She, Helena, apparently did research on these sites that scholars today admit had validity. I believe she also found what she identified as the “true cross” near the site of Christ’s burial, which is close to Golgotha, which I believe is part of the church grounds. All of the fragments of the cross became relics, of course, and though the total amount of all of the wood that claims that status would be far more than a single cross, I wonder if some of them might come from what St. Helena found.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Yes, Bruce. The church of the Holy Sepulchre was Constantine’s mother’s big find. She, Helena, apparently did research on these sites that scholars today admit had validity. I believe she also found what she identified as the “true cross” near the site of Christ’s burial, which is close to Golgotha, which I believe is part of the church grounds. All of the fragments of the cross became relics, of course, and though the total amount of all of the wood that claims that status would be far more than a single cross, I wonder if some of them might come from what St. Helena found.

  • Sean

    Can anyone help orient me to what I am seeing in those photos? Where is the tomb itself? My best guess is that it is the in the fifth panorama. the small room surrounded by giant gold candles underneath the large dome. Is this correct?

  • Sean

    Can anyone help orient me to what I am seeing in those photos? Where is the tomb itself? My best guess is that it is the in the fifth panorama. the small room surrounded by giant gold candles underneath the large dome. Is this correct?

  • Sean

    or perhaps (now that I’ve looked at the whole thing) it is the small room in the last panorama? Is the bench in the small room the place they laid his body?

  • Sean

    or perhaps (now that I’ve looked at the whole thing) it is the small room in the last panorama? Is the bench in the small room the place they laid his body?

  • Sean

    I assume that when building the church, they kept the tomb intact in some manner. Is this a correct assumption?

  • Sean

    I assume that when building the church, they kept the tomb intact in some manner. Is this a correct assumption?

  • Dan Kempin

    Sean, #4, 5, 6

    5th panorama is the outside of the of the sepulchre (which is in the rotunda of the church.) 8th panorama is the anteroom of the sepulchre and the 9th panorama is the tomb itself. (Note the nice banner/pillow that says “Christ is risen” in Greek.)

    Constantine’s mother preserved the site of the tomb by quarrying away all of the surrounding stone to the level of the tomb. Not exactly the current method of archaeological preservation, but it explains why the tomb is conveniently at the level of the church. (In all fairness, it was not preserved for the sake of archaeology, but for sacred pilgrimmage.) There are contemporary tombs (loculae) in the area, so there is archaeological evidence that the site was used for burial up until the time of Helena, but the stone bed itself is preserved at the expense of the surrounding tomb stucture.

    The rest of the pictures are chapels within the church, and the place were the crosses were said to have been placed. (There are holes in the bedrock above where crucifixions took place.)

  • Dan Kempin

    Sean, #4, 5, 6

    5th panorama is the outside of the of the sepulchre (which is in the rotunda of the church.) 8th panorama is the anteroom of the sepulchre and the 9th panorama is the tomb itself. (Note the nice banner/pillow that says “Christ is risen” in Greek.)

    Constantine’s mother preserved the site of the tomb by quarrying away all of the surrounding stone to the level of the tomb. Not exactly the current method of archaeological preservation, but it explains why the tomb is conveniently at the level of the church. (In all fairness, it was not preserved for the sake of archaeology, but for sacred pilgrimmage.) There are contemporary tombs (loculae) in the area, so there is archaeological evidence that the site was used for burial up until the time of Helena, but the stone bed itself is preserved at the expense of the surrounding tomb stucture.

    The rest of the pictures are chapels within the church, and the place were the crosses were said to have been placed. (There are holes in the bedrock above where crucifixions took place.)

  • Dan Kempin

    #7,

    Pardon me for forgetting my latin declensions. The tombs are loculi, not loculae.

  • Dan Kempin

    #7,

    Pardon me for forgetting my latin declensions. The tombs are loculi, not loculae.


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