Satellite churches with onscreen pastors

The latest in megachurch trends:  Doing without a pastor, except on streaming big screen video:

A new church was born Sunday morning, but, like an increasing number of congregations, it has no preaching pastor.

In what has become one of the most popular church growth methods across the country, a large white screen unfurled in front of the stage with the preacher’s image projected on it, preempting the live sermon and the pastor’s physical presence.

Welcome to the satellite church, a 21st century phenomenon that owes its success to advances in technology. These days, instead of starting new congregations, churches are reproducing the successful ones, franchise-style. . . .

Over the past five years, nearly every megachurch in the Triangle has done the same. Hope Community Church in Raleigh, Cleveland Community Church, or C3, in Clayton, and the Summit Church in Durham – all have at least one satellite location where the pastor’s message is recorded and then streamed live or hand-delivered on a DVD to an ancillary site where it’s screened for a different audience.

Though there are varying methods to the satellite concept, they share many of the same characteristics. Each satellite has a live praise and worship band and a local “campus pastor” who makes announcements, leads in prayer and tends to the needs of the congregants throughout the week.

But the heart of the service – the sermon – is given over to the big screen.

via Growing church opts for tele-communion – Religion – NewsObserver.com.

Why doesn’t everybody just stay home and watch it on their computers.  Think how mega such a church would be, with a congregation unlimited by location, space, or time.  Actually, I believe that is being tried.

Does anyone here go to a church like that or been to one?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    I don’t attend a church like this, but my sister and brother-in-law and their two teenage boys do. Their church tends to be much more about praise/worship music and small groups, and the sermons are really sort of tangential to the whole experience. Therefore the “live video feed” pastor is no big deal — the lack of actual presence of a pastor mirrors the tangential nature of the sermon.

    I suppose what keeps their church from going fully virtual is the fact that both contemporary praise/worship and small groups are inherently (and primarily) social activities. You can’t get the full praise and worship experience by yourself at a computer screen – you have to participate with a group. Likewise, obviously, for small group meetings.

    Interestingly, although this live video feed approach was originally started because their church was a plant from a larger church in Nashville (50mi away), their satellite church has grown to something like 100-200 people — but there are no plans ever to stop having the live video feed. Theoretically this one large church could have numerous satellites, with a total of thousands of affiliated members, all “feeding” from the same video each week. No concept of getting their own preaching pastor once they reach a certain size.

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    I don’t attend a church like this, but my sister and brother-in-law and their two teenage boys do. Their church tends to be much more about praise/worship music and small groups, and the sermons are really sort of tangential to the whole experience. Therefore the “live video feed” pastor is no big deal — the lack of actual presence of a pastor mirrors the tangential nature of the sermon.

    I suppose what keeps their church from going fully virtual is the fact that both contemporary praise/worship and small groups are inherently (and primarily) social activities. You can’t get the full praise and worship experience by yourself at a computer screen – you have to participate with a group. Likewise, obviously, for small group meetings.

    Interestingly, although this live video feed approach was originally started because their church was a plant from a larger church in Nashville (50mi away), their satellite church has grown to something like 100-200 people — but there are no plans ever to stop having the live video feed. Theoretically this one large church could have numerous satellites, with a total of thousands of affiliated members, all “feeding” from the same video each week. No concept of getting their own preaching pastor once they reach a certain size.

  • Meoip

    This puts to much stock in a single pastor and doesn’t provide the congregation access to the person feeding them. What happens when the pastor’s sermon really touches me one week, I cannot go up and talk to him I have to speak with some appointed proxy whom I’ve never met. The whole idea seems to be an ego stroke for pastors and churches, with the idea being that we have some many people we cannot fit them all so we make them watch us on tv. The old berries at the live church feel holier than those with who only watch on TV after all we are bringing our church experience to them. It’s a sales pitch not a spiritual formation.

  • Meoip

    This puts to much stock in a single pastor and doesn’t provide the congregation access to the person feeding them. What happens when the pastor’s sermon really touches me one week, I cannot go up and talk to him I have to speak with some appointed proxy whom I’ve never met. The whole idea seems to be an ego stroke for pastors and churches, with the idea being that we have some many people we cannot fit them all so we make them watch us on tv. The old berries at the live church feel holier than those with who only watch on TV after all we are bringing our church experience to them. It’s a sales pitch not a spiritual formation.

  • Booklover

    I rather doubt that the Lord’s Supper is served in these virtual services. :-(

    This reminds me of facebook with its social networking replacing a real live meal around the table with friends.

    But then here I am conversing with virtual friends on a blog. :-)

  • Booklover

    I rather doubt that the Lord’s Supper is served in these virtual services. :-(

    This reminds me of facebook with its social networking replacing a real live meal around the table with friends.

    But then here I am conversing with virtual friends on a blog. :-)

  • bunnycatch3r

    I find the image of hundreds (if not thousands) of these Christian carbon copies sitting down to a communal brainwash chilling.

  • bunnycatch3r

    I find the image of hundreds (if not thousands) of these Christian carbon copies sitting down to a communal brainwash chilling.

  • Winston Smith

    I belong to a large church (though not what you would call a modern mega-church, with the praise bands and such).

    I am sometimes wickedly tempted to think of the pastor as being so remote that he might as well be on TV. I shake his hand on the way out of the service, but in a church of that size he might as well be a local TV anchorman, or the mayor.

    However, there is no substitute for the in-person fellowship of the saints, including the Lord’s Supper. You just don’t get that sitting at home watching on TV.

  • Winston Smith

    I belong to a large church (though not what you would call a modern mega-church, with the praise bands and such).

    I am sometimes wickedly tempted to think of the pastor as being so remote that he might as well be on TV. I shake his hand on the way out of the service, but in a church of that size he might as well be a local TV anchorman, or the mayor.

    However, there is no substitute for the in-person fellowship of the saints, including the Lord’s Supper. You just don’t get that sitting at home watching on TV.

  • Orianna Laun

    I have not been to one, but I know that is one in the town in which my parents-in-law live. One church has 3 (I think) sites and has the sermon via tele conference. The town is not that big, but the church is too small for all the people flocking to it. The disenchanted local Lutherans up there seem to love it. (Why they are disenchanted is a long story. . .)

  • Orianna Laun

    I have not been to one, but I know that is one in the town in which my parents-in-law live. One church has 3 (I think) sites and has the sermon via tele conference. The town is not that big, but the church is too small for all the people flocking to it. The disenchanted local Lutherans up there seem to love it. (Why they are disenchanted is a long story. . .)

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    This trend has been around for several years now. I know of a couple of LCMS congregations that have satellite campuses, though I don’t know if they are going the onscreen preacher route. In someways, it is a variation on what we as a synod have attempted with Lutheran Hour Ministries except we never intended LHM to be a substitute for an actual congregation.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    This trend has been around for several years now. I know of a couple of LCMS congregations that have satellite campuses, though I don’t know if they are going the onscreen preacher route. In someways, it is a variation on what we as a synod have attempted with Lutheran Hour Ministries except we never intended LHM to be a substitute for an actual congregation.

  • Joe

    DL21C – As you point out there is a big distinction between having a doctrinally solid medial outlet and the parish. It seems to me that in order to justify a satellite video campus Mr. Video Pastor must be of the opinion that he alone has the true doctrine and that it cannot be found in any other. Why else would he not plant the church and let the parish call a pastor.

    It brings to mind 1 Corinthians 1:10-17.

  • Joe

    DL21C – As you point out there is a big distinction between having a doctrinally solid medial outlet and the parish. It seems to me that in order to justify a satellite video campus Mr. Video Pastor must be of the opinion that he alone has the true doctrine and that it cannot be found in any other. Why else would he not plant the church and let the parish call a pastor.

    It brings to mind 1 Corinthians 1:10-17.

  • Dan Kempin

    bunnycatch 3 r #4,

    I hope your comment was tongue in cheek. If not, it is quite unfair. The amount of time average christians spend in front of a screen being brainwashed every week is truly disturbing. It would be frankly refreshing if we plugged in to video sermons with the same zeal as the other television and video “product.”

    Meiop, #2, I think, has the point. (Despite the cynicism.) The problem is not with the content, but by distancing/de-emphasizing/compartmentalizing the pastoral office. What is the pastor’s role? Has the demand for “excellence” in preaching become so ridiculous that it is unattainable by anyone but the most extraordinarily gifted? Does the credibility of the “pastor” require such elevation that it actually disconnects him from meaningful access to the people he serves? These expectations are by no means clear in the church at large.

    Then again, as Winston, #5, points out, this is not a new issue, nor it it limited to “sattelite” congregations. Once again, I think the lutheran understanding of the office of the ministry can be of service. Neither technology nor large churches are bad. What is being lost (or deconstructed) is an understanding of the purpose and role of a pastor.

  • Dan Kempin

    bunnycatch 3 r #4,

    I hope your comment was tongue in cheek. If not, it is quite unfair. The amount of time average christians spend in front of a screen being brainwashed every week is truly disturbing. It would be frankly refreshing if we plugged in to video sermons with the same zeal as the other television and video “product.”

    Meiop, #2, I think, has the point. (Despite the cynicism.) The problem is not with the content, but by distancing/de-emphasizing/compartmentalizing the pastoral office. What is the pastor’s role? Has the demand for “excellence” in preaching become so ridiculous that it is unattainable by anyone but the most extraordinarily gifted? Does the credibility of the “pastor” require such elevation that it actually disconnects him from meaningful access to the people he serves? These expectations are by no means clear in the church at large.

    Then again, as Winston, #5, points out, this is not a new issue, nor it it limited to “sattelite” congregations. Once again, I think the lutheran understanding of the office of the ministry can be of service. Neither technology nor large churches are bad. What is being lost (or deconstructed) is an understanding of the purpose and role of a pastor.

  • forty-two

    The LCMS congregation I grew up in has a satellite campus, but no onscreen preacher. The satellite campus pastor has pretty much full autonomy over pastoral issues, but business issues are somehow connected with the main campus (I’m hazy on the details), which was why they were going the main campus/satellite route rather than planting a daughter congregation. But the result is kind of a hybrid b/w the two.

  • forty-two

    The LCMS congregation I grew up in has a satellite campus, but no onscreen preacher. The satellite campus pastor has pretty much full autonomy over pastoral issues, but business issues are somehow connected with the main campus (I’m hazy on the details), which was why they were going the main campus/satellite route rather than planting a daughter congregation. But the result is kind of a hybrid b/w the two.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    such men who would form a church like this ought not be called pastors. It is an insult to men who really do try to shepherd there flocks. Who go and counsel struggling families, or visit shut-ins, spend years training kids after school in sound doctrine, and admonishing them to live a life worthy of their calling.
    This sort of thing just makes me sick.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    such men who would form a church like this ought not be called pastors. It is an insult to men who really do try to shepherd there flocks. Who go and counsel struggling families, or visit shut-ins, spend years training kids after school in sound doctrine, and admonishing them to live a life worthy of their calling.
    This sort of thing just makes me sick.

  • http://originalsoapbox.wordpress.com/ Peter Schellhase

    This arrangement is possibly effective at transmitting the ministry of the Word–but no sacramental fellowship! How does one call this a church?

  • http://originalsoapbox.wordpress.com/ Peter Schellhase

    This arrangement is possibly effective at transmitting the ministry of the Word–but no sacramental fellowship! How does one call this a church?

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    I didn’t finish that thought. So then you have a “campus pastor” who is supposed to be meeting all those needs. But the preaching pastor is divorced from his congregation, so is the sermon.
    It may be popular but probably because it majors in platitudes. How can a pastor preach to his congregation if he doesn’t know his congregation? The sermon is to be edifying the congregation getting it to grow. This means being a part of the congregation. Actually being one with them in the same mind, judgment and heart. Spending time with them and being a part of them.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    I didn’t finish that thought. So then you have a “campus pastor” who is supposed to be meeting all those needs. But the preaching pastor is divorced from his congregation, so is the sermon.
    It may be popular but probably because it majors in platitudes. How can a pastor preach to his congregation if he doesn’t know his congregation? The sermon is to be edifying the congregation getting it to grow. This means being a part of the congregation. Actually being one with them in the same mind, judgment and heart. Spending time with them and being a part of them.

  • JoeS

    While many of these churches are surely the self-aggrandizing ego-strokes that some are calling them, many are not. I have visited one well known satellite campus where the word is preached faithfully. They have planted churches with their own pastors, they have asked people to go to other Biblically faithful Churches, and people keep coming to this one.

    Many of the objections I am reading are based on small-church models where one pastor preaches, counsels, plans the service, makes hospital visits, and goes to each parishioner’s house for dinner once every 6 months. Bigger Churches operate under the premise that each of these pastoral roles can be delegated to those who have a special gifting for that one area, so excellent congregational care can be given in each area. Is that inherently wrong? (Yes, it can be done horribly wrong and often is.)

  • JoeS

    While many of these churches are surely the self-aggrandizing ego-strokes that some are calling them, many are not. I have visited one well known satellite campus where the word is preached faithfully. They have planted churches with their own pastors, they have asked people to go to other Biblically faithful Churches, and people keep coming to this one.

    Many of the objections I am reading are based on small-church models where one pastor preaches, counsels, plans the service, makes hospital visits, and goes to each parishioner’s house for dinner once every 6 months. Bigger Churches operate under the premise that each of these pastoral roles can be delegated to those who have a special gifting for that one area, so excellent congregational care can be given in each area. Is that inherently wrong? (Yes, it can be done horribly wrong and often is.)

  • Dan Kempin

    Bror, #11,
    That is a very careless comment. It is a series of judgments about which you have no knowledge, and you give no clarity as to why this offends you. Pastors are not really pastors and make you sick if they take a different approach or lack the understanding that you have? Is that really what you mean to say?

  • Dan Kempin

    Bror, #11,
    That is a very careless comment. It is a series of judgments about which you have no knowledge, and you give no clarity as to why this offends you. Pastors are not really pastors and make you sick if they take a different approach or lack the understanding that you have? Is that really what you mean to say?

  • Tom Hering

    I support Bror @ 11. What if God had just done things from above, instead of humbling Himself to dwell among us in the person of Christ? How do you wash a person’s feet via satellite?

  • Tom Hering

    I support Bror @ 11. What if God had just done things from above, instead of humbling Himself to dwell among us in the person of Christ? How do you wash a person’s feet via satellite?

  • Joe

    “Is that inherently wrong? (Yes, it can be done horribly wrong and often is.)”

    I think it is more of a matter that no matter how hard you try to do it well it will (almost) always fail because all of these tasks are inherently integrated. Gifted preachers can be effective because the Word is always effective. But the preacher can be even more effective if he is the one who is personally engaged with the members, counseling those with troubles, visiting with the ill, etc. I cannot think of a better way for the pastor to understand what it is that his flock needs to hear from the pulpit. The Word is always efficacious, the pastor’s role in the process is to understand what his flock is facing, its troubles, struggles, highs and lows and find the particular parts of scripture that the flock most needs to hear.

  • Joe

    “Is that inherently wrong? (Yes, it can be done horribly wrong and often is.)”

    I think it is more of a matter that no matter how hard you try to do it well it will (almost) always fail because all of these tasks are inherently integrated. Gifted preachers can be effective because the Word is always effective. But the preacher can be even more effective if he is the one who is personally engaged with the members, counseling those with troubles, visiting with the ill, etc. I cannot think of a better way for the pastor to understand what it is that his flock needs to hear from the pulpit. The Word is always efficacious, the pastor’s role in the process is to understand what his flock is facing, its troubles, struggles, highs and lows and find the particular parts of scripture that the flock most needs to hear.

  • Tom Hering

    I think the earthly ministry of Christ is the model for pastors. And the most striking thing about Christ’s ministry is the Incarnation – being present in the flesh, and dwelling bodily among us. Joe @ 17 diagnoses the problem accurately: separating the ministry of the Word from pastoral care. The application of the Word to others’ sins and wounds can never be divorced from knowing those others personally. The delegation of pastoral care by a televised preacher smacks of a semi-Gnostic mindset, where flesh and other common things just don’t matter.

  • Tom Hering

    I think the earthly ministry of Christ is the model for pastors. And the most striking thing about Christ’s ministry is the Incarnation – being present in the flesh, and dwelling bodily among us. Joe @ 17 diagnoses the problem accurately: separating the ministry of the Word from pastoral care. The application of the Word to others’ sins and wounds can never be divorced from knowing those others personally. The delegation of pastoral care by a televised preacher smacks of a semi-Gnostic mindset, where flesh and other common things just don’t matter.

  • Louis

    I agree with Bror at #11. The telos here is NOT the spread of the Church, but the growing of a consumer market for “spiritual” goods. These folks are not pastors, ie shepherds, but telemarketers. Today the “gospel”, tomorrow the slap-chop…

  • Louis

    I agree with Bror at #11. The telos here is NOT the spread of the Church, but the growing of a consumer market for “spiritual” goods. These folks are not pastors, ie shepherds, but telemarketers. Today the “gospel”, tomorrow the slap-chop…

  • bkw

    I also agree with Bror. Having attended such a church, I can say with certainty that at this particular church there was no pastoral care. The pastor himself admitted that he was a ‘teaching pastor’ and didn’t desire to shepherd his flock. He also believed that he was the only one who could who could preach at the satellite site via video. Big ego. And that church didn’t have a back up plan for pastoral care. I didn’t stay there long, but that church is thriving and would be considered a mega church here in Utah.

  • bkw

    I also agree with Bror. Having attended such a church, I can say with certainty that at this particular church there was no pastoral care. The pastor himself admitted that he was a ‘teaching pastor’ and didn’t desire to shepherd his flock. He also believed that he was the only one who could who could preach at the satellite site via video. Big ego. And that church didn’t have a back up plan for pastoral care. I didn’t stay there long, but that church is thriving and would be considered a mega church here in Utah.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    L.O.L. Welcome to Houston, TX.
    On a more serious note, we need all need to ask ourselves what parameters guide our methods and why. Personally, I reject the TV model because it is not the Biblically prescribed model for shepherding God’s flock. I suppose an unspoken presupposition of that statement is the idea that God knows what is best for his church, and has prescribed methods for the flock in his word.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    L.O.L. Welcome to Houston, TX.
    On a more serious note, we need all need to ask ourselves what parameters guide our methods and why. Personally, I reject the TV model because it is not the Biblically prescribed model for shepherding God’s flock. I suppose an unspoken presupposition of that statement is the idea that God knows what is best for his church, and has prescribed methods for the flock in his word.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Dan,
    I meant what I said. I think I explained why quite well in 12.
    BKW, in Utah? well if you are ever in Tooele, look up First Lutheran.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Dan,
    I meant what I said. I think I explained why quite well in 12.
    BKW, in Utah? well if you are ever in Tooele, look up First Lutheran.

  • trotk

    You can preach from a distance, knowing your audience only loosely. This is why a book can be written that teaches an entire generation, country, community, etc.
    But you cannot pastor and shepherd from a distance (metaphorical, in the sense of how well you know someone). Shepherd necessarily means knowing exactly where a person is, and unless the Holy Spirit manifestly intervenes to communicate that message (as with Ananias and Saul), the pastor must meet the people and exercise discernment over their personal lives.
    This stuff is no more inherently wrong that writing books or giving lectures to a relatively unknown audience, but the problem is that TV (and our entire entertainment industry, hence our principal joy of amusement) has trained the average person to be passive in the process. If the audience is going to let this become their substitute for being actually shepherded, and thus lose all accountability AND authority, which they will because of the inherent passivity and laziness of man, this has the tendency to become a wretched evil.
    Wretched evil because it will teach people that skilled public speaking is the same as teaching with accountability and authority.

  • trotk

    You can preach from a distance, knowing your audience only loosely. This is why a book can be written that teaches an entire generation, country, community, etc.
    But you cannot pastor and shepherd from a distance (metaphorical, in the sense of how well you know someone). Shepherd necessarily means knowing exactly where a person is, and unless the Holy Spirit manifestly intervenes to communicate that message (as with Ananias and Saul), the pastor must meet the people and exercise discernment over their personal lives.
    This stuff is no more inherently wrong that writing books or giving lectures to a relatively unknown audience, but the problem is that TV (and our entire entertainment industry, hence our principal joy of amusement) has trained the average person to be passive in the process. If the audience is going to let this become their substitute for being actually shepherded, and thus lose all accountability AND authority, which they will because of the inherent passivity and laziness of man, this has the tendency to become a wretched evil.
    Wretched evil because it will teach people that skilled public speaking is the same as teaching with accountability and authority.

  • Dan Kempin

    Bror, #22,

    I was not referring to the point you made in #13, but to you manner of speech in #11. Someone who does this “makes you sick,” and should be stripped of the title “pastor?” The very existence of such a church is an “insult” to your (presumably) ministry? Those words are–forgive me–neither humble nor kind.

    And yet you clarify that this is exactly what you mean.

    I am assuming, of course, that you read my post at #9 and know that I am not advocating “sattellite” churches. I am not arguing with the point you made. I praise God for the faithful pastors (including you) who minister to their people in the manner you describe.

    Nevertheless, I would not be hasty to insult a servant of God, even if he is misguided. God forbid that you or I should be so quickly written off when we wander, for if we do not, it will be only by God’s merciful prevention.

  • Dan Kempin

    Bror, #22,

    I was not referring to the point you made in #13, but to you manner of speech in #11. Someone who does this “makes you sick,” and should be stripped of the title “pastor?” The very existence of such a church is an “insult” to your (presumably) ministry? Those words are–forgive me–neither humble nor kind.

    And yet you clarify that this is exactly what you mean.

    I am assuming, of course, that you read my post at #9 and know that I am not advocating “sattellite” churches. I am not arguing with the point you made. I praise God for the faithful pastors (including you) who minister to their people in the manner you describe.

    Nevertheless, I would not be hasty to insult a servant of God, even if he is misguided. God forbid that you or I should be so quickly written off when we wander, for if we do not, it will be only by God’s merciful prevention.

  • Rich Cork

    Immediately thought of Neil Postman in Amusing Ourselves To Death: ” Moreover, the television screen itself has a strong bias toward a psychology of secularism. The screen is so saturated with our memories of profane events, so deeply associated with the commercial and entertainment worlds that it is difficult for it to be recreated as a frame for sacred events”

    Although not quite the same as being televised (in this case you can’t turn the sermon off), I still have to believe this has an effect on the giving and receiving of the sermon.

  • Rich Cork

    Immediately thought of Neil Postman in Amusing Ourselves To Death: ” Moreover, the television screen itself has a strong bias toward a psychology of secularism. The screen is so saturated with our memories of profane events, so deeply associated with the commercial and entertainment worlds that it is difficult for it to be recreated as a frame for sacred events”

    Although not quite the same as being televised (in this case you can’t turn the sermon off), I still have to believe this has an effect on the giving and receiving of the sermon.

  • bkw

    Bror –
    We live in Riverton and currently attend Light of the Valley Lutheran – maybe we’ll take a field trip one day and drive out to Tooele. It would be nice to meet you in person.

  • bkw

    Bror –
    We live in Riverton and currently attend Light of the Valley Lutheran – maybe we’ll take a field trip one day and drive out to Tooele. It would be nice to meet you in person.

  • LAJ

    God’s Word comes through even in less gifted preachers, perhaps better because he may approach his task in humility. Doesn’t St. Paul write that he did not try to wow people with clever phrases or something like that? For those who believe that it is their decision to come to faith, do they really think God works through the Word or directly on their hearts?

  • LAJ

    God’s Word comes through even in less gifted preachers, perhaps better because he may approach his task in humility. Doesn’t St. Paul write that he did not try to wow people with clever phrases or something like that? For those who believe that it is their decision to come to faith, do they really think God works through the Word or directly on their hearts?

  • http://debsueknit.blogspot.com DebbieQ

    We attend a church that currently has two satellite campuses. Each campus has a “Campus pastor” who preaches a certain number of Sundays a year. For one year we attend one of the satellite campuses to help it get “off the ground” but found the watching the sermon on a big screen so not to our liking. We are now back at the main campus.

  • http://debsueknit.blogspot.com DebbieQ

    We attend a church that currently has two satellite campuses. Each campus has a “Campus pastor” who preaches a certain number of Sundays a year. For one year we attend one of the satellite campuses to help it get “off the ground” but found the watching the sermon on a big screen so not to our liking. We are now back at the main campus.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Dan @ 24,
    So what are your thoughts on Luther? Ever read any of his statements concerning the many false teachers of his day?
    Perhaps I am not Luther, and would never claim to be. But I’m calling it like I see it here. My stomach turns when I see a 4 year old beat to death. My stomach turns when I see God’s word being perverted, and the masses running to have their ears tickled in the name of Christ.
    See the thing is I’m not sure these guys doing this kind of stuff are servants of God. That is the point.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Dan @ 24,
    So what are your thoughts on Luther? Ever read any of his statements concerning the many false teachers of his day?
    Perhaps I am not Luther, and would never claim to be. But I’m calling it like I see it here. My stomach turns when I see a 4 year old beat to death. My stomach turns when I see God’s word being perverted, and the masses running to have their ears tickled in the name of Christ.
    See the thing is I’m not sure these guys doing this kind of stuff are servants of God. That is the point.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    bkw,
    Wouldn’t worry about making a field trip out here, not when you have a pastor the quality of which you have. But there is always dart ball if you want to meet.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    bkw,
    Wouldn’t worry about making a field trip out here, not when you have a pastor the quality of which you have. But there is always dart ball if you want to meet.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Trotk@23,
    Right! Precisely the problem, you can’t shepherd from a distance. And preaching is part of shepherding. The two should not be divorced. It may be good and salutary to have guest pastors preach from time to time. But the people need to hear from their shepherd on a regular basis. It should be the shepherd in the pulpit that visits. Not a “campus pastor”.
    This article exposes the deplorable state of pastoral education today. Awful that people. Think the sermon can be divorced from a pastor,s program of pastoral care.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Trotk@23,
    Right! Precisely the problem, you can’t shepherd from a distance. And preaching is part of shepherding. The two should not be divorced. It may be good and salutary to have guest pastors preach from time to time. But the people need to hear from their shepherd on a regular basis. It should be the shepherd in the pulpit that visits. Not a “campus pastor”.
    This article exposes the deplorable state of pastoral education today. Awful that people. Think the sermon can be divorced from a pastor,s program of pastoral care.


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