Deep-fried beer & chicken-fried bacon

Texas cuisine. . . .

The beer is placed inside a pocket of salty, pretzel-like dough and then dunked in oil at 375 degrees for about 20 seconds, a short enough time for the confection to remain alcoholic.

When diners take a bite the hot beer mixes with the dough in what is claimed to be a delicious taste sensation.

Inventor Mark Zable said it had taken him three years to come up with the cooking method and a patent for the process is pending. He declined to say whether any special ingredients were involved.

His deep-fried beer will be officially unveiled in a fried food competition at the Texas state fair later this month.

Five ravioli-like pieces will sell for $5 (£3) and the Texas Alcoholic Commission has already ruled that people must be aged over 21 to try it.

Mr Zable has so far been deep frying Guinness but said he may switch to a pale ale in future.

He said: “Nobody has been able to fry a liquid before. It tastes like you took a bite of hot pretzel dough and then took a drink of beer.” Mr Zable previously invented dishes including chocolate-covered strawberry waffle balls and jalapeño corndog shrimps.

Last year’s winner of the Texas state fair fried food competition was a recipe for deep-fried butter.

via Deep-fried beer invented in Texas – Telegraph.

HT: The Pearcey Report

Would you like some chicken-fried bacon with that?

Occasionally throughout history, a visionary comes along who should be honored for his Herculean efforts in swimming upstream against the tide of political correctness.

Such a man is Frank Sodolak, who is pretty darned sure he invented chicken-fried bacon.

“I ain’t never heard of it anywhere else,” Sodolak said. 

Sodolak, owner of Sodolak’s Original Country Inn in this small town (population 489) about 13 miles southwest of College Station — that’s about 100 miles northeast of Austin — serves the breaded and deep-fried bacon as one of his appetizers. For that totally brown meal, he says some people order it as an appetizer to go with their chicken-fried steak. . .

Sodolak makes his chicken-fried bacon by double-dipping uncooked bacon strips in milk and flour. Then he tosses the breaded strips in a Fryolator and nukes them in animal/vegetable oil for three or four minutes.

For that final touch, the chicken-fried bacon is served with a bowl of cream gravy. . . .

“I’ve never heard of anything worse,” said Jayne Hurley, senior nutritionist at the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington D.C., the same bunch of food frumps who warned us about theater popcorn, guacamole and Chinese food.

“They’ve taken fat, they’ve doubled-coated it in fat, they’ve fried it in more fat, and then served it with a side order of fat.”

HT:  George Clay

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Winston Smith

    I want some of each . With a Diet Coke.

  • Winston Smith

    I want some of each . With a Diet Coke.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    hmmmmmmmm. Bacon!

    “[Bacon], doubled-coated in fat, fried in more fat, and then served with a side order of fat.”

    This is how I imagine bacon will be served in heaven. :P

  • Bryan Lindemood

    hmmmmmmmm. Bacon!

    “[Bacon], doubled-coated in fat, fried in more fat, and then served with a side order of fat.”

    This is how I imagine bacon will be served in heaven. :P

  • Mary Jack

    Senior nutritionist, what ever happened to applauding human ingenuity? This stuff sounds AWESOME! Let’s keep our curiosity alive & our bellies full!

  • Mary Jack

    Senior nutritionist, what ever happened to applauding human ingenuity? This stuff sounds AWESOME! Let’s keep our curiosity alive & our bellies full!

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg
  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg
  • Booklover

    Everything sounded delicious until I read “deep-fried butter” and “CREAM GRAVY” into which the chicken fried bacon is dipped. Horrors!! But I suppose I would try the cream gravy if someone put it under my nose. . .

    And Jane Hurley is a food frump. Gaucamole and chinese food are great!!

    When I was little, my mom used to wrap bacon around weiners then broil it. But I was skinny then and it was OK. We were German, so most of our foodstuffs were drenched in butter and cream. Or offered with some form of bread–kuchen, rye, bierock, kloesse. . .

  • Booklover

    Everything sounded delicious until I read “deep-fried butter” and “CREAM GRAVY” into which the chicken fried bacon is dipped. Horrors!! But I suppose I would try the cream gravy if someone put it under my nose. . .

    And Jane Hurley is a food frump. Gaucamole and chinese food are great!!

    When I was little, my mom used to wrap bacon around weiners then broil it. But I was skinny then and it was OK. We were German, so most of our foodstuffs were drenched in butter and cream. Or offered with some form of bread–kuchen, rye, bierock, kloesse. . .

  • Louis

    Booklover – if you read Julia Child, it is apparent that there is almost nothing you can’t fix with some butter and/or cream.

  • Louis

    Booklover – if you read Julia Child, it is apparent that there is almost nothing you can’t fix with some butter and/or cream.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dr. Veith, I realize you’re from Oklahoma, but there’s no need to slander the good folks south of the Red River by calling this “Texas cuisine”. Let’s be honest and call it what it is: state-fair fare.

    And the reason that you always read stories about the ridiculous things being concocted at the Texas State Fair is that there is market pressure driving it. Since 2005, the fair has held the Big Tex Choice Awards for both “most creative” foods and those with “best taste”. According to the fair’s site, “Entries must be new to the Fair, unique and taste-tempting.” Of course, the winner gets trumpeted in press releases which, naturally, are treated as “news” by our delightful media (state, national, and international — the last two sometimes focusing on the “news of the weird” or even just the “aren’t these people freaks” aspect). These news stories naturally create interest and demand. All of which creates a perfect environment for someone to try something even crazier and more over-the-top than last year. Resulting in this list:

    2005 Most Creative: Viva Las Vegas Fried Ice Cream
    2005 Best Taste: Fried PB, Jelly and Banana Sandwich
    2006 Most Creative: Fried Coke
    2006 Best Taste: Fried Praline Perfection
    2007 Most Creative: Deep Fried Latte
    2007 Best Taste: Texas Fried Cookie Dough
    2008 Most Creative: Fried Banana Split
    2008 Best Taste: Chicken Fried Bacon
    2009 Most Creative: Deep Fried Butter
    2009 Best Taste: Fernie’s Deep Fried Peaches & Cream

    Clearly, “creativity” and uniqueness are soldly limited to the realm of frying, as no one can think outside of that crispy, brown box. And though “Fried Coke” has been around since 2006, I’ve read it was really only a batter with Coke syrup in it. Lately, the entrants have been pushing the bounds of frying liquids, as the other finalists from this year make clear:

    Deep Fried S’mores Pop•Tart®
    Fried Beer™
    Fried Chocolate
    Deep Fried Frozen Margarita
    Fried Lemonade
    Fernie’s Fried Club Salad
    Fried Texas Caviar
    Texas Fried Frito® Pie

    And even if some of the products do end up being quite tasty, I think the thing is all a ridiculous spectacle, and nothing more. It’s about innovation and technology, not food.

    I don’t know how much longer they can keep it up, though. Deep-fried butter seems to be the logical end of one arm of exploration. I guess you could slightly top that with deep-fried lard, sure, but meh. Degree, not kind.

    And though I’ve never made deep-fried bacon myself, I’ve often joked about it with my friends (yes, who lived in Texas with me) as just a logical step in the deep-fry craze. Myself, I’m wondering when we’ll finally see someone make what I call a “fry crystal”. Here’s how it would work: you take a bit of crispy, fried dough (like you used to find on the bottom of Long John Silvers fish platters), batter it, and fry it. It grows slightly larger. You repeat. Many times. Layer upon layer of fry is added. Ta-da! Fry crystal.

    When we came up with the idea a long time ago, we were being ridiculous. It’s only a matter of time now, though, before someone in Texas realizes this silly idea.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dr. Veith, I realize you’re from Oklahoma, but there’s no need to slander the good folks south of the Red River by calling this “Texas cuisine”. Let’s be honest and call it what it is: state-fair fare.

    And the reason that you always read stories about the ridiculous things being concocted at the Texas State Fair is that there is market pressure driving it. Since 2005, the fair has held the Big Tex Choice Awards for both “most creative” foods and those with “best taste”. According to the fair’s site, “Entries must be new to the Fair, unique and taste-tempting.” Of course, the winner gets trumpeted in press releases which, naturally, are treated as “news” by our delightful media (state, national, and international — the last two sometimes focusing on the “news of the weird” or even just the “aren’t these people freaks” aspect). These news stories naturally create interest and demand. All of which creates a perfect environment for someone to try something even crazier and more over-the-top than last year. Resulting in this list:

    2005 Most Creative: Viva Las Vegas Fried Ice Cream
    2005 Best Taste: Fried PB, Jelly and Banana Sandwich
    2006 Most Creative: Fried Coke
    2006 Best Taste: Fried Praline Perfection
    2007 Most Creative: Deep Fried Latte
    2007 Best Taste: Texas Fried Cookie Dough
    2008 Most Creative: Fried Banana Split
    2008 Best Taste: Chicken Fried Bacon
    2009 Most Creative: Deep Fried Butter
    2009 Best Taste: Fernie’s Deep Fried Peaches & Cream

    Clearly, “creativity” and uniqueness are soldly limited to the realm of frying, as no one can think outside of that crispy, brown box. And though “Fried Coke” has been around since 2006, I’ve read it was really only a batter with Coke syrup in it. Lately, the entrants have been pushing the bounds of frying liquids, as the other finalists from this year make clear:

    Deep Fried S’mores Pop•Tart®
    Fried Beer™
    Fried Chocolate
    Deep Fried Frozen Margarita
    Fried Lemonade
    Fernie’s Fried Club Salad
    Fried Texas Caviar
    Texas Fried Frito® Pie

    And even if some of the products do end up being quite tasty, I think the thing is all a ridiculous spectacle, and nothing more. It’s about innovation and technology, not food.

    I don’t know how much longer they can keep it up, though. Deep-fried butter seems to be the logical end of one arm of exploration. I guess you could slightly top that with deep-fried lard, sure, but meh. Degree, not kind.

    And though I’ve never made deep-fried bacon myself, I’ve often joked about it with my friends (yes, who lived in Texas with me) as just a logical step in the deep-fry craze. Myself, I’m wondering when we’ll finally see someone make what I call a “fry crystal”. Here’s how it would work: you take a bit of crispy, fried dough (like you used to find on the bottom of Long John Silvers fish platters), batter it, and fry it. It grows slightly larger. You repeat. Many times. Layer upon layer of fry is added. Ta-da! Fry crystal.

    When we came up with the idea a long time ago, we were being ridiculous. It’s only a matter of time now, though, before someone in Texas realizes this silly idea.

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