Murders in Afghanistan

Five U.S. soldiers have been charged with killing  Afghan civilians for sport.  Shame, dishonor, and depravity rear their ugly heads:

In videotaped and written statements to Army investigators, Spec. Jeremy N. Morlock, 22, a member of the 5th Stryker Combat Brigade, admitted his involvement in the killings, which took place in Kandahar province between January and May. Morlock sought to shift blame for the plot to his squad’s staff sergeant, Calvin R. Gibbs, who he said planted the idea with their unit of killing innocent Afghans for sport. . . .

Morlock, Gibbs and three other U.S. soldiers have been charged with murder in the deaths of the three Afghan civilians. In some of the grisliest allegations against American military personnel since the 2001 invasion of Iraq, they and other soldiers from their platoon also face charges of using hashish, dismembering and photographing corpses, and possessing human bones.

via Army soldier says staff sergeant plotted Afghans’ killings.

No, this is not just war.  No, it is not representative of our military or justified by the vocation of the soldier.  No, it can’t be justified by the fear of civilians wearing suicide vests.  According to everything I’ve read about it, this was active murder for its own sake.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Winston Smith

    Dr. Veith is right. This wasn’t just war. This was murder, and I am ashamed to have these men represent my country to the Afghan people.

    I’ve often thought is ironic that many of the Book of Virtues-type conservative moralists — the same ones who decry situational ethics and bemoan the lack of absolute values in post-modernist culture — will be among the first to say “well, that was wartime,” as though that makes atrocities excusable.

    There were those who defended Lt. William Calley as a hero after the My Lai massacre, and there will no doubt be some to say that these brave men were fighting to keep sharia law out of Topeka, Kansas when they made their nation-building tour into a live-action version of Grand Theft Auto III.

  • Winston Smith

    Dr. Veith is right. This wasn’t just war. This was murder, and I am ashamed to have these men represent my country to the Afghan people.

    I’ve often thought is ironic that many of the Book of Virtues-type conservative moralists — the same ones who decry situational ethics and bemoan the lack of absolute values in post-modernist culture — will be among the first to say “well, that was wartime,” as though that makes atrocities excusable.

    There were those who defended Lt. William Calley as a hero after the My Lai massacre, and there will no doubt be some to say that these brave men were fighting to keep sharia law out of Topeka, Kansas when they made their nation-building tour into a live-action version of Grand Theft Auto III.

  • Dan Kempin

    “According to everything I’ve read about it, this was active murder for its own sake.”

    Sounds like the verdict is in.

    Winston, #1,

    Great job refuting what no one has said.

  • Dan Kempin

    “According to everything I’ve read about it, this was active murder for its own sake.”

    Sounds like the verdict is in.

    Winston, #1,

    Great job refuting what no one has said.

  • Winston Smith

    “Great job refuting what no one has said.”

    Someone will. Just watch.

  • Winston Smith

    “Great job refuting what no one has said.”

    Someone will. Just watch.

  • DonS

    Clearly, based on these early accounts, there was wrongdoing. These soldiers are, of course, entitled to their day in court, but unless the stories change I don’t think you’ll see anyone on this blog defending their actions, Winston.

  • DonS

    Clearly, based on these early accounts, there was wrongdoing. These soldiers are, of course, entitled to their day in court, but unless the stories change I don’t think you’ll see anyone on this blog defending their actions, Winston.

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