When your vocation makes you miserable

T. Webb wrote this in a comment on the article:

Dr. Veith,

How I wish, oh how I wish that what you are writing were true. I hear of people who have a “dream” of doing something or other people who get up every morning excited to do whatever it is that they do, and I have no context for such things, I just can’t understand it. I have a paper pushing dead-end job, and I have nothing to look forward to. I have no dreams or aspirations. I feel like the living dead.

I replied:

T. Webb,  the doctrine is true.  But vocation means far more than “job.”  What you describe is “bearing the cross.”  Vocations do not come without trial and suffering.  But do you have a family (even if you are single do you have your parents, siblings, cousins, etc.)?  Do you have a church?   You are part of a culture.  As the article says, we have multiple vocations in the family, the church, and the culture.  And your deadend job is a calling (one many people would want in this age of unemployment).  Sometimes learning about vocation can change how you look at a job.  Does it bring neighbors into your life to love and serve?  Do you see how God is working through what you do to bless others?  (What good or service does your job provide?  Can you see that as a blessing from God?)   If you hate your work so much, though, perhaps that discontent is part of God calling you to some other line of work.  But consider the other points I’ve just raised first.  (T.Webb, this is so important and your comment so plaintive that I want to put this before the other readers of this blog in our discussions on Monday.)

What counsel could you give T. Webb?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Winston Smith

    Dead-end job? Been there, done that, got the t-shirt.

    A dead-end job may have several purposes. First, it allows you to earn money to live while you pursue activities outside of work that are more fulfilling. Secondly, it makes you grateful for fulfilling work once you do find it. Third, you may actually be doing a good and valuable service for your company, even though it bores you to tears.

    Also, unemployment will make you grateful for the regular paycheck and lousy benefits provided by the soul-killing, monotonous crummy job you have now. Yes, I’ve been unemployed, too. If being grateful isn’t considered a vocation, it ought to be.

    Anyway, T. Webb, dare to dream. Maybe the Lord has something better for you. Maybe your discontent is leading you to find something more suited to your particular talents.

  • Winston Smith

    Dead-end job? Been there, done that, got the t-shirt.

    A dead-end job may have several purposes. First, it allows you to earn money to live while you pursue activities outside of work that are more fulfilling. Secondly, it makes you grateful for fulfilling work once you do find it. Third, you may actually be doing a good and valuable service for your company, even though it bores you to tears.

    Also, unemployment will make you grateful for the regular paycheck and lousy benefits provided by the soul-killing, monotonous crummy job you have now. Yes, I’ve been unemployed, too. If being grateful isn’t considered a vocation, it ought to be.

    Anyway, T. Webb, dare to dream. Maybe the Lord has something better for you. Maybe your discontent is leading you to find something more suited to your particular talents.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    I don’t know. A dead end job is one thing. Having no dreams or aspirations is another thing completely. I might be the living dead too if I had no dreams or aspirations. And I truly love my job, and my vocations.
    So I think my advice would be start dreaming, dream away. Ask yourself why it is you have no aspirations.
    If nothing else go to the book store, and look at the magazines and find something to dream about. Or read a few books to help you with all that. Find a hobby to enjoy. And don’t let your girlfriend decide what your dreams are going to be.
    A dead end job that you despise might become just a little more tolerable if you have something to look forward to for all your work.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    I don’t know. A dead end job is one thing. Having no dreams or aspirations is another thing completely. I might be the living dead too if I had no dreams or aspirations. And I truly love my job, and my vocations.
    So I think my advice would be start dreaming, dream away. Ask yourself why it is you have no aspirations.
    If nothing else go to the book store, and look at the magazines and find something to dream about. Or read a few books to help you with all that. Find a hobby to enjoy. And don’t let your girlfriend decide what your dreams are going to be.
    A dead end job that you despise might become just a little more tolerable if you have something to look forward to for all your work.

  • Mary Jack

    Sometimes a Christian can recognize his vocation precisely because it can be a such a burden. Being a Christian isn’t about pursuing happiness or escaping misery. (Though there are A LOT more miserable things than a modern job .) But recognizing how God is at work through you in service to others is something for the here and now as we walk “through the valley” and see all the sheep & goats walking along with us.

    I really think of vocation in terms of need, not aspirations or dreams. It cuts through some of the cultural buildup in my thinking that otherwise burdens me even further. That does couple with aspirations though because in such a diverse population, we often are given the opportunities to pursue all sorts of ideas, skills, and talents. So really, I guess I balance Christian vocation as needs/ obligations but also opportunities.

  • Mary Jack

    Sometimes a Christian can recognize his vocation precisely because it can be a such a burden. Being a Christian isn’t about pursuing happiness or escaping misery. (Though there are A LOT more miserable things than a modern job .) But recognizing how God is at work through you in service to others is something for the here and now as we walk “through the valley” and see all the sheep & goats walking along with us.

    I really think of vocation in terms of need, not aspirations or dreams. It cuts through some of the cultural buildup in my thinking that otherwise burdens me even further. That does couple with aspirations though because in such a diverse population, we often are given the opportunities to pursue all sorts of ideas, skills, and talents. So really, I guess I balance Christian vocation as needs/ obligations but also opportunities.

  • Tom Hering

    A lousy job can strengthen character. By making the decision to do the best you can do in your lousy job – which won’t be anything close to the best you could do in a fulfilling job – but will still be the best you can do in your situation. (P.S. I’ve never had anything but unfulfilling jobs.)

  • Tom Hering

    A lousy job can strengthen character. By making the decision to do the best you can do in your lousy job – which won’t be anything close to the best you could do in a fulfilling job – but will still be the best you can do in your situation. (P.S. I’ve never had anything but unfulfilling jobs.)

  • Winston Smith

    You hear a lot (or read articles about) finding your dream job. I am still searching for my dream job, and would leap on it with both feet if I could find it, but when you come right down to it, work isn’t supposed to be fun. It’s work, which is why they pay you to do it. Every job — even the really interesting ones — has its moments, or hours, or days, of pure drudgery. Vocation, as Dr. Veith correctly notes, involves sacrifice.

    It’s true that temporal happiness is not promised to the Christian. That is not to say that one shouldn’t try to to find the best use for one’s gifts and talents. Struggling with an unsatisfying job may build character, but a person in a fulfilling job will do better work than one who is ill-suited to his task. If it hurts to hit your hand with a hammer, maybe you should stop.

  • Winston Smith

    You hear a lot (or read articles about) finding your dream job. I am still searching for my dream job, and would leap on it with both feet if I could find it, but when you come right down to it, work isn’t supposed to be fun. It’s work, which is why they pay you to do it. Every job — even the really interesting ones — has its moments, or hours, or days, of pure drudgery. Vocation, as Dr. Veith correctly notes, involves sacrifice.

    It’s true that temporal happiness is not promised to the Christian. That is not to say that one shouldn’t try to to find the best use for one’s gifts and talents. Struggling with an unsatisfying job may build character, but a person in a fulfilling job will do better work than one who is ill-suited to his task. If it hurts to hit your hand with a hammer, maybe you should stop.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Winston @ 5.
    I was not talking at 2 about reading articles to find a dream job. I was talking about reading articles to find a dream, an aspiration. Some people don’t dream well. Writers tend to do a good job of that, they make a living selling dreams, and I think T. Webb, just might profit himself a little buying one.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Winston @ 5.
    I was not talking at 2 about reading articles to find a dream job. I was talking about reading articles to find a dream, an aspiration. Some people don’t dream well. Writers tend to do a good job of that, they make a living selling dreams, and I think T. Webb, just might profit himself a little buying one.

  • http://RoseFremer@yahoo.com Rose

    Silver miners in Kutna Hora, Czech Republic, had to climb ladders for 2 hours after work to return home. This was 2 centuries ago.
    I like to think each one had a warm wife waiting for him who appreciated his sacrifice. There was no Women’s Movement then.
    No matter what his work, my husband shows me the Christ in his self sacrifice and devotion to our family by working so hard.
    I try to remember to thank him each day.

  • http://RoseFremer@yahoo.com Rose

    Silver miners in Kutna Hora, Czech Republic, had to climb ladders for 2 hours after work to return home. This was 2 centuries ago.
    I like to think each one had a warm wife waiting for him who appreciated his sacrifice. There was no Women’s Movement then.
    No matter what his work, my husband shows me the Christ in his self sacrifice and devotion to our family by working so hard.
    I try to remember to thank him each day.

  • Winston Smith

    Actually, Bror, I wasn’t responding to your comment at all. I do a lot of that kind of reading myself. In fact, I probably need to take my own advice to T. Webb and dream a little bigger too. As I say, I have been where he is and know the feeling well.

  • Winston Smith

    Actually, Bror, I wasn’t responding to your comment at all. I do a lot of that kind of reading myself. In fact, I probably need to take my own advice to T. Webb and dream a little bigger too. As I say, I have been where he is and know the feeling well.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Winston,
    I just wasn’t sure and wanted to clarify.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Winston,
    I just wasn’t sure and wanted to clarify.

  • Porcell

    My experience is that most work is about three quarters routine, though this needs to be done to the best of one’s ability in order to finally enjoy it.

    In a philosophy course my professor was asked what in his view is the best vocation. He referred us to a well known traffic policeman at a very difficult intersection whom every one new day in and day out did superb work often with joy and then remarked that any job done superbly may be regarded as excellent; further that to rank jobs would be futile.

    Jim Glassman in an AEI article Even Workers with “McJobs” Deserve Respect writes:

    Some 1,200 owners of McDonald’s restaurants started as crew members (no dead end for them!). So did twenty of McDonald’s fifty top worldwide managers, among them Jim Skinner, McDonald’s CEO, who told Dow Jones that what he learned from his early experience was self-confidence: ‘I hadn’t dealt with the public before then.’

    The notion of menial and “dead end” jobs is flawed.

  • Porcell

    My experience is that most work is about three quarters routine, though this needs to be done to the best of one’s ability in order to finally enjoy it.

    In a philosophy course my professor was asked what in his view is the best vocation. He referred us to a well known traffic policeman at a very difficult intersection whom every one new day in and day out did superb work often with joy and then remarked that any job done superbly may be regarded as excellent; further that to rank jobs would be futile.

    Jim Glassman in an AEI article Even Workers with “McJobs” Deserve Respect writes:

    Some 1,200 owners of McDonald’s restaurants started as crew members (no dead end for them!). So did twenty of McDonald’s fifty top worldwide managers, among them Jim Skinner, McDonald’s CEO, who told Dow Jones that what he learned from his early experience was self-confidence: ‘I hadn’t dealt with the public before then.’

    The notion of menial and “dead end” jobs is flawed.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    T. Webb,

    It sounds to me that you might be suffering from severe depression. Go to your doctor and let him/her know what you are feeling.

    Having suffered from it myself, your situation sounds familiar. There may be medications that can help.
    During my bouts of depression I did what I could to mitigate it (in addition to temporary medication) like working out and surrounding myself with people/things/activities that I love, and minimizing my exposure to the opposite when possible.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    T. Webb,

    It sounds to me that you might be suffering from severe depression. Go to your doctor and let him/her know what you are feeling.

    Having suffered from it myself, your situation sounds familiar. There may be medications that can help.
    During my bouts of depression I did what I could to mitigate it (in addition to temporary medication) like working out and surrounding myself with people/things/activities that I love, and minimizing my exposure to the opposite when possible.

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    pat @ 11

    what patrick says.

    we like to look for a spiritual solution, when a more immediate and practical solution is right before our nose.

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    pat @ 11

    what patrick says.

    we like to look for a spiritual solution, when a more immediate and practical solution is right before our nose.

  • kerner

    I was surfing for a completely different reason when I found a video by the guys who did the Bar-B-Q song Dr. Veith posted awhile ago. These guys were just trying to be funny when they swerved into making a point about vocation by finding some fast food workers who took theirs seriously. If you take your vocations seriously, there is no such thing as a dead end job.

    You have to watch it till the end to see what I mean.

  • kerner

    I was surfing for a completely different reason when I found a video by the guys who did the Bar-B-Q song Dr. Veith posted awhile ago. These guys were just trying to be funny when they swerved into making a point about vocation by finding some fast food workers who took theirs seriously. If you take your vocations seriously, there is no such thing as a dead end job.

    You have to watch it till the end to see what I mean.

  • kerner

    Let’s try that link again (I think the zero was a capital O

  • kerner

    Let’s try that link again (I think the zero was a capital O

  • kerner

    Let’s try that link one more time.

  • kerner

    Let’s try that link one more time.

  • kerner

    at last.

  • kerner

    at last.

  • helen

    I suppose most people walking past my desk see a person doing a paper pushing dead-end job.
    (With the present contraction in public education, it’s almost certainly “dead-end” and probably not as secure as I’d like either.) Nearly all the journals here pass through my hands for binding into hard cover books. A supervising Librarian, recognizing that it might be tedious, encouraged me to take the small satisfactions.
    As long as I complete my tasks I can take a break to read an interesting article or copy it for reading later.

    I was recently moved to a “cubicle”, a first for me. Mine is made habitable by pictures of scenes which portray water, green hills and distance. From time to time I bring a handful of flowers for my desk; others have left notes or told me that they are grateful for those to brighten their own day. :)

    This is a “second career”; I got my Master’s degree when my peers were looking forward to retirement.
    I live simply so that I can share what I earn; that is one of my reasons for being.
    I have the blessing of a church whose activities I enjoy and some young friends to keep me from feeling too old.

    All that said, I have recently watched a young man in his 30′s be miserable for a couple of years in a situation not so different from mine. Taking demanding classes to learn new skills (and then, I think, a romance which led to marriage in June) improved his outlook!

  • helen

    I suppose most people walking past my desk see a person doing a paper pushing dead-end job.
    (With the present contraction in public education, it’s almost certainly “dead-end” and probably not as secure as I’d like either.) Nearly all the journals here pass through my hands for binding into hard cover books. A supervising Librarian, recognizing that it might be tedious, encouraged me to take the small satisfactions.
    As long as I complete my tasks I can take a break to read an interesting article or copy it for reading later.

    I was recently moved to a “cubicle”, a first for me. Mine is made habitable by pictures of scenes which portray water, green hills and distance. From time to time I bring a handful of flowers for my desk; others have left notes or told me that they are grateful for those to brighten their own day. :)

    This is a “second career”; I got my Master’s degree when my peers were looking forward to retirement.
    I live simply so that I can share what I earn; that is one of my reasons for being.
    I have the blessing of a church whose activities I enjoy and some young friends to keep me from feeling too old.

    All that said, I have recently watched a young man in his 30′s be miserable for a couple of years in a situation not so different from mine. Taking demanding classes to learn new skills (and then, I think, a romance which led to marriage in June) improved his outlook!

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “The notion of menial and “dead end” jobs is flawed.”

    When I was in 9th grade, my English teacher (whom I didn’t like) had a poster on the wall of a close up of someone ladling soup from a big pot into bowls. The caption was, “The Dignity of Work”

    I have to say that really impressed upon me the notion that all honest work deserves respect, not only from others but also for the individual himself.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “The notion of menial and “dead end” jobs is flawed.”

    When I was in 9th grade, my English teacher (whom I didn’t like) had a poster on the wall of a close up of someone ladling soup from a big pot into bowls. The caption was, “The Dignity of Work”

    I have to say that really impressed upon me the notion that all honest work deserves respect, not only from others but also for the individual himself.

  • Tonestaple

    T. Webb, you should absolutely be evaluated for depression. And if the doctor recommends medication, do it (although do research first so you can ask lots of questions about both depression and medication). I will tell you that, although I don’t think I hated my job as much as you seem to hate yours, taking medicine for depression has lifted a veil for me and I can see a whole lot more possibility, and come up with a whole lot more ideas about what I can do that will make me happier than sitting at a desk for 9 hours a day with some dreadful people. The medicine won’t make your job better, unless it’s really truly not as awful as you think it is now. The medicine may make it possible for you to see more possibilities.

  • Tonestaple

    T. Webb, you should absolutely be evaluated for depression. And if the doctor recommends medication, do it (although do research first so you can ask lots of questions about both depression and medication). I will tell you that, although I don’t think I hated my job as much as you seem to hate yours, taking medicine for depression has lifted a veil for me and I can see a whole lot more possibility, and come up with a whole lot more ideas about what I can do that will make me happier than sitting at a desk for 9 hours a day with some dreadful people. The medicine won’t make your job better, unless it’s really truly not as awful as you think it is now. The medicine may make it possible for you to see more possibilities.

  • Matt

    T.Webb

    Man, I feel your pain! I’ve been dealing with this for about 10 years! I have a family, I make good money, But I hate what I do and it’s done some dark things to me! I almost walked from the faith in doubt. That darkness can be spiritual or physical, or both. So, I like the comment about depression/exercise etc.

    But from a spiritual perspective, bearing the cross in vocation leads to brokenness, big time! In that darkness, I was forced to confront my deepest idols ( Read Tim Keller’s counterfeit Gods). And I realized my part in the darkness was based on unbelief in the glory of the gospel. I simply disbelieved that sweetness of Christ is sufficient to comfort me in my suffering. The glory of my justification should be enough for me to draw comfort and spiritual power through any suffering. That wasn’t the answer I was hoping for!

    So, through deep prayer, God drew me deeper into the gospel. Now gospel centered, I realized my gospel was so small, it was just a formative step, and I believed it was really for unbelievers- WRONG!! The gospel isn’t just for our justification, it glory and sweetness also mortifies idolatry and vivifies our affections for God. So instead of trusting to achieve comfort in my job, I rest in the comfort Christ achieved for me on the cross.

    The other thing that really helped, was gospel centered worship! I just kept my soul in the gospel, always to draw the comfort of the cross.

    So I realized God has been there the whole time melting me to draw into the good news. I still have some really bad days and you better believe I long for heaven, I long to be redeemed from this life. And low and behold, I feel like Paul in Philippians, ‘to depart and be with Christ’.

    So the argument is: what is better to have a good job, or suffer in your labor, If by suffering, I see the glory of the cross so much better, than I would in a fulfilling job? Which brings more glory to God? Which is more beautiful? God has been trying to get me to see his glory, so the job has been a tool to bring me to real contentment and peace, in the gospel. That’s the daily battle of bearing the cross.

    So the logical conclusion is that I must praise him for my situation! I can’t believe I just wrote that!! My work situation , BTW, hasn’t changed, and there is no sign it will change, until I retire!

    So from the spiritual perspective, I would ask you do have you looked at your idols? Do you have a small gospel? Do you have a gospel centered theology of suffering? Are you in community? Do you have some sweet worship music? Have you read Veith and Luther on vocation?

    Sorry this is so long everyone, but I know what this can do to the soul, it’s a real crisis! But God is in it, forming, shaping, and doing something amazing and beautiful through the gospel.

  • Matt

    T.Webb

    Man, I feel your pain! I’ve been dealing with this for about 10 years! I have a family, I make good money, But I hate what I do and it’s done some dark things to me! I almost walked from the faith in doubt. That darkness can be spiritual or physical, or both. So, I like the comment about depression/exercise etc.

    But from a spiritual perspective, bearing the cross in vocation leads to brokenness, big time! In that darkness, I was forced to confront my deepest idols ( Read Tim Keller’s counterfeit Gods). And I realized my part in the darkness was based on unbelief in the glory of the gospel. I simply disbelieved that sweetness of Christ is sufficient to comfort me in my suffering. The glory of my justification should be enough for me to draw comfort and spiritual power through any suffering. That wasn’t the answer I was hoping for!

    So, through deep prayer, God drew me deeper into the gospel. Now gospel centered, I realized my gospel was so small, it was just a formative step, and I believed it was really for unbelievers- WRONG!! The gospel isn’t just for our justification, it glory and sweetness also mortifies idolatry and vivifies our affections for God. So instead of trusting to achieve comfort in my job, I rest in the comfort Christ achieved for me on the cross.

    The other thing that really helped, was gospel centered worship! I just kept my soul in the gospel, always to draw the comfort of the cross.

    So I realized God has been there the whole time melting me to draw into the good news. I still have some really bad days and you better believe I long for heaven, I long to be redeemed from this life. And low and behold, I feel like Paul in Philippians, ‘to depart and be with Christ’.

    So the argument is: what is better to have a good job, or suffer in your labor, If by suffering, I see the glory of the cross so much better, than I would in a fulfilling job? Which brings more glory to God? Which is more beautiful? God has been trying to get me to see his glory, so the job has been a tool to bring me to real contentment and peace, in the gospel. That’s the daily battle of bearing the cross.

    So the logical conclusion is that I must praise him for my situation! I can’t believe I just wrote that!! My work situation , BTW, hasn’t changed, and there is no sign it will change, until I retire!

    So from the spiritual perspective, I would ask you do have you looked at your idols? Do you have a small gospel? Do you have a gospel centered theology of suffering? Are you in community? Do you have some sweet worship music? Have you read Veith and Luther on vocation?

    Sorry this is so long everyone, but I know what this can do to the soul, it’s a real crisis! But God is in it, forming, shaping, and doing something amazing and beautiful through the gospel.

  • Jacob

    T. Webb,
    I have had times when I felt similar to what you are feeling – I have had periods of years where nothing seemed to go right and I felt like I was digging myself into a deep hole. I have had times where I had nothing but doubts and opposition and not a kind word from anyone. Years of that. Really bleak.

    I agree with others who say you seem like you are depressed. I think you need some help in finding perspective. That does not mean that if you are in a bad situation you should somehow “snap out of it” and feel good about the bad situation. If you are in a situation where you are being treated badly or taken advantage of, I hope you can find help in getting a perspective on your situation. It is not enough to leave a bad situation – you also should have an idea of where you should be going. That is where you need to “snap out of it” enough to discover or re-discover some dreams and goals.

    Have you taken any aptitude or personality tests to see what kind of work you might enjoy? For example, if you are good at numbers and you like to talk with people, that might indicate one career direction. If you are good at math but don’t like talking to people, that might indicate a different direction. And so on. A career counsellor should be able to help you discover what sort of work would suit you better.

    There is also a spiritual element in depression and in figuring out what to do in life. You might have to forgive people of some things before you can let go and move on. I still have to deal with feelings of bitterness and self-righteousness. I am doing better with such things than I used to but I know this side of heaven I will never “arrive.” Sometimes all you can do is muddle through even though things are not right or fair.

  • Jacob

    T. Webb,
    I have had times when I felt similar to what you are feeling – I have had periods of years where nothing seemed to go right and I felt like I was digging myself into a deep hole. I have had times where I had nothing but doubts and opposition and not a kind word from anyone. Years of that. Really bleak.

    I agree with others who say you seem like you are depressed. I think you need some help in finding perspective. That does not mean that if you are in a bad situation you should somehow “snap out of it” and feel good about the bad situation. If you are in a situation where you are being treated badly or taken advantage of, I hope you can find help in getting a perspective on your situation. It is not enough to leave a bad situation – you also should have an idea of where you should be going. That is where you need to “snap out of it” enough to discover or re-discover some dreams and goals.

    Have you taken any aptitude or personality tests to see what kind of work you might enjoy? For example, if you are good at numbers and you like to talk with people, that might indicate one career direction. If you are good at math but don’t like talking to people, that might indicate a different direction. And so on. A career counsellor should be able to help you discover what sort of work would suit you better.

    There is also a spiritual element in depression and in figuring out what to do in life. You might have to forgive people of some things before you can let go and move on. I still have to deal with feelings of bitterness and self-righteousness. I am doing better with such things than I used to but I know this side of heaven I will never “arrive.” Sometimes all you can do is muddle through even though things are not right or fair.

  • Booklover

    “I have a paper pushing dead-end job, and I have nothing to look forward to. I have no dreams or aspirations.”

    T Webb, I have nothing of eloquence to add, other than that I’ve said a prayer for you. But I thought I’d tell you something that I have tried. Can you plan one thing every week or two that you can look forward to all week, to keep you from the rut? Like just a meeting with friends on a patio? Or a walk with a friend on a hill overlooking the city?

    Or, is there something you can do in your off-hours that fits your true vocation; something, again, that you can look forward to through all the drudgery? My husband’s calling was to coach, but that wasn’t his job. He volunteered as a Little Guy Football coach and loved it and lived for it, and I think it helped him get through the day.

  • Booklover

    “I have a paper pushing dead-end job, and I have nothing to look forward to. I have no dreams or aspirations.”

    T Webb, I have nothing of eloquence to add, other than that I’ve said a prayer for you. But I thought I’d tell you something that I have tried. Can you plan one thing every week or two that you can look forward to all week, to keep you from the rut? Like just a meeting with friends on a patio? Or a walk with a friend on a hill overlooking the city?

    Or, is there something you can do in your off-hours that fits your true vocation; something, again, that you can look forward to through all the drudgery? My husband’s calling was to coach, but that wasn’t his job. He volunteered as a Little Guy Football coach and loved it and lived for it, and I think it helped him get through the day.

  • Richard

    Matt,

    Good advice! Kelller’s book, “Counterfeit Gods” is excellent! Also good are works by Paul Tripp and David Powlison. Thank you for what you said–that we need Gospel-centered lives. A nice reminder to me as I go back to work.

  • Richard

    Matt,

    Good advice! Kelller’s book, “Counterfeit Gods” is excellent! Also good are works by Paul Tripp and David Powlison. Thank you for what you said–that we need Gospel-centered lives. A nice reminder to me as I go back to work.


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