Come, Lord Jesus

It’s Advent!   I love how the Advent hymns, Scripture readings, and sermons focus on all of the different senses of Jesus’s coming to us.  Yes, we look forward to His coming in the events of Christmas.  But we also study the Old Testament prophecies of His coming.  We also contemplate His second coming.  And we also reflect on the way He comes to us personally in the sacraments and in His Word.

Let’s do another sermon compilation.  What insights did you have about Jesus’s coming in the first Sunday of Advent?

In whatever you are going through in your life, may Jesus come to you!

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • SKPeterson

    Our sermon focused on the OT Lesson, but primarily on how, as Advent points both towards Jesus’ birth and it points to His coming again, the OT also speaks of, and points toward, Christ. This tied in well with the Prophecy candle being lit.

  • SKPeterson

    Our sermon focused on the OT Lesson, but primarily on how, as Advent points both towards Jesus’ birth and it points to His coming again, the OT also speaks of, and points toward, Christ. This tied in well with the Prophecy candle being lit.

  • Mary Jack

    Well, Evangeline wouldn’t sleep so I missed much of the sermon, but one point I think Ned made went off Jesus had need for the donkey, not for Himself but for us, to fulfill prophecy, etc. That Jesus comes to us humbly for our sake so that, after receiving Him humbly (via donkey, via Word & Sacrament) we can receive Him in His glory. And that those who long to receive God only in glory are missing the glory of the cross, the fullness of what Christ does on our behalf.

  • Mary Jack

    Well, Evangeline wouldn’t sleep so I missed much of the sermon, but one point I think Ned made went off Jesus had need for the donkey, not for Himself but for us, to fulfill prophecy, etc. That Jesus comes to us humbly for our sake so that, after receiving Him humbly (via donkey, via Word & Sacrament) we can receive Him in His glory. And that those who long to receive God only in glory are missing the glory of the cross, the fullness of what Christ does on our behalf.

  • http://www.whenisayrunrun.blogspot.com Andrew Strickland

    The Gospel reading was from Matthew 24 which focused on Christ’s return.

  • http://www.whenisayrunrun.blogspot.com Andrew Strickland

    The Gospel reading was from Matthew 24 which focused on Christ’s return.

  • Porcell

    Our sermon came from the Word of Isaiah 2:1-5, that may be interpreted as a prophecy of the coming of the Lord of Zion, Jesus Christ and His Culture of God.

  • Porcell

    Our sermon came from the Word of Isaiah 2:1-5, that may be interpreted as a prophecy of the coming of the Lord of Zion, Jesus Christ and His Culture of God.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Christ upsets our expectations. Because we have false expectations as to who he is or what he is going to do it is easy to miss him altogether. He doesn’t satisfy our wants but our needs, and he does so via humble means.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Christ upsets our expectations. Because we have false expectations as to who he is or what he is going to do it is easy to miss him altogether. He doesn’t satisfy our wants but our needs, and he does so via humble means.

  • Booklover

    Our Gospel reading was Matthew 1:1-25, so the sermon focused on Jesus’ lineage through Joseph. It was mentioned that Matthew’s audience was the Jews, so his purposes were to show that Jesus had come from David, and that his coming fulfilled prophecy.

    It was a good sermon and we have a good Pastor, but I am confused, and saddened, as to why it is frequently pointed out that, “See, there are bad women mentioned in Jesus’ lineage. This makes it all the more Real.” There are plenty of ‘bad men’ mentioned in that line, but no comment is ever made about them. Curious. Maybe it’s just more of a surprise that women can be bad, and it’s a given that men are. :-)

  • Booklover

    Our Gospel reading was Matthew 1:1-25, so the sermon focused on Jesus’ lineage through Joseph. It was mentioned that Matthew’s audience was the Jews, so his purposes were to show that Jesus had come from David, and that his coming fulfilled prophecy.

    It was a good sermon and we have a good Pastor, but I am confused, and saddened, as to why it is frequently pointed out that, “See, there are bad women mentioned in Jesus’ lineage. This makes it all the more Real.” There are plenty of ‘bad men’ mentioned in that line, but no comment is ever made about them. Curious. Maybe it’s just more of a surprise that women can be bad, and it’s a given that men are. :-)

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    As I recall the “bad” women are more an account of how there were non Jews in the lineage and therefor being Jewish was about a bit more than bloodlines etc.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    As I recall the “bad” women are more an account of how there were non Jews in the lineage and therefor being Jewish was about a bit more than bloodlines etc.

  • Booklover

    Thank you, Bror. I hope that point wasn’t made while I wasn’t listening. :-/

  • Booklover

    Thank you, Bror. I hope that point wasn’t made while I wasn’t listening. :-/

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    Our service was on Genesis 15:1-6 drawing off Luther’s commentary on Genesis, taking the theme God’s promise giving us hope in the midst of despair. So it was a look back and a look forward.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    Our service was on Genesis 15:1-6 drawing off Luther’s commentary on Genesis, taking the theme God’s promise giving us hope in the midst of despair. So it was a look back and a look forward.

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    I thought about your post and God coming to us in word and sacrament.

    For the Pastors here, administration of word and sacrament is pure law. Their vocation is to be disciplined to plant the seed that they must then let go of in faith for the Holy Spirit to create faith in us listeners.

    Ordination then is a sacrament for pastors. They must often doubt their work and capabilities because those things are marred by sin and are lacking.

    So pastors need to trust in their ordinations. There they learn that they are “sent ones” who God has entrusted with the administration of word and sacrament in a particular place. God knows what he is doing, even or maybe especially in those times when pastors don´t.

    And pastors should be especially comforted by the example of every selection by God of those who bring his Word. Every single man and woman was chosen probably because of their lack of skill and qualifications rather than because of those.

    During advent, christmas and easter, many pastors go through a sort of stress and depression thinking that they need to really get it right to reach those who will show up at christmas and easter who usually are missing from church.

    I hope and pray that pastors allow themselves this easter season to also be ministered to by the joy and comfort of the Holy Gospel, that is alone, about invisible faith in christ, and trust that God will work in their vocation as he does in every other.

    Fact:

    There is nothing a pastor will or will neglect to do during the holy seasons that will make the difference of eternity for anyone.

    Everything a pastor does is of the earthly kingdom. It is about law, mortification, and sweat effort.

    There is nothing uniquely spiritual or sacred about it. We call the churchly things holy simply because alone through those things, God works the miracle of faith, in with and under human and sinfully administered things. But those things will all perish with the earth as being part of the flesh/body things of Romans 8.

    Faith alone, in christ alone is alone what is of the Kingdom of Heaven and Kingdom of God.

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    I thought about your post and God coming to us in word and sacrament.

    For the Pastors here, administration of word and sacrament is pure law. Their vocation is to be disciplined to plant the seed that they must then let go of in faith for the Holy Spirit to create faith in us listeners.

    Ordination then is a sacrament for pastors. They must often doubt their work and capabilities because those things are marred by sin and are lacking.

    So pastors need to trust in their ordinations. There they learn that they are “sent ones” who God has entrusted with the administration of word and sacrament in a particular place. God knows what he is doing, even or maybe especially in those times when pastors don´t.

    And pastors should be especially comforted by the example of every selection by God of those who bring his Word. Every single man and woman was chosen probably because of their lack of skill and qualifications rather than because of those.

    During advent, christmas and easter, many pastors go through a sort of stress and depression thinking that they need to really get it right to reach those who will show up at christmas and easter who usually are missing from church.

    I hope and pray that pastors allow themselves this easter season to also be ministered to by the joy and comfort of the Holy Gospel, that is alone, about invisible faith in christ, and trust that God will work in their vocation as he does in every other.

    Fact:

    There is nothing a pastor will or will neglect to do during the holy seasons that will make the difference of eternity for anyone.

    Everything a pastor does is of the earthly kingdom. It is about law, mortification, and sweat effort.

    There is nothing uniquely spiritual or sacred about it. We call the churchly things holy simply because alone through those things, God works the miracle of faith, in with and under human and sinfully administered things. But those things will all perish with the earth as being part of the flesh/body things of Romans 8.

    Faith alone, in christ alone is alone what is of the Kingdom of Heaven and Kingdom of God.

  • cattail

    Our pastor’s sermon was based on John 18:33-37 and focused on “What kind of king comes to us in this new year?” He comes to us not as a visible earthly King but as Heaven’s King who comes hidden in the Means of Grace.

  • cattail

    Our pastor’s sermon was based on John 18:33-37 and focused on “What kind of king comes to us in this new year?” He comes to us not as a visible earthly King but as Heaven’s King who comes hidden in the Means of Grace.

  • http://insidepastorkevinshead.blogspot.com/ Kevin Sorensen

    My sermon yesterday was the first in my Advent series, seeking to answer the question, “Why Did Jesus Come?” There could be dozens and dozens of answers to this question, so I’ve focused my answers based upon the 11-part series I just completed on the Ten Commandments. So, my first Advent message was “Why did Jesus come? To Fulfill,” based upon Matthew 5.17-20.

    Jesus did not come to do away with the Old Testament (the Law and the prophets). Instead, He came to fulfill them – to make known all that they pointed ahead to, namely, Himself. It’s usually easier to figure out how Jesus fulfills prophecy, especially the ones that pertain to His initial advent. But how does Jesus fulfill the Law? He becomes the perfect sacrifice and Great High Priest all in one. He is the perfect Ruler and King. And as the vastly superior Prophet, He calls us to the highest standard.

    Our righteous standard is to exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees. But how is this possible? Only if we come to Him by faith; only if we trust in His righteousness (2 Corinthians 5.21 and Titus 2.11–12).

    The remainder of my series will answer the question with these themes:
    • He came to take the curse
    • He came to be the propitiation
    • He came to save the lost

    May God bless all of you and your seeking Him this Advent season.

  • http://insidepastorkevinshead.blogspot.com/ Kevin Sorensen

    My sermon yesterday was the first in my Advent series, seeking to answer the question, “Why Did Jesus Come?” There could be dozens and dozens of answers to this question, so I’ve focused my answers based upon the 11-part series I just completed on the Ten Commandments. So, my first Advent message was “Why did Jesus come? To Fulfill,” based upon Matthew 5.17-20.

    Jesus did not come to do away with the Old Testament (the Law and the prophets). Instead, He came to fulfill them – to make known all that they pointed ahead to, namely, Himself. It’s usually easier to figure out how Jesus fulfills prophecy, especially the ones that pertain to His initial advent. But how does Jesus fulfill the Law? He becomes the perfect sacrifice and Great High Priest all in one. He is the perfect Ruler and King. And as the vastly superior Prophet, He calls us to the highest standard.

    Our righteous standard is to exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees. But how is this possible? Only if we come to Him by faith; only if we trust in His righteousness (2 Corinthians 5.21 and Titus 2.11–12).

    The remainder of my series will answer the question with these themes:
    • He came to take the curse
    • He came to be the propitiation
    • He came to save the lost

    May God bless all of you and your seeking Him this Advent season.

  • Pingback: Advent December 11 Note to Readers: Link to Poem | Moje Da Poet: Meditations & Musings

  • Pingback: Advent December 11 Note to Readers: Link to Poem | Moje Da Poet: Meditations & Musings


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