Special Election Day Edition

Today Americans go to the polls to vote.  In our ongoing discussion of those forbidden topics of religion and politics, I want to underscore that the two are, literally, different realms; that is to say, different Kingdoms.  Christianity is not about politics.  It is possible for two Christians to agree in the faith and yet disagree politically, and the former is far more important than the latter.  And yet we do have vocations as citizens, so participating in the deliberations of civil government has great value.

Anyway, today we will attend to politics and what looks to be a very interesting and potentially significant election.  In this post, feel free to comment upon the election as it unfolds:  your predictions, your local issues, what you see happening where you live, the key races, the final results.

Don’t get so caught up in online discussions that you forget to vote!

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • JD

    Do you think that Pelosi’s bay-area Giants beating the formerly Bush-owned Rangers last night is a harbinger of things to come today? ;-)

  • JD

    Do you think that Pelosi’s bay-area Giants beating the formerly Bush-owned Rangers last night is a harbinger of things to come today? ;-)

  • SKPeterson

    No, JD. It was merely one of the ephemeral victories of the Devil that we all must endure.

  • SKPeterson

    No, JD. It was merely one of the ephemeral victories of the Devil that we all must endure.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I was 8th in line at my precinct, in a northwest Minneapolis inner ring suburb, this morning. Turnout was smaller than I expected. As I believe my precinct is pretty heavily Democratic, I assume that indicates a lack of enthusiasm on that side of the ballot.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I was 8th in line at my precinct, in a northwest Minneapolis inner ring suburb, this morning. Turnout was smaller than I expected. As I believe my precinct is pretty heavily Democratic, I assume that indicates a lack of enthusiasm on that side of the ballot.

  • trotk

    Every election for the last few years I have been accosted at the doors by several democratic and progressive workers. Today the only people present to force their literature upon me were the conservatives, and there were about five of them.

    I don’t know how much those people change elections, or if they do, but it certainly reveals a lack of excitement in my district for the democratic party.

  • trotk

    Every election for the last few years I have been accosted at the doors by several democratic and progressive workers. Today the only people present to force their literature upon me were the conservatives, and there were about five of them.

    I don’t know how much those people change elections, or if they do, but it certainly reveals a lack of excitement in my district for the democratic party.

  • Kirk

    My precinct’s elections are pretty boring: a run of the mill neo-con “small government” type vs and run of the mill democrat with an environmental bent. The Democrat is the incumbent, and will win by a landslide. I’ve got to admit, motivating myself to get up early and vote this morning was tough.

  • Kirk

    My precinct’s elections are pretty boring: a run of the mill neo-con “small government” type vs and run of the mill democrat with an environmental bent. The Democrat is the incumbent, and will win by a landslide. I’ve got to admit, motivating myself to get up early and vote this morning was tough.

  • Joe

    trotk – where do you live? In most jurisdictions it is illegal to campaign at a polling place.

  • Joe

    trotk – where do you live? In most jurisdictions it is illegal to campaign at a polling place.

  • trotk

    I live in western North Carolina. I don’t know if it is illegal here (I will look it up), and I don’t know if what happens here counts as campaigning (I suppose it is all about how the law is written).

    Basically, there are workers who sit 50 feet or so from the door and press their literature in your hands. They urge you to vote for certain people verbally, as well. I have experienced this in western North Carolina ever since I moved here (2003) from eastern NC. I can’t remember whether it happened in Raleigh when I was there.

  • trotk

    I live in western North Carolina. I don’t know if it is illegal here (I will look it up), and I don’t know if what happens here counts as campaigning (I suppose it is all about how the law is written).

    Basically, there are workers who sit 50 feet or so from the door and press their literature in your hands. They urge you to vote for certain people verbally, as well. I have experienced this in western North Carolina ever since I moved here (2003) from eastern NC. I can’t remember whether it happened in Raleigh when I was there.

  • Joe

    Most of these laws have a distance requirement. I think Wisconsin’s is 50 feet from the door.

  • Joe

    Most of these laws have a distance requirement. I think Wisconsin’s is 50 feet from the door.

  • collie

    In 2008 I mindlessly accepted literature from one of the people outside the polling place, planning to place it into the nearest trashcan, but alas I forgot, and when I approached the table to register, got reprimanded to put that campaign literature away. I was stunned at first, thinking, what? Oh, yeah, so sorry! Gee, give me 50 lashes.

  • collie

    In 2008 I mindlessly accepted literature from one of the people outside the polling place, planning to place it into the nearest trashcan, but alas I forgot, and when I approached the table to register, got reprimanded to put that campaign literature away. I was stunned at first, thinking, what? Oh, yeah, so sorry! Gee, give me 50 lashes.

  • DonS

    Typically, the poll precinct captain will mark the campaigning limit (50 or 100 feet, usually — it’s 100 feet here in CA) with a sign, and the campaigners will all be clustered at that point. That was probably the case for Trotk.

  • DonS

    Typically, the poll precinct captain will mark the campaigning limit (50 or 100 feet, usually — it’s 100 feet here in CA) with a sign, and the campaigners will all be clustered at that point. That was probably the case for Trotk.

  • trotk

    Joe, I just looked it up. It is a 25′ feet here.

  • trotk

    Joe, I just looked it up. It is a 25′ feet here.

  • Kirk

    I’m interested to see some data on endorsements. Like, did Obama help or hurt in key races and is Sarah Palin’s backing helpful or a liability?

  • Kirk

    I’m interested to see some data on endorsements. Like, did Obama help or hurt in key races and is Sarah Palin’s backing helpful or a liability?

  • Kandyce

    I’m not voting today. I say this in “public” so I may be flogged, tarred, and feathered for my sin against this great republic.
    Why am I not voting? I am not registered to vote. I believe that voter registration in IL closed over a week ago. I am registered to vote in NV, and I thought for a minute about sending for an absentee ballot, since I am more well versed in NV politics than IL politics, but since I don’t have a NV address, I didn’t think that would fly. I think all the campaign ads I’ve seen over the last few weeks were pointed to MO voters anyway, and all those ads did was convince me that only crooked crooks run for office. I am a little cynical and overwhelmed this year.

  • Kandyce

    I’m not voting today. I say this in “public” so I may be flogged, tarred, and feathered for my sin against this great republic.
    Why am I not voting? I am not registered to vote. I believe that voter registration in IL closed over a week ago. I am registered to vote in NV, and I thought for a minute about sending for an absentee ballot, since I am more well versed in NV politics than IL politics, but since I don’t have a NV address, I didn’t think that would fly. I think all the campaign ads I’ve seen over the last few weeks were pointed to MO voters anyway, and all those ads did was convince me that only crooked crooks run for office. I am a little cynical and overwhelmed this year.

  • Tom Hering

    Just got back from voting, and was told that turnout has been good – in this strongly Democratic area. No campaigners outside the polling place, but there was a bake sale. 25¢ for any item.

  • Tom Hering

    Just got back from voting, and was told that turnout has been good – in this strongly Democratic area. No campaigners outside the polling place, but there was a bake sale. 25¢ for any item.

  • SKPeterson

    @Kandyce – don’t worry. If you’re in Illinois, you probably already voted early and often!

  • SKPeterson

    @Kandyce – don’t worry. If you’re in Illinois, you probably already voted early and often!

  • Kandyce

    @SK – Ha! Don’t I know it!
    I am feeling guilty for not voting, I guess all the bad decisions our elected officials make for the next two years will be my fault, huh?

  • Kandyce

    @SK – Ha! Don’t I know it!
    I am feeling guilty for not voting, I guess all the bad decisions our elected officials make for the next two years will be my fault, huh?

  • Joe

    Not your fault Kandyce, but you don’t get to complain. :)

  • Joe

    Not your fault Kandyce, but you don’t get to complain. :)

  • CRB

    This post may be more fitting for the 2nd topic, but here goes:
    I think what is at the root of change/no change/”not the change that I want!”) is very much connected to one’s religious beliefs.
    While no one should assume another’s motivation for trying to
    promote change in our country’s direction (policies on a myriad
    of important issues) are we not allowed to question “why” a
    politician wants to change something?
    For example, if a person of a particular Christian faith is very
    tied into “works rightouesness” he/she will reflect that belief
    in trying to bring about change to the populace as a whole.
    This is not to say that it is wrong in itself, but one can also be
    blinded by one’s seeking justifcation before God for one’s
    “works” all the while ignoring the potential harm of stubbornly
    resisting another view and refusing to compromise on any
    (or even all!) issues. In other words, if fear of punishment by
    God is the motivation of one’s acting in their vocation what can
    that lead to in the effects of such thinking on the citizenry of
    this country?

  • CRB

    This post may be more fitting for the 2nd topic, but here goes:
    I think what is at the root of change/no change/”not the change that I want!”) is very much connected to one’s religious beliefs.
    While no one should assume another’s motivation for trying to
    promote change in our country’s direction (policies on a myriad
    of important issues) are we not allowed to question “why” a
    politician wants to change something?
    For example, if a person of a particular Christian faith is very
    tied into “works rightouesness” he/she will reflect that belief
    in trying to bring about change to the populace as a whole.
    This is not to say that it is wrong in itself, but one can also be
    blinded by one’s seeking justifcation before God for one’s
    “works” all the while ignoring the potential harm of stubbornly
    resisting another view and refusing to compromise on any
    (or even all!) issues. In other words, if fear of punishment by
    God is the motivation of one’s acting in their vocation what can
    that lead to in the effects of such thinking on the citizenry of
    this country?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    In Oregon, everyone votes by mail, and we’ve been able to vote for several weeks now. I have my family’s sealed, signed ballots in my satchel, waiting to be dropped off today, which means I’ll likely be one of the last Oregonians to vote (though I’m sure that, just like with taxes, there’s a rush at the end). I should note that you don’t have to return the envelope by mail — I’ll be dropping mine in one of several ballot boxes around the city.

    What’s interesting about this is that there is a ton of campaign material in our polling place — in fact, I’ll bet some campaign material was dropped through the mail slot along with our ballots! :)

    Oregon appears to be relatively immune from the conservative shift this year, likely re-electing our Democratic senator, and most of our Democratic representatives. Odds are good that we will also still have a Democratic governor. If so, it’ll be part of a “retro” trend on the West Coast — we’ll have elected our governor from the 90s (and early 00s), much as California appears ready to elect a governor they had back in the 80s.

    I also predict that, no matter what happens, both the Republicans and “Tea Party” people will take credit for an electoral shift that was largely inevitable, as if they had done something other than not be Democrats.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    In Oregon, everyone votes by mail, and we’ve been able to vote for several weeks now. I have my family’s sealed, signed ballots in my satchel, waiting to be dropped off today, which means I’ll likely be one of the last Oregonians to vote (though I’m sure that, just like with taxes, there’s a rush at the end). I should note that you don’t have to return the envelope by mail — I’ll be dropping mine in one of several ballot boxes around the city.

    What’s interesting about this is that there is a ton of campaign material in our polling place — in fact, I’ll bet some campaign material was dropped through the mail slot along with our ballots! :)

    Oregon appears to be relatively immune from the conservative shift this year, likely re-electing our Democratic senator, and most of our Democratic representatives. Odds are good that we will also still have a Democratic governor. If so, it’ll be part of a “retro” trend on the West Coast — we’ll have elected our governor from the 90s (and early 00s), much as California appears ready to elect a governor they had back in the 80s.

    I also predict that, no matter what happens, both the Republicans and “Tea Party” people will take credit for an electoral shift that was largely inevitable, as if they had done something other than not be Democrats.

  • Tom Hering

    “… as if they had done something other than not be Democrats.”

    Stomp on a woman’s head?

  • Tom Hering

    “… as if they had done something other than not be Democrats.”

    Stomp on a woman’s head?

  • DonS

    “I also predict that, no matter what happens, both the Republicans and “Tea Party” people will take credit for an electoral shift that was largely inevitable, as if they had done something other than not be Democrats.”

    This probably will be true to some extent. And it will be unfortunate, because this election is most clearly a repudiation of Democrats doing the exact same thing in 2008. Republicans who are elected tonight had better be humble, and had better do what the people want them to do — shrink government, promote the economy, and address the deficit.

    I think there will be some surprises on the west coast tonight. Gallup reported this morning that there is a 19% enthusiasm gap between Republican and Democratic voters (63% of R’s are enthusiastic, while only 44% of D’s are). This is historic, as the highest gap previously recorded for midterms is 9% (in favor of D’s in 2006 and in favor of R’s in 1994). Pollsters don’t know how to model voter turnout in wave elections. For one thing, pollsters have been assuming a turnout similar to 2006 in CA because of Proposition 19 (the pot proposition). I guess they think D’s are a bunch of potheads and will turn out just for that. We’ll see. I’m wondering if the Giants winning the World Series last night and tearing up their city through the night will dampen turnout in the Bay area at all — that would be bad for D’s.

  • DonS

    “I also predict that, no matter what happens, both the Republicans and “Tea Party” people will take credit for an electoral shift that was largely inevitable, as if they had done something other than not be Democrats.”

    This probably will be true to some extent. And it will be unfortunate, because this election is most clearly a repudiation of Democrats doing the exact same thing in 2008. Republicans who are elected tonight had better be humble, and had better do what the people want them to do — shrink government, promote the economy, and address the deficit.

    I think there will be some surprises on the west coast tonight. Gallup reported this morning that there is a 19% enthusiasm gap between Republican and Democratic voters (63% of R’s are enthusiastic, while only 44% of D’s are). This is historic, as the highest gap previously recorded for midterms is 9% (in favor of D’s in 2006 and in favor of R’s in 1994). Pollsters don’t know how to model voter turnout in wave elections. For one thing, pollsters have been assuming a turnout similar to 2006 in CA because of Proposition 19 (the pot proposition). I guess they think D’s are a bunch of potheads and will turn out just for that. We’ll see. I’m wondering if the Giants winning the World Series last night and tearing up their city through the night will dampen turnout in the Bay area at all — that would be bad for D’s.

  • Grace

    California will most likely be saddled with Jerry Brown.

    The legalized marijuana won’t fly, most people don’t want legalized drugs, and that includes marijuana.

  • Grace

    California will most likely be saddled with Jerry Brown.

    The legalized marijuana won’t fly, most people don’t want legalized drugs, and that includes marijuana.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    DonS (@21), that’s an interesting factoid on “enthusiasm”, but the data only go back to 1994, I believe, so there isn’t a lot of context. If you look at the poll results, you’ll see that “enthusiasm” has, across the board, increased 13 percentage points from 1994 to now (actually, nearly all that change has taken place in the past decade). I believe what this reflects is the increasingly partisan, black-and-white, all-or-nothing, us-vs.-them nature of our political discourse.

    “Republicans who are elected tonight had better … do what the people want them to do — shrink government … and address the deficit.” See, this is the kind of starry-eyed, hopey-changey idealism that Republicans mocked Democrats for all of two years ago. It’s like you’ve never even paid attention to what the Republicans do when they’re in power! I mean, good luck with that and all, and I want that, too, but I’m not holding my breath.

    Nor do I think that Americans truly want a smaller government or a lower deficit — I think you’re projecting. I mean, if you asked them about those issues in isolation, sure, they’d say they want those. Just like they want lots of government services, lower taxes, a balanced budget, an end to pork, more jobs in their area, and so on. The American people are conflicted.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    DonS (@21), that’s an interesting factoid on “enthusiasm”, but the data only go back to 1994, I believe, so there isn’t a lot of context. If you look at the poll results, you’ll see that “enthusiasm” has, across the board, increased 13 percentage points from 1994 to now (actually, nearly all that change has taken place in the past decade). I believe what this reflects is the increasingly partisan, black-and-white, all-or-nothing, us-vs.-them nature of our political discourse.

    “Republicans who are elected tonight had better … do what the people want them to do — shrink government … and address the deficit.” See, this is the kind of starry-eyed, hopey-changey idealism that Republicans mocked Democrats for all of two years ago. It’s like you’ve never even paid attention to what the Republicans do when they’re in power! I mean, good luck with that and all, and I want that, too, but I’m not holding my breath.

    Nor do I think that Americans truly want a smaller government or a lower deficit — I think you’re projecting. I mean, if you asked them about those issues in isolation, sure, they’d say they want those. Just like they want lots of government services, lower taxes, a balanced budget, an end to pork, more jobs in their area, and so on. The American people are conflicted.

  • DonS

    tODD @ 23: We’re both speculating, as are the pollsters. We’ll see, in a few hours, how things go.

    I do believe there is a core of people that finally recognize that our path to date is unsustainable, and have a genuine fear for the debt and instability we are willfully leaving to our children. Trillion dollar deficits are, rightfully, scary things, and tens of trillions in unfunded future liabilities should give everyone pause.

  • DonS

    tODD @ 23: We’re both speculating, as are the pollsters. We’ll see, in a few hours, how things go.

    I do believe there is a core of people that finally recognize that our path to date is unsustainable, and have a genuine fear for the debt and instability we are willfully leaving to our children. Trillion dollar deficits are, rightfully, scary things, and tens of trillions in unfunded future liabilities should give everyone pause.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    DonS said (@24), “I do believe there is a core of people that finally recognize that our path to date is unsustainable, and have a genuine fear for the debt and instability we are willfully leaving to our children.” Sure. But can you look at the past 50 years of elections and politics and tell me that said “core” has any influence over our nation’s government?

    I realize that the argument is that “this year it’s all different!” And sure, at some point, we’re going to have to confront the deficit, even if it’s because our nation has defaulted and China is amassing a large fleet to settle debts. I just don’t believe that things are actually going to change come next year, any more than you hoped things would change in 2009.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    DonS said (@24), “I do believe there is a core of people that finally recognize that our path to date is unsustainable, and have a genuine fear for the debt and instability we are willfully leaving to our children.” Sure. But can you look at the past 50 years of elections and politics and tell me that said “core” has any influence over our nation’s government?

    I realize that the argument is that “this year it’s all different!” And sure, at some point, we’re going to have to confront the deficit, even if it’s because our nation has defaulted and China is amassing a large fleet to settle debts. I just don’t believe that things are actually going to change come next year, any more than you hoped things would change in 2009.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    In 1994, the Republicans picked up 54 seats. That will be a good benchmark to look for. In 2010, will they get fewer, or more, or about the same?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    In 1994, the Republicans picked up 54 seats. That will be a good benchmark to look for. In 2010, will they get fewer, or more, or about the same?

  • Dust

    Veith above….more, way more! And unlike 96, in 2012 they will take back the White House. The fiscal problem alone will leave the public no choice, you cannot go into infinite debt without consequences. Sooner or later, it is payback time (just like the Devil will want his some day, eh?) and you can’t print your way out of it, with infinite money.

    The dems will naturally lose support since they can no longer afford to fund the programs expected by their constituency and the folks pushing the cart will stop once they realize how many are in the cart. Folks normally sympathetic with social causes will turn against them too, since without the virtual money supply, it will begin to impact their bottom line and the life style they worked hard to create and support. It is going to be a real day of reckoning that’s for sure. Am not happy about it, but that is the way it looks to me. We are going broke and it won’t be pretty…..have a nice day :)

  • Dust

    Veith above….more, way more! And unlike 96, in 2012 they will take back the White House. The fiscal problem alone will leave the public no choice, you cannot go into infinite debt without consequences. Sooner or later, it is payback time (just like the Devil will want his some day, eh?) and you can’t print your way out of it, with infinite money.

    The dems will naturally lose support since they can no longer afford to fund the programs expected by their constituency and the folks pushing the cart will stop once they realize how many are in the cart. Folks normally sympathetic with social causes will turn against them too, since without the virtual money supply, it will begin to impact their bottom line and the life style they worked hard to create and support. It is going to be a real day of reckoning that’s for sure. Am not happy about it, but that is the way it looks to me. We are going broke and it won’t be pretty…..have a nice day :)

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Mark Hemingway sees a possible sign and portent: As all fast food gourmands are celebrating, the McRib is back at McDonald’s! The last time that paragon of sandwiches was available nationally was 1994! Could there be a cosmic connection between the McRib and a Republican victory?

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/beltway-confidential/the-mcrib-is-back-which-must-mean-the-gop-is-headed-for-big-gains-in-todays-election-106550118.html

  • Dust

    sorry should say, have a nice day….while you can :)

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Mark Hemingway sees a possible sign and portent: As all fast food gourmands are celebrating, the McRib is back at McDonald’s! The last time that paragon of sandwiches was available nationally was 1994! Could there be a cosmic connection between the McRib and a Republican victory?

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/beltway-confidential/the-mcrib-is-back-which-must-mean-the-gop-is-headed-for-big-gains-in-todays-election-106550118.html

  • Dust

    sorry should say, have a nice day….while you can :)

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Veith asks (@28), “Could there be a cosmic connection between the McRib and a Republican victory?” You mean other than the fact that both the McRibs and most Republican politicians are a product of corporate America, ersatz through-and-through, with a semblance of being good for us but usually leaving you with a bad feeling in your stomach, only trumpeting their presence from time to time as a marketing gimmick, with pork being a necessary ingredient? No, I can’t think of any other connections. ;)

    Also, Wikipedia claims that the McRib has made US appearances in 2005, October 2007, late October 2008, as well. But that wouldn’t play into the trend, would it?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Veith asks (@28), “Could there be a cosmic connection between the McRib and a Republican victory?” You mean other than the fact that both the McRibs and most Republican politicians are a product of corporate America, ersatz through-and-through, with a semblance of being good for us but usually leaving you with a bad feeling in your stomach, only trumpeting their presence from time to time as a marketing gimmick, with pork being a necessary ingredient? No, I can’t think of any other connections. ;)

    Also, Wikipedia claims that the McRib has made US appearances in 2005, October 2007, late October 2008, as well. But that wouldn’t play into the trend, would it?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    As to Veith’s question (@26), will Republicans pick up more or less 54 seats in the House tonight? I’d put even odds on their duplicating their 1994 shift, though I’m just going off of Nate Silver’s statistics here.

    I also think there is no way that Republicans will gain the Senate tonight.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    As to Veith’s question (@26), will Republicans pick up more or less 54 seats in the House tonight? I’d put even odds on their duplicating their 1994 shift, though I’m just going off of Nate Silver’s statistics here.

    I also think there is no way that Republicans will gain the Senate tonight.

  • DonS

    Dr. Veith @ 26: It will be substantially higher, on the order of 70 or more.

  • DonS

    Dr. Veith @ 26: It will be substantially higher, on the order of 70 or more.

  • DonS

    Early indicators, as the first polls are now closing, are that the wave tonight is very big.

  • DonS

    Early indicators, as the first polls are now closing, are that the wave tonight is very big.

  • Abby

    For the two kingdoms!

  • Abby

    For the two kingdoms!

  • Dust

    Agree with tODD above about the senate…..most likely not take it, but it’s going to be sooooooo close, a nail biter. no worries however, if they don’t take it, it will increase their chances of the white house and the senate in 2012 as you can count on this senate to do the wrong thing…..or can we?

  • Dust

    Agree with tODD above about the senate…..most likely not take it, but it’s going to be sooooooo close, a nail biter. no worries however, if they don’t take it, it will increase their chances of the white house and the senate in 2012 as you can count on this senate to do the wrong thing…..or can we?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    About 4 pm, I told the kids to get in the car to go to the voting place. We drove there and I ran in, voted. As I was driving away, my younger son said, “but I never even saw the boats!”

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    About 4 pm, I told the kids to get in the car to go to the voting place. We drove there and I ran in, voted. As I was driving away, my younger son said, “but I never even saw the boats!”

  • helen

    I have a complete lack of enthusiasm for our Governor’s race which has spilled over onto the whole ballot.
    I meant to go this a.m., ran late and here I am late again….
    Lord, have mercy on this spendthrift country cuz both parties have sold thmselves to the high bidders!

  • helen

    I have a complete lack of enthusiasm for our Governor’s race which has spilled over onto the whole ballot.
    I meant to go this a.m., ran late and here I am late again….
    Lord, have mercy on this spendthrift country cuz both parties have sold thmselves to the high bidders!

  • Abby

    Rand Paul won in Kentucky. 6:54 pm

  • Abby

    Rand Paul won in Kentucky. 6:54 pm

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I thought Democrats liked pork! But the McRib–which has been available in certain markets at other times, just not nationally, in every store as it is now, as in 1994–makes no pretense of being good for you. It really tastes good and is a guilty pleasure, just as conservatism is for some people.

    Also, the issue not just if the Republicans can win a majority in the Senate, which, as everyone says, is nearly impossible. But if they can break the Democrat’s filibuster-proof supermajority–which is very likely–Republicans can use the filibuster to stymie whatever the Democrats want to do.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    I thought Democrats liked pork! But the McRib–which has been available in certain markets at other times, just not nationally, in every store as it is now, as in 1994–makes no pretense of being good for you. It really tastes good and is a guilty pleasure, just as conservatism is for some people.

    Also, the issue not just if the Republicans can win a majority in the Senate, which, as everyone says, is nearly impossible. But if they can break the Democrat’s filibuster-proof supermajority–which is very likely–Republicans can use the filibuster to stymie whatever the Democrats want to do.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    We elected Gov. Moonbeam (Jerry Brown), again.

    The guy whon is larglely responsible for wrecking our once great state.

    We are suckers for punishment.

    The unions and the eco-leftists in California are partying down tonight!

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    We elected Gov. Moonbeam (Jerry Brown), again.

    The guy whon is larglely responsible for wrecking our once great state.

    We are suckers for punishment.

    The unions and the eco-leftists in California are partying down tonight!

  • DonS

    Yes, Steve, it’s hard to believe, isn’t it? Governor Moonbeam and “don’t call me Ma’am” Boxer. I had some fleeting hope that the national wave would lap into our state sufficiently far to at least give our voters a moment of lucidity, but it was not to be.

    Well, now the Democrats own it all. Good luck, Jerry! You’ll need it.

  • DonS

    Yes, Steve, it’s hard to believe, isn’t it? Governor Moonbeam and “don’t call me Ma’am” Boxer. I had some fleeting hope that the national wave would lap into our state sufficiently far to at least give our voters a moment of lucidity, but it was not to be.

    Well, now the Democrats own it all. Good luck, Jerry! You’ll need it.

  • DonS

    Well, as I write this, the Republicans have gained a confirmed 61 House seats, while the Democrats have gained 2, for a net 59 gain for Republicans. It looks like Republicans will probably gain about 7 more seats, for a total of 68, while the Democrats have the potential to gain one more seat in Hawaii. This would mean a net House gain of about 65 seats for the Republicans, with a few others too close to call. Epic, by any standard.

    On the Senate side, Republicans have picked up 6 seats, for a total of 47. They will certainly hold Alaska, as Murkowski and Miller are 1-2 in the voting. So they have 48, while the Democrats have 49 (51 including the two independents who caucus with them). Two more seats may switch to Republican, for a potential total of 8, as Buck is slightly ahead in CO and Rossi and Murray are in a dead heat in WA. So it appears that the Democrats will retain a suddenly tenuous hold on the Senate.

    Republicans have picked up 10 governorships, while the Democrats have picked up 2, for a net change of 8 in favor of the Republicans. A number of races have not yet been called. It appears as if the Republicans will end up with in excess of 30 governorships, which should help them when redistricting occurs during the next two years.

    The Republican wave obviously did fizzle to some extent as it moved west. Colorado and Nevada were somewhat disappointing Republican states, while Arizona’s House races fell a little short of expectations. California was a major disappointment, though it looks like Republicans will pick up potentially two House seats. I blame Schwarzenegger for that — as he allowed Democrats to deflect blame from their own incompetent and corrupt governance in this horribly run state. However, north of us, as of tonight, it looks as if Oregon might elect a Republican governor (the Republican is slightly ahead with 77% of the vote in, so it depends on which votes are still out), and Washington might flip a Senator and three House seats from Democrat to Republican.

  • DonS

    Well, as I write this, the Republicans have gained a confirmed 61 House seats, while the Democrats have gained 2, for a net 59 gain for Republicans. It looks like Republicans will probably gain about 7 more seats, for a total of 68, while the Democrats have the potential to gain one more seat in Hawaii. This would mean a net House gain of about 65 seats for the Republicans, with a few others too close to call. Epic, by any standard.

    On the Senate side, Republicans have picked up 6 seats, for a total of 47. They will certainly hold Alaska, as Murkowski and Miller are 1-2 in the voting. So they have 48, while the Democrats have 49 (51 including the two independents who caucus with them). Two more seats may switch to Republican, for a potential total of 8, as Buck is slightly ahead in CO and Rossi and Murray are in a dead heat in WA. So it appears that the Democrats will retain a suddenly tenuous hold on the Senate.

    Republicans have picked up 10 governorships, while the Democrats have picked up 2, for a net change of 8 in favor of the Republicans. A number of races have not yet been called. It appears as if the Republicans will end up with in excess of 30 governorships, which should help them when redistricting occurs during the next two years.

    The Republican wave obviously did fizzle to some extent as it moved west. Colorado and Nevada were somewhat disappointing Republican states, while Arizona’s House races fell a little short of expectations. California was a major disappointment, though it looks like Republicans will pick up potentially two House seats. I blame Schwarzenegger for that — as he allowed Democrats to deflect blame from their own incompetent and corrupt governance in this horribly run state. However, north of us, as of tonight, it looks as if Oregon might elect a Republican governor (the Republican is slightly ahead with 77% of the vote in, so it depends on which votes are still out), and Washington might flip a Senator and three House seats from Democrat to Republican.

  • SKPeterson

    A dead heat in Washington means Rossi will lose on any recount, just like he did in the governor’s race when more “ballots” were found for Gregoire. The Sound Dems will put the fix in for Murray.

  • SKPeterson

    A dead heat in Washington means Rossi will lose on any recount, just like he did in the governor’s race when more “ballots” were found for Gregoire. The Sound Dems will put the fix in for Murray.

  • DonS

    Haha, yes SK, there is no question Dino Rossi is feeling a little deja vu right now. Republicans in very close electoral contests very seldom win (strange how that works out ;)), and this is especially true in Washington state and the notorious King County.

  • DonS

    Haha, yes SK, there is no question Dino Rossi is feeling a little deja vu right now. Republicans in very close electoral contests very seldom win (strange how that works out ;)), and this is especially true in Washington state and the notorious King County.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I love it when “conservatives” allege corruption and impropriety in people they oppose politically. Because I know that, being Christians and honorable conservatives besides, they wouldn’t allege such things unless they knew what they were talking about, with facts. How unloving would it be to defame people you don’t even know merely because a political outcome didn’t go your way! But we are all above that.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I love it when “conservatives” allege corruption and impropriety in people they oppose politically. Because I know that, being Christians and honorable conservatives besides, they wouldn’t allege such things unless they knew what they were talking about, with facts. How unloving would it be to defame people you don’t even know merely because a political outcome didn’t go your way! But we are all above that.


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