The junk man's revolt

Charles Krauthammer says that our new folk heroes are coming from airports, from that flight attendant who slid out onto the tarmac to the man who told TSA screeners “don’t touch my junk.”  Krauthammer relates the national outrage over these third degree sexual assault patdowns to the revolt against other kinds of government infringement upon our persons.  The whole column is worth reading, but I was struck by this, especially the point about screening pilots:

The entire apparatus of the security line is a national homage to political correctness. Nowhere do more people meekly acquiesce to more useless inconvenience and needless indignity for less purpose. Wizened seniors strain to untie their shoes; beltless salesmen struggle comically to hold up their pants; 3-year-olds scream while being searched insanely for explosives – when everyone, everyone, knows that none of these people is a threat to anyone.

The ultimate idiocy is the full-body screening of the pilot. The pilot doesn’t need a bomb or box cutter to bring down a plane. All he has to do is drive it into the water, like the EgyptAir pilot who crashed his plane off Nantucket while intoning “I rely on God,” killing all on board.

But we must not bring that up. We pretend that we go through this nonsense as a small price paid to ensure the safety of air travel. Rubbish. This has nothing to do with safety – 95 percent of these inspections, searches, shoe removals and pat-downs are ridiculously unnecessary. The only reason we continue to do this is that people are too cowed to even question the absurd taboo against profiling – when the profile of the airline attacker is narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known. So instead of seeking out terrorists, we seek out tubes of gel in stroller pouches.

The junk man’s revolt marks the point at which a docile public declares that it will tolerate only so much idiocy. Metal detector? Back-of-the-hand pat? Okay. We will swallow hard and pretend airline attackers are randomly distributed in the population.

But now you insist on a full-body scan, a fairly accurate representation of my naked image to be viewed by a total stranger? Or alternatively, the full-body pat-down, which, as the junk man correctly noted, would be sexual assault if performed by anyone else?

This time you have gone too far, Big Bro’. The sleeping giant awakes. Take my shoes, remove my belt, waste my time and try my patience. But don’t touch my junk.

via Charles Krauthammer – Don’t touch my junk.

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About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Pete

    The point about the pilots is very much spot on. Pilots, without exception, fall into two groups: Those who intend to do their best to land safely and those who intend to do their best to crash their plane into something that will do the maximum amount of damage. Understandably, there are a lot more of the former than of the latter.

    It has lately occurred to me that one of the flaws of the current TSA setup is lack of “vested interest”. I screen you with whatever is the screening modality du jour, you and your fellow passengers get on the plane and, if I’ve messed up, you get blown up or flown into the Eiffel Tower while I’m still safe on the ground.

    One wonders if rather than having the government do this, some combination of passengers and crew would have the highest incentive to screen both efficiently and correctly. Perhaps a mechanism could be set up whereby passengers who were interested and who were willing to subject themselves to a certain higher level of scrutiny could get free trips or rate cuts if they volunteer to do this.

    I’ve often felt, while standing in the massive cattle call that is security screening, that a panel consisting of a pilot, a flight attendant, myself and maybe one or two other passengers could do this thing better than the current system.

    And you’d better believe we’d profile. Might even pat you down if we had to.

  • Pete

    The point about the pilots is very much spot on. Pilots, without exception, fall into two groups: Those who intend to do their best to land safely and those who intend to do their best to crash their plane into something that will do the maximum amount of damage. Understandably, there are a lot more of the former than of the latter.

    It has lately occurred to me that one of the flaws of the current TSA setup is lack of “vested interest”. I screen you with whatever is the screening modality du jour, you and your fellow passengers get on the plane and, if I’ve messed up, you get blown up or flown into the Eiffel Tower while I’m still safe on the ground.

    One wonders if rather than having the government do this, some combination of passengers and crew would have the highest incentive to screen both efficiently and correctly. Perhaps a mechanism could be set up whereby passengers who were interested and who were willing to subject themselves to a certain higher level of scrutiny could get free trips or rate cuts if they volunteer to do this.

    I’ve often felt, while standing in the massive cattle call that is security screening, that a panel consisting of a pilot, a flight attendant, myself and maybe one or two other passengers could do this thing better than the current system.

    And you’d better believe we’d profile. Might even pat you down if we had to.

  • Tom Hering

    Anti-terrorism is driven by the private sector. An American growth industry – big business with a capital “B.” It isn’t going away.

  • Tom Hering

    Anti-terrorism is driven by the private sector. An American growth industry – big business with a capital “B.” It isn’t going away.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    All it will take for this to change is for Americans to refuse to fly. Cities and airlines faced with loss of income will apply pressure to have TSA reigned in. Unless, I am forced by complete necessity, I will no longer fly. I hate to lose the convenience, but I don’t trust the machines to work as they should and I don’t want some dude groping me. I hate changing in the locker room so there is no way I want some random person seeing my naked body even if it is “anonymous.”

    Besides,the purchase of an airline ticket is not probable cause. Numerically speaking, those purchasing tickets for the purposes of mayhem and destruction are very few compared to the numbers of simple travelers.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    All it will take for this to change is for Americans to refuse to fly. Cities and airlines faced with loss of income will apply pressure to have TSA reigned in. Unless, I am forced by complete necessity, I will no longer fly. I hate to lose the convenience, but I don’t trust the machines to work as they should and I don’t want some dude groping me. I hate changing in the locker room so there is no way I want some random person seeing my naked body even if it is “anonymous.”

    Besides,the purchase of an airline ticket is not probable cause. Numerically speaking, those purchasing tickets for the purposes of mayhem and destruction are very few compared to the numbers of simple travelers.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Truth be told, I’ve taken to driving more for vacations. We enjoy it; not only do we avoid the TSA, but we get to enjoy America as we drive across the land.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Truth be told, I’ve taken to driving more for vacations. We enjoy it; not only do we avoid the TSA, but we get to enjoy America as we drive across the land.

  • Tom Hering

    “All it will take for this to change is for Americans to refuse to fly.”

    I heard this morning that two-thirds of Americans say they have no problem with body scans. We’ll see how “National Opt-Out Day” goes tomorrow. I predict very low participation.

  • Tom Hering

    “All it will take for this to change is for Americans to refuse to fly.”

    I heard this morning that two-thirds of Americans say they have no problem with body scans. We’ll see how “National Opt-Out Day” goes tomorrow. I predict very low participation.

  • Booklover

    My dear elderly and disabled mother was searched top to bottom, as was her electric wheelchair. It took them 1 1/2 hours to roll up her pant legs, remove her socks and shoes from her poor little swollen legs, move her urine bag from side to side, remove her coat and pat her body up and down, inspect her Amigo wheelchair, then put her clothes aright.

    They left me alone, and I was the one who wanted to kill someone. . .

    When I raised toddlers and one of them got into the cookie jar, I went after the one with crumbs on his hands. I didn’t bother the baby who couldn’t reach the jar. Call it profiling. I call it wise.

  • Booklover

    My dear elderly and disabled mother was searched top to bottom, as was her electric wheelchair. It took them 1 1/2 hours to roll up her pant legs, remove her socks and shoes from her poor little swollen legs, move her urine bag from side to side, remove her coat and pat her body up and down, inspect her Amigo wheelchair, then put her clothes aright.

    They left me alone, and I was the one who wanted to kill someone. . .

    When I raised toddlers and one of them got into the cookie jar, I went after the one with crumbs on his hands. I didn’t bother the baby who couldn’t reach the jar. Call it profiling. I call it wise.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    “I heard this morning that two-thirds of Americans say they have no problem with body scans. We’ll see how “National Opt-Out Day” goes tomorrow. I predict very low participation.”

    Honestly, I am not surprised. Too many people are willing to exchange privacy and freedom for a sense of security, even a false sense of security. Let supposedly deleted pictures start making it to the internet and we will see how this changes. There has already been a reported case of machines not deleting pictures, it is only a matter of time before somebody starts posting them.

    “National Opt-Out Day” is just stupid. Refuse the scanner and be groped, what’s the point? A better way to get the point across would be for the airports to be empty tomorrow. Let them face the reality of people being tired of being treated like criminals.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    “I heard this morning that two-thirds of Americans say they have no problem with body scans. We’ll see how “National Opt-Out Day” goes tomorrow. I predict very low participation.”

    Honestly, I am not surprised. Too many people are willing to exchange privacy and freedom for a sense of security, even a false sense of security. Let supposedly deleted pictures start making it to the internet and we will see how this changes. There has already been a reported case of machines not deleting pictures, it is only a matter of time before somebody starts posting them.

    “National Opt-Out Day” is just stupid. Refuse the scanner and be groped, what’s the point? A better way to get the point across would be for the airports to be empty tomorrow. Let them face the reality of people being tired of being treated like criminals.

  • Tom Hering

    “Refuse the scanner and be groped, what’s the point?”

    Yes, it was a self-defeating choice of strategies. People are motivated to fly, no matter what, on the day before Thanksgiving.

  • Tom Hering

    “Refuse the scanner and be groped, what’s the point?”

    Yes, it was a self-defeating choice of strategies. People are motivated to fly, no matter what, on the day before Thanksgiving.

  • S Bauer

    Let me see. The latest attempt to bring down planes was to put bombs in toner cartridges to be shipped in cargo holds. So the logical response to this threat is to start full body scans and pat-downs of travelers?

  • S Bauer

    Let me see. The latest attempt to bring down planes was to put bombs in toner cartridges to be shipped in cargo holds. So the logical response to this threat is to start full body scans and pat-downs of travelers?

  • saddler

    It seems that CYA applies here. The public is quick to assign blame when something bad happens. Blame the bureaucrats, politicians, TSA workers. These folks are all trying to keep their jobs, so in order to avoid risk to the populace, here comes the laundry list of rules and regulations to ensure safety. When everyone arrives safely, everyone keeps their job.

  • saddler

    It seems that CYA applies here. The public is quick to assign blame when something bad happens. Blame the bureaucrats, politicians, TSA workers. These folks are all trying to keep their jobs, so in order to avoid risk to the populace, here comes the laundry list of rules and regulations to ensure safety. When everyone arrives safely, everyone keeps their job.

  • Porcell

    The person who does the full-body scans sits in a closed room and erases the image as soon as he clears it. I’v e gone through this several times and have no problem with it, as it offers better security than in the past. We have too many passengers to accomplish what the Israelis do without such scaning.

    It does appear that the TSA workers are developing the usual smugness and callousness of government bureaucrats. The TSA budget is $7.8 billion and it is likely that 50,000 of its employees will become unionized. If the TSA were privatized, it would be better streamlined, less costly, and more polite

  • Porcell

    The person who does the full-body scans sits in a closed room and erases the image as soon as he clears it. I’v e gone through this several times and have no problem with it, as it offers better security than in the past. We have too many passengers to accomplish what the Israelis do without such scaning.

    It does appear that the TSA workers are developing the usual smugness and callousness of government bureaucrats. The TSA budget is $7.8 billion and it is likely that 50,000 of its employees will become unionized. If the TSA were privatized, it would be better streamlined, less costly, and more polite

  • SKPeterson

    @Tom #2 – “Anti-terrorism is driven by the private sector.”

    It is being driven by crony capitalism, not the private sector per se. Just trace back the money for full body scanners to one M. Cherthoff. Seems he had a relationship with the TSA at some point …

  • SKPeterson

    @Tom #2 – “Anti-terrorism is driven by the private sector.”

    It is being driven by crony capitalism, not the private sector per se. Just trace back the money for full body scanners to one M. Cherthoff. Seems he had a relationship with the TSA at some point …

  • Grace

    “CAIR: TSA Can Only Pat Down Muslim Women’s Head, Neck,” by Meredith Jessup for The Blaze, November 12 (thanks to all who sent this in):

    The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) has issued a travel notice to Muslim airline passengers, warning them that new regulations from the Transportation Security Administration violate certain religious rules.
    According to CAIR, the TSA’s new “enhanced pat down” policy should be limited to searching only around Muslim women’s head and neck if they are wearing a hijab and that Muslims objecting to the enhanced full-body scans have the right to request the pat-down procedure be done in a private place.

    http://www.jihadwatch.org/2010/11/hamas-linked-cair-tsa-may-only-search-around-muslim-womens-head-neck.html

  • Grace

    “CAIR: TSA Can Only Pat Down Muslim Women’s Head, Neck,” by Meredith Jessup for The Blaze, November 12 (thanks to all who sent this in):

    The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) has issued a travel notice to Muslim airline passengers, warning them that new regulations from the Transportation Security Administration violate certain religious rules.
    According to CAIR, the TSA’s new “enhanced pat down” policy should be limited to searching only around Muslim women’s head and neck if they are wearing a hijab and that Muslims objecting to the enhanced full-body scans have the right to request the pat-down procedure be done in a private place.

    http://www.jihadwatch.org/2010/11/hamas-linked-cair-tsa-may-only-search-around-muslim-womens-head-neck.html

  • Grace

    Information from CAIR

    CAIR Travel Advisory: New Airport Pat-Downs Called Invasive, Humiliating
    Posted 11/10/2010 4:03:00 PM

    http://www.cair.com/ArticleDetails.aspx?ArticleID=26681&&name=n&&currPage=1

  • Grace

    Information from CAIR

    CAIR Travel Advisory: New Airport Pat-Downs Called Invasive, Humiliating
    Posted 11/10/2010 4:03:00 PM

    http://www.cair.com/ArticleDetails.aspx?ArticleID=26681&&name=n&&currPage=1

  • DonS

    It is understandable how we have gotten into this position. Metal detectors were introduced back in the ’70′s because people started hijacking airlines with knives and guns. So, criminals and terrorists started figuring out ways around that security — smaller weapons that didn’t set off the detectors, weapons having more non-metallic content, etc. Security heightened after 9/11 for obvious reasons. Plastic explosives came into vogue, so we get shoe removal, full body scanners and invasive pat-downs. Always reactive, always one step behind the terrorists.

    What our security apparatus needs to do is take a step back and evaluate. For one thing, if the threat is concealed plastic explosives, then why the focus on airplanes? Sure, it’s dramatic when a plane explodes in the sky, but is it any less so when a subway train explodes beneath the streets of NYC? So why do we not also set these systems up in Union Station and in the metro stations throughout our major cities? And why not in our public arenas, where thousands of people are gathered in close proximity?

    For another thing, at some point you cross the line, making the process of boarding so onerous, humiliating, and time consuming that you destroy the industry. Life is risky, and we cannot eliminate the risks. So the question becomes where the line is between taking reasoned measures to reduce risk and going too far.

    Personally, I think we need a new approach. Certainly, it is ridiculous for flight crews to go through the same type of security as passengers. Airlines conduct background checks on employees, which is better than any screening process at sorting out risk. At the very least, they should be subject only to random, unpredictable, security screening so that usually they are unscreened or minimally screened, but cannot know for sure that they won’t go through full screening on any given occasion. Frequent flyers ought to be able to be in this type of status as well, by applying for it and submitting to periodic background checks. I know they have such a thing at Dulles Airport in Virginia. It’s a good idea, and would help to reduce the lines for general screening.

    As for the remaining passengers, we need to be smarter in using our screening resources effectively. Some profiling is certainly warranted. The IRS profiles, targeting certain types of returns for audits, and then also auditing a percentage of returns randomly. If it’s OK for the IRS, it’s OK for the TSA. No one should be sure that they won’t be screened, but my 75 year old mother should not be screened as often as a a single 30 year old man. That’s just logical.

    Two other points. One is that the process needs to be a little bit friendlier and more relaxed. The TSA needs to be seen and to see themselves as human. The process should be respectful. It’s serious business, but the intimidating atmosphere is not healthy. Additionally, I think profiling would be more effective in a relaxed atmosphere where people let down their guard a little bit. It would be easier to pick out who was tense because they had something to hide. Another thing is that we passengers need to remember that TSA employees are not the enemy. They are doing their jobs, that’s all, and we as Christians should treat them respectfully.

  • DonS

    It is understandable how we have gotten into this position. Metal detectors were introduced back in the ’70′s because people started hijacking airlines with knives and guns. So, criminals and terrorists started figuring out ways around that security — smaller weapons that didn’t set off the detectors, weapons having more non-metallic content, etc. Security heightened after 9/11 for obvious reasons. Plastic explosives came into vogue, so we get shoe removal, full body scanners and invasive pat-downs. Always reactive, always one step behind the terrorists.

    What our security apparatus needs to do is take a step back and evaluate. For one thing, if the threat is concealed plastic explosives, then why the focus on airplanes? Sure, it’s dramatic when a plane explodes in the sky, but is it any less so when a subway train explodes beneath the streets of NYC? So why do we not also set these systems up in Union Station and in the metro stations throughout our major cities? And why not in our public arenas, where thousands of people are gathered in close proximity?

    For another thing, at some point you cross the line, making the process of boarding so onerous, humiliating, and time consuming that you destroy the industry. Life is risky, and we cannot eliminate the risks. So the question becomes where the line is between taking reasoned measures to reduce risk and going too far.

    Personally, I think we need a new approach. Certainly, it is ridiculous for flight crews to go through the same type of security as passengers. Airlines conduct background checks on employees, which is better than any screening process at sorting out risk. At the very least, they should be subject only to random, unpredictable, security screening so that usually they are unscreened or minimally screened, but cannot know for sure that they won’t go through full screening on any given occasion. Frequent flyers ought to be able to be in this type of status as well, by applying for it and submitting to periodic background checks. I know they have such a thing at Dulles Airport in Virginia. It’s a good idea, and would help to reduce the lines for general screening.

    As for the remaining passengers, we need to be smarter in using our screening resources effectively. Some profiling is certainly warranted. The IRS profiles, targeting certain types of returns for audits, and then also auditing a percentage of returns randomly. If it’s OK for the IRS, it’s OK for the TSA. No one should be sure that they won’t be screened, but my 75 year old mother should not be screened as often as a a single 30 year old man. That’s just logical.

    Two other points. One is that the process needs to be a little bit friendlier and more relaxed. The TSA needs to be seen and to see themselves as human. The process should be respectful. It’s serious business, but the intimidating atmosphere is not healthy. Additionally, I think profiling would be more effective in a relaxed atmosphere where people let down their guard a little bit. It would be easier to pick out who was tense because they had something to hide. Another thing is that we passengers need to remember that TSA employees are not the enemy. They are doing their jobs, that’s all, and we as Christians should treat them respectfully.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Very interesting discussion on this yesterday on Issues, Etc. Check in out:
    http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/issuesetc.org/podcast/626112210H2S2.mp3

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Very interesting discussion on this yesterday on Issues, Etc. Check in out:
    http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/issuesetc.org/podcast/626112210H2S2.mp3

  • helen

    I’ll be so respectful that I won’t fly anymore.
    It hasn’t been fun for years (except maybe on Southwest).
    Let them all see if they can make ends meet by flying congressmen (who get “profiled” to walk straight through, if they are on public lines at all).

    Tell me again about the ‘classless’ society, Mommy!

  • helen

    I’ll be so respectful that I won’t fly anymore.
    It hasn’t been fun for years (except maybe on Southwest).
    Let them all see if they can make ends meet by flying congressmen (who get “profiled” to walk straight through, if they are on public lines at all).

    Tell me again about the ‘classless’ society, Mommy!

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I think Krauthammer’s losing it, increasingly turning to pop-culture-driven flights of mild revenge fantasy. He still makes good points here and there, but “the junk man’s revolt”? Cringe-worthy. “The sleeping giant awakes.” Yes, and makes a few snippy comments on the Internet before going off and submitting to that thing he just complained about. The government is shaking in its boots!

    “The profile of the airline attacker is narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known.” Great, then someone can spell it out for me here. Make sure your profile fits his criteria.

    I think this situation of making clothes invisible or having a stranger’s hand grope you aptly demonstrates the limits of Adam Smith’s Magic Invisible Hand (see what I did there?). DLi2C (@3) suggests we boycott the system, but in so doing, assumes that demand for air travel is elastic. And yet, a quick glance at any airport for the next month will likely put that theory to rest. Moreover, it isn’t that all of air travel is a pain (as such; or, at least, we’ve gotten used to how lousy it is), just this one part at the airport. So the traveler has a choice: having invested some serious cash in purchasing tickets and some serious time in planning this trip, he can make a fuss, thereby increasing the odds that he will jeopardize his travel plans, or he can suck it up and be humiliated for a few minutes.

    Or he can drive for several days as an alternative to several minutes of embarrassment and several hours of flying. Given how much vacation time I have budgeted for going back to Texas this Christmas, I would spend more time trying to get there and back than I would with my parents. Not going to happen.

    Pete (@1) suggests that we let the people rule this system, and yet I cannot think of a worse idea. What makes you think, Pete, that my fellow travelers would not subject me to even more indignity? They are, after all, already scared enough to let strangers see the outline of their body and/or grope them. I’m pretty certain a stranger who looked sufficiently terroristical would get nothing short of a full-cavity search from his future cabin-mates.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I think Krauthammer’s losing it, increasingly turning to pop-culture-driven flights of mild revenge fantasy. He still makes good points here and there, but “the junk man’s revolt”? Cringe-worthy. “The sleeping giant awakes.” Yes, and makes a few snippy comments on the Internet before going off and submitting to that thing he just complained about. The government is shaking in its boots!

    “The profile of the airline attacker is narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known.” Great, then someone can spell it out for me here. Make sure your profile fits his criteria.

    I think this situation of making clothes invisible or having a stranger’s hand grope you aptly demonstrates the limits of Adam Smith’s Magic Invisible Hand (see what I did there?). DLi2C (@3) suggests we boycott the system, but in so doing, assumes that demand for air travel is elastic. And yet, a quick glance at any airport for the next month will likely put that theory to rest. Moreover, it isn’t that all of air travel is a pain (as such; or, at least, we’ve gotten used to how lousy it is), just this one part at the airport. So the traveler has a choice: having invested some serious cash in purchasing tickets and some serious time in planning this trip, he can make a fuss, thereby increasing the odds that he will jeopardize his travel plans, or he can suck it up and be humiliated for a few minutes.

    Or he can drive for several days as an alternative to several minutes of embarrassment and several hours of flying. Given how much vacation time I have budgeted for going back to Texas this Christmas, I would spend more time trying to get there and back than I would with my parents. Not going to happen.

    Pete (@1) suggests that we let the people rule this system, and yet I cannot think of a worse idea. What makes you think, Pete, that my fellow travelers would not subject me to even more indignity? They are, after all, already scared enough to let strangers see the outline of their body and/or grope them. I’m pretty certain a stranger who looked sufficiently terroristical would get nothing short of a full-cavity search from his future cabin-mates.

  • Another Kerner

    Fox News Alert…
    Delta Aircraft, Logan Airport, Boston.
    A Canine has alerted for explosives on packages from Nigeria in a cargo area.
    The bomb squads are there now…

    Apparently bomb sniffer dogs are able to “profile”, no problem.

  • Another Kerner

    Fox News Alert…
    Delta Aircraft, Logan Airport, Boston.
    A Canine has alerted for explosives on packages from Nigeria in a cargo area.
    The bomb squads are there now…

    Apparently bomb sniffer dogs are able to “profile”, no problem.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    Moments of impugned modesty and honor aside aside, my biggest concern isn’t somebody seeing my “naked” body it is the fact we have so casually laid aside the 4th amendment, just so we can mistakenly feel safe.

    I say mistakenly, because just looking at the pictures of sample screenings I can see how easy it will be to beat the system. It, honestly, is child’s play to beat. I am not going to spell it out, I don’t want to unwittingly aid those of sinister intent. I will say this it can be largely done with items that will pass inspection. A surface scanning machine just isn’t going to hack it.

    If they want an electronic means of scanning people, they really need to get something straight out of sci-fi that can detect items internally ala “Total Recall” not something that is limited to a surface scan.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in 21st Century

    Moments of impugned modesty and honor aside aside, my biggest concern isn’t somebody seeing my “naked” body it is the fact we have so casually laid aside the 4th amendment, just so we can mistakenly feel safe.

    I say mistakenly, because just looking at the pictures of sample screenings I can see how easy it will be to beat the system. It, honestly, is child’s play to beat. I am not going to spell it out, I don’t want to unwittingly aid those of sinister intent. I will say this it can be largely done with items that will pass inspection. A surface scanning machine just isn’t going to hack it.

    If they want an electronic means of scanning people, they really need to get something straight out of sci-fi that can detect items internally ala “Total Recall” not something that is limited to a surface scan.

  • collie

    I think using dogs is an excellent suggestion, and not only for seeking out bombs in luggage. I’d rather have a dog sniff me than endure one of those pat-downs.

  • collie

    I think using dogs is an excellent suggestion, and not only for seeking out bombs in luggage. I’d rather have a dog sniff me than endure one of those pat-downs.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Nothing’s going to get better, as far as security tactics (or “security theater”, really) go, until we’re hit by another terrorist attack here in the US. Until then, proponents of all these security measures can reasonably claim that it’s all “working” to keep us safe. And people who just want to be safe will put up with it.

    Of course, while a successful terrorist attack would show that our present tactics aren’t working, it’s more likely that such an occasion will merely serve as a pretext for even more stupid security tactics, just as every successful (or near-successful) terrorist attack has so far.

    And that’s a problem. The “security theater” is always reactive. We only started taking off our shoes after someone tried to stuff his with explosives and set them on fire. Well, now we’re on the lookout for someone trying to do the exact same thing … but what are the odds the terrorists are that stupid?

    The same thing goes for profiling, as well. No one has yet stepped up to Krauthammer’s challenge and laid out for me what the obvious terrorist profile is, but I bet it’ll be reactionary. Time was, we all would have said: an Arab-looking male in his 20s or 30s. But, in case you haven’t been paying attention, most of the attempted attackers since 9/11 haven’t looked like that (and, note to Juan Williams, none of them were wearing obviously “Muslim” garb). And if, as Krauthammer asserts, the profile of our next attackers is “universally known”, why wouldn’t our attackers just pick someone outside of that profile? What, you think there are no radical Muslim women? Ask Israel about that.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Nothing’s going to get better, as far as security tactics (or “security theater”, really) go, until we’re hit by another terrorist attack here in the US. Until then, proponents of all these security measures can reasonably claim that it’s all “working” to keep us safe. And people who just want to be safe will put up with it.

    Of course, while a successful terrorist attack would show that our present tactics aren’t working, it’s more likely that such an occasion will merely serve as a pretext for even more stupid security tactics, just as every successful (or near-successful) terrorist attack has so far.

    And that’s a problem. The “security theater” is always reactive. We only started taking off our shoes after someone tried to stuff his with explosives and set them on fire. Well, now we’re on the lookout for someone trying to do the exact same thing … but what are the odds the terrorists are that stupid?

    The same thing goes for profiling, as well. No one has yet stepped up to Krauthammer’s challenge and laid out for me what the obvious terrorist profile is, but I bet it’ll be reactionary. Time was, we all would have said: an Arab-looking male in his 20s or 30s. But, in case you haven’t been paying attention, most of the attempted attackers since 9/11 haven’t looked like that (and, note to Juan Williams, none of them were wearing obviously “Muslim” garb). And if, as Krauthammer asserts, the profile of our next attackers is “universally known”, why wouldn’t our attackers just pick someone outside of that profile? What, you think there are no radical Muslim women? Ask Israel about that.

  • collie

    Let’s revive the rail system. It’s enery-efficient, scenic, and less emotionally draining than driving a car hundreds of miles. Even though, as DonS pointed out, no type of transportation is immune to attack, it seems as if terrorists are mainly focused on airliners, probably because they can be turned into missiles, and then one can aim anywhere they please. Can’t do that so much with a train.

  • collie

    Let’s revive the rail system. It’s enery-efficient, scenic, and less emotionally draining than driving a car hundreds of miles. Even though, as DonS pointed out, no type of transportation is immune to attack, it seems as if terrorists are mainly focused on airliners, probably because they can be turned into missiles, and then one can aim anywhere they please. Can’t do that so much with a train.

  • Grace

    Air travel has become a vulgar experience. I love to travel, yet it’s now over the top. Sitting next to those who are so drunk they can’t sit up but lean on me, bad breath, smelling like cheap scotch, people who travel from countries where individuals can’t find time to bath once a day, never wear deodorant, then there are the ETC’s I could add to this list,…. just one more – those who are so over weight they take up their seat and then expect to take part of mine.

    We as a nation have become conditioned to accept the next step, step after step. Some conservatives speak out, but yet the madness continues. Children are now groped? – but of course, it’s for our safety – As for body scans and pat downs – let’s get on with the real problem – what is wrong with PROFILING, those who have threatened us, obvious as to their origin – why not throw the political correctness in the toilet where it belongs? Is it so difficult to see who is threatening us? – who continues to be a threat? – YES, we don’t know every single group who are mentally deranged, who might plan to harm us, but we certainly have a fairly clear idea of who has, and continues to threaten the free world. I would go so far as to deny access to our country, from any country that has taught terrorism, who continues to harbor terrorists. Anyone who wishes to leave the United States, either a citizen or traveler would not be allowed access back to the U.S.A. if they visited any country on that list. I believe in cutting off travel to and from these countries.

    I believe Charles Krauthammer wrote a great piece.

    We have a lot of friends who have taken off for ski resorts, kids in tow, SUV loaded,….. they can keep their planes – There is so much to do here, any type of weather, choose to be at the beach, dessert, snow covered mountains, wine country, San Francisco or any number of venues – I would rather buy a new SUV I’ve had my eyes on, than go through an airport, ___________ fill in the blank, and then sit next to, ________ fill in the blank.

    tODD as for your post; most people know that women have used the same tactics as males in Israel. I don’t think anyone believes men are only to be profiled. Did you read or click on the links to the two posts I made above? Women should be treated no differently then men when profiling.

  • Grace

    Air travel has become a vulgar experience. I love to travel, yet it’s now over the top. Sitting next to those who are so drunk they can’t sit up but lean on me, bad breath, smelling like cheap scotch, people who travel from countries where individuals can’t find time to bath once a day, never wear deodorant, then there are the ETC’s I could add to this list,…. just one more – those who are so over weight they take up their seat and then expect to take part of mine.

    We as a nation have become conditioned to accept the next step, step after step. Some conservatives speak out, but yet the madness continues. Children are now groped? – but of course, it’s for our safety – As for body scans and pat downs – let’s get on with the real problem – what is wrong with PROFILING, those who have threatened us, obvious as to their origin – why not throw the political correctness in the toilet where it belongs? Is it so difficult to see who is threatening us? – who continues to be a threat? – YES, we don’t know every single group who are mentally deranged, who might plan to harm us, but we certainly have a fairly clear idea of who has, and continues to threaten the free world. I would go so far as to deny access to our country, from any country that has taught terrorism, who continues to harbor terrorists. Anyone who wishes to leave the United States, either a citizen or traveler would not be allowed access back to the U.S.A. if they visited any country on that list. I believe in cutting off travel to and from these countries.

    I believe Charles Krauthammer wrote a great piece.

    We have a lot of friends who have taken off for ski resorts, kids in tow, SUV loaded,….. they can keep their planes – There is so much to do here, any type of weather, choose to be at the beach, dessert, snow covered mountains, wine country, San Francisco or any number of venues – I would rather buy a new SUV I’ve had my eyes on, than go through an airport, ___________ fill in the blank, and then sit next to, ________ fill in the blank.

    tODD as for your post; most people know that women have used the same tactics as males in Israel. I don’t think anyone believes men are only to be profiled. Did you read or click on the links to the two posts I made above? Women should be treated no differently then men when profiling.

  • Grace

    Collie – trains aren’t all that fun, especially on long trips. When you arrive at your destination you need to rent a car. Granted, it’s a romantic idea, but that’s about it.

    They can blow up trains as well, knocking out rail and cities.

  • Grace

    Collie – trains aren’t all that fun, especially on long trips. When you arrive at your destination you need to rent a car. Granted, it’s a romantic idea, but that’s about it.

    They can blow up trains as well, knocking out rail and cities.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace suggested (@24), “I would go so far as to deny access to our country, from any country that has taught terrorism, who continues to harbor terrorists.” Okay, Grace, what countries are those? Define “taught” and “harbor” — certainly people in the US have taught terrorism, and terrorists have lived here and come from here.

    “I believe in cutting off travel to and from these countries.” And do you believe, therefore in effectively banning businesses from dealing with those countries? Should we give our government the power to control businesses even more, and what countries they can do business with, based on the existence of terrorists or terrorist teaching in those countries?

    Seriously, what is the “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile to which Krauthammer refers? It’s universally known, but I don’t know it — surely those in favor of more security know it, then? It apparently doesn’t include gender, as Grace says, “I don’t think anyone believes men are only to be profiled.” So what does it include? Anyone? Hello?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace suggested (@24), “I would go so far as to deny access to our country, from any country that has taught terrorism, who continues to harbor terrorists.” Okay, Grace, what countries are those? Define “taught” and “harbor” — certainly people in the US have taught terrorism, and terrorists have lived here and come from here.

    “I believe in cutting off travel to and from these countries.” And do you believe, therefore in effectively banning businesses from dealing with those countries? Should we give our government the power to control businesses even more, and what countries they can do business with, based on the existence of terrorists or terrorist teaching in those countries?

    Seriously, what is the “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile to which Krauthammer refers? It’s universally known, but I don’t know it — surely those in favor of more security know it, then? It apparently doesn’t include gender, as Grace says, “I don’t think anyone believes men are only to be profiled.” So what does it include? Anyone? Hello?

  • Grace

    The State Department and CIA have defined countries who support terrorism. You know this tODD, why play the contrarian? – OR the ‘lets ask questions and get into it’ -

    Jihad is not a secret, nor are the countries who wage this war against the rest of the world.

  • Grace

    The State Department and CIA have defined countries who support terrorism. You know this tODD, why play the contrarian? – OR the ‘lets ask questions and get into it’ -

    Jihad is not a secret, nor are the countries who wage this war against the rest of the world.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace (@27), it wasn’t clear to me that you were merely referring to the State Department’s list of “State Sponsors of Terrorism”. After all, you’d said (@24), “I would go so far as to deny access to our country, from any country that has taught terrorism, who continues to harbor terrorists.”

    But the State Department’s list consists of all of four countries: Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria. Is that all you were referring to? Is there even any evidence that Cuba has “taught” or “harbored” terrorists in the modern airplane-destroying sense?

    What’s more, have any of the terrorists involved in successful or attempted attacks come from any of these countries? And (since I’m pretty sure the answer to that question is an emphatic “No”), of what value is this measure?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace (@27), it wasn’t clear to me that you were merely referring to the State Department’s list of “State Sponsors of Terrorism”. After all, you’d said (@24), “I would go so far as to deny access to our country, from any country that has taught terrorism, who continues to harbor terrorists.”

    But the State Department’s list consists of all of four countries: Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria. Is that all you were referring to? Is there even any evidence that Cuba has “taught” or “harbored” terrorists in the modern airplane-destroying sense?

    What’s more, have any of the terrorists involved in successful or attempted attacks come from any of these countries? And (since I’m pretty sure the answer to that question is an emphatic “No”), of what value is this measure?

  • Grace

    tODD – I would like to move forward.

    Some of the countries at fault, (not listed) we the U.S.A. do business, but is it, in light of terrorism wise and prudent ? – are not our citizens more important, keeping them safe.

    To achieve peace and a semblance of order, I see no other way to protect the citizens of this country but to have a fair amount of profiling. Yes I can just hear the screams of injustice, but there is a time when PC (political correctness) or pretense of conscience, takes a back seat to the obvious in identifying and profiling those who do harm.

    Airlines, trains, buildings, schools, malls and any other can take so many precautionary plans, ….. and then the day arrives when profiling the individual groups who are most likely to harm are profiled.

    We have those in this country who are ‘home grown’ that have turned from the values of the United States, they have formed units to learn warfare. They can be imprisoned in our own country when caught and brought to trial and found guilty if it can be proven.

  • Grace

    tODD – I would like to move forward.

    Some of the countries at fault, (not listed) we the U.S.A. do business, but is it, in light of terrorism wise and prudent ? – are not our citizens more important, keeping them safe.

    To achieve peace and a semblance of order, I see no other way to protect the citizens of this country but to have a fair amount of profiling. Yes I can just hear the screams of injustice, but there is a time when PC (political correctness) or pretense of conscience, takes a back seat to the obvious in identifying and profiling those who do harm.

    Airlines, trains, buildings, schools, malls and any other can take so many precautionary plans, ….. and then the day arrives when profiling the individual groups who are most likely to harm are profiled.

    We have those in this country who are ‘home grown’ that have turned from the values of the United States, they have formed units to learn warfare. They can be imprisoned in our own country when caught and brought to trial and found guilty if it can be proven.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace (@29), I would like someone to answer my question, and since you are in favor of profiling, it seems you should be able to do it: what is this “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile that Krauthammer speaks of?

    And should the federal government effectively end all economic interactions with Saudi Arabia and Nigeria? I feel that might have an effect on our economy, or at least certain sectors. Even while failing to actually make us any safer.

    Consider, after all, how much travel to Cuba has been stopped in light of our restrictions there. Hint: it hasn’t. I know an American who’s been to Cuba. He knew how to get there. And the people in Cuba knew what to do, too. So that’s working wonders.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace (@29), I would like someone to answer my question, and since you are in favor of profiling, it seems you should be able to do it: what is this “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile that Krauthammer speaks of?

    And should the federal government effectively end all economic interactions with Saudi Arabia and Nigeria? I feel that might have an effect on our economy, or at least certain sectors. Even while failing to actually make us any safer.

    Consider, after all, how much travel to Cuba has been stopped in light of our restrictions there. Hint: it hasn’t. I know an American who’s been to Cuba. He knew how to get there. And the people in Cuba knew what to do, too. So that’s working wonders.

  • collie

    @Grace – I’ve heard long distance train travel can be uncomfortable, but short to medium distances, like between D.C. and New York are tolerable, or so I’ve heard, from people who have done it. I guess I would just like to see some competition to air travel, and if there was more demand for alternatives I bet someone would design trains that would be more accomodating. Plus, it would give us something else to build, here in Michigan, and put to use some of our plants that are gathering dust.

    @tODD – I could give you a profile, but the problem is, as I think you’ve alluded to, is that a determined terrorist will circumvent it and start using people who don’t look or act like the profile. But couldn’t airlines at least tag travelers with a certain pattern such as frequent travel to countries known to sponsor terrorism, etc? That, it seems would at least net more suspects, and with less effort than the insane process we have now.

  • collie

    @Grace – I’ve heard long distance train travel can be uncomfortable, but short to medium distances, like between D.C. and New York are tolerable, or so I’ve heard, from people who have done it. I guess I would just like to see some competition to air travel, and if there was more demand for alternatives I bet someone would design trains that would be more accomodating. Plus, it would give us something else to build, here in Michigan, and put to use some of our plants that are gathering dust.

    @tODD – I could give you a profile, but the problem is, as I think you’ve alluded to, is that a determined terrorist will circumvent it and start using people who don’t look or act like the profile. But couldn’t airlines at least tag travelers with a certain pattern such as frequent travel to countries known to sponsor terrorism, etc? That, it seems would at least net more suspects, and with less effort than the insane process we have now.

  • Grace

    tODD – 30

    You don’t have any defined suggestions. You play the contrarian card, which takes no thought. You’ve done it with other people on this blog – three of which come to mind -

    “I would like someone to answer my question, and since you are in favor of profiling, it seems you should be able to do it: what is this “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile that Krauthammer speaks of?”

    There are no guarantees, as in – “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” – If you want to know Krauthammer’s answer you will need to ask him. However, I do agree with him on his paper. That might sound contrary, but it is isn’t.

  • Grace

    tODD – 30

    You don’t have any defined suggestions. You play the contrarian card, which takes no thought. You’ve done it with other people on this blog – three of which come to mind -

    “I would like someone to answer my question, and since you are in favor of profiling, it seems you should be able to do it: what is this “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile that Krauthammer speaks of?”

    There are no guarantees, as in – “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” – If you want to know Krauthammer’s answer you will need to ask him. However, I do agree with him on his paper. That might sound contrary, but it is isn’t.

  • Grace

    Collie – 31

    “I’ve heard long distance train travel can be uncomfortable, but short to medium distances, like between D.C. and New York are tolerable,”

    Travel between New York and D.C. is done everyday. So are other short distances. However I would not want to travel by train any longer than an hour or two. N.Y. and D.C are different, most people don’t need cars in those cities, there is limited parking.

    California would be almost impossible, …. one must rent a car here – and that is also a must in many other states.

  • Grace

    Collie – 31

    “I’ve heard long distance train travel can be uncomfortable, but short to medium distances, like between D.C. and New York are tolerable,”

    Travel between New York and D.C. is done everyday. So are other short distances. However I would not want to travel by train any longer than an hour or two. N.Y. and D.C are different, most people don’t need cars in those cities, there is limited parking.

    California would be almost impossible, …. one must rent a car here – and that is also a must in many other states.

  • Grace

    tODD

    “Consider, after all, how much travel to Cuba has been stopped in light of our restrictions there. Hint: it hasn’t. I know an American who’s been to Cuba. He knew how to get there. And the people in Cuba knew what to do, too. So that’s working wonders.”

    There is no “hint” – there will always be a few who can cross into another country such as Cuba – that isn’t a news flash!

  • Grace

    tODD

    “Consider, after all, how much travel to Cuba has been stopped in light of our restrictions there. Hint: it hasn’t. I know an American who’s been to Cuba. He knew how to get there. And the people in Cuba knew what to do, too. So that’s working wonders.”

    There is no “hint” – there will always be a few who can cross into another country such as Cuba – that isn’t a news flash!

  • collie

    @Grace – I think trains make sense in some areas more than others. I would be happy to see more train travel promoted within each State. Just as an alternative. Right now, business travelers who travel relatively short distances ( somewhere between a comfortable car ride and a cross-country trip) are forced to take planes because there’s no alternative. If they even wanted to take a train, there’s not enough train track arteries connecting cities in a direct manner. I don’t know, it’s just an idea, it seems like it could work, especially for high density places.

  • collie

    @Grace – I think trains make sense in some areas more than others. I would be happy to see more train travel promoted within each State. Just as an alternative. Right now, business travelers who travel relatively short distances ( somewhere between a comfortable car ride and a cross-country trip) are forced to take planes because there’s no alternative. If they even wanted to take a train, there’s not enough train track arteries connecting cities in a direct manner. I don’t know, it’s just an idea, it seems like it could work, especially for high density places.

  • Another Kerner

    Dr. Luther in 21st Century @20 asks us to reflect carefully on the 4th Amendment to the United States Consitution….which declares what the Federal Govenment cannot do its citizens: it guards citizens against unreasonable search and seizure, requiring warrents, judicially sanctioned. Seems there is a term used in law called “probable cause”.

    We disregard the provisions of this amendment at our peril.

    If, in the name of “safety”, people are willing to forgo those provided protections , allowing instead pervasive, sexually aggressive
    body searches by individuals (who are not required to change their gloves from one person to the next) in order to travel in this country, we have gone some considerable steps too far.

  • Another Kerner

    Dr. Luther in 21st Century @20 asks us to reflect carefully on the 4th Amendment to the United States Consitution….which declares what the Federal Govenment cannot do its citizens: it guards citizens against unreasonable search and seizure, requiring warrents, judicially sanctioned. Seems there is a term used in law called “probable cause”.

    We disregard the provisions of this amendment at our peril.

    If, in the name of “safety”, people are willing to forgo those provided protections , allowing instead pervasive, sexually aggressive
    body searches by individuals (who are not required to change their gloves from one person to the next) in order to travel in this country, we have gone some considerable steps too far.

  • Grace

    Another Kerner – 36

    “If, in the name of “safety”, people are willing to forgo those provided protections , allowing instead pervasive, sexually aggressive
    body searches by individuals (who are not required to change their gloves from one person to the next)
    in order to travel in this country, we have gone some considerable steps too far.”

    I agree -

    STD’s are rampant. It has no age limit, many are a life long experience, endless medication. When I saw the glove hand – I thought “who are they protecting?” They should be made to change gloves every single time time they touch another person.

    Many diseases are transmitted on door knobs, shopping carts, just to name two – that is why disinfectant wipes are offered in markets and other places – the don’t do a great job, but they do cut some of the risk. This might sound overly cautious, but if you knew the percentage of those who carry STD’s you would be shocked.

    Too many people fail to wash their hands even when using the bathroom, who knows what else they fail to do while in the bathroom stall – yet, those of us who are careful are put at risk.

  • Grace

    Another Kerner – 36

    “If, in the name of “safety”, people are willing to forgo those provided protections , allowing instead pervasive, sexually aggressive
    body searches by individuals (who are not required to change their gloves from one person to the next)
    in order to travel in this country, we have gone some considerable steps too far.”

    I agree -

    STD’s are rampant. It has no age limit, many are a life long experience, endless medication. When I saw the glove hand – I thought “who are they protecting?” They should be made to change gloves every single time time they touch another person.

    Many diseases are transmitted on door knobs, shopping carts, just to name two – that is why disinfectant wipes are offered in markets and other places – the don’t do a great job, but they do cut some of the risk. This might sound overly cautious, but if you knew the percentage of those who carry STD’s you would be shocked.

    Too many people fail to wash their hands even when using the bathroom, who knows what else they fail to do while in the bathroom stall – yet, those of us who are careful are put at risk.

  • Grace

    Collie – 35

    Your idea is not all bad, but it presents a problem for those who then must rent a car when they arrive at their destination. Taking a bus from the train station, to the office or a meeting, is out of the question in many places. New York, Washington, New Jersey and the surrounding areas are a perfect fit, but the rest of the country isn’t workable for the most part.

    When I traveled a lot on business I flew, I was met at the airport by someone to take me either to their office or somewhere else, OR a car had been left for me at a hotel, I then took a cab or shuttle. That isn’t possible for everyone, nor would it work for people who go to the same place everyday. Safety is another aspect when traveling on business, even for men. My husband was held up twice, once in the parking lot of a hotel, and another time in the hallway of his hotel room while setting down his brief case. I lost my car one night at the air terminal, I was so tired. I finally called a security guard, he took me in his golf cart to find my car…….. I fortunately realized things were wrong – I told him I saw my car, and then ran back to my car (I was an excellent runner) those are but three instances – there are more. I thank God for His protection.

  • Grace

    Collie – 35

    Your idea is not all bad, but it presents a problem for those who then must rent a car when they arrive at their destination. Taking a bus from the train station, to the office or a meeting, is out of the question in many places. New York, Washington, New Jersey and the surrounding areas are a perfect fit, but the rest of the country isn’t workable for the most part.

    When I traveled a lot on business I flew, I was met at the airport by someone to take me either to their office or somewhere else, OR a car had been left for me at a hotel, I then took a cab or shuttle. That isn’t possible for everyone, nor would it work for people who go to the same place everyday. Safety is another aspect when traveling on business, even for men. My husband was held up twice, once in the parking lot of a hotel, and another time in the hallway of his hotel room while setting down his brief case. I lost my car one night at the air terminal, I was so tired. I finally called a security guard, he took me in his golf cart to find my car…….. I fortunately realized things were wrong – I told him I saw my car, and then ran back to my car (I was an excellent runner) those are but three instances – there are more. I thank God for His protection.

  • Grace

    tODD do you know why sg has not been posting anymore since “The ideological crisis of liberalism” thread? – I ask, because there was some misunderstanding or hurt feelings, and then you asked her to email you.

  • Grace

    tODD do you know why sg has not been posting anymore since “The ideological crisis of liberalism” thread? – I ask, because there was some misunderstanding or hurt feelings, and then you asked her to email you.

  • Porcell

    The reality is that many people are in denial of the necessity to scan every passenger boarding an airplane, pilots and aircrews possibly excepted. The best way to scan is full body; when all airports have this equipment, security will be improved.

    Again, the scanner sits in a closed room and can’t see the real person; the anonymous image is erased immediately after it is cleared. Only a fool would opt for the necessarily invasive pat down.

    Americans are the biggest whiners in the world. They want airport security but can’t handle the price of it. They are involved in a very real war against smart terrorists who know these latest scanners can effectively reveal hidden weapons. Sure, other parts of the system need tightening, though those are separate issues.

    As to Krauthammer, whom I often agree with, he is wrong and grandstanding with this issue.

  • Porcell

    The reality is that many people are in denial of the necessity to scan every passenger boarding an airplane, pilots and aircrews possibly excepted. The best way to scan is full body; when all airports have this equipment, security will be improved.

    Again, the scanner sits in a closed room and can’t see the real person; the anonymous image is erased immediately after it is cleared. Only a fool would opt for the necessarily invasive pat down.

    Americans are the biggest whiners in the world. They want airport security but can’t handle the price of it. They are involved in a very real war against smart terrorists who know these latest scanners can effectively reveal hidden weapons. Sure, other parts of the system need tightening, though those are separate issues.

    As to Krauthammer, whom I often agree with, he is wrong and grandstanding with this issue.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace, you complained (@32) that I “don’t have any defined suggestions.” If I may say so, that’s the kind of attitude that got us where we are today. No, I don’t have any simple solutions, because it’s an extraordinarily difficult problem to solve. But a lot of people are scared and don’t want to hear about all that, they just want someone to do … something! And that’s what we have right now: the TSA is doing … something. Something that is annoying and invasive and humiliating and probably ineffective, but at least they’re not pointing out the problems with their own solution, hey?

    I think it’s pretty obvious at this point that Krauthammer’s “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile for terrorists doesn’t exist. It certainly isn’t “universally known” among any commenters here, that’s for sure. I suppose it’s nice to imagine, from a culture-war point of view, that “everyone knows” how to keep us secure from terrorists, but only a fear driven by “political correctness” stopped us from implementing such a solution, but I don’t see it.

    There just aren’t any easy solutions, as can be seen in the discussion I’ve had with Grace over which countries we should ban travel to and from entirely. Oh, and Grace, my mentioning Cuba (@30) was about more than just “a few” — many people from the US who wants to travel to Cuba do so, easily. The ban has no effect on them, just as it would have no effect on terrorists. The only people affected by such a ban are those who would do business with Cuba. Which means it’s a net economic loss for a zero gain in safety.

    The reason there are no easy solutions is because our free society is, ultimately, the “problem”. The only way to solve the problem of being (or feeling!) unsafe is to willingly give up our freedoms. And that is what those are suggesting who think the new measures are, somehow, “worth it”.

    No, I don’t have any simple solutions. But that doesn’t mean that the simple solutions we’re trying, anyhow, are good ideas. Nor do I think we’re likely to find any good solutions if we are driven by fear.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace, you complained (@32) that I “don’t have any defined suggestions.” If I may say so, that’s the kind of attitude that got us where we are today. No, I don’t have any simple solutions, because it’s an extraordinarily difficult problem to solve. But a lot of people are scared and don’t want to hear about all that, they just want someone to do … something! And that’s what we have right now: the TSA is doing … something. Something that is annoying and invasive and humiliating and probably ineffective, but at least they’re not pointing out the problems with their own solution, hey?

    I think it’s pretty obvious at this point that Krauthammer’s “narrow, concrete, uniquely definable and universally known” profile for terrorists doesn’t exist. It certainly isn’t “universally known” among any commenters here, that’s for sure. I suppose it’s nice to imagine, from a culture-war point of view, that “everyone knows” how to keep us secure from terrorists, but only a fear driven by “political correctness” stopped us from implementing such a solution, but I don’t see it.

    There just aren’t any easy solutions, as can be seen in the discussion I’ve had with Grace over which countries we should ban travel to and from entirely. Oh, and Grace, my mentioning Cuba (@30) was about more than just “a few” — many people from the US who wants to travel to Cuba do so, easily. The ban has no effect on them, just as it would have no effect on terrorists. The only people affected by such a ban are those who would do business with Cuba. Which means it’s a net economic loss for a zero gain in safety.

    The reason there are no easy solutions is because our free society is, ultimately, the “problem”. The only way to solve the problem of being (or feeling!) unsafe is to willingly give up our freedoms. And that is what those are suggesting who think the new measures are, somehow, “worth it”.

    No, I don’t have any simple solutions. But that doesn’t mean that the simple solutions we’re trying, anyhow, are good ideas. Nor do I think we’re likely to find any good solutions if we are driven by fear.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace (@39), I have not heard from SG via email, no.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace (@39), I have not heard from SG via email, no.

  • Grace

    Porcell and tODD -

    Perhaps you two gentlemen don’t realize that women feel very differently than men when it comes to nuding up, or down LOL

    Women aren’t really thrilled about open gym showers, etc. Even with a terrific body, tanned to perfection makes little difference – - add to that an airport, with ‘who knows who or what’ looking at our bodies is degrading. I’m sure there are a raft of women who don’t give a damn, but I do, and so do many others. It’s not a matter of education or sophistication, it is all about decency, and that includes what the LORD Jesus sees as sinful. I’m probably going to get more flack from this post than I do normally, but it needed to be said.

  • Grace

    Porcell and tODD -

    Perhaps you two gentlemen don’t realize that women feel very differently than men when it comes to nuding up, or down LOL

    Women aren’t really thrilled about open gym showers, etc. Even with a terrific body, tanned to perfection makes little difference – - add to that an airport, with ‘who knows who or what’ looking at our bodies is degrading. I’m sure there are a raft of women who don’t give a damn, but I do, and so do many others. It’s not a matter of education or sophistication, it is all about decency, and that includes what the LORD Jesus sees as sinful. I’m probably going to get more flack from this post than I do normally, but it needed to be said.

  • Grace

    tODD – 42 – thanks for letting me know – I miss her posts, hope she returns soon.

  • Grace

    tODD – 42 – thanks for letting me know – I miss her posts, hope she returns soon.

  • Porcell

    Grace, my wife and I travel frequently to Europe and have recently experienced many full-body scans. We’re amused at those fools who go for truly invasive pat-downs out of a false sense of modesty. My wife couldn’t care less that some anonymous scanner who doesn’t see her in person looks at a ghostly, largely skeletal, image. Both of us applaud any real improvement to security such as the full-body scanner.

    As to Christ, he says nothing relevant to this issue.

  • Porcell

    Grace, my wife and I travel frequently to Europe and have recently experienced many full-body scans. We’re amused at those fools who go for truly invasive pat-downs out of a false sense of modesty. My wife couldn’t care less that some anonymous scanner who doesn’t see her in person looks at a ghostly, largely skeletal, image. Both of us applaud any real improvement to security such as the full-body scanner.

    As to Christ, he says nothing relevant to this issue.

  • Grace

    Peter,

    I wouldn’t go for either scan or pat down. And yes, we have traveled a great deal as well.

    “As to Christ, he says nothing relevant to this issue.”

    The LORD doesn’t give a thumbs up on nudity.

  • Grace

    Peter,

    I wouldn’t go for either scan or pat down. And yes, we have traveled a great deal as well.

    “As to Christ, he says nothing relevant to this issue.”

    The LORD doesn’t give a thumbs up on nudity.

  • Grace

    We are becoming so conditioned to acquiesce to whatever is demanded of us, and that includes travel. Maybe you’re all laughing at my posts, but it makes no difference to me, except sadness, for my country and the world at large. At this point, I have no interest in traveling, I doubt my mind will change

    We are to deny ourselves and follow Him – I cannot see Jesus Christ allowing His mother to be scanned or anyone else, just for the sake of travel, … if air travel had been available over 2,000 years ago.

  • Grace

    We are becoming so conditioned to acquiesce to whatever is demanded of us, and that includes travel. Maybe you’re all laughing at my posts, but it makes no difference to me, except sadness, for my country and the world at large. At this point, I have no interest in traveling, I doubt my mind will change

    We are to deny ourselves and follow Him – I cannot see Jesus Christ allowing His mother to be scanned or anyone else, just for the sake of travel, … if air travel had been available over 2,000 years ago.

  • trotk

    Grace, STDs are, well, you know, transmitted by sexual activity. You don’t need to worry about contracting one from the gloved hand of a TSA agent. They do manage to keep their hands on top of the clothing.

    That isn’t to say that the pat down isn’t wrong. It does break the 4th amendment, in my estimation. It is incredibly invasive. But disease, especially sexually transmitted disease?

    Not a worry.

    For my part, my desire to fly disappears a little each day. Not so much because I view TSA as Big Brother, but just because every time I do (which is only a few times a year recently) I feel like a head of cattle, caught in long lines between fences while being prodded at and questioned and squished and delayed. Flying after 9/11 and after the recent recession has lost its luster.

  • trotk

    Grace, STDs are, well, you know, transmitted by sexual activity. You don’t need to worry about contracting one from the gloved hand of a TSA agent. They do manage to keep their hands on top of the clothing.

    That isn’t to say that the pat down isn’t wrong. It does break the 4th amendment, in my estimation. It is incredibly invasive. But disease, especially sexually transmitted disease?

    Not a worry.

    For my part, my desire to fly disappears a little each day. Not so much because I view TSA as Big Brother, but just because every time I do (which is only a few times a year recently) I feel like a head of cattle, caught in long lines between fences while being prodded at and questioned and squished and delayed. Flying after 9/11 and after the recent recession has lost its luster.

  • Grace

    trotk – 48

    “STDs are, well, you know, transmitted by sexual activity. You don’t need to worry about contracting one from the gloved hand of a TSA agent. They do manage to keep their hands on top of the clothing.”

    There are many news stories just like the one below!

    “Prosthetics to Conceal Explosives

    TSA Under Fire for New Security Procedures, Administrator John Pistole Says Agency May Rethink Protocols

    ABC NEWS

    Nov. 22, 2010

    By JAKE TAPPER, HUMA KHAN, SHARYN ALFONSI and LEE FERRAN

    “The woman who checked me reached her hands inside my underwear and felt her way around,” she said. “It was basically worse than going to the gynecologist. It was embarrassing. It was demeaning. It was inappropriate.”

    The head of the Transportation Security Administration John Pistole today said that at least one airport passenger screening went too far when an officer reached inside a traveler’s underwear, and said the agency is open to rethinking current protocols.”

    http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/tsa-responds-passenger-outrages-underwear-search-happen/story?id=12208932

    When trying on swimwear or underwear, women are asked to try it on over their own underwear. Their are signs in dressing rooms. This is for a very good reason. I would never wear underwear until it has been washed.

    Those who have herpes, with a breakout, certainly are contagious. Crabs can be on toilet seats, underwear, etc.

  • Grace

    trotk – 48

    “STDs are, well, you know, transmitted by sexual activity. You don’t need to worry about contracting one from the gloved hand of a TSA agent. They do manage to keep their hands on top of the clothing.”

    There are many news stories just like the one below!

    “Prosthetics to Conceal Explosives

    TSA Under Fire for New Security Procedures, Administrator John Pistole Says Agency May Rethink Protocols

    ABC NEWS

    Nov. 22, 2010

    By JAKE TAPPER, HUMA KHAN, SHARYN ALFONSI and LEE FERRAN

    “The woman who checked me reached her hands inside my underwear and felt her way around,” she said. “It was basically worse than going to the gynecologist. It was embarrassing. It was demeaning. It was inappropriate.”

    The head of the Transportation Security Administration John Pistole today said that at least one airport passenger screening went too far when an officer reached inside a traveler’s underwear, and said the agency is open to rethinking current protocols.”

    http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/tsa-responds-passenger-outrages-underwear-search-happen/story?id=12208932

    When trying on swimwear or underwear, women are asked to try it on over their own underwear. Their are signs in dressing rooms. This is for a very good reason. I would never wear underwear until it has been washed.

    Those who have herpes, with a breakout, certainly are contagious. Crabs can be on toilet seats, underwear, etc.

  • Grace

    I have had the same gyn for 14 years. When anyone who comes into their office with an STD, using the bathroom – when they leave it is cleaned with disinfectant – that is for a very good reason.

    STD’s are far more prevalent than people realize.

  • Grace

    I have had the same gyn for 14 years. When anyone who comes into their office with an STD, using the bathroom – when they leave it is cleaned with disinfectant – that is for a very good reason.

    STD’s are far more prevalent than people realize.

  • Another Kerner

    Grace at @37

    No, Grace, not STD.
    We are not in agreement about that.

    Some news articles seem to indicate that some of the TSA staff are complaining about the personal hygene of some of the public they “pat down”.
    They may be concerned about infectious diseases.

    The fact that the TSO wears gloves seems to indicate that the gloves are for their protection, not the travelers.

    Protection for the individual being searched would require a change of gloves for each passenger.

    Of course, the TSO has options.
    He/she could seek out other employment opportunities.

    (There is this matter of traveler privacy pertinent to medical issues and appliances, however.)

    Rather, as trotk @48 suggests, we probably should be focused on the import of the 4th Amendment to the US Constitution.

  • Another Kerner

    Grace at @37

    No, Grace, not STD.
    We are not in agreement about that.

    Some news articles seem to indicate that some of the TSA staff are complaining about the personal hygene of some of the public they “pat down”.
    They may be concerned about infectious diseases.

    The fact that the TSO wears gloves seems to indicate that the gloves are for their protection, not the travelers.

    Protection for the individual being searched would require a change of gloves for each passenger.

    Of course, the TSO has options.
    He/she could seek out other employment opportunities.

    (There is this matter of traveler privacy pertinent to medical issues and appliances, however.)

    Rather, as trotk @48 suggests, we probably should be focused on the import of the 4th Amendment to the US Constitution.

  • Kandyce

    My husband has a problem with the new imagers/pat downs. Me, I have other things that are keeping me from getting upset over this. Now when I fly in a month, we’ll see if my opinion changes. I do think we need to consider two questions.
    1. Are we violating the rights of citizens with these searches?
    2. Is there another way to solve this problem?
    Everything else seems like so much fluff and a lot of whining to me and therefore a bit unproductive, and I’ve got things to do.

  • Kandyce

    My husband has a problem with the new imagers/pat downs. Me, I have other things that are keeping me from getting upset over this. Now when I fly in a month, we’ll see if my opinion changes. I do think we need to consider two questions.
    1. Are we violating the rights of citizens with these searches?
    2. Is there another way to solve this problem?
    Everything else seems like so much fluff and a lot of whining to me and therefore a bit unproductive, and I’ve got things to do.

  • Grace

    Another Kerner -

    You and I don’t have to agree on whether someone can acquire herpes or any other disease from another person when, hand or fingers touch open herpes sores, and then the same gloved hand on bare skin is touching another on their genitals.

    Every pat down should include a change of gloves. The gloves should be for the protection of the individual who is “patting down” and the person being “patted down” -

  • Grace

    Another Kerner -

    You and I don’t have to agree on whether someone can acquire herpes or any other disease from another person when, hand or fingers touch open herpes sores, and then the same gloved hand on bare skin is touching another on their genitals.

    Every pat down should include a change of gloves. The gloves should be for the protection of the individual who is “patting down” and the person being “patted down” -

  • Grace

    BIG SIS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Next step for body scanners could be trains, boats, metro
    THE HILL

    By Jordy Yager – 11/23/10 02:09 PM ET

    The next step in tightened security could be on U.S. public transportation, trains and boats.

    Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says terrorists will continue to look for U.S. vulnerabilities, making tighter security standards necessary.

    “[Terrorists] are going to continue to probe the system and try to find a way through,” Napolitano said in an interview that aired Monday night on “Charlie Rose.”

    “I think the tighter we get on aviation, we have to also be thinking now about going on to mass transit or to trains or maritime. So, what do we need to be doing to strengthen our protections there?”

    Napolitano’s comments, made a day before one of the nation’s busiest travel days, come in the wake of a public outcry over newly implemented airport screening measures that have been criticized for being too invasive.”

    http://drudgefeed.com/l/OmKZM

  • Grace

    BIG SIS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Next step for body scanners could be trains, boats, metro
    THE HILL

    By Jordy Yager – 11/23/10 02:09 PM ET

    The next step in tightened security could be on U.S. public transportation, trains and boats.

    Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says terrorists will continue to look for U.S. vulnerabilities, making tighter security standards necessary.

    “[Terrorists] are going to continue to probe the system and try to find a way through,” Napolitano said in an interview that aired Monday night on “Charlie Rose.”

    “I think the tighter we get on aviation, we have to also be thinking now about going on to mass transit or to trains or maritime. So, what do we need to be doing to strengthen our protections there?”

    Napolitano’s comments, made a day before one of the nation’s busiest travel days, come in the wake of a public outcry over newly implemented airport screening measures that have been criticized for being too invasive.”

    http://drudgefeed.com/l/OmKZM

  • Stephen

    Wow, this one’s gettin’ weird – both the comments and the airport security.

    I’d rather not fly. I’m tall, I hate the hassle, staring down the tube, bumping my head, no leg room, the bad air, how nervous my wife gets, schlepping crap around, the poor treatment one is likely to receive along the way. And, oddly enough, I like airplanes. I used to want to be a pilot!

    But I think this one is worth a letter to a Congressman (or woman) actually. It’s bizarre. I’m not pleased about being humiliated by a nonsensical procedure that EVERYONE KNOWS has not been proven to have any value whatsoever. As tODD points out, until it is disproven by another terrorist attack, we must take it on faith that it’s for the best. How’s that for irony my brothers and sisters? But I’m even more concerned about seeing my wife have to go through a body scan than I am for myself. It’s extremely disturbing. And I’m certainly not letting somebody grope my child.

    I think flying is out until this goes away. If not, then perhaps we are road warriors from here on out. The assurances of the government and the scientists who invented these things only serve to heighten my sense of suspicion. I agree with Tom, and I hate to be this cynical, but I think this is market-driven as much as anything. Where, I wonder, do the images go? I know that for no good reason the State of Texas has my fingerprint because it is required to get a driver’s license. What other data would the government like? Or a corporation for that matter?

    When I visited Ground Zero in 2003 I stood at the chain link fence not knowing what I was feeling. It was a bright cloudless day in the fall just like two years before. There was dust rising from the construction that was going on in the hole below. I couldn’t see much, just a bunch of blank buildings facing the empty space. I think I said a prayer, but I’m not sure. Then as we turned to leave I looked across the street and there were several vendors selling t-shirts and all kinds of patriotic memorabilia, ready to cash in on whatever it was that I wasn’t sure I was feeling. At that moment I remember what I felt – disgust. I’m feeling some of that right now thinking about this particular turn of events.

  • Stephen

    Wow, this one’s gettin’ weird – both the comments and the airport security.

    I’d rather not fly. I’m tall, I hate the hassle, staring down the tube, bumping my head, no leg room, the bad air, how nervous my wife gets, schlepping crap around, the poor treatment one is likely to receive along the way. And, oddly enough, I like airplanes. I used to want to be a pilot!

    But I think this one is worth a letter to a Congressman (or woman) actually. It’s bizarre. I’m not pleased about being humiliated by a nonsensical procedure that EVERYONE KNOWS has not been proven to have any value whatsoever. As tODD points out, until it is disproven by another terrorist attack, we must take it on faith that it’s for the best. How’s that for irony my brothers and sisters? But I’m even more concerned about seeing my wife have to go through a body scan than I am for myself. It’s extremely disturbing. And I’m certainly not letting somebody grope my child.

    I think flying is out until this goes away. If not, then perhaps we are road warriors from here on out. The assurances of the government and the scientists who invented these things only serve to heighten my sense of suspicion. I agree with Tom, and I hate to be this cynical, but I think this is market-driven as much as anything. Where, I wonder, do the images go? I know that for no good reason the State of Texas has my fingerprint because it is required to get a driver’s license. What other data would the government like? Or a corporation for that matter?

    When I visited Ground Zero in 2003 I stood at the chain link fence not knowing what I was feeling. It was a bright cloudless day in the fall just like two years before. There was dust rising from the construction that was going on in the hole below. I couldn’t see much, just a bunch of blank buildings facing the empty space. I think I said a prayer, but I’m not sure. Then as we turned to leave I looked across the street and there were several vendors selling t-shirts and all kinds of patriotic memorabilia, ready to cash in on whatever it was that I wasn’t sure I was feeling. At that moment I remember what I felt – disgust. I’m feeling some of that right now thinking about this particular turn of events.

  • Grace

    Stephen – 55

    “But I’m even more concerned about seeing my wife have to go through a body scan than I am for myself. It’s extremely disturbing. And I’m certainly not letting somebody grope my child.

    I think flying is out until this goes away. If not, then perhaps we are road warriors from here on out. “

    Steve, I’m proud of you. you are what men should be made of, but too often are not.

    “Road warriors” – yes you are one, …. your wife is fortunate to have a husband as you, and so is your little one.

    God bless you, may others see your stand for Christ.

  • Grace

    Stephen – 55

    “But I’m even more concerned about seeing my wife have to go through a body scan than I am for myself. It’s extremely disturbing. And I’m certainly not letting somebody grope my child.

    I think flying is out until this goes away. If not, then perhaps we are road warriors from here on out. “

    Steve, I’m proud of you. you are what men should be made of, but too often are not.

    “Road warriors” – yes you are one, …. your wife is fortunate to have a husband as you, and so is your little one.

    God bless you, may others see your stand for Christ.

  • collie

    The editors of National Review suggest 4 things:

    1-Give TSA access to data available to the U.S. Customs & Border Protection.
    2-Develop a pre-screening program for passengers willing to go through an extensive background check. They would then get to skip the lengthy invasive routine at the airport.
    3-Profile. example: a man with the name Mohammed who either lives in Pakistan or has recently visited there.
    4-Divert some of the funds for TSA training into R&D development, hopefully to promote better screening equipment.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/253864/tsa-troubles-editors

    Another thought: the profile is narrow. All of the attacks to date have been planned and carried out by radical Islamists. That, I think, is what Krauthammer is referring to. The challenge lies in identifying them, since they don’t show up at airports in Islamic garb chanting Koranic verses. It seems to me, though, that we could eliminate a lot of people from the profiling process such as little kids (do we really believe they’re going to be used as mules?), most elderly and handicapped or wheel-chair bound. Yes, it would involve some subjectivism (is that a terrorist cloaking himself as a handicapped person?), but why couldn’t we do this, especially if we employ people specially trained in intelligence gathering. It could be a good job for retired or disabled police officers, who could use their experience in law enforcement dealing with lawbreakers to advantage. I’m sure they have better “suspicious people radar” than the general public.

    I didn’t like the system in place before all this new invasive stuff; these new procedures are outrageous, and really puts a dent in my desire to travel by air.

  • collie

    The editors of National Review suggest 4 things:

    1-Give TSA access to data available to the U.S. Customs & Border Protection.
    2-Develop a pre-screening program for passengers willing to go through an extensive background check. They would then get to skip the lengthy invasive routine at the airport.
    3-Profile. example: a man with the name Mohammed who either lives in Pakistan or has recently visited there.
    4-Divert some of the funds for TSA training into R&D development, hopefully to promote better screening equipment.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/253864/tsa-troubles-editors

    Another thought: the profile is narrow. All of the attacks to date have been planned and carried out by radical Islamists. That, I think, is what Krauthammer is referring to. The challenge lies in identifying them, since they don’t show up at airports in Islamic garb chanting Koranic verses. It seems to me, though, that we could eliminate a lot of people from the profiling process such as little kids (do we really believe they’re going to be used as mules?), most elderly and handicapped or wheel-chair bound. Yes, it would involve some subjectivism (is that a terrorist cloaking himself as a handicapped person?), but why couldn’t we do this, especially if we employ people specially trained in intelligence gathering. It could be a good job for retired or disabled police officers, who could use their experience in law enforcement dealing with lawbreakers to advantage. I’m sure they have better “suspicious people radar” than the general public.

    I didn’t like the system in place before all this new invasive stuff; these new procedures are outrageous, and really puts a dent in my desire to travel by air.

  • Randall

    After reading all of the recent articles about the TSA, I happen upon this article, “Former Lancaster County Prison Inmates Share $74,000 from Lawsuit.” http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/316823?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+local%2F8%2F9+%28LancasterOnline+-+News%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

  • Randall

    After reading all of the recent articles about the TSA, I happen upon this article, “Former Lancaster County Prison Inmates Share $74,000 from Lawsuit.” http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/316823?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+local%2F8%2F9+%28LancasterOnline+-+News%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

  • Grace

    What’s next, malls, markets, schools, work place, hospitals, DMV, maybe grammar schools?

    Airports not the only place for full-body scanners; equipment popping up at courthouses

    By P. SOLOMON BANDA , Associated Press

    November 23, 2010 – 8:21 PM

    CASTLE ROCK, Colo. – Taking a trip during the holidays isn’t the only time that people might get a full-body scan to pass through security. People heading to court to testify, get a restraining order, pay a ticket or answer criminal charges could also face a full-body scan at courthouses.

    The U.S. Marshals Service, which is in charge of protecting federal judges nationwide, is exploring their use at federal courthouses. And two state courthouses in Douglas and El Paso counties in Colorado have already deployed full-body scanners that use radio waves to detect all objects on a person, including paper.

    http://www.startribune.com/nation/110247899.html

  • Grace

    What’s next, malls, markets, schools, work place, hospitals, DMV, maybe grammar schools?

    Airports not the only place for full-body scanners; equipment popping up at courthouses

    By P. SOLOMON BANDA , Associated Press

    November 23, 2010 – 8:21 PM

    CASTLE ROCK, Colo. – Taking a trip during the holidays isn’t the only time that people might get a full-body scan to pass through security. People heading to court to testify, get a restraining order, pay a ticket or answer criminal charges could also face a full-body scan at courthouses.

    The U.S. Marshals Service, which is in charge of protecting federal judges nationwide, is exploring their use at federal courthouses. And two state courthouses in Douglas and El Paso counties in Colorado have already deployed full-body scanners that use radio waves to detect all objects on a person, including paper.

    http://www.startribune.com/nation/110247899.html

  • Grace

    TSA screeners’ qualifications are jaw-dropping

    September 29th, 2010

    “After 9/11, the TSA was created to transfer control of airport security to the federal government. In March 2003, TSA became part of the Department of Homeland Security along with every other agency but the kitchen sink. As with other government agencies, TSA has focused its energy on meeting unrealistic federal mandate deadlines in order to receive billions of dollars in DHS grants. TSA needed to deploy more than 55,000 screeners, personnel and equipment to secure the nation’s airways in order to meet the mandate.
    The qualifications of employees were left at the discretion of the agency’s Under Secretary. As it stands, TSA screeners must possess “a high school diploma, a general equivalency diploma, or experience that the Under Secretary has determined to be sufficient for the individual to perform the duties of the position.”

    Other requirements include they must know their basic colors and screeners who perform pat-downs or handheld metal detector searches of individuals shall have sufficient dexterity and capability to thoroughly conduct those procedures over an individual’s entire body. To be clear — a high school diploma or GED is not necessarily required.

    Another excerpt -

    “Last week, TSA announced that over the next two years 10,000 employees will be granted secret clearances, access to information that has been classified as “secret” that is not put out for general distribution in the agency.

    http://www.examiner.com/homeland-security-in-chicago/tsa-screeners-qualifications-are-jaw-dropping

  • Grace

    TSA screeners’ qualifications are jaw-dropping

    September 29th, 2010

    “After 9/11, the TSA was created to transfer control of airport security to the federal government. In March 2003, TSA became part of the Department of Homeland Security along with every other agency but the kitchen sink. As with other government agencies, TSA has focused its energy on meeting unrealistic federal mandate deadlines in order to receive billions of dollars in DHS grants. TSA needed to deploy more than 55,000 screeners, personnel and equipment to secure the nation’s airways in order to meet the mandate.
    The qualifications of employees were left at the discretion of the agency’s Under Secretary. As it stands, TSA screeners must possess “a high school diploma, a general equivalency diploma, or experience that the Under Secretary has determined to be sufficient for the individual to perform the duties of the position.”

    Other requirements include they must know their basic colors and screeners who perform pat-downs or handheld metal detector searches of individuals shall have sufficient dexterity and capability to thoroughly conduct those procedures over an individual’s entire body. To be clear — a high school diploma or GED is not necessarily required.

    Another excerpt -

    “Last week, TSA announced that over the next two years 10,000 employees will be granted secret clearances, access to information that has been classified as “secret” that is not put out for general distribution in the agency.

    http://www.examiner.com/homeland-security-in-chicago/tsa-screeners-qualifications-are-jaw-dropping


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