Packers and Steelers go to the Superbowl

Both of the division championship games were surprisingly alike.  One team absolutely dominated in the first half, but then in the second half the other team showed life and came within striking distance.  But the Packers from Green Bay, Wisconsin (pop. 100,353) defeated the Bears from Chicago, Illinois (pop. 2,896,016).  Also the Steelers from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (pop. 312,819), defeated the Jets from New York City, New York (pop. 8,214,426).

So it will be a small town Superbowl, a rust belt Superbowl.

I realize that people who live or have lived in Pittsburgh and in Pennsylvania generally will support the Steelers.

I urge everyone else to support the Packers.   Liberals should like them because they aren’t owned by some rich capitalist; rather, they are publicly owned.  Conservatives should like them because they represent small town America.  Let’s make this a campaign for national unity (except for Pittsburgh).

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • WebMonk

    Pittsburgh has always been better than the rest, so we don’t mind the petty jealousies that crop up all over the place. We’re used to it. We deal with it quite handily, actually …

    BY WINNING SUPERBOWLS!
    :-D

  • WebMonk

    Pittsburgh has always been better than the rest, so we don’t mind the petty jealousies that crop up all over the place. We’re used to it. We deal with it quite handily, actually …

    BY WINNING SUPERBOWLS!
    :-D

  • taly2010

    Well said, Dr. Veith!

  • taly2010

    Well said, Dr. Veith!

  • trotk

    What about cheering for the Packers because they are quarterbacked by someone who hasn’t been accused of rape multiple times and the team doesn’t include defensive players who routinely try to concuss the other team’s players?

    Sounds reasonable to me. Go Packers!

  • trotk

    What about cheering for the Packers because they are quarterbacked by someone who hasn’t been accused of rape multiple times and the team doesn’t include defensive players who routinely try to concuss the other team’s players?

    Sounds reasonable to me. Go Packers!

  • kerner

    Webmonk:

    The Packers, however, have won more NFL championships, counting the pre-Superbowl years. So, bring it, pal.

  • kerner

    Webmonk:

    The Packers, however, have won more NFL championships, counting the pre-Superbowl years. So, bring it, pal.

  • aletheist

    Just for the record, the “New York” Jets are actually from East Rutherford, New Jersey (pop. 8,931).

  • aletheist

    Just for the record, the “New York” Jets are actually from East Rutherford, New Jersey (pop. 8,931).

  • Cincinnatus

    trotk: You went there…

    But yes. The Steelers aren’t a very likable team at the moment, if they ever were (if my childhood spent in a small town inexplicably crawling with consummately obnoxious Steelers fans, then they probably never were).

  • Cincinnatus

    trotk: You went there…

    But yes. The Steelers aren’t a very likable team at the moment, if they ever were (if my childhood spent in a small town inexplicably crawling with consummately obnoxious Steelers fans, then they probably never were).

  • David Fleming

    Dr. Veith, not only are you a great theologian and professor, but you pick the right team. Go PACKERS!

    The only thing I’m kind of sad about, is that I wonder how much better we might have done if we could’ve kept Bret Favre. ;-)

  • David Fleming

    Dr. Veith, not only are you a great theologian and professor, but you pick the right team. Go PACKERS!

    The only thing I’m kind of sad about, is that I wonder how much better we might have done if we could’ve kept Bret Favre. ;-)

  • WebMonk

    Ha! That’s only because the Packers got an earlier start than the Steelers, and the Steelers started off slow, hampered by their “Steagles” and “Carpets” years.

    (yes, yes, I know. excuses, excuses, excuses)

    However! Steelers don’t rest on their rusty laurels, merely reliving their long-gone heydays in dusty dreams of faded glory!

  • WebMonk

    Ha! That’s only because the Packers got an earlier start than the Steelers, and the Steelers started off slow, hampered by their “Steagles” and “Carpets” years.

    (yes, yes, I know. excuses, excuses, excuses)

    However! Steelers don’t rest on their rusty laurels, merely reliving their long-gone heydays in dusty dreams of faded glory!

  • Porcell

    I’m glad that the Steelers took out the classless Jets, though I’m rooting for the Packers, as Wisconsin partly due to producing Paul Ryan and mostly for its reputation, especially in the Lombardi era, for first-class football, played with as much finesse as brawn.

  • Porcell

    I’m glad that the Steelers took out the classless Jets, though I’m rooting for the Packers, as Wisconsin partly due to producing Paul Ryan and mostly for its reputation, especially in the Lombardi era, for first-class football, played with as much finesse as brawn.

  • WebMonk

    Like I said in a previous post’s comments, the Steelers (and Jets) are fairly unstable teams this year, mixing boneheaded ineptitude with moments of incredible brilliance and skill.

    What was the Steelers-Jets game if not an example of exactly that. Steelers – powerhouse first half against an inept Jets team. Second half the Steelers went flat and the Jets played brilliantly at times. The Steelers managed to hold on, but it was a very close thing.

    That safety by the Jets followed by a TD moments later was very close to destroying the Steelers. Fortunately Brown made a big play – rescuing them by a fell stroke of skill and luck as opposed to an extended campaign of solid performance. Brilliance and Ineptitude.

    However, they’ve got the Packers’ number. That’s a game I won’t be too stressed about.

  • WebMonk

    Like I said in a previous post’s comments, the Steelers (and Jets) are fairly unstable teams this year, mixing boneheaded ineptitude with moments of incredible brilliance and skill.

    What was the Steelers-Jets game if not an example of exactly that. Steelers – powerhouse first half against an inept Jets team. Second half the Steelers went flat and the Jets played brilliantly at times. The Steelers managed to hold on, but it was a very close thing.

    That safety by the Jets followed by a TD moments later was very close to destroying the Steelers. Fortunately Brown made a big play – rescuing them by a fell stroke of skill and luck as opposed to an extended campaign of solid performance. Brilliance and Ineptitude.

    However, they’ve got the Packers’ number. That’s a game I won’t be too stressed about.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Time to bring Lombardi back to Green Bay.

    Plus, two other reasons I want them to win.

    1.) As I understand it, Aaron Rodgers is pretty public about his Christianity (Not saying that there are no Christians on the Pittsburgh team, but…)

    2.) Charles Woodson, Michigan alumnus. One of my boys.

    GO PACK and GO BLUE!

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Time to bring Lombardi back to Green Bay.

    Plus, two other reasons I want them to win.

    1.) As I understand it, Aaron Rodgers is pretty public about his Christianity (Not saying that there are no Christians on the Pittsburgh team, but…)

    2.) Charles Woodson, Michigan alumnus. One of my boys.

    GO PACK and GO BLUE!

  • Joe

    Webmonk – we (the packers – I’m an owner of one share of stock) have won championships in the 20′s, 30′s, 40′s, 60′s and 90′s – were not resting on rusty laurels my friend – we just seem to win in almost ever era.

  • Joe

    Webmonk – we (the packers – I’m an owner of one share of stock) have won championships in the 20′s, 30′s, 40′s, 60′s and 90′s – were not resting on rusty laurels my friend – we just seem to win in almost ever era.

  • Joe

    J. Dean – he is public in the sense that he does not hide it, he is not public in the sense that he forces it into situations were it is awkward. For instances, we he visits sick kids he prays and/or gives them autographs with bible versus. But when he scores a touchdown he simply cerebrates without the God cares that I scored a touchdown bit.

  • Joe

    J. Dean – he is public in the sense that he does not hide it, he is not public in the sense that he forces it into situations were it is awkward. For instances, we he visits sick kids he prays and/or gives them autographs with bible versus. But when he scores a touchdown he simply cerebrates without the God cares that I scored a touchdown bit.

  • WebMonk

    Joe – one victory over a decade and a half ago which was preceded by almost thirty years of victorylessness.

    All except one of the wins (1994) was over 40 years ago. Those laurels have long since wilted.

    *evil grin*

  • WebMonk

    Joe – one victory over a decade and a half ago which was preceded by almost thirty years of victorylessness.

    All except one of the wins (1994) was over 40 years ago. Those laurels have long since wilted.

    *evil grin*

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Agreed, Joe.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Agreed, Joe.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    A defense that tries to concuss the other team? I thought that was what American football was all about? The Steelers have got a killer defense (no pun intended), but I expect the Packers field intelligence will give them the win. Either way, it will be a great game.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    A defense that tries to concuss the other team? I thought that was what American football was all about? The Steelers have got a killer defense (no pun intended), but I expect the Packers field intelligence will give them the win. Either way, it will be a great game.

  • Joe

    Webmonk – yeah we had some bad years – but you claimed we were resting on the past. We are not, we are resting on our current team. The 6th seed that made it to the big dance with 15 players on IR. We’re not concerned with the past, except to point out how great of an organization the Packers have been (on the whole) for the last 90 years or so.

    I think this is going to be a very good game. Two smart young coaches. Two great defenses. Two great QBs. Vagas has the Pack as 2.5 favorites. I say its a pick ‘em. But, I’m picking the Pack.

    GO PACK GO!

  • Joe

    Webmonk – yeah we had some bad years – but you claimed we were resting on the past. We are not, we are resting on our current team. The 6th seed that made it to the big dance with 15 players on IR. We’re not concerned with the past, except to point out how great of an organization the Packers have been (on the whole) for the last 90 years or so.

    I think this is going to be a very good game. Two smart young coaches. Two great defenses. Two great QBs. Vagas has the Pack as 2.5 favorites. I say its a pick ‘em. But, I’m picking the Pack.

    GO PACK GO!

  • TE Schroeder

    It’s the Super Bowl of the Yellow Pants!!!!

    Go Pack!!!!

  • TE Schroeder

    It’s the Super Bowl of the Yellow Pants!!!!

    Go Pack!!!!

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Send the Packers packing. They’re the ones who are going to be wearing Joe Namath’s pantyhose this Super Bowl!

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Send the Packers packing. They’re the ones who are going to be wearing Joe Namath’s pantyhose this Super Bowl!

  • WebMonk

    Here’s another little tidbit – neither team has cheerleaders. I knew the Steelers don’t have them, but I didn’t realize the Packers don’t have them either.

    Psychoanalyze that!

    I say it’s because the Steelers are too focused on the game to be interested in distractions.

    Those Packers just can’t find any attractive women willing to root for their team, even for pay.

  • WebMonk

    Here’s another little tidbit – neither team has cheerleaders. I knew the Steelers don’t have them, but I didn’t realize the Packers don’t have them either.

    Psychoanalyze that!

    I say it’s because the Steelers are too focused on the game to be interested in distractions.

    Those Packers just can’t find any attractive women willing to root for their team, even for pay.

  • Joe

    WebMonk, the Pack has cheerleaders every home game. The University of Wisconsin – Green Bay and St. Norbert College take turns sending their cheerleaders to Lambeau Field.

    Unlike most NFL teams – we don’t have to pay attractive women to come to our games, they volunteer.

  • Joe

    WebMonk, the Pack has cheerleaders every home game. The University of Wisconsin – Green Bay and St. Norbert College take turns sending their cheerleaders to Lambeau Field.

    Unlike most NFL teams – we don’t have to pay attractive women to come to our games, they volunteer.

  • WebMonk

    Excellent Joe!

    Touché!

    And, just to head off the inevitable comment, I’ll put it up first. The reason Steelers don’t have cheerleaders:

    “Big Ben” doesn’t need the distraction!

    badum cha!

  • WebMonk

    Excellent Joe!

    Touché!

    And, just to head off the inevitable comment, I’ll put it up first. The reason Steelers don’t have cheerleaders:

    “Big Ben” doesn’t need the distraction!

    badum cha!

  • DonS

    I grew up in the Philadelphia area in the ’70′s, as an Eagles fan. I can tell you that, at least in that era, there was no love lost between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh — Phillies-Pirates, Eagles-Steelers, Flyers-Penguins were all rivalries.

    I don’t live there any more, but I think this is still the case — eastern Pennsylvania will have plenty of Packers fans, including my family that is still there.

    Go Pack!

  • DonS

    I grew up in the Philadelphia area in the ’70′s, as an Eagles fan. I can tell you that, at least in that era, there was no love lost between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh — Phillies-Pirates, Eagles-Steelers, Flyers-Penguins were all rivalries.

    I don’t live there any more, but I think this is still the case — eastern Pennsylvania will have plenty of Packers fans, including my family that is still there.

    Go Pack!

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Mike, didn’t the team whose QB was wearing pantyhose WIN that Super Bowl? Something of an unfortunate analogy you’re making, there. I think his team was wearing green, too.

    That said, this libertarian-leaning conservative is going to do his best to ignore the socialist NFL and do something productive with that Sunday afternoon, like go skating with the kids to keep them away from the convicts on both sides of the ball.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Mike, didn’t the team whose QB was wearing pantyhose WIN that Super Bowl? Something of an unfortunate analogy you’re making, there. I think his team was wearing green, too.

    That said, this libertarian-leaning conservative is going to do his best to ignore the socialist NFL and do something productive with that Sunday afternoon, like go skating with the kids to keep them away from the convicts on both sides of the ball.

  • Cincinnatus

    How is the NFL “socialist”? It’s the consummate example of capitalism–at its best or worst, depending upon how you view the situation.

    Meanwhile, if your kids are boys, I think you’re fine. Roethlisberger is a solid advocate of the feminine persuasion, I’ve heard.

  • Cincinnatus

    How is the NFL “socialist”? It’s the consummate example of capitalism–at its best or worst, depending upon how you view the situation.

    Meanwhile, if your kids are boys, I think you’re fine. Roethlisberger is a solid advocate of the feminine persuasion, I’ve heard.

  • WebMonk

    Bike, that’s horribly unfair. Big Ben was never convicted, so he obviously can’t be a convict! Shame on you, maligning the poor guy’s reputation. How was he to know some little girl would lie? Totally not his fault!

    He was the victim and everyone is always blaming him. Oh what a sorry state our culture is in, always blaming the victim!

    *major sarcasm alert there*

  • WebMonk

    Bike, that’s horribly unfair. Big Ben was never convicted, so he obviously can’t be a convict! Shame on you, maligning the poor guy’s reputation. How was he to know some little girl would lie? Totally not his fault!

    He was the victim and everyone is always blaming him. Oh what a sorry state our culture is in, always blaming the victim!

    *major sarcasm alert there*

  • Dust

    Support for Steelers = Support for Rush Limbaugh

  • Dust

    Support for Steelers = Support for Rush Limbaugh

  • DonS

    OK, back to football. Was anyone else wondering why the Bears didn’t call their final timeout on 4th and 4 at the Pack’s 27 yard line and about 50 seconds left to play, and actually organize a play to try to get the first down? Then they would have had, assuming they made the first down, four legitimate shots at the end zone from about the 20 yard line — they didn’t need that time out to take those shots. Lovie should be fired for that disastrous decision, which resulted in a game-ending interception.

  • DonS

    OK, back to football. Was anyone else wondering why the Bears didn’t call their final timeout on 4th and 4 at the Pack’s 27 yard line and about 50 seconds left to play, and actually organize a play to try to get the first down? Then they would have had, assuming they made the first down, four legitimate shots at the end zone from about the 20 yard line — they didn’t need that time out to take those shots. Lovie should be fired for that disastrous decision, which resulted in a game-ending interception.

  • TE Schroeder

    And when Shields caught that game-winning interception, were any other Packers’ fans yelling, “FALL DOWN!!!!” as he returned it for a meaningless 20-30 yards? Or to BJ Raji, “TUCK IN THE BALL!!!” when he was pre-celebrating his TD?

    Do any players (professionals, no less) understand game situations anymore, or just self-promotion? (No need to answer that; it is pretty much hypothetical.)

  • TE Schroeder

    And when Shields caught that game-winning interception, were any other Packers’ fans yelling, “FALL DOWN!!!!” as he returned it for a meaningless 20-30 yards? Or to BJ Raji, “TUCK IN THE BALL!!!” when he was pre-celebrating his TD?

    Do any players (professionals, no less) understand game situations anymore, or just self-promotion? (No need to answer that; it is pretty much hypothetical.)

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    breaking thread-
    RE:March for Life in Wash. DC-
    any Lutheran ‘leaders’ there-in the fore front?
    I know there are Roman Catholic leaders.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/24/AR2011012402577.html
    Carol-CS
    LA-Lutherans for Life…

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    breaking thread-
    RE:March for Life in Wash. DC-
    any Lutheran ‘leaders’ there-in the fore front?
    I know there are Roman Catholic leaders.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/24/AR2011012402577.html
    Carol-CS
    LA-Lutherans for Life…

  • saddler

    Don,
    Coach Smith inserting the third string quarterback before the beginning of the fourth quarter was another misstep. By doing so, he was left with no backup quarterback to finish the game if Hanie were to go down to injury. I understand that rules prohibit reinserting quarterbacks unless it is in the fourth quarter. What an embarassment that would have been if Hanie had been injured.

  • saddler

    Don,
    Coach Smith inserting the third string quarterback before the beginning of the fourth quarter was another misstep. By doing so, he was left with no backup quarterback to finish the game if Hanie were to go down to injury. I understand that rules prohibit reinserting quarterbacks unless it is in the fourth quarter. What an embarassment that would have been if Hanie had been injured.

  • Joe

    Carol – yes the LCMS was at the March for life:
    http://www.lcms.org/pages/internal.asp?NavID=18206

    Saddler – I really disagree. They should have gone with Hanie sooner. Collins is a joke and Culter is out, why waste the entire 3rd quarter with Collins? Besides, every team has another skill player who is the 4th QB. For Green Bay it is the TE – Quarless. I think the Bears have their punter as the 4th.

  • Joe

    Carol – yes the LCMS was at the March for life:
    http://www.lcms.org/pages/internal.asp?NavID=18206

    Saddler – I really disagree. They should have gone with Hanie sooner. Collins is a joke and Culter is out, why waste the entire 3rd quarter with Collins? Besides, every team has another skill player who is the 4th QB. For Green Bay it is the TE – Quarless. I think the Bears have their punter as the 4th.

  • SKPeterson

    Something has gone horribly, horribly wrong.

    It was supposed to be Cowboys v. Vikes and Titans v. Colts for the championship with it being a Cowboys v. Titans Superbowl. Right?

    Most worthless Superbowl year. Ever.

  • SKPeterson

    Something has gone horribly, horribly wrong.

    It was supposed to be Cowboys v. Vikes and Titans v. Colts for the championship with it being a Cowboys v. Titans Superbowl. Right?

    Most worthless Superbowl year. Ever.

  • Dan Kempin

    Don, #28, and saddler, #31,

    By all means, fire Lovie for his incompetence! Why, with a dolt like him it is a wonder that the Bears were even IN the championship! Um, and the superbowl. Uh, and hold three divisional titles during his tenure. It is sheer luck that he has an overall willing record, and that he reached 50 wins faster than Bill Parcells, Bill Walsh, and Bill Belichick! Gosh!

    Plus, Jay Cutler obviously tore his own MCL to cover the fact that he was FAKING injury yesterday!

    No wonder Bears fans are always cranky.

  • Dan Kempin

    Don, #28, and saddler, #31,

    By all means, fire Lovie for his incompetence! Why, with a dolt like him it is a wonder that the Bears were even IN the championship! Um, and the superbowl. Uh, and hold three divisional titles during his tenure. It is sheer luck that he has an overall willing record, and that he reached 50 wins faster than Bill Parcells, Bill Walsh, and Bill Belichick! Gosh!

    Plus, Jay Cutler obviously tore his own MCL to cover the fact that he was FAKING injury yesterday!

    No wonder Bears fans are always cranky.

  • Dan Kempin

    (That should be an overall “winning” record above, of course.)

    (Plus, I just wanted to point out that it was comment #34.)

    (Plus, Go Pack!)

  • Dan Kempin

    (That should be an overall “winning” record above, of course.)

    (Plus, I just wanted to point out that it was comment #34.)

    (Plus, Go Pack!)

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    The NFL is socialist in that they’re constantly demanding public funds for new stadiums.

    And regrettably, it’s not just Roethlisberger that’s the criminal problem….and I’ve got mostly daughters and, thankfully, a carry permit. :^)

    (why we fund the NFL to the tune of billions of dollars in stadiums to get dozens of musclebound partiers in our fair cities is beyond me…..)

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    The NFL is socialist in that they’re constantly demanding public funds for new stadiums.

    And regrettably, it’s not just Roethlisberger that’s the criminal problem….and I’ve got mostly daughters and, thankfully, a carry permit. :^)

    (why we fund the NFL to the tune of billions of dollars in stadiums to get dozens of musclebound partiers in our fair cities is beyond me…..)

  • Joe

    Bike – socialism has an actual definition and, while building sports stadiums falls outside of my views as to what the gov’t should or should not do, it is not socialism.

  • Joe

    Bike – socialism has an actual definition and, while building sports stadiums falls outside of my views as to what the gov’t should or should not do, it is not socialism.

  • DonS

    Dan @ 34: Yeah, firing him would probably be a little bit of an overreaction. By the way, I’m no Bears fan (I was rooting for the Packers), but that was a huge gaffe. When your QB is a 3d stringer with about 1 quarter of NFL playoff experience, it’s a terrible idea to have him scramble the team up to the line and call a play on the fly, as the clock ticks down inside the final minute in the NFC championship game on 4th and 4. Not a shock that he threw a pick in that situation. You’ve gotta use your time out, settle him down, and call a play for him. Give him a chance to make the play. Assuming he makes it, and even assuming you’ve got to spike the ball to stop the clock, you will still at least have three shots at the end zone, with a chance to go to the Super Bowl.

    Saddler @ 31: I don’t think Smith had a choice but to insert Hanie when he did. Collins was doing nothing, and for that matter, Cutler hadn’t done anything either. You can’t worry about injury at that point. Heck, if Hanie had played the whole game, maybe they would’ve won ;-)

  • DonS

    Dan @ 34: Yeah, firing him would probably be a little bit of an overreaction. By the way, I’m no Bears fan (I was rooting for the Packers), but that was a huge gaffe. When your QB is a 3d stringer with about 1 quarter of NFL playoff experience, it’s a terrible idea to have him scramble the team up to the line and call a play on the fly, as the clock ticks down inside the final minute in the NFC championship game on 4th and 4. Not a shock that he threw a pick in that situation. You’ve gotta use your time out, settle him down, and call a play for him. Give him a chance to make the play. Assuming he makes it, and even assuming you’ve got to spike the ball to stop the clock, you will still at least have three shots at the end zone, with a chance to go to the Super Bowl.

    Saddler @ 31: I don’t think Smith had a choice but to insert Hanie when he did. Collins was doing nothing, and for that matter, Cutler hadn’t done anything either. You can’t worry about injury at that point. Heck, if Hanie had played the whole game, maybe they would’ve won ;-)

  • Dan Kempin

    Don, #38,

    I hope you realize that my reply to you was really a shot at the media coverage Lovie has gotten his whole career in Chicago. He does make game mistakes, though, I’ve no debate over that. (He has a tendency to NOT throw the challenge flag.) I think the bigger mistake in this game was not trying for the field goal when they were down by 14.

    Still, that Hanie kid had some moxie. If the game lasted five quarters instead of four, the Bears might have taken it!

  • Dan Kempin

    Don, #38,

    I hope you realize that my reply to you was really a shot at the media coverage Lovie has gotten his whole career in Chicago. He does make game mistakes, though, I’ve no debate over that. (He has a tendency to NOT throw the challenge flag.) I think the bigger mistake in this game was not trying for the field goal when they were down by 14.

    Still, that Hanie kid had some moxie. If the game lasted five quarters instead of four, the Bears might have taken it!

  • saddler

    Don,
    You’re right. At this point in the ‘game’ Smith wasn’t thinking about embarassment, he was really wanting to win a ball game. I was echoing the remarks of (I believe it was Shannon Sharpe) one of the talking heads in the post game show. The other members of the panel seemed to agree with his assessment that he should have stayed with Collins until the end of the third. I thought Hanie came in and did a good job in a really tough situation.

  • saddler

    Don,
    You’re right. At this point in the ‘game’ Smith wasn’t thinking about embarassment, he was really wanting to win a ball game. I was echoing the remarks of (I believe it was Shannon Sharpe) one of the talking heads in the post game show. The other members of the panel seemed to agree with his assessment that he should have stayed with Collins until the end of the third. I thought Hanie came in and did a good job in a really tough situation.

  • George A. Marquart

    And now, as they used to say on Monty Python, for something completely different. What is the role of professional football in our society? For one thing, the media, advertisers and the American system of higher education are in it for the billions in revenue it generates. Sportsmanship, fairness, or any noble motives have no place in it, because the whole point is to make money, not anything else. When someone suggests that a player should be honest in a questionable situation, they are regarded with pity. Those in charge delude the players and the fans into thinking that there is something noble about the endeavor, because they know that we must delude ourselves with some noble motive, else they will loose revenue.

    The sport has the highest rate of injury per participant of all sports conducted in public schools. Any other commercial enterprise that produces this many injuries would be shut down. A high percentage of professional football players suffers from chronic pain for the rest of their lives after retirement.

    The damage football and yes, other sports, have done to our system of higher education is incalculable. Sports are such a huge source of income that education takes a secondary role. Of course, from time to time there are campaigns to emphasize education, leading to such anecdotes as the head coach of the University of Nebraska’s football team telling his player, “Remember, men, that “N” on your sweater does not just stand for Nebraska, it also stands for (K)Nowledge.”

    Do you know why, although soccer is the most popular spectator sport in the entire world, it will never be as popular as football in the USA? Because there are no opportunities for advertising! If the sponsors cannot make any money, they will not hype it, and we will not develop the addiction from which we need to suffer for the sport to become popular.

    And yes, I will watch the Superbowl. I saw Joe Namath and the Jets beat Baltimore so many years ago. It is a spectacle. But even as I watch it, I feel pity for the victims, especially those I see twisting injured on the field, and I feel a little dirty.

    Peace and Joy!
    George A. Marquart

  • George A. Marquart

    And now, as they used to say on Monty Python, for something completely different. What is the role of professional football in our society? For one thing, the media, advertisers and the American system of higher education are in it for the billions in revenue it generates. Sportsmanship, fairness, or any noble motives have no place in it, because the whole point is to make money, not anything else. When someone suggests that a player should be honest in a questionable situation, they are regarded with pity. Those in charge delude the players and the fans into thinking that there is something noble about the endeavor, because they know that we must delude ourselves with some noble motive, else they will loose revenue.

    The sport has the highest rate of injury per participant of all sports conducted in public schools. Any other commercial enterprise that produces this many injuries would be shut down. A high percentage of professional football players suffers from chronic pain for the rest of their lives after retirement.

    The damage football and yes, other sports, have done to our system of higher education is incalculable. Sports are such a huge source of income that education takes a secondary role. Of course, from time to time there are campaigns to emphasize education, leading to such anecdotes as the head coach of the University of Nebraska’s football team telling his player, “Remember, men, that “N” on your sweater does not just stand for Nebraska, it also stands for (K)Nowledge.”

    Do you know why, although soccer is the most popular spectator sport in the entire world, it will never be as popular as football in the USA? Because there are no opportunities for advertising! If the sponsors cannot make any money, they will not hype it, and we will not develop the addiction from which we need to suffer for the sport to become popular.

    And yes, I will watch the Superbowl. I saw Joe Namath and the Jets beat Baltimore so many years ago. It is a spectacle. But even as I watch it, I feel pity for the victims, especially those I see twisting injured on the field, and I feel a little dirty.

    Peace and Joy!
    George A. Marquart

  • DonS

    Well, yes George, and the other reason soccer will never be as popular as football in the U.S. is that it is deadly dull ;-)

  • DonS

    Well, yes George, and the other reason soccer will never be as popular as football in the U.S. is that it is deadly dull ;-)

  • DonS

    Oh, and while there seem to be considerably fewer injuries on the soccer field, there are many, many serious injuries in the stands.

  • DonS

    Oh, and while there seem to be considerably fewer injuries on the soccer field, there are many, many serious injuries in the stands.

  • kerner

    I’ll give you this, George. The Owners’ attempts to lengthen the season should be denied somehow. The players’ bodies simply can’t take any more.

  • kerner

    I’ll give you this, George. The Owners’ attempts to lengthen the season should be denied somehow. The players’ bodies simply can’t take any more.

  • Dennis Peskey

    George – Thanks to PETA, the animals are absent; yet, the time has not come when we will beat our swords into plowshares. Sans swords, our modern gladiators don their armor and freely enter the arena for the last vestige of combat permitted.

    They do this not for the sake of the advertisers; they do this not for the money; they do this not for honor nor prestige; they do this because they can and their opponet is worthy. The ads, money and honor all follow the game – but it is the game which is foremost. For this, a chosen few from a steel town in Pennsylvania will suit up against a battered group from a smaller town in northern Wisconsin. The showdown is to be held in Texas (Arlington, not Dallas) without any cowboys participating. How fitting! Go Pack Go.
    Peace,
    Dennis

  • Dennis Peskey

    George – Thanks to PETA, the animals are absent; yet, the time has not come when we will beat our swords into plowshares. Sans swords, our modern gladiators don their armor and freely enter the arena for the last vestige of combat permitted.

    They do this not for the sake of the advertisers; they do this not for the money; they do this not for honor nor prestige; they do this because they can and their opponet is worthy. The ads, money and honor all follow the game – but it is the game which is foremost. For this, a chosen few from a steel town in Pennsylvania will suit up against a battered group from a smaller town in northern Wisconsin. The showdown is to be held in Texas (Arlington, not Dallas) without any cowboys participating. How fitting! Go Pack Go.
    Peace,
    Dennis

  • WebMonk

    Dennis, football is far from the “last vestige of combat permitted”. They’re downright tame compared to MMA and boxing.

    “They do this not for the sake of the advertisers; they do this not for the money; they do this not for honor nor prestige; they do this because they can and their opponet is worthy. The ads, money and honor all follow the game – but it is the game which is foremost.”

    That was extremely poetic and beautifully stated.

    If you believe that in a literal sense, I have some prime oceanfront property in Kansas I would be interested in selling you.

  • WebMonk

    Dennis, football is far from the “last vestige of combat permitted”. They’re downright tame compared to MMA and boxing.

    “They do this not for the sake of the advertisers; they do this not for the money; they do this not for honor nor prestige; they do this because they can and their opponet is worthy. The ads, money and honor all follow the game – but it is the game which is foremost.”

    That was extremely poetic and beautifully stated.

    If you believe that in a literal sense, I have some prime oceanfront property in Kansas I would be interested in selling you.

  • Dennis Peskey

    Dear Webmonk – In 1972, I ventured onto Route 66 westward bound to California. The exodus came to a screeching halt upon entry in Kansas. I quickly deduced why Dorothy caught the first “wind” departing – as did I (albeit in a Pontiac, not a whirlwind.) In summation, I’ll elect to forgo the “oceanfront property” offer so graciously extended.

    In 1968, after departing the Republic of Vietnam and arriving at Red Beach in Okinawa, as members of the Third Marine Amphious Brigade we found ourselves restricted to Camp Hanses base (the USMC wisely undertook a “pasification program” to rehabiliate us prior to any off-base liberty.) Having little to do, some Marine produced a football; within minutes, the game was on. In the rain, in the mud, without fear and with great gusto we play for four hours. The game ended when we nolonger could muster sufficient bodies to continue – most of our entourage had departed for sickbay with accompaning injuries. The next day, our regiment surgeon attended morning muster to announce the prohibition of any further games of football – we had substained more injuries in this four hour period than fours months of combat in Vietnam.

    We played football not for money, not for advertisers, not for prestige; we played for the game. That was enough; even this was taken from us but we have our memories.
    P.S. I boxed in the Corps; the regimental surgeon never prohibited this practice. (I would caution respect be given to certain boxers in the Corps – they will try to remove your cranium in a most uncivil manner.) In sum, I wrote what I believe, here I stand, I can do no other.
    Peace,
    Dennis

  • Dennis Peskey

    Dear Webmonk – In 1972, I ventured onto Route 66 westward bound to California. The exodus came to a screeching halt upon entry in Kansas. I quickly deduced why Dorothy caught the first “wind” departing – as did I (albeit in a Pontiac, not a whirlwind.) In summation, I’ll elect to forgo the “oceanfront property” offer so graciously extended.

    In 1968, after departing the Republic of Vietnam and arriving at Red Beach in Okinawa, as members of the Third Marine Amphious Brigade we found ourselves restricted to Camp Hanses base (the USMC wisely undertook a “pasification program” to rehabiliate us prior to any off-base liberty.) Having little to do, some Marine produced a football; within minutes, the game was on. In the rain, in the mud, without fear and with great gusto we play for four hours. The game ended when we nolonger could muster sufficient bodies to continue – most of our entourage had departed for sickbay with accompaning injuries. The next day, our regiment surgeon attended morning muster to announce the prohibition of any further games of football – we had substained more injuries in this four hour period than fours months of combat in Vietnam.

    We played football not for money, not for advertisers, not for prestige; we played for the game. That was enough; even this was taken from us but we have our memories.
    P.S. I boxed in the Corps; the regimental surgeon never prohibited this practice. (I would caution respect be given to certain boxers in the Corps – they will try to remove your cranium in a most uncivil manner.) In sum, I wrote what I believe, here I stand, I can do no other.
    Peace,
    Dennis

  • WebMonk

    Ah, ok. You’re talking about the general participation in football rather than the professional side of things.

    People do still partake in football for the challenge and any monetary benefits are secondary, but those people are becoming vanishingly rare in professional sports. Not just football, but almost all the major sports. (I might give a pass to tennis, though I don’t follow it much, and just might be blind to some of its aspects) People may begin in a sport for the love and challenge, but it seems that those who have risen to greatness within professional leagues have transformed from playing for the love and challenge to playing for the money and fame available.

  • WebMonk

    Ah, ok. You’re talking about the general participation in football rather than the professional side of things.

    People do still partake in football for the challenge and any monetary benefits are secondary, but those people are becoming vanishingly rare in professional sports. Not just football, but almost all the major sports. (I might give a pass to tennis, though I don’t follow it much, and just might be blind to some of its aspects) People may begin in a sport for the love and challenge, but it seems that those who have risen to greatness within professional leagues have transformed from playing for the love and challenge to playing for the money and fame available.


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