Beware the Ides of March

For the Romans, the 15th (or sometimes the 13th) of every month was called the “Ides,” marking the full moon.  Today is the Ides of March.

On this day in 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of Senators led by his friend Brutus, who was trying to preserve the Roman Republic by killing the man who was turning Rome into an empire.  The action only delayed briefly the fall of the republic.  (We tend to fixate on the fall of the Roman empire, but we need to worry more about parallels with the fall of the Roman republic.)

See Ides of March – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

So this Roman centurion goes into a bar and orders a martinus.  The bartender asks, “Do you mean a martini?”  The centurion says, “Look, if I wanted a double I’d tell you!”

Let us observe the Ides of March with Latin jokes, reasons why Latin should be taught in school, parallels with the transition from republic to empire, predictions of doom, or whatever else seems appropriate.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Cassius and Brutus were right.

    As for Latin jokes, I’m afraid I’m at the shallow end of the wit pool. Nothing comes to mind.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Cassius and Brutus were right.

    As for Latin jokes, I’m afraid I’m at the shallow end of the wit pool. Nothing comes to mind.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    As the Bruces said, Bibo ergo sum. Or, as Dave Barry learned his conjugations, flatulo, flatulas, flatulat…..

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    As the Bruces said, Bibo ergo sum. Or, as Dave Barry learned his conjugations, flatulo, flatulas, flatulat…..

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    The only Roman joke I can think of is an old and bad one. Brutus meets Julius Caesar one morning and asks him what he had for breakfast.

    “Eggs,” says Caesar.

    “How many?”

    “Et two, Brute.”

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    The only Roman joke I can think of is an old and bad one. Brutus meets Julius Caesar one morning and asks him what he had for breakfast.

    “Eggs,” says Caesar.

    “How many?”

    “Et two, Brute.”

  • Dan Kempin

    “So this Roman centurion goes into a bar and orders a martinus . . .”

    Ha! I love it! I’m going to savor this moment of latin wit, since it is such a rarity.

    And remember: Semper ubi sub ubi! (I can’t believe I’m the first to post that!)

    Or if you prefer the motto of Possum Lodge: “Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati.”

  • Dan Kempin

    “So this Roman centurion goes into a bar and orders a martinus . . .”

    Ha! I love it! I’m going to savor this moment of latin wit, since it is such a rarity.

    And remember: Semper ubi sub ubi! (I can’t believe I’m the first to post that!)

    Or if you prefer the motto of Possum Lodge: “Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati.”

  • Dorkus Malorkus

    What do you call it when daily expenses are paid in fish?

    “Carpe Per Diem”

  • Dorkus Malorkus

    What do you call it when daily expenses are paid in fish?

    “Carpe Per Diem”

  • Dan Kempin

    What do you call a small Belgian ant?

    An ant twerp.

    (Ok, not latin, but it is my favorite pun. Ergo it seems appropriate. Wait, now I’m covered!)

  • Dan Kempin

    What do you call a small Belgian ant?

    An ant twerp.

    (Ok, not latin, but it is my favorite pun. Ergo it seems appropriate. Wait, now I’m covered!)

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in exile

    I love Latin jokes! I have a whole book of them here somewhere.

  • http://www.hempelstudios.com Sarah in exile

    I love Latin jokes! I have a whole book of them here somewhere.

  • Cincinnatus

    A besotted aristocratic class that had abandoned its public obligations and the good of the commonwealth arrayed against a vulgar populist mass ready to leap into the arms of whichever despot promised the most goodies? Sounds vaguely familiar.

    I agree that the fall of the Republic serves as a prescient warning to our own condition; but then again, so does the fall of the Empire. The United States arguably hasn’t had a “Caesaric” moment (perhaps Lincoln?)–and some might argue that neither did Rome–but it is indisputable that currently the United States offers the specter of a modest republic attempting an uneasy and ultimately impossible union with the largest and strongest empire in world history. Which is likely to “fall” first?

    Personally, I think we lost the fundamental life of the Republic a long time ago, but I could be wrong…

  • Cincinnatus

    A besotted aristocratic class that had abandoned its public obligations and the good of the commonwealth arrayed against a vulgar populist mass ready to leap into the arms of whichever despot promised the most goodies? Sounds vaguely familiar.

    I agree that the fall of the Republic serves as a prescient warning to our own condition; but then again, so does the fall of the Empire. The United States arguably hasn’t had a “Caesaric” moment (perhaps Lincoln?)–and some might argue that neither did Rome–but it is indisputable that currently the United States offers the specter of a modest republic attempting an uneasy and ultimately impossible union with the largest and strongest empire in world history. Which is likely to “fall” first?

    Personally, I think we lost the fundamental life of the Republic a long time ago, but I could be wrong…

  • Orianna Laun

    Some people say “Carpe Diem”–I say, “Carpe Carp”. Sorry, it’s the only Latin humor I know. Maybe that’s why Latin should be taught in schools–so there would be more widespread Latin humor.

  • Orianna Laun

    Some people say “Carpe Diem”–I say, “Carpe Carp”. Sorry, it’s the only Latin humor I know. Maybe that’s why Latin should be taught in schools–so there would be more widespread Latin humor.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Not jokes, but a few great quotes for Latin memorization:
    This one’s from Luther:

    Pecca fortiter, sed crede fortius.

    Sin strongly, but believe more strongly.

    And from St. Ambrose:

    Quia semper pecco, semper debeo accipere medicinam.

    Because I always sin, I always ought to take the medicine (Lord’s Supper).

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Not jokes, but a few great quotes for Latin memorization:
    This one’s from Luther:

    Pecca fortiter, sed crede fortius.

    Sin strongly, but believe more strongly.

    And from St. Ambrose:

    Quia semper pecco, semper debeo accipere medicinam.

    Because I always sin, I always ought to take the medicine (Lord’s Supper).

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    The Latin professor’s class was conjugating verbs and it got to be Julius’s turn. But Julius had not been paying close attention. So he turned to the student beside him and discreetly asked, “What’s the verb?”

    She replied, “Darn if I know.”

    So our hero sat up and conjugated: “darnifino, darnifinas, darnifinat. darnifinamus, darnifinatis, darnifinant. “

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    The Latin professor’s class was conjugating verbs and it got to be Julius’s turn. But Julius had not been paying close attention. So he turned to the student beside him and discreetly asked, “What’s the verb?”

    She replied, “Darn if I know.”

    So our hero sat up and conjugated: “darnifino, darnifinas, darnifinat. darnifinamus, darnifinatis, darnifinant. “

  • DonS

    A variant on the “martini” joke:

    The Latin professor was uncharacteristically late in returning home. His wife was starting to worry when he entered the house. His hair was disheveled, his clothes were torn, his glasses were broken, and his left eye was starting to swell up.

    “What happened to you?”

    “My dear, you won’t believe it. On my way home from school I was set upon by a bunch of hoodla.”

  • DonS

    A variant on the “martini” joke:

    The Latin professor was uncharacteristically late in returning home. His wife was starting to worry when he entered the house. His hair was disheveled, his clothes were torn, his glasses were broken, and his left eye was starting to swell up.

    “What happened to you?”

    “My dear, you won’t believe it. On my way home from school I was set upon by a bunch of hoodla.”

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Hoodli, isn’t it? (sorry, I should have declined to respond….oh wait, I did….)

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Hoodli, isn’t it? (sorry, I should have declined to respond….oh wait, I did….)

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Oops, I’m thinking “hoodlis.”

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Oops, I’m thinking “hoodlis.”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    “So this Roman centurion goes into a bar and orders a martinus.” I was curious, so I looked it up. “Martinus” actually means “warlike” or “warring”. Which adds a dimension to a certain someone’s name. Actually, “Luther”, according to Wikipedia,

    is derived from a Germanic personal name compounded from the words liut, “people”, and heri, “army”. … Luther is also derived from the ancient Greek eleutherius, a liberator.

    Put them all together and you get … a warring liberator? I don’t know. I thought it was mildly interesting. And totally off topic. Sorry.

    Erm, how about “Tu stultus est”, the motto of the ersatz erstwhile newspaper The Onion?

    And, according to this interesting page, the South Park planetarium’s motto is “Me transmitte sursum, Caledoni!”

    Failing that, there’s always “Illegitimi non carborundum”.

    Of course, finding that humorous may or may not be a “reason why Latin should be taught in school”.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    “So this Roman centurion goes into a bar and orders a martinus.” I was curious, so I looked it up. “Martinus” actually means “warlike” or “warring”. Which adds a dimension to a certain someone’s name. Actually, “Luther”, according to Wikipedia,

    is derived from a Germanic personal name compounded from the words liut, “people”, and heri, “army”. … Luther is also derived from the ancient Greek eleutherius, a liberator.

    Put them all together and you get … a warring liberator? I don’t know. I thought it was mildly interesting. And totally off topic. Sorry.

    Erm, how about “Tu stultus est”, the motto of the ersatz erstwhile newspaper The Onion?

    And, according to this interesting page, the South Park planetarium’s motto is “Me transmitte sursum, Caledoni!”

    Failing that, there’s always “Illegitimi non carborundum”.

    Of course, finding that humorous may or may not be a “reason why Latin should be taught in school”.

  • Dan Kempin

    OK, tODD, I give up. I cannot find the root “carbor-” in any of my latin dictionaries. What does it mean? (And shouldn’t that be “carborundum sunt?”)

  • Dan Kempin

    OK, tODD, I give up. I cannot find the root “carbor-” in any of my latin dictionaries. What does it mean? (And shouldn’t that be “carborundum sunt?”)

  • Cincinnatus

    The internet is a beautiful thing, Dan: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegitimi_non_carborundum

  • Cincinnatus

    The internet is a beautiful thing, Dan: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegitimi_non_carborundum

  • Dan Kempin

    Ah. Mock latin. No fair–I didn’t go to Harvard.

    So does that qualify as a joke, or as a reason latin should be taught in school?

    In any case, the joke is on me.

  • Dan Kempin

    Ah. Mock latin. No fair–I didn’t go to Harvard.

    So does that qualify as a joke, or as a reason latin should be taught in school?

    In any case, the joke is on me.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@18), “So does that qualify as a joke, or as a reason Latin should be taught in school?” Yes.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@18), “So does that qualify as a joke, or as a reason Latin should be taught in school?” Yes.

  • James Hageman

    So far, best post and comments of the year.

  • James Hageman

    So far, best post and comments of the year.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Another reason Latin ought to be taught; so people can get the joke behind the Michelin Man, Bibendum. (“let us drink”)

    And “Martinus” would be “warring one,” as it’s a noun form. Martinus, Martini, Martino, Martinum, Martino, Martini…..

    But seriously, I’ve been trying to gently hint to my friends for years that the reason to study Latin (and Greek for that matter) is that it is (they are) the language of just about everything in the western world.

    In umbra, igitur, blogabimus!

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Another reason Latin ought to be taught; so people can get the joke behind the Michelin Man, Bibendum. (“let us drink”)

    And “Martinus” would be “warring one,” as it’s a noun form. Martinus, Martini, Martino, Martinum, Martino, Martini…..

    But seriously, I’ve been trying to gently hint to my friends for years that the reason to study Latin (and Greek for that matter) is that it is (they are) the language of just about everything in the western world.

    In umbra, igitur, blogabimus!

  • Dan Kempin

    OK, then, I repent. And in keeping with repentance, lent, and an afterimage of ash wednesday, I present the following:

    (Try it to the tune of, “All Depends On Our Possessing”)

    “Quum sit omnis homo foenum,
    Et post foenum fiat coenum,
    Ut quid, homo, extolleris?
    Cerne quid es et quid eris:
    Modo flos es, et verteris
    In favillam cineris.”

  • Dan Kempin

    OK, then, I repent. And in keeping with repentance, lent, and an afterimage of ash wednesday, I present the following:

    (Try it to the tune of, “All Depends On Our Possessing”)

    “Quum sit omnis homo foenum,
    Et post foenum fiat coenum,
    Ut quid, homo, extolleris?
    Cerne quid es et quid eris:
    Modo flos es, et verteris
    In favillam cineris.”

  • Dan Kempin

    Bike, #21,

    “Blogabimus.” I like it. Keepin’ it in the first conjugation!

    Blogabimus, frater, et fortiter skypemus!

    (Skypio, skypere, skipi, skeptum–to video communicate via the internet. Do you think it will make the next edition of the Oxford Latin dictionary?)

  • Dan Kempin

    Bike, #21,

    “Blogabimus.” I like it. Keepin’ it in the first conjugation!

    Blogabimus, frater, et fortiter skypemus!

    (Skypio, skypere, skipi, skeptum–to video communicate via the internet. Do you think it will make the next edition of the Oxford Latin dictionary?)

  • Cincinnatus

    I will say that this thread is inducing PTSD-related flashbacks for me.

  • Cincinnatus

    I will say that this thread is inducing PTSD-related flashbacks for me.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I don’t actually know Latin (away from the Internet, at least), but I do always giggle when I hear this section of “In taberna quando sumus”, from Orff’s Carmina Burana. Please note, this is not an endorsement of everything in that song (much less the whole work), as it is more or less the opposite in tone from Dan’s more appropriate hymn (@22):

    Bibit hera, bibit herus,
    bibit miles, bibit clerus,
    bibit ille, bibit illa,
    bibit servis cum ancilla,
    bibit velox, bibit piger,
    bibit albus, bibit niger,
    bibit constans, bibit vagus,
    bibit rudis, bibit magus.
    Bibit pauper et aegrotus,
    bibit exul et ignotus,
    bibit puer, bibit canus,
    bibit praesul et decanus,
    bibit soror, bibit frater,
    bibit anus, bibit mater,
    bibit ista, bibit ille,
    bibunt centum, bibunt mille.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I don’t actually know Latin (away from the Internet, at least), but I do always giggle when I hear this section of “In taberna quando sumus”, from Orff’s Carmina Burana. Please note, this is not an endorsement of everything in that song (much less the whole work), as it is more or less the opposite in tone from Dan’s more appropriate hymn (@22):

    Bibit hera, bibit herus,
    bibit miles, bibit clerus,
    bibit ille, bibit illa,
    bibit servis cum ancilla,
    bibit velox, bibit piger,
    bibit albus, bibit niger,
    bibit constans, bibit vagus,
    bibit rudis, bibit magus.
    Bibit pauper et aegrotus,
    bibit exul et ignotus,
    bibit puer, bibit canus,
    bibit praesul et decanus,
    bibit soror, bibit frater,
    bibit anus, bibit mater,
    bibit ista, bibit ille,
    bibunt centum, bibunt mille.

  • Cincinnatus

    Opera? Sophisticated latinate puns and jests?

    Who knew you were such a snob, tODD?

  • Cincinnatus

    Opera? Sophisticated latinate puns and jests?

    Who knew you were such a snob, tODD?

  • Dan Kempin

    Wait a tick . . .

    ” . . . bibit soror, bibit frater, bibit anus, bibit mater . . .”

    bibit ANUS?!?

    (checking paper dictionary)

    sister drinks, brother drinks, GRANDMA drinks, mother drinks

    Ah. You’re off the hook, tODD.

    Turns out there is a latin homonym for “anus” which means “old woman.” Who knew.

    Pretty funny, though. In taberna quando sum, that is.

  • Dan Kempin

    Wait a tick . . .

    ” . . . bibit soror, bibit frater, bibit anus, bibit mater . . .”

    bibit ANUS?!?

    (checking paper dictionary)

    sister drinks, brother drinks, GRANDMA drinks, mother drinks

    Ah. You’re off the hook, tODD.

    Turns out there is a latin homonym for “anus” which means “old woman.” Who knew.

    Pretty funny, though. In taberna quando sum, that is.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Actually, Cincinnatus (@26), I’m enough of a snob to point out that Carmina Burana isn’t opera. It’s a cantata (though I had to check Wikipedia to confirm this, so, you know, mitigating factors).

    Again, Spanish was the only language I actually studied. And bless those sensible Spaniards for ditching cases, hmm?

    Dan (@27), yes, I noticed that, too, as I was copying it. I just figured that those dirty old Latins hated grandmothers. Or, to put the best construction on things … revered certain orifices as much as they did the elderly?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Actually, Cincinnatus (@26), I’m enough of a snob to point out that Carmina Burana isn’t opera. It’s a cantata (though I had to check Wikipedia to confirm this, so, you know, mitigating factors).

    Again, Spanish was the only language I actually studied. And bless those sensible Spaniards for ditching cases, hmm?

    Dan (@27), yes, I noticed that, too, as I was copying it. I just figured that those dirty old Latins hated grandmothers. Or, to put the best construction on things … revered certain orifices as much as they did the elderly?

  • Dan Kempin

    And for those who would want a (loose) translation of the quote @22 above, since it is kind of serious, it is from a hymn of St. Bernard, “Vanitas Mundi,” the vanity of the world:

    “Since every man is grass,
    and after grass he becomes dirt,
    What, O man, will you extoll?
    Know what you are and what you will be:
    You are like a flower, and you will return
    To ashes and embers.”

  • Dan Kempin

    And for those who would want a (loose) translation of the quote @22 above, since it is kind of serious, it is from a hymn of St. Bernard, “Vanitas Mundi,” the vanity of the world:

    “Since every man is grass,
    and after grass he becomes dirt,
    What, O man, will you extoll?
    Know what you are and what you will be:
    You are like a flower, and you will return
    To ashes and embers.”

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    tODD, methinks instead of a reverence for orifices or the elderly, we have a false cognate…… :^)

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    tODD, methinks instead of a reverence for orifices or the elderly, we have a false cognate…… :^)

  • cattail

    Not a joke, but an observation: When I visited Rome (2nd week of April 2001), I noticed that a lot of people had evidently been leaving flowers at Julius Caesar’s statue in the Forum. Does anyone know why Romans were still doing this 2045 years after his death?

  • cattail

    Not a joke, but an observation: When I visited Rome (2nd week of April 2001), I noticed that a lot of people had evidently been leaving flowers at Julius Caesar’s statue in the Forum. Does anyone know why Romans were still doing this 2045 years after his death?

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    latin´s a dead language,
    as dead as it can be.

    First it killed the Romans,
    and now it´s killing me!

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    latin´s a dead language,
    as dead as it can be.

    First it killed the Romans,
    and now it´s killing me!

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    My personal motto:

    “semper ubi sub ubi.”

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    My personal motto:

    “semper ubi sub ubi.”

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    who can translate this very ancient latin poem:

    “mine mike maneo
    africanum subito
    si reclamit digito!
    mine mike maneo.”

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    who can translate this very ancient latin poem:

    “mine mike maneo
    africanum subito
    si reclamit digito!
    mine mike maneo.”

  • Dan Kempin

    FWS, #34,

    Hmm. I suspect I am being set up again, since ancient latin did not have the letter “k.”

    Looks like dog latin, and I am guessing it it another Harvard attempt–this time referring to the digging of boogers.

    (Gotta love a first person booger poem, though.)

    Am I close?

  • Dan Kempin

    FWS, #34,

    Hmm. I suspect I am being set up again, since ancient latin did not have the letter “k.”

    Looks like dog latin, and I am guessing it it another Harvard attempt–this time referring to the digging of boogers.

    (Gotta love a first person booger poem, though.)

    Am I close?

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    dan @ 35

    yeah the k is probably wrong. it should probably be a “c”. It really is an ancient latin poem that is very very familiar to english speaking americans.

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    dan @ 35

    yeah the k is probably wrong. it should probably be a “c”. It really is an ancient latin poem that is very very familiar to english speaking americans.

  • Dan Kempin

    FWS,

    Ok, then, I’ll give it a poke:

    “Shake, threaten, I remain
    Suddenly deeper
    If he pushes with a finger
    Shake, threaten, I remain.”

    That takes some pretty big liberties. “Africanus” means African and can mean south. I rendered it as “deeper.” I also mistranslated “reclamit” as push, though it really means to object or cry out against. Perhaps it is a misspelling.

    So . . . how did I do? Any REAL latin scholars please help–I’m just a semi-self-taught hack. (I KNOW you are out there!)

    And more importantly, where did you find this, FWS? Is it a contemporary thing in Brazil, or was it floating in your head from some latin class long ago?

    south (deeper?!?)
    If he objects/declaims (sp?) with a finger
    Shake, threaten, I remain.”

  • Dan Kempin

    FWS,

    Ok, then, I’ll give it a poke:

    “Shake, threaten, I remain
    Suddenly deeper
    If he pushes with a finger
    Shake, threaten, I remain.”

    That takes some pretty big liberties. “Africanus” means African and can mean south. I rendered it as “deeper.” I also mistranslated “reclamit” as push, though it really means to object or cry out against. Perhaps it is a misspelling.

    So . . . how did I do? Any REAL latin scholars please help–I’m just a semi-self-taught hack. (I KNOW you are out there!)

    And more importantly, where did you find this, FWS? Is it a contemporary thing in Brazil, or was it floating in your head from some latin class long ago?

    south (deeper?!?)
    If he objects/declaims (sp?) with a finger
    Shake, threaten, I remain.”

  • Dan Kempin

    (Oops. Forgot to delete my notes at the bottom.)

  • Dan Kempin

    (Oops. Forgot to delete my notes at the bottom.)

  • Kelly

    C’mon, if you want classic Latin jokes for the Ides of March, you MUST watch Wayne & Shuster’s “Rinse the Blood Off My Toga” sketch! They even use the martini joke. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rR_5h8CzRcI

  • Kelly

    C’mon, if you want classic Latin jokes for the Ides of March, you MUST watch Wayne & Shuster’s “Rinse the Blood Off My Toga” sketch! They even use the martini joke. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rR_5h8CzRcI

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    dan @ 37

    Here is a story Dan:

    I was in the preseminary college of the WELS when it was still located in Watertown , WI. The 5th year latin teacher was named “smiley schrader”. All the profs had nicknames. Of course the dear Prof Schrader had that nick because he was incapable of Smiling. I honestly think he was born without those facial muscles.

    So we arrive one morning and there, written on the chalk board was this latin poem in the form of a pop quiz.

    Good Lord! I thought in the middle of us puzzling over the quiz that Smiley was having a heart attack. His face turned bright red and he started trembling phyically. THEN he started laughing.

    He said: “Ok, the poem starts out in this english form that you are all familiar with… “eenie, meenie, miney, moe, catch an african by the toe…..”

  • http://www.thirduse.com fws

    dan @ 37

    Here is a story Dan:

    I was in the preseminary college of the WELS when it was still located in Watertown , WI. The 5th year latin teacher was named “smiley schrader”. All the profs had nicknames. Of course the dear Prof Schrader had that nick because he was incapable of Smiling. I honestly think he was born without those facial muscles.

    So we arrive one morning and there, written on the chalk board was this latin poem in the form of a pop quiz.

    Good Lord! I thought in the middle of us puzzling over the quiz that Smiley was having a heart attack. His face turned bright red and he started trembling phyically. THEN he started laughing.

    He said: “Ok, the poem starts out in this english form that you are all familiar with… “eenie, meenie, miney, moe, catch an african by the toe…..”

  • Dan Kempin

    Funny, FWS. Though you may have scrambled some words in the recollection.

    possibly . . . (mine mike) capio
    africanum digito
    si reclamit eximo ?? Maybe?

    Anyway, thanks. That was fun. Plus I now have enough material to write a latin poem about boogers.

  • Dan Kempin

    Funny, FWS. Though you may have scrambled some words in the recollection.

    possibly . . . (mine mike) capio
    africanum digito
    si reclamit eximo ?? Maybe?

    Anyway, thanks. That was fun. Plus I now have enough material to write a latin poem about boogers.

  • Dan Kempin

    On an odd note, I just happened to see Mel Brooks’ “History of the World.” I had never seen it (and will never see it again–extremely crass), but . . . latin jokes galore.

    “Sic transit gloria.”

    “I didn’t know Gloria was sick.”

  • Dan Kempin

    On an odd note, I just happened to see Mel Brooks’ “History of the World.” I had never seen it (and will never see it again–extremely crass), but . . . latin jokes galore.

    “Sic transit gloria.”

    “I didn’t know Gloria was sick.”

  • Corinne

    “Semper ubi sub ubi” is something that used to crack my class up in Latin I in high school. Not a literal translation, but it’s fun to hear a pastor joking about underwear.

  • Corinne

    “Semper ubi sub ubi” is something that used to crack my class up in Latin I in high school. Not a literal translation, but it’s fun to hear a pastor joking about underwear.

  • http://holycats mariea mangarelli

    ithink caesar is honored by people who visit rome even these days because of all the ancient epic films like rome.spartacus ,and others that are produced for tv and filmsand also he probably did some good for rome too.way back when.at least we can say we celebrate the 4 of july.it sounds better than the 4 of quintillis.oh a roman joke is…nero fiddled while rome burned ,he liked his music hot. dont laugh that a very old country song by roy acuff.

  • http://holycats mariea mangarelli

    ithink caesar is honored by people who visit rome even these days because of all the ancient epic films like rome.spartacus ,and others that are produced for tv and filmsand also he probably did some good for rome too.way back when.at least we can say we celebrate the 4 of july.it sounds better than the 4 of quintillis.oh a roman joke is…nero fiddled while rome burned ,he liked his music hot. dont laugh that a very old country song by roy acuff.


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