Obama starts his reelection campaign

President Obama formally threw his hat back into the ring, announcing that he will run for re-election.

He’s got a lot of weaknesses and vulnerabilities, what with the economy, his new war in Libya, a reputation as indecisive, and a number of unpopular policies.  And yet, say Democrats, who can the Republicans put against him who would not be even less popular?  He at least, they say, comes across as presidential, unlike most of his Republican rivals.  The power of the incumbency is great, and things may get better by the next election.

What do you think?

 

NationalJournal.com – Obama Announces Reelection Bid – Monday, April 4, 2011.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • helen

    He likes campaigning better than the work of the Presidency.

    I don’t know if he had to bail out the banks, but he didn’t have to bail out the bankers.
    (However, that began with the S&L scandals and just got bigger.)
    He seems better at getting into wars than getting out of them. (But so was “Dubya”.)

    There is still the abortion/euthanasia issue which keeps me from voting “Democrat”.
    Altho, the Republican solution… “let ‘em starve, w/o doctors unless they can pay” is not very different,
    especially since they are so busy robbing the middle class to support the richest 1%.

    Is this America?
    [Yes, I know... wrong forum.]

  • helen

    He likes campaigning better than the work of the Presidency.

    I don’t know if he had to bail out the banks, but he didn’t have to bail out the bankers.
    (However, that began with the S&L scandals and just got bigger.)
    He seems better at getting into wars than getting out of them. (But so was “Dubya”.)

    There is still the abortion/euthanasia issue which keeps me from voting “Democrat”.
    Altho, the Republican solution… “let ‘em starve, w/o doctors unless they can pay” is not very different,
    especially since they are so busy robbing the middle class to support the richest 1%.

    Is this America?
    [Yes, I know... wrong forum.]

  • helen

    “Bold” didn’t work as intended. Oh, well….

  • helen

    “Bold” didn’t work as intended. Oh, well….

  • Kirk

    Donald Trump is the clear front runner, in my mind. We need someone to class up this country.

  • Kirk

    Donald Trump is the clear front runner, in my mind. We need someone to class up this country.

  • J

    How does he come across as presidential? I don’t see it.

    As for the “campaign strategy” he’s losing his option on using the internet…the parody of his reelection announcement has more Youtube hits then his announcement…

  • J

    How does he come across as presidential? I don’t see it.

    As for the “campaign strategy” he’s losing his option on using the internet…the parody of his reelection announcement has more Youtube hits then his announcement…

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    His campaigning ended?

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    His campaigning ended?

  • Kirk

    Actually, what would be awesome is a 3-way primary battle between Sarah Palin, Michele Bachman and Christine O’Donnell! Can you imagine the feuding!? And then they, after they all lose to Donald Trump, they could go on Dancing with the Stars and compete again!

  • Kirk

    Actually, what would be awesome is a 3-way primary battle between Sarah Palin, Michele Bachman and Christine O’Donnell! Can you imagine the feuding!? And then they, after they all lose to Donald Trump, they could go on Dancing with the Stars and compete again!

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Obama 2012! Because no girl should have to be punished with a baby!

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Obama 2012! Because no girl should have to be punished with a baby!

  • helen

    Mike @7

    And no parent ought to be a burden on the children!

  • helen

    Mike @7

    And no parent ought to be a burden on the children!

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    Its too bad Obama looks just like the previous pres., or he might get reelected. As it stands, I see a long twilight of writing books and buying shadow companies in the man’s future…

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    Its too bad Obama looks just like the previous pres., or he might get reelected. As it stands, I see a long twilight of writing books and buying shadow companies in the man’s future…

  • DonS

    It’s way too early to tell what will happen in November 2012. That’s a lifetime in politics.

    The bottom line is that presidents usually get re-elected when they run for a second term. Carter and Bush I were relatively rare exceptions. So the odds are with him. However, it will apparently be a very polarized campaign, and he will need to show some recognition that he realizes that government spending and future commitments are on an unsustainable path, and that he is willing to accept present pain in order to ensure that our future generations are not ruined. So far, he hasn’t seemed to grasp that message, since he has drawn a line in the sand over relative pennies in budget cuts.

  • DonS

    It’s way too early to tell what will happen in November 2012. That’s a lifetime in politics.

    The bottom line is that presidents usually get re-elected when they run for a second term. Carter and Bush I were relatively rare exceptions. So the odds are with him. However, it will apparently be a very polarized campaign, and he will need to show some recognition that he realizes that government spending and future commitments are on an unsustainable path, and that he is willing to accept present pain in order to ensure that our future generations are not ruined. So far, he hasn’t seemed to grasp that message, since he has drawn a line in the sand over relative pennies in budget cuts.

  • JonSLC

    Paul Ryan, Republican congressman from Wisconsin and House Budget Committee chairman, would be an intriguing candidate.

    Also Mitch Daniels, Republican governor of Indiana, though he may be too moderate to make it out of any Republican primary.

  • JonSLC

    Paul Ryan, Republican congressman from Wisconsin and House Budget Committee chairman, would be an intriguing candidate.

    Also Mitch Daniels, Republican governor of Indiana, though he may be too moderate to make it out of any Republican primary.

  • Porcell

    I’m with Jon SLC, the best candidates in the Republican stable are Mitch Daniels and Paul Ryan. Both of these men understand the depth of our fiscal crisis and have compelling solutions for it. Of the two, I favor Daniels since, he has solid private economy credentials along with high-level experience inside the Beltway, as well as being a very successful governor in Indiana through implementing hard-headed fiscal policy with the support of most government workers and the people.

    Unless Obama learns how to move from campaign mode to governing mode by seriously addressing the fast looming fiscal catastrophe, he is political toast. Those who regard him as coming across as presidential are mistaking a shallow surface coolness for the reality of a gelatinous core. Also, he is largely regarded as a joke on the international scene.

  • Porcell

    I’m with Jon SLC, the best candidates in the Republican stable are Mitch Daniels and Paul Ryan. Both of these men understand the depth of our fiscal crisis and have compelling solutions for it. Of the two, I favor Daniels since, he has solid private economy credentials along with high-level experience inside the Beltway, as well as being a very successful governor in Indiana through implementing hard-headed fiscal policy with the support of most government workers and the people.

    Unless Obama learns how to move from campaign mode to governing mode by seriously addressing the fast looming fiscal catastrophe, he is political toast. Those who regard him as coming across as presidential are mistaking a shallow surface coolness for the reality of a gelatinous core. Also, he is largely regarded as a joke on the international scene.

  • SKPeterson

    Porcell – We may have toast for a president as I have yet to see any compelling Reps that could hold the nation’s attention for 3 to 6 months during the election period. The irony is that Obama is extraordinarily weak, not even Jimmy Carter weak, but really, really Walter Mondale weak, but the Republicans are even weaker, even though they hold the better political hand. We may have the interesting situation of a weak Obama administration paired with a very strong Republican Congress. It will be intriguing to see Reps push for greater Congressional prerogatives and calling for limits on an “imperial” Executive’s discretion.

  • SKPeterson

    Porcell – We may have toast for a president as I have yet to see any compelling Reps that could hold the nation’s attention for 3 to 6 months during the election period. The irony is that Obama is extraordinarily weak, not even Jimmy Carter weak, but really, really Walter Mondale weak, but the Republicans are even weaker, even though they hold the better political hand. We may have the interesting situation of a weak Obama administration paired with a very strong Republican Congress. It will be intriguing to see Reps push for greater Congressional prerogatives and calling for limits on an “imperial” Executive’s discretion.

  • Steve

    Tim Pawlenty. He’s low on the charisma factor (at least so far), and that could really hurt him (because I think many Americans want a celebrity, and not an experienced executive, as president). But he had a solid reputation governing Minnesota with little baggage weighing him down. Is he a longshot? Probably, at least right now.

    Then again, his temperment may work in his favor now. He has that humble, blue-collar, “aw shucks” down-home Midwestern charm. In a time of great uncertainty, perhaps people will be less charmed by “Hope/Change” soaring rhetoric, and ready for someone who looks, and sounds, more like them.

    T-Paw!

  • Steve

    Tim Pawlenty. He’s low on the charisma factor (at least so far), and that could really hurt him (because I think many Americans want a celebrity, and not an experienced executive, as president). But he had a solid reputation governing Minnesota with little baggage weighing him down. Is he a longshot? Probably, at least right now.

    Then again, his temperment may work in his favor now. He has that humble, blue-collar, “aw shucks” down-home Midwestern charm. In a time of great uncertainty, perhaps people will be less charmed by “Hope/Change” soaring rhetoric, and ready for someone who looks, and sounds, more like them.

    T-Paw!

  • Porcell

    SK, given the graveness of the fiscal crisis, we need both a strong president and Congress who will, like Paul Ryan, tell the truth to the American people and come up with a credible solution

    Your assumption than no Republican can hold the attention of the American people is obviated by the growing attention to Pul Ryan’s statesmanship. For an excellent article on this I should suggest that you have a look at Steven Hayward’s NRO article today, The Ryan Express: One part FDR, one part Gipper, including:

    The liberal reaction to Paul Ryan’s budget plan makes it evident that liberals are more terrified than they’ve been since Jack Kemp (one of Ryan’s mentors) advanced supply-side economics back in the late 1970s. And although Ryan may not run for president next year, it is clear that just as Ronald Reagan had to embrace the Kemp-Roth tax-cut plan in his 1980 campaign, the eventual GOP nominee will have to embrace Ryan’s budget plan if he or she is going to be taken seriously by the party, and especially the Tea Party.

    You’re assuming that politics as usual will prevail, though we learned last November that the American people have caught on to the reality of the Beltway disaster area. The best folk who understand this are Mitch Daniels and PaulRyan.

  • Porcell

    SK, given the graveness of the fiscal crisis, we need both a strong president and Congress who will, like Paul Ryan, tell the truth to the American people and come up with a credible solution

    Your assumption than no Republican can hold the attention of the American people is obviated by the growing attention to Pul Ryan’s statesmanship. For an excellent article on this I should suggest that you have a look at Steven Hayward’s NRO article today, The Ryan Express: One part FDR, one part Gipper, including:

    The liberal reaction to Paul Ryan’s budget plan makes it evident that liberals are more terrified than they’ve been since Jack Kemp (one of Ryan’s mentors) advanced supply-side economics back in the late 1970s. And although Ryan may not run for president next year, it is clear that just as Ronald Reagan had to embrace the Kemp-Roth tax-cut plan in his 1980 campaign, the eventual GOP nominee will have to embrace Ryan’s budget plan if he or she is going to be taken seriously by the party, and especially the Tea Party.

    You’re assuming that politics as usual will prevail, though we learned last November that the American people have caught on to the reality of the Beltway disaster area. The best folk who understand this are Mitch Daniels and PaulRyan.

  • Porcell

    PPardon me, the link above is Here.

  • Porcell

    PPardon me, the link above is Here.

  • http://lastdanceofthejackalope.blogspot.com JD Loofbourrow

    Ha ha, things “may” get better. That’s funny.

    I’m just glad there’s a two term limit.

  • http://lastdanceofthejackalope.blogspot.com JD Loofbourrow

    Ha ha, things “may” get better. That’s funny.

    I’m just glad there’s a two term limit.

  • Cincinnatus

    I predict a cakewalk for Obama, unless a viable Republican steps up from the shadows–there definitely aren’t any showing themselves in the daylight at the moment. Let me clarify that this is the Republicans’ race to lose: Obama is a weak President whose policies and circumstances conjure Carterian visions. And yet the Republicans seem determined to lose the race anyway.

    Porcell: Paul Ryan is an absolute no-go right now. He does not have any bipartisan appeal (as all successful Presidents and candidates must), and he’s repeatedly threatened to gut Social Security and Medicare. Both programs, of course, need to be gutted, but that’s not exactly a winning proposition at the moment.

  • Cincinnatus

    I predict a cakewalk for Obama, unless a viable Republican steps up from the shadows–there definitely aren’t any showing themselves in the daylight at the moment. Let me clarify that this is the Republicans’ race to lose: Obama is a weak President whose policies and circumstances conjure Carterian visions. And yet the Republicans seem determined to lose the race anyway.

    Porcell: Paul Ryan is an absolute no-go right now. He does not have any bipartisan appeal (as all successful Presidents and candidates must), and he’s repeatedly threatened to gut Social Security and Medicare. Both programs, of course, need to be gutted, but that’s not exactly a winning proposition at the moment.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    For my part, Paul Ryan is annoying not so much because of his hard-line stance on entitlement programs, but because of his sadly predictable party-line stance when it comes to insisting on tax cuts.

    I realize it’s close to holy writ for many “conservatives” that “the less you tax, the more money you make”. (Strangely, this usually only translates into upper-bracket tax cuts, and not an embracing of my proposal, which gets rid of all taxes except for a $0.01 surcharge on on new automobile sales. I mean, just think of it! The taxes would be so insanely low that the income the government would reap would be near infinite!)

    But as someone otherwise interested in what Paul Ryan was doing, hearing about his insisting on tax cuts in a plan to cut the deficit has pretty much turned me off to his message, as it seems like just more GOP foofaraw.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    For my part, Paul Ryan is annoying not so much because of his hard-line stance on entitlement programs, but because of his sadly predictable party-line stance when it comes to insisting on tax cuts.

    I realize it’s close to holy writ for many “conservatives” that “the less you tax, the more money you make”. (Strangely, this usually only translates into upper-bracket tax cuts, and not an embracing of my proposal, which gets rid of all taxes except for a $0.01 surcharge on on new automobile sales. I mean, just think of it! The taxes would be so insanely low that the income the government would reap would be near infinite!)

    But as someone otherwise interested in what Paul Ryan was doing, hearing about his insisting on tax cuts in a plan to cut the deficit has pretty much turned me off to his message, as it seems like just more GOP foofaraw.

  • Cincinnatus

    tODD: While I sympathize with your feelings regarding further tax cuts, I’m also “turned off” to your “message” based on your repetition of a few partisan truisms from the left that are, in fact, untrue:

    1) It is actually true that, within constraints posed by the Laffer curve, “the less you tax, the more money you make” (until a certain point). While many on the more fashionable end of the left disbelieve in the existence of the Laffer Curve, much like they disbelieve in Santa Clause, federal tax receipts/revenues actually did increase both when Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush cut payroll taxes. How interesting. However, I do wonder if the rhetoric of cutting taxes is the wisest strategy when we need more money, not less, and cutting taxes, intuitively but incorrect, is believed always to reduce revenue. The bit about “insanely low” taxes is a red herring: “true believers” in the Laffer Curve know that if taxes are reduced too much, revenues will also decrease. Of course, it’s doubtful that we’ve reached that point yet, as, again, revenues did increase when taxes were cut. So there’s always that. Mileage at the state level has varied.

    2) The recent Republican policy of cutting taxes has emphatically not, strangely or otherwise, translated only into taxes for the “upper brackets.” That just couldn’t possibly be more false. False false false. All recent tax cuts, from at least Reagan to the present have benefited all tax brackets,” with the biggest proportional cuts going to what is traditionally called the “middle class.” Moreover, 40% of American citizens pay no federal income tax whatsoever, and many of those 40% make a profit when various non-refundable rebates, etc., are factored in.

    Come on, tODD. You can do better than that.

  • Cincinnatus

    tODD: While I sympathize with your feelings regarding further tax cuts, I’m also “turned off” to your “message” based on your repetition of a few partisan truisms from the left that are, in fact, untrue:

    1) It is actually true that, within constraints posed by the Laffer curve, “the less you tax, the more money you make” (until a certain point). While many on the more fashionable end of the left disbelieve in the existence of the Laffer Curve, much like they disbelieve in Santa Clause, federal tax receipts/revenues actually did increase both when Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush cut payroll taxes. How interesting. However, I do wonder if the rhetoric of cutting taxes is the wisest strategy when we need more money, not less, and cutting taxes, intuitively but incorrect, is believed always to reduce revenue. The bit about “insanely low” taxes is a red herring: “true believers” in the Laffer Curve know that if taxes are reduced too much, revenues will also decrease. Of course, it’s doubtful that we’ve reached that point yet, as, again, revenues did increase when taxes were cut. So there’s always that. Mileage at the state level has varied.

    2) The recent Republican policy of cutting taxes has emphatically not, strangely or otherwise, translated only into taxes for the “upper brackets.” That just couldn’t possibly be more false. False false false. All recent tax cuts, from at least Reagan to the present have benefited all tax brackets,” with the biggest proportional cuts going to what is traditionally called the “middle class.” Moreover, 40% of American citizens pay no federal income tax whatsoever, and many of those 40% make a profit when various non-refundable rebates, etc., are factored in.

    Come on, tODD. You can do better than that.

  • Cincinnatus

    Santa, of course, is a Claus, not a “Clause,” a popular series of children’s Christmas movies notwithstanding.

  • Cincinnatus

    Santa, of course, is a Claus, not a “Clause,” a popular series of children’s Christmas movies notwithstanding.

  • Porcell

    Cincinnatus: he’s repeatedly threatened to gut Social Security and Medicare.

    This is a rather baseless remark. Ryan maintains Social Security and MediCare for people over fifty-five and for younger people through a system of credible reforms that replaces these programs with defined contributions as opposed to defined benefits.

    Ryan, as Stephen Hayward avers, actually puts the entitlements on a sustainable basis, thus saving them, which many Americans already understand. My son, who had given up any hope or Social Security and Medicare, views Ryan as a quite level-headed statesman who might just in the long run put these “entitlements” on a sound basis, dealing with the most pressing issue of our time.

    Your prediction of a cakewalk for Obama is ludicrous. The fellow is in way over his head pretending to be president, something that most sensible Americans quite understand. You can only fool the American some of the time.

  • Porcell

    Cincinnatus: he’s repeatedly threatened to gut Social Security and Medicare.

    This is a rather baseless remark. Ryan maintains Social Security and MediCare for people over fifty-five and for younger people through a system of credible reforms that replaces these programs with defined contributions as opposed to defined benefits.

    Ryan, as Stephen Hayward avers, actually puts the entitlements on a sustainable basis, thus saving them, which many Americans already understand. My son, who had given up any hope or Social Security and Medicare, views Ryan as a quite level-headed statesman who might just in the long run put these “entitlements” on a sound basis, dealing with the most pressing issue of our time.

    Your prediction of a cakewalk for Obama is ludicrous. The fellow is in way over his head pretending to be president, something that most sensible Americans quite understand. You can only fool the American some of the time.

  • Cincinnatus

    Did you actually read my comment, Porcell?

  • Cincinnatus

    Did you actually read my comment, Porcell?

  • Porcell

    Todd: …hearing about his insisting on tax cuts in a plan to cut the deficit has pretty much turned me off to his message, as it seems like just more GOP foofaraw.

    You are (characteristically) ill informed on Ryan’s tax proposal. While on balance it provides for a modest decrease in taxes, mainly he reforms the basic system including the tax breaks for corporations involved in crony capitalism.

    Yuval Levin in an article yesterday, The Republican Budget
    nicely summarizes Ryan’s tax reform as follows:

    But spending and entitlement reforms are only the beginning. This budget also includes (rather surprisingly) an ambitious outline for tax reform which would broaden the tax base by eliminating credits, deductions, and loopholes while consolidating and lowering rates. And it includes, among other things, an extension of the logic of the cash-welfare reform of the 90s (block granting programs to the states and imposing some time limits and work requirements) to other welfare programs including housing assistance and food stamps; the repeal of Obamacare and portions of last year’s financial-reform bill that almost guarantee future Wall Street bailouts; the privatization of Fannie and Freddie; cutbacks in farm subsidies, energy subsidies, and corporate welfare; and the consolidation of dozens of duplicative worker-training programs into a new adult scholarship program to help displaced workers more easily get the training they need for new jobs.

  • Porcell

    Todd: …hearing about his insisting on tax cuts in a plan to cut the deficit has pretty much turned me off to his message, as it seems like just more GOP foofaraw.

    You are (characteristically) ill informed on Ryan’s tax proposal. While on balance it provides for a modest decrease in taxes, mainly he reforms the basic system including the tax breaks for corporations involved in crony capitalism.

    Yuval Levin in an article yesterday, The Republican Budget
    nicely summarizes Ryan’s tax reform as follows:

    But spending and entitlement reforms are only the beginning. This budget also includes (rather surprisingly) an ambitious outline for tax reform which would broaden the tax base by eliminating credits, deductions, and loopholes while consolidating and lowering rates. And it includes, among other things, an extension of the logic of the cash-welfare reform of the 90s (block granting programs to the states and imposing some time limits and work requirements) to other welfare programs including housing assistance and food stamps; the repeal of Obamacare and portions of last year’s financial-reform bill that almost guarantee future Wall Street bailouts; the privatization of Fannie and Freddie; cutbacks in farm subsidies, energy subsidies, and corporate welfare; and the consolidation of dozens of duplicative worker-training programs into a new adult scholarship program to help displaced workers more easily get the training they need for new jobs.

  • DonS

    tODD @ 19 raises a good point. Ryan’s plan is being demagogued by many on the left as calling for tax cuts, when really its fundamental thrust is to call for tax rate cuts, accompanied by a reduction of tax deductions and credits, to thereby broaden the tax base, make taxes more fair, and simplify tax compliance. Here is a link to the actual 2012 budget proposal: http://www.politico.com/static/PPM170_1100405_plantoprosperity.html

    If you look at page 50, you will see this broad outline:

    In addition, this budget starts, not by asking what is the “right mix” of tax increases and spending cuts to balance
    the budget, but by asking what is the purpose of government, and then raising only as much revenue as the
    federal government needs to efficiently fund those missions that rightly belong in its domain, while maximizing
    economic growth and job creation.

    Simplifying the Tax Code for Individuals

    Major proposals
    • Reject the President’s call to raise taxes. Instead, keep overall revenue as a share of the
    economy at historical averages between 18 and 19 percent, a level compatible with growth,
    and – if the spending restraints in this budget are enacted – sufficient to fund government
    operations over time.
    • Reform the tax code by consolidating the current six brackets and cutting the top
    individual rate from 35 percent to 25 percent.
    • Broaden the tax base to keep revenue as a share of the economy at levels sufficient to fund
    critical missions that rightly belong in the domain of the federal government (as outlined
    elsewhere in this budget).

    As you can see, Ryan is not calling for tax cuts, but for tax revenues to remain at their historical level of between 18 and 19 & of GDP. Last year, collections were only 17% of GDP, so actually a tax increase is anticipated. We’re long overdue for tax simplification, and I, for one, am sick and tired of government deciding which economic expenditures are favored and which are disfavored, by slapping tax credits and deductions on various whims. Yes, I would be willing to give up all deductions, including charitable and home mortgage, in exchange for lower and fairer tax rates — and I think you would see much better tax compliance than you do when you are taxing people at 50 or more % of their income.

    Look, this is a serious proposal that deserves to be taken seriously by those of both parties as at least a starting point for negotiating a way out of the mess that we are in. It cannot just be readily dismissed, with just some vague idea that we are going to just keep on what we are doing, putting a few band-aids on things here and there, and hope it all doesn’t blow up. Because it will. We are on a clearly unsustainable path that everyone needs to grow up and realize. And we are royally shafting our kids.

  • DonS

    tODD @ 19 raises a good point. Ryan’s plan is being demagogued by many on the left as calling for tax cuts, when really its fundamental thrust is to call for tax rate cuts, accompanied by a reduction of tax deductions and credits, to thereby broaden the tax base, make taxes more fair, and simplify tax compliance. Here is a link to the actual 2012 budget proposal: http://www.politico.com/static/PPM170_1100405_plantoprosperity.html

    If you look at page 50, you will see this broad outline:

    In addition, this budget starts, not by asking what is the “right mix” of tax increases and spending cuts to balance
    the budget, but by asking what is the purpose of government, and then raising only as much revenue as the
    federal government needs to efficiently fund those missions that rightly belong in its domain, while maximizing
    economic growth and job creation.

    Simplifying the Tax Code for Individuals

    Major proposals
    • Reject the President’s call to raise taxes. Instead, keep overall revenue as a share of the
    economy at historical averages between 18 and 19 percent, a level compatible with growth,
    and – if the spending restraints in this budget are enacted – sufficient to fund government
    operations over time.
    • Reform the tax code by consolidating the current six brackets and cutting the top
    individual rate from 35 percent to 25 percent.
    • Broaden the tax base to keep revenue as a share of the economy at levels sufficient to fund
    critical missions that rightly belong in the domain of the federal government (as outlined
    elsewhere in this budget).

    As you can see, Ryan is not calling for tax cuts, but for tax revenues to remain at their historical level of between 18 and 19 & of GDP. Last year, collections were only 17% of GDP, so actually a tax increase is anticipated. We’re long overdue for tax simplification, and I, for one, am sick and tired of government deciding which economic expenditures are favored and which are disfavored, by slapping tax credits and deductions on various whims. Yes, I would be willing to give up all deductions, including charitable and home mortgage, in exchange for lower and fairer tax rates — and I think you would see much better tax compliance than you do when you are taxing people at 50 or more % of their income.

    Look, this is a serious proposal that deserves to be taken seriously by those of both parties as at least a starting point for negotiating a way out of the mess that we are in. It cannot just be readily dismissed, with just some vague idea that we are going to just keep on what we are doing, putting a few band-aids on things here and there, and hope it all doesn’t blow up. Because it will. We are on a clearly unsustainable path that everyone needs to grow up and realize. And we are royally shafting our kids.

  • Grace

    Donald Trump? – should add a bit of levity for everyone’s entertainment!

    WSJ/NBC Poll: A Donald Trump Surprise

    April 6, 2011,

    By Jonathan Weisman and Scott Greenberg

    Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney appears to be the early front-runner in the largely unformed race for the Republican nomination for president, but real estate magnate Donald Trump may be a surprise contender, according to a new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll.

    Among Republican primary voters, Mr. Romney captured the support of 21% in a broad, nine-candidate field. Mr. Trump was tied for second with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, with 17%. House Speaker Newt Gingrich got 11%, just ahead of former Republican Vice Presidential nominee Sarah Palin’s 10%. Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, considered a strong contender by political handicappers, remains largely unknown, with just 6% support. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota had 5%, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum 3%, and Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour with just 1%.

    Mr. Trump “may be a punch line but when he talks about the way to solve our problems, he makes a lot of sense to the average guy out there,” said Todd Mauney, a conservative Republican in Weatherford, Texas. “I don’t know if people can get over him being the butt of every joke but for me, he can be serious when it’s time to make real decisions.“

    http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2011/04/06/wsjnbc-poll-a-donald-trump-surprise/

  • Grace

    Donald Trump? – should add a bit of levity for everyone’s entertainment!

    WSJ/NBC Poll: A Donald Trump Surprise

    April 6, 2011,

    By Jonathan Weisman and Scott Greenberg

    Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney appears to be the early front-runner in the largely unformed race for the Republican nomination for president, but real estate magnate Donald Trump may be a surprise contender, according to a new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll.

    Among Republican primary voters, Mr. Romney captured the support of 21% in a broad, nine-candidate field. Mr. Trump was tied for second with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, with 17%. House Speaker Newt Gingrich got 11%, just ahead of former Republican Vice Presidential nominee Sarah Palin’s 10%. Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, considered a strong contender by political handicappers, remains largely unknown, with just 6% support. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota had 5%, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum 3%, and Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour with just 1%.

    Mr. Trump “may be a punch line but when he talks about the way to solve our problems, he makes a lot of sense to the average guy out there,” said Todd Mauney, a conservative Republican in Weatherford, Texas. “I don’t know if people can get over him being the butt of every joke but for me, he can be serious when it’s time to make real decisions.“

    http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2011/04/06/wsjnbc-poll-a-donald-trump-surprise/

  • SKPeterson

    Grace @26 – Trump would be different, would he not? An American Berlusconi.

    Anyhow, there is another WSJ article (which I cannot locate right now) that indicates the results for Romney, Huckabee and Gingrich are probably maxima – they have very little upside, and a lot of unfactored downside. Palin is a factor, but largely regarded as non-Presidential in character – a nice cheerleader for the team, but not much more. Bachmann, maybe, except her recent botching of an explanation of her (former) membership in WELS regarding its attitudes towards the papacy and the anti-christ (i.e., standard Lutheran dogma right out of the AC) will leave many (ok, me – and all of America thinks like me) regarding her as a generic politician who chooses her church for political advantage and not for reasons of doctrine or belief. Sad, I kinda liked her, but would have been more impressed if she’d stuck to her guns.

  • SKPeterson

    Grace @26 – Trump would be different, would he not? An American Berlusconi.

    Anyhow, there is another WSJ article (which I cannot locate right now) that indicates the results for Romney, Huckabee and Gingrich are probably maxima – they have very little upside, and a lot of unfactored downside. Palin is a factor, but largely regarded as non-Presidential in character – a nice cheerleader for the team, but not much more. Bachmann, maybe, except her recent botching of an explanation of her (former) membership in WELS regarding its attitudes towards the papacy and the anti-christ (i.e., standard Lutheran dogma right out of the AC) will leave many (ok, me – and all of America thinks like me) regarding her as a generic politician who chooses her church for political advantage and not for reasons of doctrine or belief. Sad, I kinda liked her, but would have been more impressed if she’d stuck to her guns.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    I am ‘hoping’ for a ‘change’.

    Put him on a shelve for 2012!

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    I am ‘hoping’ for a ‘change’.

    Put him on a shelve for 2012!

  • Grace

    I believe when Obama is out of office he will leave the U.S. and go abroad.

    He hasn’t done anything but make shambles of the country he claims to have been born in. WHY is that?

    WHY has this man put this country in debt within just over two years, so that all our children, grandchildren will be paying for the recovery for decades. WHY has this man chosen people to advise him, that have backgrounds that are questionable, without a flicker of shame? Think about it….. WHY? – is there a reason everyone has overlooked?

  • Grace

    I believe when Obama is out of office he will leave the U.S. and go abroad.

    He hasn’t done anything but make shambles of the country he claims to have been born in. WHY is that?

    WHY has this man put this country in debt within just over two years, so that all our children, grandchildren will be paying for the recovery for decades. WHY has this man chosen people to advise him, that have backgrounds that are questionable, without a flicker of shame? Think about it….. WHY? – is there a reason everyone has overlooked?

  • Carl Vehse

    @28: “Put him on a shelve for 2012!”

    Preferably, after his trial, conviction, and sentencing, a shelf that drops out from under him in his short fall.

  • Carl Vehse

    @28: “Put him on a shelve for 2012!”

    Preferably, after his trial, conviction, and sentencing, a shelf that drops out from under him in his short fall.

  • helen

    Grace, Carl,
    What has Obama done that the Bushes didn’t do before him & all Congress and the Supreme Court do now… kow tow to Wall Street!?
    If you are a little crook, you may go to jail.
    If you are a big enough crook, you can rob the Treasury of the United States and be rewarded for it!

  • helen

    Grace, Carl,
    What has Obama done that the Bushes didn’t do before him & all Congress and the Supreme Court do now… kow tow to Wall Street!?
    If you are a little crook, you may go to jail.
    If you are a big enough crook, you can rob the Treasury of the United States and be rewarded for it!

  • helen

    This country didn’t get into debt “in two years”.
    Debt has escalated since Reagan. Companies (not just GE), are rewarded for taking American jobs and money overseas. If those jobs were here, paying taxes and social security, and the companies paying their share likewise, we wouldn’t be beggars dependent on China.

  • helen

    This country didn’t get into debt “in two years”.
    Debt has escalated since Reagan. Companies (not just GE), are rewarded for taking American jobs and money overseas. If those jobs were here, paying taxes and social security, and the companies paying their share likewise, we wouldn’t be beggars dependent on China.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Carl “Eighth Commandment” Vehse (@30), everyone!

    He gets his panties in a wad if you call Terry “Quran-burnin’” Jones’ actions “tacky”, demanding that you “substantiate” such a statement.

    But he feels no compunction whatsoever in calling for Obama’s execution! Even as he completely fails to “substantiate” said comment!

    Carl “Eighth Commandment” Vehse, everyone!

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Carl “Eighth Commandment” Vehse (@30), everyone!

    He gets his panties in a wad if you call Terry “Quran-burnin’” Jones’ actions “tacky”, demanding that you “substantiate” such a statement.

    But he feels no compunction whatsoever in calling for Obama’s execution! Even as he completely fails to “substantiate” said comment!

    Carl “Eighth Commandment” Vehse, everyone!

  • Carl Vehse

    tODD, I’ve stated previously that the Barry and his supporters are guilt of supporting and enabling the genocide of unborn Amercan infants.

    But you go ahead and show Cranach readers how you can whine for no reason at all.

  • Carl Vehse

    tODD, I’ve stated previously that the Barry and his supporters are guilt of supporting and enabling the genocide of unborn Amercan infants.

    But you go ahead and show Cranach readers how you can whine for no reason at all.

  • Grace

    From The American Thinker – dated August 17, 2008


    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

    By Kyle-Anne Shiver

    “Throughout my career, I’ve been a consistent and strong supporter of reproductive justice, and have consistently had a 100% pro-choice rating with Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice America.”
    -Barack Obama, Statement on 35th Anniversary of Roe v. Wade Decision
    If there is one issue, upon which Barack Obama has been willing to take a front-and-center political stand, it is on abortion and, yes, even infanticide. On this issue, amidst his many other flip-flops, Barack Obama has been consistent.

    And really, is it any wonder that Barack, father of daughters, supports completely unfettered abortion?

    Isn’t this absolutely consistent with his highly-touted Christian faith?

    Last March, at a townhall meeting in Pennsylvania, Obama explained his position perfectly:

    “I’ve got two daughters. 9 years old and 6 years old. I am going to teach them first of all about values and morals. But if they make a mistake, I don’t want them punished with a baby.”

    href=”http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/08/obamas_christian_creds_vs_abor.html” rel=”nofollow”>
    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

    href=”http://www.geneveith.com/2009/03/09/obama-to-overturn-ban-on-embryonic-stem-cell-research/#comment-57901″ rel=”nofollow”>stated previously

  • Grace

    From The American Thinker – dated August 17, 2008


    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

    By Kyle-Anne Shiver

    “Throughout my career, I’ve been a consistent and strong supporter of reproductive justice, and have consistently had a 100% pro-choice rating with Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice America.”
    -Barack Obama, Statement on 35th Anniversary of Roe v. Wade Decision
    If there is one issue, upon which Barack Obama has been willing to take a front-and-center political stand, it is on abortion and, yes, even infanticide. On this issue, amidst his many other flip-flops, Barack Obama has been consistent.

    And really, is it any wonder that Barack, father of daughters, supports completely unfettered abortion?

    Isn’t this absolutely consistent with his highly-touted Christian faith?

    Last March, at a townhall meeting in Pennsylvania, Obama explained his position perfectly:

    “I’ve got two daughters. 9 years old and 6 years old. I am going to teach them first of all about values and morals. But if they make a mistake, I don’t want them punished with a baby.”

    href=”http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/08/obamas_christian_creds_vs_abor.html” rel=”nofollow”>
    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

    href=”http://www.geneveith.com/2009/03/09/obama-to-overturn-ban-on-embryonic-stem-cell-research/#comment-57901″ rel=”nofollow”>stated previously

  • Grace

    Sorry about the LINK mess, I hope this works.

    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

  • Grace

    Sorry about the LINK mess, I hope this works.

    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

  • Grace

    I used to use the LINK in the past all the time, but it appears I am missing something.

    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

    http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/08/obamas_christian_creds_vs_abor.html

  • Grace

    I used to use the LINK in the past all the time, but it appears I am missing something.

    Obama’s Christian Creds Vs. Abortion and Infanticide

    http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/08/obamas_christian_creds_vs_abor.html


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