Eye of Newt and Mitt of Romney

Finally two big-name, legitimate candidates have thrown their hats into the ring, running for the Republican presidential nomination.  They are:   Newt Gingrich.  And Mitt Romney.

Those of you whose Christianity shapes your politics, could you vote for either of these guys?  Newt has lots of creative conservative ideas, but he has a history of admitted adultery, has been divorced twice, and is on his third marriage.  Would you say that character is more important than ideology?  And if so, would you ever be able to vote for Newt?  (He has recently converted from being a Baptist to being a Roman Catholic.  Does anyone know if he would be allowed to take Holy Communion, given his multiple marriages, even though they were pre-conversion?)

As for Mitt Romney, he is not a Christian at all, but rather a Mormon.  Does that make a difference to you in your willingness to ever vote for him?  Luther’s oft-cited quotation about better to vote for a wise Turk than a foolish Christian is apparently one of those urban legends.  But even if you agree with the principle, do you think Romney is a wise-enough Turk?

This weekend Mike Huckabee, last year a social conservative favorite, announced he is not running.  Mitch Daniel is a candidate with gravitas, but he is the one who called for a “truce” on social issues, such as abortion and gay marriage.  (Even though as Indiana governor he has recently defunded Planned Parenthood in that state.)

Would Christian conservatives rally around Pawlenty?  Santorum?  Bachman?

Is there any potential GOP candidate that, if he or she were the Republican nominee, would make you vote for Obama instead?

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://gslcnm.com Pastor Phil Spomer

    No one now gets me real excited. (I haven’t been enthusiastic about a politician since Ronald Reagan.) If I had to pick, I’d take Pawlenty.

  • http://gslcnm.com Pastor Phil Spomer

    No one now gets me real excited. (I haven’t been enthusiastic about a politician since Ronald Reagan.) If I had to pick, I’d take Pawlenty.

  • Joe

    “Is there any potential GOP candidate that, if he or she were the Republican nominee, would make you vote for Obama instead?”

    No, but there are some who might make me vote third-party (again).

  • Joe

    “Is there any potential GOP candidate that, if he or she were the Republican nominee, would make you vote for Obama instead?”

    No, but there are some who might make me vote third-party (again).

  • David

    Newt is better for conservatism outside the government; I have the same impression of Palin, though for somewhat different reasons. Romney just doesn’t do anything for me, but I can’t quite put my finger on why.

    From what I have seen so far, Herman Cain has my support.

  • David

    Newt is better for conservatism outside the government; I have the same impression of Palin, though for somewhat different reasons. Romney just doesn’t do anything for me, but I can’t quite put my finger on why.

    From what I have seen so far, Herman Cain has my support.

  • WebMonk

    I could get behind Santorum on some things. I’m not greatly enthused about him, but I like enough of his positions that I would vote for him. Pawlenty and Daniel also seems like we have enough areas of overlap that I would vote for them. As far as being able to be elected though, none of them are very likely, IMO. Pawlenty or Daniel, 15:1. Santorum, 20:1.

    Neither Newt nor Romney are at all attractive to me, and not because of marital infidelity or religion – I just plain don’t like either of their politics. They’re both purely political creatures without any serious standards beyond what they think will get them the most support. Newt, 10:1. Romney, 3:1.

    I suspect I’ll be voting 3rd party yet again.

  • WebMonk

    I could get behind Santorum on some things. I’m not greatly enthused about him, but I like enough of his positions that I would vote for him. Pawlenty and Daniel also seems like we have enough areas of overlap that I would vote for them. As far as being able to be elected though, none of them are very likely, IMO. Pawlenty or Daniel, 15:1. Santorum, 20:1.

    Neither Newt nor Romney are at all attractive to me, and not because of marital infidelity or religion – I just plain don’t like either of their politics. They’re both purely political creatures without any serious standards beyond what they think will get them the most support. Newt, 10:1. Romney, 3:1.

    I suspect I’ll be voting 3rd party yet again.

  • WebMonk

    David, I had to go look up who Herman Cain was. I guess I’m not sufficiently plugged in. Based on Wikipedia, I would probably vote for him in an election vs President Obama.

  • WebMonk

    David, I had to go look up who Herman Cain was. I guess I’m not sufficiently plugged in. Based on Wikipedia, I would probably vote for him in an election vs President Obama.

  • http://necessaryroughness.org Dan at Necessary Roughness

    They are both for single-payer health care; Romney on the state level, Gingrich on the federal level. I won’t for either of these guys.

    Herman Cain sounds good, but he’s not known well enough yet.

  • http://necessaryroughness.org Dan at Necessary Roughness

    They are both for single-payer health care; Romney on the state level, Gingrich on the federal level. I won’t for either of these guys.

    Herman Cain sounds good, but he’s not known well enough yet.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    So this is what I am hoping is going on here with the Republicans, they are pruning out dead wood with a campaign they don’t think they have a chance of winning. They are holding back for the next election when Obama is done.
    I wish they would run someone worthwhile against Obama, but I’m not really seeing that at this point. I’d vote for Newt over Romney. I don’t think I could ever bring myself to vote for Romney. He has the personality of a cardboard cut out.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    So this is what I am hoping is going on here with the Republicans, they are pruning out dead wood with a campaign they don’t think they have a chance of winning. They are holding back for the next election when Obama is done.
    I wish they would run someone worthwhile against Obama, but I’m not really seeing that at this point. I’d vote for Newt over Romney. I don’t think I could ever bring myself to vote for Romney. He has the personality of a cardboard cut out.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    I like Mitch Daniels, and there is no one I’m aware of in the GOP that could make me vote for Obama. I also haven’t been terribly impressed by the third part (Libertarian, Constitution) party candidates–one group is “guys who want to smoke dope and patronize hooker and don’t like to pay taxes,” and the Constitution party tends towards a certain degree of theonomy, with which I disagree theologically.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    I like Mitch Daniels, and there is no one I’m aware of in the GOP that could make me vote for Obama. I also haven’t been terribly impressed by the third part (Libertarian, Constitution) party candidates–one group is “guys who want to smoke dope and patronize hooker and don’t like to pay taxes,” and the Constitution party tends towards a certain degree of theonomy, with which I disagree theologically.

  • Porcell

    Daniels, Christie, or Ryan could beat Obama in 2012. Romney and Gingrich are political toast.

  • Porcell

    Daniels, Christie, or Ryan could beat Obama in 2012. Romney and Gingrich are political toast.

  • Jerry

    We appear to finally be reaping what was sown in the 60′s and 70′s. There appears to be a definite lack of persons with principled character who can take the leadership to continue an America that probably reached its peak with the greatest generation, those who won the war and came home to re-build the US after almost two decades of economic decline.

    As much as the Mormon church would have us believe they have a highly principled set of beliefs, I personally feel they go with which ever way the wind blows, and for that reason I would have trouble voting for a Mormon. Same goes with anyone who has led a personal life such as Newt has.

    Obama has shown himself to be anti- whatever I treasure so I could never see any reason to vote for him.

    Although I have reservations about her leadership abilities, and that’s what we need is a good leader, Bachman is the only one sufficiently principled and currently running I could support.

  • Jerry

    We appear to finally be reaping what was sown in the 60′s and 70′s. There appears to be a definite lack of persons with principled character who can take the leadership to continue an America that probably reached its peak with the greatest generation, those who won the war and came home to re-build the US after almost two decades of economic decline.

    As much as the Mormon church would have us believe they have a highly principled set of beliefs, I personally feel they go with which ever way the wind blows, and for that reason I would have trouble voting for a Mormon. Same goes with anyone who has led a personal life such as Newt has.

    Obama has shown himself to be anti- whatever I treasure so I could never see any reason to vote for him.

    Although I have reservations about her leadership abilities, and that’s what we need is a good leader, Bachman is the only one sufficiently principled and currently running I could support.

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    NO on newt-he’s a couch sitter (nancy P) and a waffler-

    romney-NO-gvt (tax-payer ) health care remember?!!

    Bachmann-YES-
    there are one or two others -bold-and freedom lovers…
    C-CS

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    NO on newt-he’s a couch sitter (nancy P) and a waffler-

    romney-NO-gvt (tax-payer ) health care remember?!!

    Bachmann-YES-
    there are one or two others -bold-and freedom lovers…
    C-CS

  • Carl Vehse

    Sarah Palin is still a contender, and a candidate for whom liberal/clymer heads would explode in rage.

  • Carl Vehse

    Sarah Palin is still a contender, and a candidate for whom liberal/clymer heads would explode in rage.

  • helen

    Palin walked off the job when she was only Governor (albeit of the biggest state). :) The Presidency should be about more than infuriating the libs!
    Do we really need a President who isn’t there when things get hot?
    [Come to think of it... have we tried that? One column I read had the President's Aide making the calls. Is there truth in that?]

  • helen

    Palin walked off the job when she was only Governor (albeit of the biggest state). :) The Presidency should be about more than infuriating the libs!
    Do we really need a President who isn’t there when things get hot?
    [Come to think of it... have we tried that? One column I read had the President's Aide making the calls. Is there truth in that?]

  • Rich

    “Luther’s oft-cited quotation about better to vote for a wise Turk than a foolish Christian is apparently one of those urban legends.”

    I have always wondered about this. What is the background of this urban legend. Anyone know?

  • Rich

    “Luther’s oft-cited quotation about better to vote for a wise Turk than a foolish Christian is apparently one of those urban legends.”

    I have always wondered about this. What is the background of this urban legend. Anyone know?

  • Jonathan

    @14 this page provides some background.

    http://www.scholardarity.com/?page_id=462

    Luther, apparently, valued reason in a governor. Thus, I doubt we’d find him today in the GOP ranks, were he alive.

  • Jonathan

    @14 this page provides some background.

    http://www.scholardarity.com/?page_id=462

    Luther, apparently, valued reason in a governor. Thus, I doubt we’d find him today in the GOP ranks, were he alive.

  • Carl Vehse

    Here’s a link to a February 21, 2007, Cranach article, “The Wise Turk quote.”

  • Carl Vehse

    Here’s a link to a February 21, 2007, Cranach article, “The Wise Turk quote.”

  • DonS

    No GOP candidate yet surfaced is bad enough for me to consider voting for Obama, or throwing my vote away on a third party candidate and thus de facto voting for Obama. Four more years of Obama will exact lasting damage on our country, most importantly because of the kind of far left judicial nominees he is foisting upon our federal judiciary. Their lifetime appointments will do damage far beyond his eight year term. And, were he to get a second term, he would have an excellent chance of tipping the Supreme Court for decades to come.

    Gingrich and Romney will not be factors. As Porcell says, they are political toast. I’m not sure we have any idea yet who will ultimately get the nomination. Who had any idea, in May 2007, that our next president would be Obama?

  • DonS

    No GOP candidate yet surfaced is bad enough for me to consider voting for Obama, or throwing my vote away on a third party candidate and thus de facto voting for Obama. Four more years of Obama will exact lasting damage on our country, most importantly because of the kind of far left judicial nominees he is foisting upon our federal judiciary. Their lifetime appointments will do damage far beyond his eight year term. And, were he to get a second term, he would have an excellent chance of tipping the Supreme Court for decades to come.

    Gingrich and Romney will not be factors. As Porcell says, they are political toast. I’m not sure we have any idea yet who will ultimately get the nomination. Who had any idea, in May 2007, that our next president would be Obama?

  • SKPeterson

    Jonathan @15 – and based upon his value of reason and his comments on the Peasant’s Rebellion, I doubt he’d side with the Democrats either.

    Romney is the Republican version of John Kerry.

    Right now, the only one I can think of is Bachmann, and even she’s a little iffy. The Republicans screwed up the last election by selecting McCain (anyone remember him?)

    I will say that this election is shaping up to be one for the history books – how one of the absolutely weakest Presidents ever is still the strongest candidate in the race. It does not bode well for the Republic.

  • SKPeterson

    Jonathan @15 – and based upon his value of reason and his comments on the Peasant’s Rebellion, I doubt he’d side with the Democrats either.

    Romney is the Republican version of John Kerry.

    Right now, the only one I can think of is Bachmann, and even she’s a little iffy. The Republicans screwed up the last election by selecting McCain (anyone remember him?)

    I will say that this election is shaping up to be one for the history books – how one of the absolutely weakest Presidents ever is still the strongest candidate in the race. It does not bode well for the Republic.

  • Jonathan

    DonS, provide examples of these “far left judicial nominees” and how do they differ from merely “left” nominees”? And when you say “foisting,” don’t you mean “confirmed by the Senate”?

  • Jonathan

    DonS, provide examples of these “far left judicial nominees” and how do they differ from merely “left” nominees”? And when you say “foisting,” don’t you mean “confirmed by the Senate”?

  • Porcell

    DonS, take a close at Mitch Daniels; he has been a superb and popular governor of Indiana, having turned a serious structural deficit around to a surplus and substantially reformed the state’s education system. He has high-level Washington experience under Reagan and Bush II, as well as having been a top executive at Eli Lilly. In his own humble and modest way he has a certain charisma.

    In a speech to AEI awhile back he stated the country’s fiscal crisis is a grave matter of survival.

  • Porcell

    DonS, take a close at Mitch Daniels; he has been a superb and popular governor of Indiana, having turned a serious structural deficit around to a surplus and substantially reformed the state’s education system. He has high-level Washington experience under Reagan and Bush II, as well as having been a top executive at Eli Lilly. In his own humble and modest way he has a certain charisma.

    In a speech to AEI awhile back he stated the country’s fiscal crisis is a grave matter of survival.

  • Carl Vehse

    In his “On Governmental Authority,” Martin Luther writes:

    “You must know that since the beginning of the world a wise prince is a mighty rare bird, and an upright prince even rarer. They are generally the biggest fools or the worst scoundrels on earth; therefore one must constantly expect the worst from them and look for little good… If a prince should happen to be wise, upright, or a Christian, that is one of the great miracles, the most precious token of divine grace upon that land. Ordinarily the course of events is in accordance with the passage from Is. 3[:4], “I will make boys their princes, and gaping fools shall rule over them”; and in Hos. 13[:11], “I will give you a king in my anger, and take him away in my wrath.” The world is too wicked, and does not deserve to have many wise and upright princes. Frogs must have their storks.”

  • Carl Vehse

    In his “On Governmental Authority,” Martin Luther writes:

    “You must know that since the beginning of the world a wise prince is a mighty rare bird, and an upright prince even rarer. They are generally the biggest fools or the worst scoundrels on earth; therefore one must constantly expect the worst from them and look for little good… If a prince should happen to be wise, upright, or a Christian, that is one of the great miracles, the most precious token of divine grace upon that land. Ordinarily the course of events is in accordance with the passage from Is. 3[:4], “I will make boys their princes, and gaping fools shall rule over them”; and in Hos. 13[:11], “I will give you a king in my anger, and take him away in my wrath.” The world is too wicked, and does not deserve to have many wise and upright princes. Frogs must have their storks.”

  • Carl Vehse

    And by “prince” we Americans can think not only of our elected and appointed bureaucrats, but also the electorate… the person in the voting booth next to you… the driver in front of you with the faded “Gore/Lieberman” sticker on his bumper.

  • Carl Vehse

    And by “prince” we Americans can think not only of our elected and appointed bureaucrats, but also the electorate… the person in the voting booth next to you… the driver in front of you with the faded “Gore/Lieberman” sticker on his bumper.

  • Grace

    Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney, are “toast” as Porcell pointed out. Gingrich should be embarrassed to run, Romney belongs to a cult. …. he should know by now he doesn’t have a chance.

  • Grace

    Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney, are “toast” as Porcell pointed out. Gingrich should be embarrassed to run, Romney belongs to a cult. …. he should know by now he doesn’t have a chance.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    My opinion probably isn’t worth much on this thread (even though, or perhaps because, I voted for Ron Paul last election, not the guy I’m always accused of having supported), but …

    I could never vote for Romney, but not because he’s LDS. I think SK more or less hit on my thinking when he said (@18), “Romney is the Republican version of John Kerry.” Which would make him a fairly fitting candidate, given that I still think 2012 will be the Republicans’ equivalent to the Democrats’ 2004, as it were.

    I actually think I might be able to vote for Gingrich, or at least would be far more interested in a Gingrich vs. Obama campaign. I saw him in a debate with Nader once here in Portland (when he wasn’t running for any office, and thus was most likely to come across as sensible), and he really held his own in front of what should have been a hostile crowd. It’s so rare that we actually get ideas candidates these days. Anyhow, I do think he’ll be sunk by his personal life — which I am in no way defending — even though it’s largely irrelevant to the job.

    All of you Bachmann lovers are, in my opinion, completely wacked in the head as to her larger appeal. Might as well have Christine O’Donnell run for President.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    My opinion probably isn’t worth much on this thread (even though, or perhaps because, I voted for Ron Paul last election, not the guy I’m always accused of having supported), but …

    I could never vote for Romney, but not because he’s LDS. I think SK more or less hit on my thinking when he said (@18), “Romney is the Republican version of John Kerry.” Which would make him a fairly fitting candidate, given that I still think 2012 will be the Republicans’ equivalent to the Democrats’ 2004, as it were.

    I actually think I might be able to vote for Gingrich, or at least would be far more interested in a Gingrich vs. Obama campaign. I saw him in a debate with Nader once here in Portland (when he wasn’t running for any office, and thus was most likely to come across as sensible), and he really held his own in front of what should have been a hostile crowd. It’s so rare that we actually get ideas candidates these days. Anyhow, I do think he’ll be sunk by his personal life — which I am in no way defending — even though it’s largely irrelevant to the job.

    All of you Bachmann lovers are, in my opinion, completely wacked in the head as to her larger appeal. Might as well have Christine O’Donnell run for President.

  • Louis

    A good fellow I know has an entirely different take on the matter, and one that might be spot-on, to the discomfort of many:

    http://jerkonomics.blogspot.com/2011/05/how-obama-wins-2012.html

  • Louis

    A good fellow I know has an entirely different take on the matter, and one that might be spot-on, to the discomfort of many:

    http://jerkonomics.blogspot.com/2011/05/how-obama-wins-2012.html

  • Louis

    Todd @ 24 – regarding Bachman. A fellow I know, not a very polite one (and a Marxist to boot), assembled a bunch of really, really sad Bachman quotes, and followed it up with this: Bachman/Palin 2012, because two half-wits make a whole wit ……

    Not that I agree (or disagree), but it is just too funny….

  • Louis

    Todd @ 24 – regarding Bachman. A fellow I know, not a very polite one (and a Marxist to boot), assembled a bunch of really, really sad Bachman quotes, and followed it up with this: Bachman/Palin 2012, because two half-wits make a whole wit ……

    Not that I agree (or disagree), but it is just too funny….

  • Carl Vehse

    Fearsome Tycoon does provide four highly convincing points regarding Barry’s win over a likely 2012 RINO nominee:

    1. The Republican base will be disgusted and not show up.
    2. Independents will either not show up or choose “Better the devil you know…”
    3. The left will be mobilized by the [clymer] media.

    Oh, and the fourth:

    “If, by some miracle, the Republicans nominate an adult, we’ll see headlines like “Scientific Study: [GOP] Candidate X’s Budget Plan Would Result in Widespread Childhood Cancer.” [S]He’s doomed.”

  • Carl Vehse

    Fearsome Tycoon does provide four highly convincing points regarding Barry’s win over a likely 2012 RINO nominee:

    1. The Republican base will be disgusted and not show up.
    2. Independents will either not show up or choose “Better the devil you know…”
    3. The left will be mobilized by the [clymer] media.

    Oh, and the fourth:

    “If, by some miracle, the Republicans nominate an adult, we’ll see headlines like “Scientific Study: [GOP] Candidate X’s Budget Plan Would Result in Widespread Childhood Cancer.” [S]He’s doomed.”

  • Louis

    The essence of his remarks, Carl, are the following:

    The problem with the Republicans can be summarized succinctly: They are terrified of making anyone currently on the federal teat dislike them. Oh sure, they don’t much care for $1.6 T deficits. But almost immediately upon taking the House, they realized there is no Federal Department of Waste, Fraud, and Abuse to cut, that there is not a single dollar of federal spending that is not spent on a real live person who would rather keep it. The $100b in promised cuts was quickly reduced to oh, somewhere near zero. Promising to cut spending in general is popular (remember, Obama promised the same thing in 2008). Actually taking away someone’s free lunch, by contrast, requires taking sides and making someone unhappy. After all, cowboy poets vote.

  • Louis

    The essence of his remarks, Carl, are the following:

    The problem with the Republicans can be summarized succinctly: They are terrified of making anyone currently on the federal teat dislike them. Oh sure, they don’t much care for $1.6 T deficits. But almost immediately upon taking the House, they realized there is no Federal Department of Waste, Fraud, and Abuse to cut, that there is not a single dollar of federal spending that is not spent on a real live person who would rather keep it. The $100b in promised cuts was quickly reduced to oh, somewhere near zero. Promising to cut spending in general is popular (remember, Obama promised the same thing in 2008). Actually taking away someone’s free lunch, by contrast, requires taking sides and making someone unhappy. After all, cowboy poets vote.

  • Simone

    Herman Cain 2012! I heard him speak two years ago at an Atlanta event, and have been a fan ever since. He is amazing, but not very well known yet. But, as of now, I will be voting for him.
    Here’s a short bio of him: http://www.hermancain.com/inner.asp?z=1

  • Simone

    Herman Cain 2012! I heard him speak two years ago at an Atlanta event, and have been a fan ever since. He is amazing, but not very well known yet. But, as of now, I will be voting for him.
    Here’s a short bio of him: http://www.hermancain.com/inner.asp?z=1

  • Kyralessa

    I wouldn’t vote for Gingrich because I think character is important, and two failed marriages (for the reasons he admitted to) don’t bespeak good character.

    I wouldn’t vote for Romney, not because of his LDS faith, but because of his liberalism on social issues when he was governor of Massachusetts. This doesn’t seem to be widely known, because the media latched onto the Mormon thing instead. Perhaps from a liberal standpoint Romney is the best candidate, and for that reason they call opposition to him religious prejudice (similar to how opposition to Obama has always been called racism).

    Mitch Daniels was foolish to use the “truce” language on social issues. But if actions speak louder than words even in the political realm, he appears to have better actions than the other two candidates.

  • Kyralessa

    I wouldn’t vote for Gingrich because I think character is important, and two failed marriages (for the reasons he admitted to) don’t bespeak good character.

    I wouldn’t vote for Romney, not because of his LDS faith, but because of his liberalism on social issues when he was governor of Massachusetts. This doesn’t seem to be widely known, because the media latched onto the Mormon thing instead. Perhaps from a liberal standpoint Romney is the best candidate, and for that reason they call opposition to him religious prejudice (similar to how opposition to Obama has always been called racism).

    Mitch Daniels was foolish to use the “truce” language on social issues. But if actions speak louder than words even in the political realm, he appears to have better actions than the other two candidates.

  • SKPeterson

    The big knock on Cain is that he’s a shill for the monetary profligacy that is the Federal Reserve. He’s never met a bailout he couldn’t love or an industry that isn’t too big to fail on up to the federal money trough.

    That’s par for the course of current candidates, making him generally undifferentiated in anything substantial in regards to policy, which is enough to kill his candidacy in my view.

  • SKPeterson

    The big knock on Cain is that he’s a shill for the monetary profligacy that is the Federal Reserve. He’s never met a bailout he couldn’t love or an industry that isn’t too big to fail on up to the federal money trough.

    That’s par for the course of current candidates, making him generally undifferentiated in anything substantial in regards to policy, which is enough to kill his candidacy in my view.

  • Louis

    BTW, Trump is now officially not running anymore….

  • Louis

    BTW, Trump is now officially not running anymore….

  • Jonathan

    So, Louis, is he out of gas…? Would that were true.

  • Jonathan

    So, Louis, is he out of gas…? Would that were true.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    I wouldn’t vote for Romney, but I sure would vote against his Democratic opponent, if you catch my drift.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    I wouldn’t vote for Romney, but I sure would vote against his Democratic opponent, if you catch my drift.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    Chris Christie or Ron Paul are my choices. Gingrich has shown himself treacherous in his personal dealings and anyone who thinks he wouldn’t be likewise in his public service is naive. Romney is ‘socialist lite’ and all of the others are either too low profile or have too much baggage.

    SK Peterson@18 “I will say that this election is shaping up to be one for the history books – how one of the absolutely weakest Presidents ever is still the strongest candidate in the race. It does not bode well for the Republic.”

    Isn’t that the truth? The last several presidential elections have lacked any truly standout candidates. (With the exception of Ron Paul, whom the media and the powers that be will never allow to win.) The pool of suitable candidates is becoming shallower as the years go by.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    Chris Christie or Ron Paul are my choices. Gingrich has shown himself treacherous in his personal dealings and anyone who thinks he wouldn’t be likewise in his public service is naive. Romney is ‘socialist lite’ and all of the others are either too low profile or have too much baggage.

    SK Peterson@18 “I will say that this election is shaping up to be one for the history books – how one of the absolutely weakest Presidents ever is still the strongest candidate in the race. It does not bode well for the Republic.”

    Isn’t that the truth? The last several presidential elections have lacked any truly standout candidates. (With the exception of Ron Paul, whom the media and the powers that be will never allow to win.) The pool of suitable candidates is becoming shallower as the years go by.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    ” (He has recently converted from being a Baptist to being a Roman Catholic. Does anyone know if he would be allowed to take Holy Communion, given his multiple marriages, even though they were pre-conversion?)”

    It is my understanding (via a friend who had three marriages annulled by the RCC ) that if you are not married in the RCC and members thereof your marriage is not viewed as a real Christian marriage and is therefore not binding.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    ” (He has recently converted from being a Baptist to being a Roman Catholic. Does anyone know if he would be allowed to take Holy Communion, given his multiple marriages, even though they were pre-conversion?)”

    It is my understanding (via a friend who had three marriages annulled by the RCC ) that if you are not married in the RCC and members thereof your marriage is not viewed as a real Christian marriage and is therefore not binding.

  • Jonathan

    Patrick Kyle @35 If the media won’t allow Paul to win, it’s because he insists on going on it to announce his views. He’s now said that, like his son, he would have voted against the ’64 Civil Rights Act, proving that white majority rule still finds a voice in the GOP. That’s one of many reasons why he won’t win.

  • Jonathan

    Patrick Kyle @35 If the media won’t allow Paul to win, it’s because he insists on going on it to announce his views. He’s now said that, like his son, he would have voted against the ’64 Civil Rights Act, proving that white majority rule still finds a voice in the GOP. That’s one of many reasons why he won’t win.

  • Lou

    I think Mitt Romney is a strong choice. He is the only non-crazy Republican candidate, and Glenn Beck seems to have broken down a lot of barriers between the Christian/Mormon divide politically.
    Personally, I don’t think that an atheist should ever be considered, but considering the fact that the Christian political worldview is pretty much only really conservative, Theistic/Judeo/Christian and not really anything specifically Christian per se, I really don’t see a problem with Romney.

  • Lou

    I think Mitt Romney is a strong choice. He is the only non-crazy Republican candidate, and Glenn Beck seems to have broken down a lot of barriers between the Christian/Mormon divide politically.
    Personally, I don’t think that an atheist should ever be considered, but considering the fact that the Christian political worldview is pretty much only really conservative, Theistic/Judeo/Christian and not really anything specifically Christian per se, I really don’t see a problem with Romney.

  • Lou

    Okay, I just read the rest of the comments. Guess I don’t know anything about politics.

  • Lou

    Okay, I just read the rest of the comments. Guess I don’t know anything about politics.

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  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    Johnathan@37

    You said” He’s now said that, like his son, he would have voted against the ’64 Civil Rights Act, proving that white majority rule still finds a voice in the GOP. That’s one of many reasons why he won’t win.”

    Ron Paul is not a racist. He obviously felt that there were flaws in the bill that would curtail the liberty of others.(As the courts have now found in various affirmative action and reverse discrimination cases,) However, in this age of soundbite politics, that is enough to paint a man as racist and throw him under the bus.

    In the end I really don’t think that any of the ‘princes’ vying for power in the next election will be able to make a difference. Unless something almost miraculous happens, the American Experiment looks to be headed toward some real ugliness. No one seems to have the balls to really address the issues, including most of the American citizenry, so instead of taking our very unpleasant medicine now in return for a brighter future, we are determined to ride this train until it slams into the wall. Our candidates are just trying to sell us schemes for making the end less painful or to live in denial until things implode.. Its like holding a belly flop contest from the high dive. No matter how artistic or flamboyant the dive, it always ends poorly.

  • http://www.newreformationpress.com Patrick Kyle

    Johnathan@37

    You said” He’s now said that, like his son, he would have voted against the ’64 Civil Rights Act, proving that white majority rule still finds a voice in the GOP. That’s one of many reasons why he won’t win.”

    Ron Paul is not a racist. He obviously felt that there were flaws in the bill that would curtail the liberty of others.(As the courts have now found in various affirmative action and reverse discrimination cases,) However, in this age of soundbite politics, that is enough to paint a man as racist and throw him under the bus.

    In the end I really don’t think that any of the ‘princes’ vying for power in the next election will be able to make a difference. Unless something almost miraculous happens, the American Experiment looks to be headed toward some real ugliness. No one seems to have the balls to really address the issues, including most of the American citizenry, so instead of taking our very unpleasant medicine now in return for a brighter future, we are determined to ride this train until it slams into the wall. Our candidates are just trying to sell us schemes for making the end less painful or to live in denial until things implode.. Its like holding a belly flop contest from the high dive. No matter how artistic or flamboyant the dive, it always ends poorly.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    If someone ran an anti-free trade, anti-immigration, anti-Wall Street, and anti-China campaign I’d probably vote for them in either party.

    However given the odds of that I probably won’t be voting in 2012.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    If someone ran an anti-free trade, anti-immigration, anti-Wall Street, and anti-China campaign I’d probably vote for them in either party.

    However given the odds of that I probably won’t be voting in 2012.

  • steve

    I’d vote for Obama before I voted for Trump. But since Trump isn’t running anymore, Obama just moved down a rank. He now sits just below my lawn guy.

  • steve

    I’d vote for Obama before I voted for Trump. But since Trump isn’t running anymore, Obama just moved down a rank. He now sits just below my lawn guy.

  • Louis

    Jonathan @ 33, he is out of gas, but there is still plenty of hot air left…

  • Louis

    Jonathan @ 33, he is out of gas, but there is still plenty of hot air left…

  • Jonathan

    @40 Sorry, but for Paul to say that he opposes the ’64 Civil Rights Act now, almost 50 years after the fact, is racist, because he knows darn well why that act was so necessary. There’s no place today in adult society for someone who supports a business’s “right” to refuse to serve black people. The only liberty curtailed by the Act was those of bigots. Please, please go read the history of that time, or at the very least talk to some black folk in your town who remember those days.

    @43 Right on.

  • Jonathan

    @40 Sorry, but for Paul to say that he opposes the ’64 Civil Rights Act now, almost 50 years after the fact, is racist, because he knows darn well why that act was so necessary. There’s no place today in adult society for someone who supports a business’s “right” to refuse to serve black people. The only liberty curtailed by the Act was those of bigots. Please, please go read the history of that time, or at the very least talk to some black folk in your town who remember those days.

    @43 Right on.

  • Grace

    This might be the man!

    Rick Perry Presidential Push Quietly Gains Steam

    May 17, 2011

    By Erin McPike and Scott Conroy

    As many grass-roots Republicans remain in search of a conservative candidate with the pizazz to go toe-to-toe against President Obama, a man from deep in the heart of Texas who was tea party before the tea party was cool appears to be giving the presidential race some thought.

    Gov. Rick Perry has insisted on multiple occasions that he has no interest in the presidency, but RCP has learned that political associates have begun to nose around quietly on Perry’s behalf.

    A Texas pol who is close to Perry has been telling a few key strategists that the nation’s longest-serving governor sees a vacuum and is waiting to be summoned into the race. This source believes that could happen by late summer. Without fellow Southerners Haley Barbour or Mike Huckabee in the race — and with Newt Gingrich’s early troubles raising further doubts about the current lineup — there could be a glaring niche for Perry to fill.

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2011/05/17/rick_perry_presidential_push_quietly_gains_steam_109894.html

  • Grace

    This might be the man!

    Rick Perry Presidential Push Quietly Gains Steam

    May 17, 2011

    By Erin McPike and Scott Conroy

    As many grass-roots Republicans remain in search of a conservative candidate with the pizazz to go toe-to-toe against President Obama, a man from deep in the heart of Texas who was tea party before the tea party was cool appears to be giving the presidential race some thought.

    Gov. Rick Perry has insisted on multiple occasions that he has no interest in the presidency, but RCP has learned that political associates have begun to nose around quietly on Perry’s behalf.

    A Texas pol who is close to Perry has been telling a few key strategists that the nation’s longest-serving governor sees a vacuum and is waiting to be summoned into the race. This source believes that could happen by late summer. Without fellow Southerners Haley Barbour or Mike Huckabee in the race — and with Newt Gingrich’s early troubles raising further doubts about the current lineup — there could be a glaring niche for Perry to fill.

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2011/05/17/rick_perry_presidential_push_quietly_gains_steam_109894.html

  • Grace

    Perry’s Christian religious beliefs

    In what was described as a “God and country” sermon at the Cornerstone church in San Antonio, attended by Perry and other mostly Republican candidates, the Rev. John Hagee stated,”If you live your life and don’t confess your sins to God Almighty through the authority of Christ and His blood, I’m going to say this very plainly, you’re going straight to hell with a nonstop ticket.” Perry was asked if he agreed with those comments and said, “It is my faith, and I’m a believer of that.” Perry went on to say that there was nothing in the sermon that he took exception with. Humorist and entertainer Kinky Friedman, the Jewish independent candidate for governor in the 2006 election, said, “He doesn’t think very differently from the Taliban, does he?” Carole Keeton Strayhorn disagreed with Perry’s comments, and Democrat Chris Bell said that one who is in public office should “respect people of all faiths and denominations.” Conservatives then responded, arguing that Perry had a right to his religious beliefs, and that he was not disrespecting Americans of other religious convictions.[39] While on tour in August 2009 interview with Israel’s Jerusalem Post Perry affirmed his support for Israel from his religious background, “I’m a big believer that this country was given to the people of Israel a long time ago, by God, and that’s ordained.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Perry

  • Grace

    Perry’s Christian religious beliefs

    In what was described as a “God and country” sermon at the Cornerstone church in San Antonio, attended by Perry and other mostly Republican candidates, the Rev. John Hagee stated,”If you live your life and don’t confess your sins to God Almighty through the authority of Christ and His blood, I’m going to say this very plainly, you’re going straight to hell with a nonstop ticket.” Perry was asked if he agreed with those comments and said, “It is my faith, and I’m a believer of that.” Perry went on to say that there was nothing in the sermon that he took exception with. Humorist and entertainer Kinky Friedman, the Jewish independent candidate for governor in the 2006 election, said, “He doesn’t think very differently from the Taliban, does he?” Carole Keeton Strayhorn disagreed with Perry’s comments, and Democrat Chris Bell said that one who is in public office should “respect people of all faiths and denominations.” Conservatives then responded, arguing that Perry had a right to his religious beliefs, and that he was not disrespecting Americans of other religious convictions.[39] While on tour in August 2009 interview with Israel’s Jerusalem Post Perry affirmed his support for Israel from his religious background, “I’m a big believer that this country was given to the people of Israel a long time ago, by God, and that’s ordained.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Perry

  • Kyralessa

    I was about to agree with you, Grace, but then I realized it didn’t say Rick Astley like I thought at first.

  • Kyralessa

    I was about to agree with you, Grace, but then I realized it didn’t say Rick Astley like I thought at first.

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