And now war in Yemen?

Has President Obama, the former peace candidate, now started a 4th war?

The Obama administration has intensified the American covert war in Yemen, exploiting a growing power vacuum in the country to strike at militant suspects with armed drones and fighter jets, according to American officials.

The acceleration of the American campaign in recent weeks comes amid a violent conflict in Yemen that has left the government in Sana, a United States ally, struggling to cling to power. Yemeni troops that had been battling militants linked to Al Qaeda in the south have been pulled back to the capital, and American officials see the strikes as one of the few options to keep the militants from consolidating power.

On Friday, American jets killed Abu Ali al-Harithi, a midlevel Qaeda operative, and several other militant suspects in a strike in southern Yemen. According to witnesses, four civilians were also killed in the airstrike. Weeks earlier, drone aircraft fired missiles aimed at Anwar al-Awlaki, the radical American-born cleric who the United States government has tried to kill for more than a year. Mr. Awlaki survived.

via U.S. Is Intensifying a Secret Campaign of Yemen Airstrikes – NYTimes.com.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://www.examiner.com/x-27802-Televangelism--Pop-Christianity-Examiner Bob Hunter

    Why not invade? America just can’t manage to stay out of a war.

  • http://www.examiner.com/x-27802-Televangelism--Pop-Christianity-Examiner Bob Hunter

    Why not invade? America just can’t manage to stay out of a war.

  • Carl Vehse

    He can probably get away with it since the RINOs in Congress are too gutless to impeach Barry.

  • Carl Vehse

    He can probably get away with it since the RINOs in Congress are too gutless to impeach Barry.

  • Jonathan

    I am glad to see that we are hunting down these virulent pathogens. I am glad that the president sees the reality of the situation in the terror war and that he has not shyed away from his responsibility as commander in chief to take action that is needed to wipe them out before they come after us. Much to the chagrin of his party and supporters. Rock on.

  • Jonathan

    I am glad to see that we are hunting down these virulent pathogens. I am glad that the president sees the reality of the situation in the terror war and that he has not shyed away from his responsibility as commander in chief to take action that is needed to wipe them out before they come after us. Much to the chagrin of his party and supporters. Rock on.

  • Dennis Peskey

    I see a great similarity between the military strategy of this current administration and the foreign policy of the United States during the Banana Wars. The ongoing policy of Al Qaeda posits only two scenarios; either we submit (ironically, the meaning of “Islam”) or we defend our interests at home and abroad. I trust we are placing strong emphasis on intelligence for target acquisition; the current weapons of choice (drone aircraft fired missiles and manned aircraft) allow for minimum exposure of military personnel to accomplish a mission of selective removal of our enemies. How different life might have been had President Clinton had and employed such tactics when Bin-Laden was know to reside in Yemen. And, lest I forget, we still possess our number one means of foreign policy – send in the Marines!
    Semper Fi,
    Dennis

  • Dennis Peskey

    I see a great similarity between the military strategy of this current administration and the foreign policy of the United States during the Banana Wars. The ongoing policy of Al Qaeda posits only two scenarios; either we submit (ironically, the meaning of “Islam”) or we defend our interests at home and abroad. I trust we are placing strong emphasis on intelligence for target acquisition; the current weapons of choice (drone aircraft fired missiles and manned aircraft) allow for minimum exposure of military personnel to accomplish a mission of selective removal of our enemies. How different life might have been had President Clinton had and employed such tactics when Bin-Laden was know to reside in Yemen. And, lest I forget, we still possess our number one means of foreign policy – send in the Marines!
    Semper Fi,
    Dennis

  • steve

    The democrats willingness to get into a conflict has never been in question. It’s starting a war that makes them squeamish.

  • steve

    The democrats willingness to get into a conflict has never been in question. It’s starting a war that makes them squeamish.

  • WebMonk

    These drone strikes in Yemen are extremely short-sighted and unwise. Right now (or as of a couple months ago) Yemen wasn’t a serious enemy of our country. They had al quaida members, but only a small part of al quaida in Yemen was aimed at the US. The majority of the Yemeni al quaida groups were very local-focused, not worldwide.

    However, the drone strikes and the civilian deaths that accompany them are very likely to create a very fertile ground for anger at the US there. We could be knocking out a few mid-level al quaida operatives that aren’t much of a threat to the US, and propping up a regime that is very likely to fall no matter what we do, in exchange for creating a future growth a strong anti-US sentiment that could develop a much larger population of al quaida members who are focused on revenge against the US.

    Very short-sighted, from what I can tell.

  • WebMonk

    These drone strikes in Yemen are extremely short-sighted and unwise. Right now (or as of a couple months ago) Yemen wasn’t a serious enemy of our country. They had al quaida members, but only a small part of al quaida in Yemen was aimed at the US. The majority of the Yemeni al quaida groups were very local-focused, not worldwide.

    However, the drone strikes and the civilian deaths that accompany them are very likely to create a very fertile ground for anger at the US there. We could be knocking out a few mid-level al quaida operatives that aren’t much of a threat to the US, and propping up a regime that is very likely to fall no matter what we do, in exchange for creating a future growth a strong anti-US sentiment that could develop a much larger population of al quaida members who are focused on revenge against the US.

    Very short-sighted, from what I can tell.

  • Jonathan

    Where have most all of the AQ operatives come from or been linked lately? Yemen. Underwear bomber. Time Square bomber.

    It’s time to clean house in Yemen while we still have a bead on them and they move again. AQ always goes for the failing/ed states for its prime base. Short sighted, indeed!

    What we need to do is pressure the Saudi’s go in there, not our troops.

  • Jonathan

    Where have most all of the AQ operatives come from or been linked lately? Yemen. Underwear bomber. Time Square bomber.

    It’s time to clean house in Yemen while we still have a bead on them and they move again. AQ always goes for the failing/ed states for its prime base. Short sighted, indeed!

    What we need to do is pressure the Saudi’s go in there, not our troops.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “However, the drone strikes and the civilian deaths that accompany them are very likely to create a very fertile ground for anger at the US there.”

    Why doesn’t it cause anger against al Qaeda? Are they too simple to figure out that Al Qaeda is a magnet for wars? You would think middle eastern folk would themselves purge Al Qaeda just for the sake of their own safety.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “However, the drone strikes and the civilian deaths that accompany them are very likely to create a very fertile ground for anger at the US there.”

    Why doesn’t it cause anger against al Qaeda? Are they too simple to figure out that Al Qaeda is a magnet for wars? You would think middle eastern folk would themselves purge Al Qaeda just for the sake of their own safety.

  • WebMonk

    Why doesn’t it cause anger against al Qaeda? Are they too simple to figure out that Al Qaeda is a magnet for wars? You would think middle eastern folk would themselves purge Al Qaeda just for the sake of their own safety.

    sg, I’m not sure you realize how AQ is perceived by their local supporters. We don’t have an analogue here in the US. In a lot of ways they handle the functions of government in their areas – they get money for schools, handle ‘health care’, are the police force, etc. In many instances they are far less corrupt than the country’s official government.

    For us, AQ is a foreign enemy, for them AQ is their cousin, son, brother, school friend, admired town mayor, etc. They are also typically supported and tied in with the local mosques – it would be like your pastor and elders giving strong support to to your cousin within a small town.

    AQ is very popular locally for a LOT of reasons.

    Then, your cousin starts working for the town council which is also working to fight your (vague) enemies a long ways away. Then that (vague and far away) enemy sends in a missile in the night and blows up his house, along with his wife (with whom you are friends) and their kids (whom you’ve babysat several times and are good friends with your kids).

    At that point, the most obvious reaction for everyone is to wake up and realize that your cousin, his wife, and children were all bad people and more or less deserved their fate because they should have driven off your cousin. Yup, that’s the obvious reaction everyone would have.

    There’s no possible way they might get angry at the foreign enemy who just killed your family and friends, and there’s no possible way that those feelings could ever build up over time, or that every death that the foreign and faceless enemy causes builds up deep and unrelenting hatred for that foreign enemy and a determination to not kneel down to the foreigners but to rather resist in any way possible.

    Nope. No chance at all. That would never happen.

  • WebMonk

    Why doesn’t it cause anger against al Qaeda? Are they too simple to figure out that Al Qaeda is a magnet for wars? You would think middle eastern folk would themselves purge Al Qaeda just for the sake of their own safety.

    sg, I’m not sure you realize how AQ is perceived by their local supporters. We don’t have an analogue here in the US. In a lot of ways they handle the functions of government in their areas – they get money for schools, handle ‘health care’, are the police force, etc. In many instances they are far less corrupt than the country’s official government.

    For us, AQ is a foreign enemy, for them AQ is their cousin, son, brother, school friend, admired town mayor, etc. They are also typically supported and tied in with the local mosques – it would be like your pastor and elders giving strong support to to your cousin within a small town.

    AQ is very popular locally for a LOT of reasons.

    Then, your cousin starts working for the town council which is also working to fight your (vague) enemies a long ways away. Then that (vague and far away) enemy sends in a missile in the night and blows up his house, along with his wife (with whom you are friends) and their kids (whom you’ve babysat several times and are good friends with your kids).

    At that point, the most obvious reaction for everyone is to wake up and realize that your cousin, his wife, and children were all bad people and more or less deserved their fate because they should have driven off your cousin. Yup, that’s the obvious reaction everyone would have.

    There’s no possible way they might get angry at the foreign enemy who just killed your family and friends, and there’s no possible way that those feelings could ever build up over time, or that every death that the foreign and faceless enemy causes builds up deep and unrelenting hatred for that foreign enemy and a determination to not kneel down to the foreigners but to rather resist in any way possible.

    Nope. No chance at all. That would never happen.


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