The first Lutheran president

Both Joe Carter and Sarah Pulliam Bailey note this article by Doyle McManus in the Los Angeles Times on the end of the mainline Protestant domination of the American presidency.  But what I take from it is the prospect that we could theoretically be getting the first Lutheran president!  That would be Michele Bachman, if she runs and if she wins.  (And aren’t Lutherans mainline Protestants, just the only ones that still hold to a Biblical orthodoxy?)

Of the 44 U.S. presidents, all but a handful have been affiliated with a relatively narrow list of traditional Protestant denominations.

Eleven were Episcopalians (12 if you count Thomas Jefferson, whose adult beliefs are a subject of debate), eight were Presbyterians, four were Methodists and four were Baptists. Others included Congregationalists, Dutch Reformed and Disciples of Christ.

President Obama attended Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, a congregation with traditional Protestant roots despite its untraditional pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. In Washington, Obama has attended services at mostly black Protestant churches.

The only chief executive whose roots were clearly outside that mainstream tradition was John F. Kennedy, a Roman Catholic.

But among the leading candidates for this year’s Republican presidential nomination, not one is a member of the Protestant denominations that for so long have dominated American political culture.

Two of the potential candidates are Mormons (former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr.); one is a member of an interdenominational evangelical church (former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty); two others are Catholics (former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Sen. Rick Santorum). Rep. Michele Bachmann, who says she’s considering the race, worships at an evangelical Lutheran church; if elected, she’d be the first Lutheran president.

But no matter who wins from this list, it won’t be an Episcopalian, a Presbyterian or a Methodist.

via Doyle McManus: Religion and politics in America – latimes.com.

What does this mean?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Pete

    Imminent rapture.

  • Pete

    Imminent rapture.

  • Jonathan

    I heard she has left WELS over the Confession of the AntiChrist being the Bishop of Rome. Wohin geht sie?

  • Jonathan

    I heard she has left WELS over the Confession of the AntiChrist being the Bishop of Rome. Wohin geht sie?

  • http://www.thirduse.com FWS

    I heard that too! I also heard that she was worshipping at some non denominational church now.

    Anyone here can confirm any of this?

  • http://www.thirduse.com FWS

    I heard that too! I also heard that she was worshipping at some non denominational church now.

    Anyone here can confirm any of this?

  • Jeremy

    I’m just curious, suppose I went in to your average Lutheran, Presbyterian, Methodist, or Baptist congregation, and took our your average member, and said I’m just going to ask you a few very basic questions on how your denomination differs from other protestants, how do you think that person would do?

  • Jeremy

    I’m just curious, suppose I went in to your average Lutheran, Presbyterian, Methodist, or Baptist congregation, and took our your average member, and said I’m just going to ask you a few very basic questions on how your denomination differs from other protestants, how do you think that person would do?

  • SAL

    Americans of this era are fundamentally a different people than Americans prior to the 1960′s.

    We’re ethnically and religiously a different sort of nation than existed in America from 1840-1960.

    America had such shifts in the 1830′s (Catholic immigration, Second Great Awakening) that caused disconitinuity with 1630-1830.

  • SAL

    Americans of this era are fundamentally a different people than Americans prior to the 1960′s.

    We’re ethnically and religiously a different sort of nation than existed in America from 1840-1960.

    America had such shifts in the 1830′s (Catholic immigration, Second Great Awakening) that caused disconitinuity with 1630-1830.

  • http://esgetology.com Christopher Esget

    One of my parishioners works for Rep. Bachman, and she told me last week that Rep. Bachman no longer is a member of her former WELS congregation, having joined a non-denominational church.

  • http://esgetology.com Christopher Esget

    One of my parishioners works for Rep. Bachman, and she told me last week that Rep. Bachman no longer is a member of her former WELS congregation, having joined a non-denominational church.

  • Carl Vehse

    The first President in the United States of America WAS a Lutheran (and PK) – John Hanson (1715-1783), who was elected in 1781. Strictly speaking, his title was “President of the Continental Congress” under the Articles of Confederation, since it was only in 1789 with the new U.S. Constitution that the executive office of the President of the United States was established.

  • Carl Vehse

    The first President in the United States of America WAS a Lutheran (and PK) – John Hanson (1715-1783), who was elected in 1781. Strictly speaking, his title was “President of the Continental Congress” under the Articles of Confederation, since it was only in 1789 with the new U.S. Constitution that the executive office of the President of the United States was established.

  • SKPeterson

    Pr. Esget,

    Has your parishioner discussed the Council of Trent with Rep. Bachmann? She lost lots of credibility with me when she jumped ship over the silly little canard of papal anti-Christ-ness. If she can jettison what should be central,core beliefs over such a throw-away accusation, I’m not sure she has the mettle to be President.

  • SKPeterson

    Pr. Esget,

    Has your parishioner discussed the Council of Trent with Rep. Bachmann? She lost lots of credibility with me when she jumped ship over the silly little canard of papal anti-Christ-ness. If she can jettison what should be central,core beliefs over such a throw-away accusation, I’m not sure she has the mettle to be President.

  • Jonathan

    I’m curious, what kind of apologetic could a Lutheran politician make for the confession of the antichrist? Obviously, Rep. Bachmann cut and ran. Was that the only thing she could have done?

  • Jonathan

    I’m curious, what kind of apologetic could a Lutheran politician make for the confession of the antichrist? Obviously, Rep. Bachmann cut and ran. Was that the only thing she could have done?

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    As of three months or so ago, my information indicated that Michelle Bachmann was still a member of a WELS congregation. I haven’t heard anything about a change in status since then.

    But I can’t help but wonder how often she could manage to attend services in her home congregation with the schedule she keeps, even if she never changed membership.

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    As of three months or so ago, my information indicated that Michelle Bachmann was still a member of a WELS congregation. I haven’t heard anything about a change in status since then.

    But I can’t help but wonder how often she could manage to attend services in her home congregation with the schedule she keeps, even if she never changed membership.

  • Carl Vehse

    Oh, and John Hanson was elected unanimously by the Continental Congress, which included George Washington.

    No unanimous vote from the electoral college has since occurred, although James Monroe got 231 votes to Rufus King’s 1 vote in 1816; Franklin Roosevelt got 523 votes to Alf Landon’s 8 in 1936; and Ronald Reagan got 525 votes to Walter Mondale’s 13 in 1984.

  • Carl Vehse

    Oh, and John Hanson was elected unanimously by the Continental Congress, which included George Washington.

    No unanimous vote from the electoral college has since occurred, although James Monroe got 231 votes to Rufus King’s 1 vote in 1816; Franklin Roosevelt got 523 votes to Alf Landon’s 8 in 1936; and Ronald Reagan got 525 votes to Walter Mondale’s 13 in 1984.

  • Carl Vehse

    That the pope is the Antichrist is part of the Lutheran Confessions and not, as regarded by Romanists, quatenus Lufauxrans, and others, a “silly little canard.”

  • Carl Vehse

    That the pope is the Antichrist is part of the Lutheran Confessions and not, as regarded by Romanists, quatenus Lufauxrans, and others, a “silly little canard.”

  • Jonathan

    Carl, agreed. But how’s it going to play in Peoria?

  • Jonathan

    Carl, agreed. But how’s it going to play in Peoria?

  • Christopher S. Esget

    SKPeterson,

    I fear that to say much more would break a confidence. The matter runs deeper than the Antichrist issue.

  • Christopher S. Esget

    SKPeterson,

    I fear that to say much more would break a confidence. The matter runs deeper than the Antichrist issue.

  • http://matthaeusglyptes.blogspot.com matthaeus glyptes

    Don’t forget Muhlenberg, the “president” before US presidents began to be.

  • http://matthaeusglyptes.blogspot.com matthaeus glyptes

    Don’t forget Muhlenberg, the “president” before US presidents began to be.

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    Pr. Esget’s information is obviously more recent and accurate than mine! I had heard Bachmann might be considering joining a non-WELS Lutheran church; I’m sorry, but not surprised, to hear she’s apparently going non-denom.

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    Pr. Esget’s information is obviously more recent and accurate than mine! I had heard Bachmann might be considering joining a non-WELS Lutheran church; I’m sorry, but not surprised, to hear she’s apparently going non-denom.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    If she really doesn’t think the Pope is the Anti Christ, why did she not become Catholic? It is absolutely ridiculous to break with a Lutheran church over that, and join another protestant church body, who may not call the Pope the anti Christ word for word, but still refuses to acknowledge him. And a non-denominational church at that? It is interesting because most I know or have run into in non-denominational churches refuse to even acknowledge the Catholic church as Christian, and the members there of for that matter.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    If she really doesn’t think the Pope is the Anti Christ, why did she not become Catholic? It is absolutely ridiculous to break with a Lutheran church over that, and join another protestant church body, who may not call the Pope the anti Christ word for word, but still refuses to acknowledge him. And a non-denominational church at that? It is interesting because most I know or have run into in non-denominational churches refuse to even acknowledge the Catholic church as Christian, and the members there of for that matter.

  • http://matthaeusglyptes.blogspot.com matthaeus glyptes

    Or maybe I’m confusing Muhlenberg with Hanson, whom Carl names above.

  • http://matthaeusglyptes.blogspot.com matthaeus glyptes

    Or maybe I’m confusing Muhlenberg with Hanson, whom Carl names above.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Carl,
    I see a lot of Lutheran pages claiming Hanson was a Lutheran. I also see a lot of pages claiming he was a black man…. is there anything like church records to back up the claim that he was Lutheran?

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    Carl,
    I see a lot of Lutheran pages claiming Hanson was a Lutheran. I also see a lot of pages claiming he was a black man…. is there anything like church records to back up the claim that he was Lutheran?

  • Jon

    @16 Pr. Samuelson, I’m curious why you’re not suprised Bachamann joined a non-denominal church. I was in the WELS years ago; my experience, for what it’s worth, was that those who left first went to other synods. Shouldn’t you have expected Bachmann to go to Missouri? That she didn’t makes me think her objection to the Pope = AntiChrist belief in Lutheranism is real.

  • Jon

    @16 Pr. Samuelson, I’m curious why you’re not suprised Bachamann joined a non-denominal church. I was in the WELS years ago; my experience, for what it’s worth, was that those who left first went to other synods. Shouldn’t you have expected Bachmann to go to Missouri? That she didn’t makes me think her objection to the Pope = AntiChrist belief in Lutheranism is real.

  • SKPeterson

    The silly little canard is that the condemnations of the papacy are held to be controversial, or that they should be viewed as controversial by a Lutheran, or even thought of as a “political” issue. That Ms. Bachmann could not answer such a question is sad, but understandable, but how attending a non-denominational protestant church evades such as position is beyond me. She could just as easily said that the position of WELS was shared by the LCMS (maybe the ELCA, but who knows what they believe anymore), the Presbyterians, the Reformed and probably a large swathe of what is modern American evangelical Protestantism, as well as being supported by statements from the Eastern Orthodox. To which, what if she was Orthodox and she was asked about the anathemas that led to the Great Schism? Would she have automatically and blithely abandoned her Orthodox faith? My guess is that non-denominational churches are political safe-havens for Republicans – conveniently “conservative,” but also generic and bland, without any hard and fast beliefs that might be questioned by a reporter.

  • SKPeterson

    The silly little canard is that the condemnations of the papacy are held to be controversial, or that they should be viewed as controversial by a Lutheran, or even thought of as a “political” issue. That Ms. Bachmann could not answer such a question is sad, but understandable, but how attending a non-denominational protestant church evades such as position is beyond me. She could just as easily said that the position of WELS was shared by the LCMS (maybe the ELCA, but who knows what they believe anymore), the Presbyterians, the Reformed and probably a large swathe of what is modern American evangelical Protestantism, as well as being supported by statements from the Eastern Orthodox. To which, what if she was Orthodox and she was asked about the anathemas that led to the Great Schism? Would she have automatically and blithely abandoned her Orthodox faith? My guess is that non-denominational churches are political safe-havens for Republicans – conveniently “conservative,” but also generic and bland, without any hard and fast beliefs that might be questioned by a reporter.

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    @20 Jon — The reason I’m not surprised at Bachmann’s move to a non-denominational church is because since she first starting getting national attention (and I became aware of her) I’ve seen the occasional news reports of her speaking at this evangelical church or joining with that non-denominational group or using the non-Lutheran religious language of conservative Christianity. In other words, I hadn’t seen her acting much in a way that suggests to me that placed a high value on being Lutheran (at least not confessionally so).

    And there’s also the matter of the two kingdoms doctrine we Lutherans are known for. Bachmann was encouraged, in the WELS, to simply keep her religious views separate from her politics — but to rally the evangelical right behind her or her issues she’s going to need to talk their talk and walk their walk (and keeping the two kingdoms distinct is not a noted part of their worldview).

    I also wouldn’t be surprised — and this is total speculation on my part — if WELS and even LCMS teaching on the roles of men and women could have made her uncomfortable remaining among our ranks. The non-denominational/evangelical world is generally a lot more open to and comfortable with women holding powerful positions and exercising authority over men in society (so long as they’re not liberal women, of course!).

    But I do have to say I was wondering a few months ago what effect it would have had on the WELS and confessional Lutheranism in general to have one of our own as a major candidate for national office. I guess we’re not going to find out this time around.

  • http://www.christlutheran.net Jeff Samelson

    @20 Jon — The reason I’m not surprised at Bachmann’s move to a non-denominational church is because since she first starting getting national attention (and I became aware of her) I’ve seen the occasional news reports of her speaking at this evangelical church or joining with that non-denominational group or using the non-Lutheran religious language of conservative Christianity. In other words, I hadn’t seen her acting much in a way that suggests to me that placed a high value on being Lutheran (at least not confessionally so).

    And there’s also the matter of the two kingdoms doctrine we Lutherans are known for. Bachmann was encouraged, in the WELS, to simply keep her religious views separate from her politics — but to rally the evangelical right behind her or her issues she’s going to need to talk their talk and walk their walk (and keeping the two kingdoms distinct is not a noted part of their worldview).

    I also wouldn’t be surprised — and this is total speculation on my part — if WELS and even LCMS teaching on the roles of men and women could have made her uncomfortable remaining among our ranks. The non-denominational/evangelical world is generally a lot more open to and comfortable with women holding powerful positions and exercising authority over men in society (so long as they’re not liberal women, of course!).

    But I do have to say I was wondering a few months ago what effect it would have had on the WELS and confessional Lutheranism in general to have one of our own as a major candidate for national office. I guess we’re not going to find out this time around.

  • Carl Vehse

    Matthaeus, Frederick Muhlenberg, son of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (founder of the Lutheran Church in America) and brother to Peter Muhlenberg (Lutheran Minister and Continental Army General), was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives under the new U.S. Constitution.

    Bror, there are a number of internet sites that list Hanson as Lutheran, although none that I’ve found indicate what church he attended in Maryland.

    The Wikipedia lists Hanson’s father’s occupation as a planter and later political office holder, not as Lutheran pastor, as sites do. It also claims Hanson’s ancestry as English. Another site I found claims Hanson was of Swedish ancestry. His burial site is apparently unknown.

    There appears to be another historical person named “John Hanson” who was black.

  • Carl Vehse

    Matthaeus, Frederick Muhlenberg, son of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (founder of the Lutheran Church in America) and brother to Peter Muhlenberg (Lutheran Minister and Continental Army General), was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives under the new U.S. Constitution.

    Bror, there are a number of internet sites that list Hanson as Lutheran, although none that I’ve found indicate what church he attended in Maryland.

    The Wikipedia lists Hanson’s father’s occupation as a planter and later political office holder, not as Lutheran pastor, as sites do. It also claims Hanson’s ancestry as English. Another site I found claims Hanson was of Swedish ancestry. His burial site is apparently unknown.

    There appears to be another historical person named “John Hanson” who was black.

  • Jonathan

    SKP @21,
    I think if she gave that answer you suggest, which is technically correct, she would be toast. To suggest that everyone in Christendom outside RC shares that view would make her a zealot and she might as well pack up and enjoy the rest of her term. It’s just not going to play well in Peoria.

  • Jonathan

    SKP @21,
    I think if she gave that answer you suggest, which is technically correct, she would be toast. To suggest that everyone in Christendom outside RC shares that view would make her a zealot and she might as well pack up and enjoy the rest of her term. It’s just not going to play well in Peoria.

  • Carl Vehse

    From the Christian Post‘s “Interview: Michele Bachmann on Faith, Family“:

    “I was born into a Christian family and brought up in a Lutheran church. My faith has been the center point of my life, really, since I was a child, but at 16 years of age, I fully surrendered my life over to Christ. At that point, as a teenager, I began to grasp the concept of Christ’s true love and forgiveness.

    “First of all, I would point to the teachings of Jesus Christ and to the Old and New Testaments. Furthermore, when my husband and I were in college we were influenced by Dr. Francis Schaeffer’s “How Should We Then Live?” He was one of the greatest philosophers of the last century. I also enjoy listening to Ravi Zacharias.”

    That all doesn’t sound very Lutheranish-like to me.

    BTW, Bachmann did not answer the last question of the interview: “If you choose to not pursue the presidency, what would you think about a Sarah Palin attempt?”

  • Carl Vehse

    From the Christian Post‘s “Interview: Michele Bachmann on Faith, Family“:

    “I was born into a Christian family and brought up in a Lutheran church. My faith has been the center point of my life, really, since I was a child, but at 16 years of age, I fully surrendered my life over to Christ. At that point, as a teenager, I began to grasp the concept of Christ’s true love and forgiveness.

    “First of all, I would point to the teachings of Jesus Christ and to the Old and New Testaments. Furthermore, when my husband and I were in college we were influenced by Dr. Francis Schaeffer’s “How Should We Then Live?” He was one of the greatest philosophers of the last century. I also enjoy listening to Ravi Zacharias.”

    That all doesn’t sound very Lutheranish-like to me.

    BTW, Bachmann did not answer the last question of the interview: “If you choose to not pursue the presidency, what would you think about a Sarah Palin attempt?”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    SK (@21), you hit on the idea I had: politicians would probably prefer being members of a church with as little written, public doctrine as possible, for the simple reason that this would hinder opposition research.

    Non-denominational churches fit this bill quite nicely, often with no more written confession than what can be found on a Web site (and Web sites are easily edited, if need be). Opposition researchers would have to attend a politician’s church frequently to find out what “dirt” there was to act on. The Mormon church, with their not-so-public doctrine, would also be a nice cover.

    (Confessional) Lutherans, with their easily-verified public beliefs, are fairly easily targeted for any topic that might be controversial in the day. And let’s face it, calling the Pope the anti-Christ sounds remarkably controversial, mostly because (1) most people’s ideas of the anti-Christ are informed by Evangelicals (cf. Left Behind and Chick tracts), being some Satanic, evil guy, and (2) it easily lends itself to the charge of Catholic-bashing (Bill Donohue, are your ears burning?). It would take far more effort to explain that position than it would to spread like wildfire among a religiously ignorant public.

    Oddly, Catholics probably get a pass on the whole issue, since there are so many of them and they rarely agree on anything. I mean, both former candidate John Kerry and current candidate Santorum both belong to the same church. Who’s going to bother holding their feet to the same fire?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    SK (@21), you hit on the idea I had: politicians would probably prefer being members of a church with as little written, public doctrine as possible, for the simple reason that this would hinder opposition research.

    Non-denominational churches fit this bill quite nicely, often with no more written confession than what can be found on a Web site (and Web sites are easily edited, if need be). Opposition researchers would have to attend a politician’s church frequently to find out what “dirt” there was to act on. The Mormon church, with their not-so-public doctrine, would also be a nice cover.

    (Confessional) Lutherans, with their easily-verified public beliefs, are fairly easily targeted for any topic that might be controversial in the day. And let’s face it, calling the Pope the anti-Christ sounds remarkably controversial, mostly because (1) most people’s ideas of the anti-Christ are informed by Evangelicals (cf. Left Behind and Chick tracts), being some Satanic, evil guy, and (2) it easily lends itself to the charge of Catholic-bashing (Bill Donohue, are your ears burning?). It would take far more effort to explain that position than it would to spread like wildfire among a religiously ignorant public.

    Oddly, Catholics probably get a pass on the whole issue, since there are so many of them and they rarely agree on anything. I mean, both former candidate John Kerry and current candidate Santorum both belong to the same church. Who’s going to bother holding their feet to the same fire?

  • Jon

    Bachmann’s decision to leave WELS, though, makes me wonder if Lutherans shouldn’t rethink Pope = AntiChrist, or at least extend the label to, say, the head of the So. Baptist Convention or the Archbishop of Canterbury. I think this is what happens when denominations stand on statements of faith or confessions that were written in the 16th c. and reflect the politics of that era.

  • Jon

    Bachmann’s decision to leave WELS, though, makes me wonder if Lutherans shouldn’t rethink Pope = AntiChrist, or at least extend the label to, say, the head of the So. Baptist Convention or the Archbishop of Canterbury. I think this is what happens when denominations stand on statements of faith or confessions that were written in the 16th c. and reflect the politics of that era.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Jon (@27), your comment makes me think you’re not aware of what informs the doctrine of the Pope being the Antichrist. It’s not merely that we disagree with him, or that he holds to false doctrine, or else your suggestion might make more sense. It has to do with specific doctrines of the Catholic church and specific passages from Scripture. I’m sure you can find more information on that from a Lutheran source.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Jon (@27), your comment makes me think you’re not aware of what informs the doctrine of the Pope being the Antichrist. It’s not merely that we disagree with him, or that he holds to false doctrine, or else your suggestion might make more sense. It has to do with specific doctrines of the Catholic church and specific passages from Scripture. I’m sure you can find more information on that from a Lutheran source.

  • Jon

    @27, tODD, I appreciate the suggestion.

  • Jon

    @27, tODD, I appreciate the suggestion.

  • Dan Kempin

    I suspect she left the WELS because in order to keep their doctrine on fellowship, she would not have been able to accept votes from non WELS members.

  • Dan Kempin

    I suspect she left the WELS because in order to keep their doctrine on fellowship, she would not have been able to accept votes from non WELS members.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@30), perhaps some sort of indicator would be helpful to others in knowing that you were in no way being serious.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@30), perhaps some sort of indicator would be helpful to others in knowing that you were in no way being serious.

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #31,

    I was pausing for comedic effect, expecting some chuckles in response, but perhaps I was wrong to assume that everyone would recognize my absurdity as absurdity. In any case, my jibe was in good fun and with the highest respect.

    (Plus maybe I took the gratuitous opportunity to crack wise about conservative fellowship issues where the Missouri Synod was not the butt of the joke.)

    I hope this doesn’t compromise our blog fellowship.

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #31,

    I was pausing for comedic effect, expecting some chuckles in response, but perhaps I was wrong to assume that everyone would recognize my absurdity as absurdity. In any case, my jibe was in good fun and with the highest respect.

    (Plus maybe I took the gratuitous opportunity to crack wise about conservative fellowship issues where the Missouri Synod was not the butt of the joke.)

    I hope this doesn’t compromise our blog fellowship.

  • Jonathan

    Would Gingrich cut and run from the RCC over a question on the anathemas in Trent? Wouldn’t he risk losing all of protestantism if he said he affirmed Trent.

  • Jonathan

    Would Gingrich cut and run from the RCC over a question on the anathemas in Trent? Wouldn’t he risk losing all of protestantism if he said he affirmed Trent.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    “I hope this doesn’t compromise our blog fellowship.” Oh, Dan (@32)! That made me smile.

    Of course, it is so like an LCMSer to throw an adjective in front of the word “fellowship” and claim that it is a perfectly legitimate, and distinct, form of fellowship, with its own set of rules and all that. ;)

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    “I hope this doesn’t compromise our blog fellowship.” Oh, Dan (@32)! That made me smile.

    Of course, it is so like an LCMSer to throw an adjective in front of the word “fellowship” and claim that it is a perfectly legitimate, and distinct, form of fellowship, with its own set of rules and all that. ;)

  • http://www.abookofeverything.blogspot.com Brian

    Hello Blog of Veith,

    I am a Catholic deacon in NJ – with Lutheran roots. I watched Michele Bachman last night on the CNN debate – I think she is fabulous – and will make a fine president! God bless her!!!

    Deacon Brian

  • http://www.abookofeverything.blogspot.com Brian

    Hello Blog of Veith,

    I am a Catholic deacon in NJ – with Lutheran roots. I watched Michele Bachman last night on the CNN debate – I think she is fabulous – and will make a fine president! God bless her!!!

    Deacon Brian


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