Any Kindle suggestions?

I’m becoming a regular high-tech kind of guy, though at least I’m a late adopter.  I now have a Kindle.  (My wife wanted one for Mother’s Day, so I obliged, whereupon since I was always borrowing hers, she bought me one for Father’s Day.  Our devices are hooked up to the same account so that when either of us buy a book it is “archived” on the other’s device, allowing us to download each other’s books for free.)  I carry around with me some 22 books and they don’t weigh a thing.  That makes it great for the traveling I have been doing lately.  The device will even read the book aloud to you, in a technology I do not understand.  (If anyone does, please explain it to me.  Also explain how the voice feature on my GPS device–see!  more technology!–works.)  That makes it a good treadmill companion, helping me not be  so bored as I pursue physical health.  Then I learned that I can increase the size of the type so that I can read it myself on the treadmill.

I can’t say I don’t prefer paper, but I’ve gotten used to reading on the Kindle.  In addition to reading what I consider “fun” books, I have downloaded some great classics for free or nearly so, including volumes of the complete works of G. K. Chesterton (one of my favorite writers of all time, but who has written lots of stuff I haven’t read yet) and Agatha Christie.  Also the complete Sherlock Holmes stories.  And I love my The Lutheran Study Bible on Kindle, which is set up so that you simply click the passages to read the notes, all in big and readable print.  Also my Treasury of Daily Prayer.  (Click the links to get them yourself.)

Many writers are finding that they can make their books available through Kindle directly without going through a publisher, taking all of the money themselves while also making their books cheaper for their readers.  The problem is, a publisher vets books, keeping out those that are unreadable, and also makes people aware of them.  It’s thus hard to know about worthy books that are electronically published, except by word of mouth.   So let’s have some word of mouth.

What are some good Kindle titles that you would recommend?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Jack K

    I have CONCORDIA The Lutheran Confessions and LUTHER’S SMALL CATECHISM.

    Do you also have the Kindle App on your iPhone and PC? The app is free and you’ll have everything that’s on your Kindle available to you, on those items and more.

  • Jack K

    I have CONCORDIA The Lutheran Confessions and LUTHER’S SMALL CATECHISM.

    Do you also have the Kindle App on your iPhone and PC? The app is free and you’ll have everything that’s on your Kindle available to you, on those items and more.

  • SKPeterson

    I would suggest the Online Library of Liberty site, as one source. They have a lot of the classics of philosophy and religion available in ePub format.

  • SKPeterson

    I would suggest the Online Library of Liberty site, as one source. They have a lot of the classics of philosophy and religion available in ePub format.

  • Susan

    Our family has Nooks instead of Kindles. We have saved a great deal of money purchasing classics this way for schoolwork since more than one person can read the same book at the same time on different devices. The fact that Kindles were not open to library lending and Epub at the time were big factors in our decision.

    I continue to look for my favorite Veith books so that we can purchase them for our Nooks. This spring I had to purchase a hard copy of the new edition of The Spirituality of the Cross for my children to read when I couldn’t find it on the Nook.

    I have purchased some ePub books but none that I would recommend so far.

  • Susan

    Our family has Nooks instead of Kindles. We have saved a great deal of money purchasing classics this way for schoolwork since more than one person can read the same book at the same time on different devices. The fact that Kindles were not open to library lending and Epub at the time were big factors in our decision.

    I continue to look for my favorite Veith books so that we can purchase them for our Nooks. This spring I had to purchase a hard copy of the new edition of The Spirituality of the Cross for my children to read when I couldn’t find it on the Nook.

    I have purchased some ePub books but none that I would recommend so far.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    Make sure to check out the “Free e-book collections” section in Amazon’s Kindle store (you probably know this already). Guttenberg.com is only one of the sources for free books in the public domain. Formatting problems are, alas, common, but a reasonably intelligent reader can get through them.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    Make sure to check out the “Free e-book collections” section in Amazon’s Kindle store (you probably know this already). Guttenberg.com is only one of the sources for free books in the public domain. Formatting problems are, alas, common, but a reasonably intelligent reader can get through them.

  • Rev. F. Bischoff

    I suggest checking out their free books. I have enjoyed reading the classics again — like “Moby Dick” and “Silas Marner.”

  • Rev. F. Bischoff

    I suggest checking out their free books. I have enjoyed reading the classics again — like “Moby Dick” and “Silas Marner.”

  • Booklover

    I ordered that precise Kindle just two days ago for my husband’s birthday, which is next week, because he asked for one. I’d been wanting a Kindle ever since I lost 2000 books when our basement was filled to the brim in last year’s Father’s Day flood. So now I’ll read my husband’s. And we’ll stick this one just under the main floor ceiling.

    GK was the first guy I was going to download on it, too. :-)

    Is there anything else that one should purchase with a Kindle? Does one need a cover? They seem relatively expensive compared to the device itself. Can written music be downloaded onto a Kindle?

  • Booklover

    I ordered that precise Kindle just two days ago for my husband’s birthday, which is next week, because he asked for one. I’d been wanting a Kindle ever since I lost 2000 books when our basement was filled to the brim in last year’s Father’s Day flood. So now I’ll read my husband’s. And we’ll stick this one just under the main floor ceiling.

    GK was the first guy I was going to download on it, too. :-)

    Is there anything else that one should purchase with a Kindle? Does one need a cover? They seem relatively expensive compared to the device itself. Can written music be downloaded onto a Kindle?

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I recommend getting a cover. Kindles are fairly rugged, but you can’t drop them too many times (and the screen is especially liable to get damaged). My brother delighted in slipping his in his back pocket, until he sat down forgetting it was there, and cracked the screen. When he replaced it, he bought a cover and stopped using the pocket.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I recommend getting a cover. Kindles are fairly rugged, but you can’t drop them too many times (and the screen is especially liable to get damaged). My brother delighted in slipping his in his back pocket, until he sat down forgetting it was there, and cracked the screen. When he replaced it, he bought a cover and stopped using the pocket.

  • Mark Latham

    I have book from some well known Christian writer called “Spirituality of the Cross” Do you know him? Ha Ha

  • Mark Latham

    I have book from some well known Christian writer called “Spirituality of the Cross” Do you know him? Ha Ha

  • Helen F

    Here’s one I would like to get, but have to first get the Kindle:
    “Luther’s Last Battles” by Mark Edwards. Here’s one Amazon review:
    This book takes an extraordinarily unique approach to the discussion of the polemics of the “old man” Luther. Edwards proposes that many of the contemporary interpretations, of Luther’s motivating psychological disposition as shaping the polemical work of the latter part of his life, from 1530 on, are incorrect. He insistently urges readers to put aside the pre-established views promulgated by Erik Erikson and his Crones- that “young man” Luther’s troubled childhood had created a sort of ill-crazed, schizophrenic “old man.” Edwards consistently takes a contextual, historical, and political approach to his very extensive interpretation of Luther’s post 1530 polemics, minimizing Luther’s mental and physical conditions.
    “Luther’s Last Battles” contains extensive interpretation of several of these latter polemical tracts. It is a task that few, if any, historians have undertaken. This being the case, it has allowed Edwards the freedom to promulgate his specific bent on the motivating drive of “old man” Luther.
    Edwards ultimately concludes, that by approaching Luther’s works through his new approach, it becomes clear that he had indeed carried strong political and theological convictions. His vulgarity and apocalyptic rhetoric were ultimately a result of the surrounding circumstances of sixteenth century society in the midst of the first Reformation.

    Edwards’s work deserves the highest praise. A reader ultimately gains an appreciation for the difficulty of such an analytical task. He has continually and effectively stressed the political motivation and interests in Luther’s polemics. By attempting to provide a fresh outlook on the elder Luther, a task not often undertaken, Edwards has created an important new method for historians to use in evaluating polemical literature of the past. In so doing, he has demonstrated that the most complete evaluation of a person’s persona and driving forces may be done only through historical contextual evaluation of primary sources. Goodbye Erik Erikson, Mark Edwards is here to stay!

  • Helen F

    Here’s one I would like to get, but have to first get the Kindle:
    “Luther’s Last Battles” by Mark Edwards. Here’s one Amazon review:
    This book takes an extraordinarily unique approach to the discussion of the polemics of the “old man” Luther. Edwards proposes that many of the contemporary interpretations, of Luther’s motivating psychological disposition as shaping the polemical work of the latter part of his life, from 1530 on, are incorrect. He insistently urges readers to put aside the pre-established views promulgated by Erik Erikson and his Crones- that “young man” Luther’s troubled childhood had created a sort of ill-crazed, schizophrenic “old man.” Edwards consistently takes a contextual, historical, and political approach to his very extensive interpretation of Luther’s post 1530 polemics, minimizing Luther’s mental and physical conditions.
    “Luther’s Last Battles” contains extensive interpretation of several of these latter polemical tracts. It is a task that few, if any, historians have undertaken. This being the case, it has allowed Edwards the freedom to promulgate his specific bent on the motivating drive of “old man” Luther.
    Edwards ultimately concludes, that by approaching Luther’s works through his new approach, it becomes clear that he had indeed carried strong political and theological convictions. His vulgarity and apocalyptic rhetoric were ultimately a result of the surrounding circumstances of sixteenth century society in the midst of the first Reformation.

    Edwards’s work deserves the highest praise. A reader ultimately gains an appreciation for the difficulty of such an analytical task. He has continually and effectively stressed the political motivation and interests in Luther’s polemics. By attempting to provide a fresh outlook on the elder Luther, a task not often undertaken, Edwards has created an important new method for historians to use in evaluating polemical literature of the past. In so doing, he has demonstrated that the most complete evaluation of a person’s persona and driving forces may be done only through historical contextual evaluation of primary sources. Goodbye Erik Erikson, Mark Edwards is here to stay!

  • http://theplugers.wordpress.com Chris Pluger

    Touchstone: A Journal of Mere Christianity is now available as a Kindle download subscription. Its unique perspective on Christianity and current topics is well worth the $1.99/month.

    http://www.amazon.com/Touchstone/dp/B0057OOYX8/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1311178136&sr=1-1

  • http://theplugers.wordpress.com Chris Pluger

    Touchstone: A Journal of Mere Christianity is now available as a Kindle download subscription. Its unique perspective on Christianity and current topics is well worth the $1.99/month.

    http://www.amazon.com/Touchstone/dp/B0057OOYX8/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1311178136&sr=1-1

  • Ash

    http://fkbt.wordpress.com/ is a good blog to check daily – lists Kindle books available for free, often for only a day or so. A lot of the free books don’t interest me, but it’s easy to take a quick look at what’s there, and I’ve gotten a number of good Christian books there.

    Also http://www.manybooks.net/ is a good library of free books you can download, and http://puritanlibrary.com/ is a great collection of free puritan books for download.

    And if you really like a particular classic author, the MobileReference collections (available at Amazon) are more than worth it – all the works of an author for $5.00 (say 200+ works of Dickens or 100+ works of Kipling). It’s easier to manage on your Kindle than getting the individual books for free (and harder to find poem and essay collections for some authors for free, like for Milton or Kipling), and they are much, much better formatted for the Kindle than the free versions.

    I love my Kindle :)

  • Ash

    http://fkbt.wordpress.com/ is a good blog to check daily – lists Kindle books available for free, often for only a day or so. A lot of the free books don’t interest me, but it’s easy to take a quick look at what’s there, and I’ve gotten a number of good Christian books there.

    Also http://www.manybooks.net/ is a good library of free books you can download, and http://puritanlibrary.com/ is a great collection of free puritan books for download.

    And if you really like a particular classic author, the MobileReference collections (available at Amazon) are more than worth it – all the works of an author for $5.00 (say 200+ works of Dickens or 100+ works of Kipling). It’s easier to manage on your Kindle than getting the individual books for free (and harder to find poem and essay collections for some authors for free, like for Milton or Kipling), and they are much, much better formatted for the Kindle than the free versions.

    I love my Kindle :)

  • Jerry Roseleip

    Lars @ 7: My cover has a light that pulls out of the corner. It is a great tool for reading in the airplane at night!

    Dr. Veith, I agree that it does not replace bound books but the Kindle sure is easier to carry when it comes to traveling. I need to spend more time figuring out how to search a book on the kindle. I enjoyed “The Gift and the Defender”( T. Emmett Bramley) and Klemet Preus’ “The Fire and the Staff”. I am now reading Luther’s “A Treatise on Good Works”.

  • Jerry Roseleip

    Lars @ 7: My cover has a light that pulls out of the corner. It is a great tool for reading in the airplane at night!

    Dr. Veith, I agree that it does not replace bound books but the Kindle sure is easier to carry when it comes to traveling. I need to spend more time figuring out how to search a book on the kindle. I enjoyed “The Gift and the Defender”( T. Emmett Bramley) and Klemet Preus’ “The Fire and the Staff”. I am now reading Luther’s “A Treatise on Good Works”.

  • Matthew Vander Jagt

    Check out the free e-book downloads available on monergism.com.

  • Matthew Vander Jagt

    Check out the free e-book downloads available on monergism.com.

  • Frank Dent

    I read The Hammer of God with Kindle Reader on my iPad. Just bought a Kenneth Bailey book published by CPH for Kindle after hearing an Issues Etc. rebroadcast of an interview on Jesus’ use of parables. I read this blog using free WIFI on the commuter rail every day. So, I’m hooked.

  • Frank Dent

    I read The Hammer of God with Kindle Reader on my iPad. Just bought a Kenneth Bailey book published by CPH for Kindle after hearing an Issues Etc. rebroadcast of an interview on Jesus’ use of parables. I read this blog using free WIFI on the commuter rail every day. So, I’m hooked.

  • http://www.imajinbooks.com Cheryl Tardif

    You may enjoy some of our titles. We’re a new publisher of ebooks and print, and currently all our ebooks are priced at $3 or less (until July 31st). We have something for everyone, including bestsellers and award winners.

    http://www.imajinbooks.com

  • http://www.imajinbooks.com Cheryl Tardif

    You may enjoy some of our titles. We’re a new publisher of ebooks and print, and currently all our ebooks are priced at $3 or less (until July 31st). We have something for everyone, including bestsellers and award winners.

    http://www.imajinbooks.com

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    I just got a Kindle for my birthday a couple of weeks ago and loving it. I’m going to start working my way through the Harvard Classics series (the so-called “five foot shelf of knowledge”) on the Kindle. Most of the titles in the series are available for free, but there is actually a Harvard Classics series that bundles each of the volumes together as they originally appeared in the print versions, and formats them nicely, for $0.99 each. Here’s volume 1: http://amzn.com/B004IAS0UK You should be able to jump off to the other volumes from there.

  • http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com Robert Talbert

    I just got a Kindle for my birthday a couple of weeks ago and loving it. I’m going to start working my way through the Harvard Classics series (the so-called “five foot shelf of knowledge”) on the Kindle. Most of the titles in the series are available for free, but there is actually a Harvard Classics series that bundles each of the volumes together as they originally appeared in the print versions, and formats them nicely, for $0.99 each. Here’s volume 1: http://amzn.com/B004IAS0UK You should be able to jump off to the other volumes from there.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    “publishers vet,” I’ve been thinking about this for a while now. That is a somewhat nice perk. Unfortunately, vetting could also be confused with censoring…. I’m not sure publishers were ever appreciated for vetting. I am sure a lot more junk will hit the market, but then there have always been publishers willing to publish junk. If vetting is all the publisher can claim to do these days, publishing as we knew it is dead. Word of mouth will take over, vetting will be left to bloggers, newspapers, reviewers, magazines and journals. If CPH thinks it can survive off the procedes of Luther’s Small Catechism, well I bet they are already rethinking their business model. Borders couldn’t stay in business.

  • http://www.utah-lutheran.blogspot.com Bror Erickson

    “publishers vet,” I’ve been thinking about this for a while now. That is a somewhat nice perk. Unfortunately, vetting could also be confused with censoring…. I’m not sure publishers were ever appreciated for vetting. I am sure a lot more junk will hit the market, but then there have always been publishers willing to publish junk. If vetting is all the publisher can claim to do these days, publishing as we knew it is dead. Word of mouth will take over, vetting will be left to bloggers, newspapers, reviewers, magazines and journals. If CPH thinks it can survive off the procedes of Luther’s Small Catechism, well I bet they are already rethinking their business model. Borders couldn’t stay in business.

  • Tom Moeller

    I got my Kindle Saturday. Wow. Late adopters unite!

    I have the Triglotta from Amazon (0.99) and love the kindle editions of Church Fathers linked to Amazon from
    http://www.ccel.org/fathers.html
    A couple of volumes at a time of Schaff’s Ante Nicene, Nicene and Post Nicene Fathers at 4.99 each is a real deal.

    Caution: Mickey Spillane is more expensive as Kindle than paper!

  • Tom Moeller

    I got my Kindle Saturday. Wow. Late adopters unite!

    I have the Triglotta from Amazon (0.99) and love the kindle editions of Church Fathers linked to Amazon from
    http://www.ccel.org/fathers.html
    A couple of volumes at a time of Schaff’s Ante Nicene, Nicene and Post Nicene Fathers at 4.99 each is a real deal.

    Caution: Mickey Spillane is more expensive as Kindle than paper!

  • SM

    Dr. Veith, I see that you’re a great fan of Chesterton. Just wanted to let you know that the local chapter of the American Chesterton Society meets monthly at the Famous Dave’s off of Cascades Parkway in Loudon County. The group meets (usually) from 3 to 5pm on the first Saturday of the month. (The August meeting is the second Saturday, Aug. 13th, however).

  • SM

    Dr. Veith, I see that you’re a great fan of Chesterton. Just wanted to let you know that the local chapter of the American Chesterton Society meets monthly at the Famous Dave’s off of Cascades Parkway in Loudon County. The group meets (usually) from 3 to 5pm on the first Saturday of the month. (The August meeting is the second Saturday, Aug. 13th, however).

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