Another consideration in a presidential candidate

In choosing which presidential candidate a person will support, the most usual preoccupation for people in both parties is “what does he–or she–believe”? That’s certainly important, since a leader’s beliefs will manifest themselves in their policies and decisions.  But there is something else to consider:  How well can this person govern?

Having an ideology and having the ability to preside over a government are two different dimensions that are not necessarily related to each other.  To run something–as a manager, an administrator, a CEO, a president–takes leadership; that is, the ability to get people to do what you want them to do.  This, in turn, takes people skills such as diplomacy, the ability to persuade, effective communication, the capacity to inspire.

A candidate with the right ideas, solid all the way down the line, who lacks these abilities will not make an effective president.  For one thing, ideology has little to do with much of what a president has to do.  And to the extent that the ideology is important, any good ideas that the president might have will never be implemented without good administrative qualities.

Again, I am by no means minimizing the importance of political ideology and personal convictions.  I’m just saying that those are not enough to make an effective president.  Reagan could govern; Bush II, for all of his good beliefs and personal qualities, not so much.  Clinton could govern, even with a divided Congress; Carter, with similar ideals, could not.  Obama’s main problem is not his ideology, as misguided as that may be, but his lack of leadership and administrative ability.

I’d like to know how a candidate works with staff.  His or her record of getting pet projects from ideas to realities.  Can this person twist arms, create consensus, win over critics?  Can this candidate work behind the scenes, break through people’s apathy, get things done?

I wish the media and political pundits of either party would report on that sort of thing.

Who do you think would be the best candidates with these criteria?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Matthew H

    Herman Cain

  • Matthew H

    Herman Cain

  • fws

    LBJ!

  • fws

    LBJ!

  • Joe

    Being a CEO or corporate VP is dramatically different than being in government. A CEO doesn’t normally need the support of anyone (occasionally he’ll need the board’s approval but very really does he need to start counting votes and making deals). A VP has only to convince his CEO that his idea is good and then his department will take their orders.

    If you want to find someone with the types of leadership skills necessary for the Presidency, I think you should look first to governors and second to legislators who have held leadership positions.

    Of course you can be a good president with out any of this background. But this type of experience can’t hurt.

  • Joe

    Being a CEO or corporate VP is dramatically different than being in government. A CEO doesn’t normally need the support of anyone (occasionally he’ll need the board’s approval but very really does he need to start counting votes and making deals). A VP has only to convince his CEO that his idea is good and then his department will take their orders.

    If you want to find someone with the types of leadership skills necessary for the Presidency, I think you should look first to governors and second to legislators who have held leadership positions.

    Of course you can be a good president with out any of this background. But this type of experience can’t hurt.

  • Rose

    Obama was the American Idol candidate. Let’s hope the lesson was learned.

  • Rose

    Obama was the American Idol candidate. Let’s hope the lesson was learned.

  • Kirk

    I’m with Joe. Corporate executive experience isn’t the same as government executive experience. I think the latter is far more valuable in a President than the former because it demonstrates some measure of political savvy to accompany time in leadership. This is why Herman Cain doesn’t fit the bill for qualified executive experience, which he demonstrates nearly every time he opens his mouth (sorry @Matthew H).

  • Kirk

    I’m with Joe. Corporate executive experience isn’t the same as government executive experience. I think the latter is far more valuable in a President than the former because it demonstrates some measure of political savvy to accompany time in leadership. This is why Herman Cain doesn’t fit the bill for qualified executive experience, which he demonstrates nearly every time he opens his mouth (sorry @Matthew H).

  • Steve Billingsley

    There is a reason that the most common previous job description of a Presidential candidate was governor of a state (at least in the last 40 years). The ability to be an effective executive in the context of the public sector is seen to be a big deal.

    I guess right now the top candidate left in the race from that perspective would be either Perry or Romney. (I initially liked Pawlenty, but to call his campaign a disappointment would be a major understatement). Both Perry and Romney have effectively governed (Perry earns points for longevity and general economic success and Romney earns points for being able to do this with a majority Democratic legislature). I guess it isn’t a surprise that right now they are the front-runners for Republican nomination.

  • Steve Billingsley

    There is a reason that the most common previous job description of a Presidential candidate was governor of a state (at least in the last 40 years). The ability to be an effective executive in the context of the public sector is seen to be a big deal.

    I guess right now the top candidate left in the race from that perspective would be either Perry or Romney. (I initially liked Pawlenty, but to call his campaign a disappointment would be a major understatement). Both Perry and Romney have effectively governed (Perry earns points for longevity and general economic success and Romney earns points for being able to do this with a majority Democratic legislature). I guess it isn’t a surprise that right now they are the front-runners for Republican nomination.

  • Jonathan

    Rick Perry.

  • Jonathan

    Rick Perry.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Newt Gingrich, Rick Perry. These guys are professional politicians who find ways to get what they want done. They are very hard men.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Newt Gingrich, Rick Perry. These guys are professional politicians who find ways to get what they want done. They are very hard men.

  • Tom Hering

    I knew it. “sg” is the reincarnation of Mae West.

  • Tom Hering

    I knew it. “sg” is the reincarnation of Mae West.

  • Jonathan

    I think Newt would be an excellent VP.

  • Jonathan

    I think Newt would be an excellent VP.

  • Tom Hering

    But will Newt’s patriotism drive him to commit adultery yet again? And will that harm his President, who will be an upholder of traditional morals – as all conservative Republican Presidents are.

  • Tom Hering

    But will Newt’s patriotism drive him to commit adultery yet again? And will that harm his President, who will be an upholder of traditional morals – as all conservative Republican Presidents are.

  • John

    Call me a pragmatist, but I always put ability to govern ahead of beliefs. This is one more reason why Perry is a terrible candidate. For those who are not Texans, the governor of Texas has got far less authority than in most other states (read a copy of the Texas state constitution and statutes, here. Perry hasn’t actually governed the state; he has only been along for the ride. In a way this is good, because he can shrug responsibility for the state’s multi-billion dollar deficits.

  • John

    Call me a pragmatist, but I always put ability to govern ahead of beliefs. This is one more reason why Perry is a terrible candidate. For those who are not Texans, the governor of Texas has got far less authority than in most other states (read a copy of the Texas state constitution and statutes, here. Perry hasn’t actually governed the state; he has only been along for the ride. In a way this is good, because he can shrug responsibility for the state’s multi-billion dollar deficits.

  • Carl Vehse

    Maybe Newt could switch temporarily to being a Demonrat whenever he got “the urge.” In that way the media can give him a pass, and Newt can demonstrate bi-partisan camaraderie.

  • Carl Vehse

    Maybe Newt could switch temporarily to being a Demonrat whenever he got “the urge.” In that way the media can give him a pass, and Newt can demonstrate bi-partisan camaraderie.

  • Tom Hering

    Hmmm. The media didn’t give Bill Clinton a pass. I seem to remember hearing about nothing but his infidelity – for a year or more.

  • Tom Hering

    Hmmm. The media didn’t give Bill Clinton a pass. I seem to remember hearing about nothing but his infidelity – for a year or more.

  • Joe

    John – I have not read the Texas constitution but I do generally understand that the Governor is on the weaker end of the scale as compared to say Wisconsin, which arguably has the strongest exec. But isn’t it also true that the Lt. Governor is an active member of the state senate and that while Perry held the post of Lt. Gov. was very adept at getting legislation passed? I remember some people discounting Bush’s exec. experience by saying that Perry was doing all the real work in Texas when Bush was Gov.

    I saw on the Wikipedia page that Perry was also named one the 10 most effective members of the legislature by the Dallas Morning News. (It does not say what year).

    I have not yet decided if I will support Perry – but wrt getting stuff done in a political setting he seems to have some credibility.

  • Joe

    John – I have not read the Texas constitution but I do generally understand that the Governor is on the weaker end of the scale as compared to say Wisconsin, which arguably has the strongest exec. But isn’t it also true that the Lt. Governor is an active member of the state senate and that while Perry held the post of Lt. Gov. was very adept at getting legislation passed? I remember some people discounting Bush’s exec. experience by saying that Perry was doing all the real work in Texas when Bush was Gov.

    I saw on the Wikipedia page that Perry was also named one the 10 most effective members of the legislature by the Dallas Morning News. (It does not say what year).

    I have not yet decided if I will support Perry – but wrt getting stuff done in a political setting he seems to have some credibility.

  • Joe

    Tom – its comment like number 10 that make me wish we had a “like” button around here.

  • Joe

    Tom – its comment like number 10 that make me wish we had a “like” button around here.

  • helen

    I wouldn’t vote for Newt Gingrich for dog catcher.

  • helen

    I wouldn’t vote for Newt Gingrich for dog catcher.

  • Tom Hering

    Joe @ 16, my comment is now @ 11, because Frank’s comment @ 2 showed up a few minutes ago. Maybe it was blocked because of Johnson’s last two initials. I guess Todd is awake now, anyways. :-)

    Perry is off to a good start – for Obama:

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iNoBFgnjVat_yxWAS26jHVkJd0Ag?docId=CNG.e465939209075d4ca665138490bf3cb9.71

  • Tom Hering

    Joe @ 16, my comment is now @ 11, because Frank’s comment @ 2 showed up a few minutes ago. Maybe it was blocked because of Johnson’s last two initials. I guess Todd is awake now, anyways. :-)

    Perry is off to a good start – for Obama:

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iNoBFgnjVat_yxWAS26jHVkJd0Ag?docId=CNG.e465939209075d4ca665138490bf3cb9.71

  • Matthew H

    Quite possibly the reason why most presidents were in politics (like governors) before is that non-career politicians (like Cain) don’t bother to run. That doesn’t disqualify Cain or anyone else from taking a shot at it in my book. If you need a certain skill set, I would choose Cain’s over Obama’s any day. Can’t see where the current crop of long term hacks political has anything viable to offer.

  • Matthew H

    Quite possibly the reason why most presidents were in politics (like governors) before is that non-career politicians (like Cain) don’t bother to run. That doesn’t disqualify Cain or anyone else from taking a shot at it in my book. If you need a certain skill set, I would choose Cain’s over Obama’s any day. Can’t see where the current crop of long term hacks political has anything viable to offer.

  • Carl Vehse

    The media didn’t give Bill Clinton a pass.

    The media (and specifically Newsweek) ignored the scandal, until Matt Drudge published the story on Jan. 17, 1998, about Monica Lewinsky’s boyfriend. And while the media jacked up their ratings with double entendre headlines, their “wink-wink” reporting tapdanced around and avoided seriously investigating Clinton’s real criminal issues.

  • Carl Vehse

    The media didn’t give Bill Clinton a pass.

    The media (and specifically Newsweek) ignored the scandal, until Matt Drudge published the story on Jan. 17, 1998, about Monica Lewinsky’s boyfriend. And while the media jacked up their ratings with double entendre headlines, their “wink-wink” reporting tapdanced around and avoided seriously investigating Clinton’s real criminal issues.

  • Tom Hering

    But we were talking about getting a pass on sexual immorality. Not other wrongdoings.

  • Tom Hering

    But we were talking about getting a pass on sexual immorality. Not other wrongdoings.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “Perry hasn’t actually governed the state; he has only been along for the ride. In a way this is good, because he can shrug responsibility for the state’s multi-billion dollar deficits.”

    A little honesty moment here.

    Texas has multi billion dollar debt because it has tons of illegal aliens. If the Federal government aggressively deported illegal aliens and punished their employers, Texas government would have much less debt. I always get a kick out of media who report that there is poverty in Texas. Yeah, no duh, Texas has a border with Mexico and the poor are just flooding in. It would be interesting to see disaggregated data on citizens vs. non-citzens in poverty in Texas.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “Perry hasn’t actually governed the state; he has only been along for the ride. In a way this is good, because he can shrug responsibility for the state’s multi-billion dollar deficits.”

    A little honesty moment here.

    Texas has multi billion dollar debt because it has tons of illegal aliens. If the Federal government aggressively deported illegal aliens and punished their employers, Texas government would have much less debt. I always get a kick out of media who report that there is poverty in Texas. Yeah, no duh, Texas has a border with Mexico and the poor are just flooding in. It would be interesting to see disaggregated data on citizens vs. non-citzens in poverty in Texas.

  • Bob

    Tom @18

    Rick Perry — yet another Republican presidential wannabe — but like the rest, Not Ready for Prime Time.

    And as his record is given a closer look in the days ahead, it will become even more clear why.

    Facts are subbor things.

  • Bob

    Tom @18

    Rick Perry — yet another Republican presidential wannabe — but like the rest, Not Ready for Prime Time.

    And as his record is given a closer look in the days ahead, it will become even more clear why.

    Facts are subbor things.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    The perfect candidate is not coming. Maybe not even the mostly good. So, fine, we have to choose the least bad. So, who is least bad? The guy who is competent but has some friends you don’t like? The guy of the wrong religion? The gal who doesn’t have much of a performance record? The incumbent who is spending a lot? The choices are not infinite. I guess I am a pragmatist. Who will do the least damage?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    The perfect candidate is not coming. Maybe not even the mostly good. So, fine, we have to choose the least bad. So, who is least bad? The guy who is competent but has some friends you don’t like? The guy of the wrong religion? The gal who doesn’t have much of a performance record? The incumbent who is spending a lot? The choices are not infinite. I guess I am a pragmatist. Who will do the least damage?

  • helen

    sg @22
    I always get a kick out of media who report that there is poverty in Texas. Yeah, no duh, Texas has a border with Mexico and the poor are just flooding in. It would be interesting to see disaggregated data on citizens vs. non-citzens in poverty in Texas.

    It would be interesting, but I don’t think it would help much.
    The availability of people who will work for less is likely to drag down the wage for the rest.

  • helen

    sg @22
    I always get a kick out of media who report that there is poverty in Texas. Yeah, no duh, Texas has a border with Mexico and the poor are just flooding in. It would be interesting to see disaggregated data on citizens vs. non-citzens in poverty in Texas.

    It would be interesting, but I don’t think it would help much.
    The availability of people who will work for less is likely to drag down the wage for the rest.

  • helen

    Anyway, as soon as a couple have a child here (who gets automatic citizenship) you can’t deport them without a wail going up from the papers.
    People who have no intention of becoming citizens come over the border to have their children born here; that’s been going on for many decades. Why? The whole family has an “insurance policy” in that child’s birth certificate. Also, the maternity care is good, and cheap at the price, which is usually nothing to them and all to the taxpayers.
    Those “citizens” and also non citizen children of illegals, who have gone to public school here, can get “in state” tuition at college, which is a better deal than citizens of other states can get.

    So our kids lose out on music, art and sometimes libraries, (because the schools don’t have enough money) but we import ESL teachers from Mexico, so the kids can start school here in the home dialect.
    Guess who foots the bill…

  • helen

    Anyway, as soon as a couple have a child here (who gets automatic citizenship) you can’t deport them without a wail going up from the papers.
    People who have no intention of becoming citizens come over the border to have their children born here; that’s been going on for many decades. Why? The whole family has an “insurance policy” in that child’s birth certificate. Also, the maternity care is good, and cheap at the price, which is usually nothing to them and all to the taxpayers.
    Those “citizens” and also non citizen children of illegals, who have gone to public school here, can get “in state” tuition at college, which is a better deal than citizens of other states can get.

    So our kids lose out on music, art and sometimes libraries, (because the schools don’t have enough money) but we import ESL teachers from Mexico, so the kids can start school here in the home dialect.
    Guess who foots the bill…

  • Grace

    I posted this on the other thread, but it belongs here!

    GOOD NEWS!

    GOP Primary: Perry 29%, Romney 18%, Bachmann 13%

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011

    “Texas Governor Rick Perry, the new face in the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, has jumped to a double-digit lead over Mitt Romney and Michele Bachmann with the other announced candidates trailing even further behind.

    Perry 29%, Romney 18%, Bachmann 13%

    I support Rick Perry, he would make a good president.

  • Grace

    I posted this on the other thread, but it belongs here!

    GOOD NEWS!

    GOP Primary: Perry 29%, Romney 18%, Bachmann 13%

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011

    “Texas Governor Rick Perry, the new face in the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, has jumped to a double-digit lead over Mitt Romney and Michele Bachmann with the other announced candidates trailing even further behind.

    Perry 29%, Romney 18%, Bachmann 13%

    I support Rick Perry, he would make a good president.

  • Lou

    While I tend to agree that Obama’s main problem isn’t as much his belief system as it is ability to govern and lead and in the are of administration, I have to admit that I have become quite concerned about the ideologies of certain Republican candidates.

    For instance, today, First Things posted a dismissive article about concerns in the liberal media toward the dominionist views (I say reconstructionist views) held by many mainstream candidates right now. He sees them as conspiracy theorists. I see their positions as something that seriously needs to be looked at and warned against by conservative Christians.
    http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/firstthoughts/2011/08/16/dominionismists-the-new-birthers/

  • Lou

    While I tend to agree that Obama’s main problem isn’t as much his belief system as it is ability to govern and lead and in the are of administration, I have to admit that I have become quite concerned about the ideologies of certain Republican candidates.

    For instance, today, First Things posted a dismissive article about concerns in the liberal media toward the dominionist views (I say reconstructionist views) held by many mainstream candidates right now. He sees them as conspiracy theorists. I see their positions as something that seriously needs to be looked at and warned against by conservative Christians.
    http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/firstthoughts/2011/08/16/dominionismists-the-new-birthers/

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Veith said:

    I wish the media and political pundits of either party would report on that sort of thing.

    Do you? Because I’m curious how you think that would work. How does one objectively report the facts of a person’s leadership? What is the rubric for measuring the ability to govern?

    For what it’s worth, I’m fairly certain I’ve read endorsements from the media that mention such things, but it’s hard to say more than a few sentences about it. Seems to me, along with the inchoate “presidential” quality, one either has leadership or one doesn’t.

    Beliefs and ideas, on the other hand, can fill up over a year’s worth of stories, not least of all because there are so many things one can believe and think.

    And while it’s very “conservative”/Republican of you to blame “the media” for this, it seems quite obvious to me that pretty much our entire system is set up to examine a candidate’s beliefs, but not so much his leadership (again, however one were to do that). What are debates but a televised airing of ideas? Voter’s guides? They just list summaries of the candidates’ beliefs. Candidate’s advertisements? Mostly full of beliefs and ideas (and, sure, quick, unsupported references to “leadership”). I don’t really see anyone complaining about this, either.

    I mean, by all means, suggest how our televised debates should be less idea-centric and more about leadership.

    Myself, I have this theory I just came up with. And it’s that, in principle, we Americans want to believe that, really, anyone can be President (or whatever elected position). So we have all these practices that are mainly set up to examine your ideas, regardless of “who you are”: do you have good ideas? You could be President! But in practice, we’re not really comfortable with this, which is why we keep on voting for incumbents and people who have been elected to other positions. Experience being a necessary precursor for “leadership” (the two terms often being interchangeable, really).

    We kinda like having an elite political class, it turns out. But that’s anathema to our mythos. So it remains largely unexamined.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Veith said:

    I wish the media and political pundits of either party would report on that sort of thing.

    Do you? Because I’m curious how you think that would work. How does one objectively report the facts of a person’s leadership? What is the rubric for measuring the ability to govern?

    For what it’s worth, I’m fairly certain I’ve read endorsements from the media that mention such things, but it’s hard to say more than a few sentences about it. Seems to me, along with the inchoate “presidential” quality, one either has leadership or one doesn’t.

    Beliefs and ideas, on the other hand, can fill up over a year’s worth of stories, not least of all because there are so many things one can believe and think.

    And while it’s very “conservative”/Republican of you to blame “the media” for this, it seems quite obvious to me that pretty much our entire system is set up to examine a candidate’s beliefs, but not so much his leadership (again, however one were to do that). What are debates but a televised airing of ideas? Voter’s guides? They just list summaries of the candidates’ beliefs. Candidate’s advertisements? Mostly full of beliefs and ideas (and, sure, quick, unsupported references to “leadership”). I don’t really see anyone complaining about this, either.

    I mean, by all means, suggest how our televised debates should be less idea-centric and more about leadership.

    Myself, I have this theory I just came up with. And it’s that, in principle, we Americans want to believe that, really, anyone can be President (or whatever elected position). So we have all these practices that are mainly set up to examine your ideas, regardless of “who you are”: do you have good ideas? You could be President! But in practice, we’re not really comfortable with this, which is why we keep on voting for incumbents and people who have been elected to other positions. Experience being a necessary precursor for “leadership” (the two terms often being interchangeable, really).

    We kinda like having an elite political class, it turns out. But that’s anathema to our mythos. So it remains largely unexamined.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I think Perry exemplifies the problems with considering “ability to govern” in a candidate. Consider Steve’s endorsement (@6) of the man’s leadership:

    Perry earns points for longevity and general economic success.

    We’ve already discussed elsewhere why Perry doesn’t deserve most of the credit for “general economic success” under the Texas constitution (even if Cincinnatus thinks this argument is too wonky to be influential, and maybe it is). This seems to boil “leadership” down to good timing, a bit of luck, and the work of other people.

    But “longevity”? How is that indicative of leadership? I mean, President Bush had two terms, but as to his ability to govern, Veith said, “for all of his good beliefs and personal qualities, not so much”.

    Is “leadership” just a convenient fudge factor onto which we project our intuition? If so, is that a good thing?

    Consider also one of Veith’s questions regarding leadership:

    Can this person twist arms, create consensus, win over critics?

    What’s funny is that answering “yes” to this is not a sign that you’d vote for the person. Because, of course, politicians you do not like who “twist arms” are usually vilified for their strong-arm tactics. But politicians who you agree with that act like that are, of course, to be praised for their leadership.

    But wait, what makes you like or agree with a politician, then, if not leadership? Again, it all comes down to ideas. I don’t know anyone who votes for someone with leadership skills but ideas they dislike.

    So perhaps leadership is a good thing, whatever it is, but it certainly is not a first-level consideration. It’s, at best, a reason to consider one candidate over another from among those who hold the ideas you agree with.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I think Perry exemplifies the problems with considering “ability to govern” in a candidate. Consider Steve’s endorsement (@6) of the man’s leadership:

    Perry earns points for longevity and general economic success.

    We’ve already discussed elsewhere why Perry doesn’t deserve most of the credit for “general economic success” under the Texas constitution (even if Cincinnatus thinks this argument is too wonky to be influential, and maybe it is). This seems to boil “leadership” down to good timing, a bit of luck, and the work of other people.

    But “longevity”? How is that indicative of leadership? I mean, President Bush had two terms, but as to his ability to govern, Veith said, “for all of his good beliefs and personal qualities, not so much”.

    Is “leadership” just a convenient fudge factor onto which we project our intuition? If so, is that a good thing?

    Consider also one of Veith’s questions regarding leadership:

    Can this person twist arms, create consensus, win over critics?

    What’s funny is that answering “yes” to this is not a sign that you’d vote for the person. Because, of course, politicians you do not like who “twist arms” are usually vilified for their strong-arm tactics. But politicians who you agree with that act like that are, of course, to be praised for their leadership.

    But wait, what makes you like or agree with a politician, then, if not leadership? Again, it all comes down to ideas. I don’t know anyone who votes for someone with leadership skills but ideas they dislike.

    So perhaps leadership is a good thing, whatever it is, but it certainly is not a first-level consideration. It’s, at best, a reason to consider one candidate over another from among those who hold the ideas you agree with.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @26

    For the record, Obama’s administration is deporting record numbers of illegals. Virtually all of them were arrested for something. So, they are going after the worst first. That is a good strategy and one that prioritizes the safety of everyone.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @26

    For the record, Obama’s administration is deporting record numbers of illegals. Virtually all of them were arrested for something. So, they are going after the worst first. That is a good strategy and one that prioritizes the safety of everyone.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg
  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg
  • Grace

    tODD – 29

    “Myself, I have this theory I just came up with. And it’s that, in principle, we Americans want to believe that, really, anyone can be President (or whatever elected position).

    I don’t know one single educated individual, who believes such nonsense. The idea which states that “you can be anything you want to be” is nothing but ‘gibberish, rattled off in an attempt to make everyone, no matter their capabilities believe something that has no foundation, but it offers a ‘fuzzy sensation to all the wannabe’s.

    In the case of Obama, we know very little about his academic achievements, …. that’s because they have never been revealed. He became president under the bar, not because he had made any great strides in Chicago or the Senate, but, the time was ripe for such a moment as Obama. I doubt it will ever happen again in the near future. Obama falls under the “Americans want to believe that, really, anyone can be President (or whatever elected position).” Obama had no leadership qualities, one has only to look at his record in the WH since he took office, it’s an embarrassment to our country, and it should make anyone cringe who voted for a man who had no ability or background, just a façade.

  • Grace

    tODD – 29

    “Myself, I have this theory I just came up with. And it’s that, in principle, we Americans want to believe that, really, anyone can be President (or whatever elected position).

    I don’t know one single educated individual, who believes such nonsense. The idea which states that “you can be anything you want to be” is nothing but ‘gibberish, rattled off in an attempt to make everyone, no matter their capabilities believe something that has no foundation, but it offers a ‘fuzzy sensation to all the wannabe’s.

    In the case of Obama, we know very little about his academic achievements, …. that’s because they have never been revealed. He became president under the bar, not because he had made any great strides in Chicago or the Senate, but, the time was ripe for such a moment as Obama. I doubt it will ever happen again in the near future. Obama falls under the “Americans want to believe that, really, anyone can be President (or whatever elected position).” Obama had no leadership qualities, one has only to look at his record in the WH since he took office, it’s an embarrassment to our country, and it should make anyone cringe who voted for a man who had no ability or background, just a façade.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace said (@33):

    I don’t know one single educated individual

    Well, there must be some somewhere in your neighborhood. Is there a college nearby? Try looking there, maybe?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Grace said (@33):

    I don’t know one single educated individual

    Well, there must be some somewhere in your neighborhood. Is there a college nearby? Try looking there, maybe?

  • Grace

    tODD,

    I live, and have lived, very close to California Universities all my life. The old tale of ‘you can be anything you want to be’ is a farce. YES, yes, there are those who haven’t a clue as to their limitations academically, but fall into the traps you claimed “I have a theory” – it’s touted in many high schools, instead of being honest with students. They live in la la land!

  • Grace

    tODD,

    I live, and have lived, very close to California Universities all my life. The old tale of ‘you can be anything you want to be’ is a farce. YES, yes, there are those who haven’t a clue as to their limitations academically, but fall into the traps you claimed “I have a theory” – it’s touted in many high schools, instead of being honest with students. They live in la la land!

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    Musolini really got things done!

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    Musolini really got things done!

  • Grace

    Poor Obama, he didn’t serve in the military, and he wants Perry to keep the comparison out of the mix?

    One of the (many) problems Obama suffers, is his lack of experience, not just in the military but in a vast number of areas.

    Obama To Perry: “Be A Little More Careful About What You Say”
    August 16, 2011

    WOLF BLITZER, HOST, CNN’S “THE SITUATION ROOM”: Rick Perry, the governor of Texas, Republican presidential candidate now, says, the men and women of the United States military want someone who’s worn the uniform. He says he served in the Air Force.

    Obama To Perry: “Be A Little More Careful About What You Say”

  • Grace

    Poor Obama, he didn’t serve in the military, and he wants Perry to keep the comparison out of the mix?

    One of the (many) problems Obama suffers, is his lack of experience, not just in the military but in a vast number of areas.

    Obama To Perry: “Be A Little More Careful About What You Say”
    August 16, 2011

    WOLF BLITZER, HOST, CNN’S “THE SITUATION ROOM”: Rick Perry, the governor of Texas, Republican presidential candidate now, says, the men and women of the United States military want someone who’s worn the uniform. He says he served in the Air Force.

    Obama To Perry: “Be A Little More Careful About What You Say”

  • Grace

    Rick Perry has the ability to lead, he has real ideas and plans that make sense.

    Rick Perry: Use Predators to track illegal drug traffic on U.S. border

    August 16, 2011

    In his announcement speech in South Carolina on Saturday, Perry said:

    “America’s standing in the world is in peril, not only because of disastrous economic policies, but from the incoherent muddle that they call foreign policy. Our president has insulted our friends and he’s encouraged our enemies, thumbing his nose at traditional allies like Israel.

    He seeks to dictate new borders for the Middle East and the oldest democracy there, Israel, while he is an abject failure in his constitutional duty to protect our borders in the United States.”

    And the nation’s longest-serving governor waved his right hand toward Mexico as he said it before a national TV audience and an enthusiastic crowd of conservative online writers at the RedState Gathering.
    Now comes word that the border-state governor thinks as long as the U.S. is using unmanned aircraft so effectively in Afghanistan and Pakistan, why not use the same Air Force surveillance assets to protect the homeland?

    The feds, former Air Force pilot Perry told a campaign gathering in New Hampshire, should use unarmed Predator drones to monitor the flow of illegal drugs coming from Mexico. Predators can fly for up to 20 hours undetected and are equipped with sophisticated video and tracking technology.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/washington/2011/08/rick-perry-predator-drones-obama-mexico.html

  • Grace

    Rick Perry has the ability to lead, he has real ideas and plans that make sense.

    Rick Perry: Use Predators to track illegal drug traffic on U.S. border

    August 16, 2011

    In his announcement speech in South Carolina on Saturday, Perry said:

    “America’s standing in the world is in peril, not only because of disastrous economic policies, but from the incoherent muddle that they call foreign policy. Our president has insulted our friends and he’s encouraged our enemies, thumbing his nose at traditional allies like Israel.

    He seeks to dictate new borders for the Middle East and the oldest democracy there, Israel, while he is an abject failure in his constitutional duty to protect our borders in the United States.”

    And the nation’s longest-serving governor waved his right hand toward Mexico as he said it before a national TV audience and an enthusiastic crowd of conservative online writers at the RedState Gathering.
    Now comes word that the border-state governor thinks as long as the U.S. is using unmanned aircraft so effectively in Afghanistan and Pakistan, why not use the same Air Force surveillance assets to protect the homeland?

    The feds, former Air Force pilot Perry told a campaign gathering in New Hampshire, should use unarmed Predator drones to monitor the flow of illegal drugs coming from Mexico. Predators can fly for up to 20 hours undetected and are equipped with sophisticated video and tracking technology.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/washington/2011/08/rick-perry-predator-drones-obama-mexico.html

  • Grace

    I should have posted the following in post#38:

    Los Angeles Times Nation
    Top of the Ticket
    Political commentary from Andrew Malcolm

  • Grace

    I should have posted the following in post#38:

    Los Angeles Times Nation
    Top of the Ticket
    Political commentary from Andrew Malcolm

  • John

    @Joe 15
    Yes, that is true. However, the typical understanding on the streets of Houston is that someone else came up with the laws and Perry knew all the right people to schmooze. I am sure that is not an entirely fair characterization!

  • John

    @Joe 15
    Yes, that is true. However, the typical understanding on the streets of Houston is that someone else came up with the laws and Perry knew all the right people to schmooze. I am sure that is not an entirely fair characterization!

  • John

    @sg

    “A little honesty moment here.

    Texas has multi billion dollar debt because it has tons of illegal aliens. If the Federal government aggressively deported illegal aliens and punished their employers, Texas government would have much less debt.”

    1. It wasn’t the fed that set up Houston and SA to operate as sanctuary cities – it was Texas.

    2. This claim is unsubstantiated and frankly incongruous with the evidence we do have. In 2011, the largest portion of spending (33%) was education – the funding for which comes from property tax. Immigrants – legal or otherwise – actually increase property tax revenue.

  • John

    @sg

    “A little honesty moment here.

    Texas has multi billion dollar debt because it has tons of illegal aliens. If the Federal government aggressively deported illegal aliens and punished their employers, Texas government would have much less debt.”

    1. It wasn’t the fed that set up Houston and SA to operate as sanctuary cities – it was Texas.

    2. This claim is unsubstantiated and frankly incongruous with the evidence we do have. In 2011, the largest portion of spending (33%) was education – the funding for which comes from property tax. Immigrants – legal or otherwise – actually increase property tax revenue.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    So Grace (@27, 37, 38), who do you support in the election that’s fifteen months from now?

    And do you have any largely-irrelevant media articles you could quote from at length that would, in some manner, give a reason for why you think Perry — I mean, your favored candidate, whoever that is — is so super-awesome, mere days after he’s announced his candidacy … or so?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    So Grace (@27, 37, 38), who do you support in the election that’s fifteen months from now?

    And do you have any largely-irrelevant media articles you could quote from at length that would, in some manner, give a reason for why you think Perry — I mean, your favored candidate, whoever that is — is so super-awesome, mere days after he’s announced his candidacy … or so?

  • Joe

    John @ 40 – thanks. There are some aspects of Perry that I like and some that I don’t. This is helpful as I work through those.

  • Joe

    John @ 40 – thanks. There are some aspects of Perry that I like and some that I don’t. This is helpful as I work through those.

  • Cincinnatus

    Wait, did I miss something? Since when was Bush unable to govern? Perhaps in the last year or so of his tenure. But I’m fairly certain Bush got most everything he wanted (except Social Security reform), and many of his signature pieces of legislation–NCLB and Medicare Part D–were the result of deep consensus with Democrats. The problem wasn’t that Bush couldn’t govern but that he simply had terrible ideas.

  • Cincinnatus

    Wait, did I miss something? Since when was Bush unable to govern? Perhaps in the last year or so of his tenure. But I’m fairly certain Bush got most everything he wanted (except Social Security reform), and many of his signature pieces of legislation–NCLB and Medicare Part D–were the result of deep consensus with Democrats. The problem wasn’t that Bush couldn’t govern but that he simply had terrible ideas.

  • Frank in Spokane

    Ron Paul.

    Pity it took 45 posts for anyone to mention him.

  • Frank in Spokane

    Ron Paul.

    Pity it took 45 posts for anyone to mention him.

  • Grace

    tODD @42 ”

    ~~ “So Grace (@27, 37, 38), who do you support in the election that’s fifteen months from now?” ~~

    My husband and I called Governor Rick Perry’s offices months ago and offered our support. We believe as many others, that he’s the man for the position of POTUS.

    ~~”And do you have any largely-irrelevant media articles you could quote from at length that would, in some manner, give a reason for why you think Perry — I mean, your favored candidate, whoever that is — is so super-awesome, mere days after he’s announced his candidacy … or so?” ~~

    As I’ve stated above, Gov. Perry has been our choice long before he made his announcement to run for president.

    I’m sure you’ll come up with one of your ‘theories as you did earlier, @ post 29 ~~ “Myself, I have this theory I just came up with.” ~~ and then blather on.

    Rick Perry is ahead in the polls because he is far and away, the best choice.

  • Grace

    tODD @42 ”

    ~~ “So Grace (@27, 37, 38), who do you support in the election that’s fifteen months from now?” ~~

    My husband and I called Governor Rick Perry’s offices months ago and offered our support. We believe as many others, that he’s the man for the position of POTUS.

    ~~”And do you have any largely-irrelevant media articles you could quote from at length that would, in some manner, give a reason for why you think Perry — I mean, your favored candidate, whoever that is — is so super-awesome, mere days after he’s announced his candidacy … or so?” ~~

    As I’ve stated above, Gov. Perry has been our choice long before he made his announcement to run for president.

    I’m sure you’ll come up with one of your ‘theories as you did earlier, @ post 29 ~~ “Myself, I have this theory I just came up with.” ~~ and then blather on.

    Rick Perry is ahead in the polls because he is far and away, the best choice.

  • Corno di Bassetto

    Right now with the pool of candidates out there, my inclination next November is writing in “None of the Above is Acceptable.”

  • Corno di Bassetto

    Right now with the pool of candidates out there, my inclination next November is writing in “None of the Above is Acceptable.”


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