Make a good shoe

A while ago I blogged about Tullian Tchividjian–Billy Graham’s grandson and the successor to William Kennedy as the pastor of Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church”–and his reaction to Lutheran novelist Bo Giertz.  (He offered a clarification to that post:   “I didn’t say that Giertz caused a Copernican revolution in my preaching but that the conversation between Henrik and Linder described the Copernican revolution that took place in my preaching a number of years ago.”)

He since has written an interesting post about vocation:

Martin Luther was once approached by a man who enthusiastically announced that he’d recently become a Christian. Wanting desperately to serve the Lord, he asked Luther, “What should I do now?” As if to say, should he become a minister or perhaps a traveling evangelist. A monk, perhaps.

Luther asked him, “What is your work now?”

“I’m a shoe maker.”

Much to the cobbler’s surprise, Luther replied, “Then make a good shoe, and sell it at a fair price.”

In becoming a Christian, we don’t need to retreat from the vocational calling we already have—nor do we need to justify that calling, whatever it is, in terms of its “spiritual” value or evangelistic usefulness. We simply exercise whatever our calling is with new God-glorifying motives, goals, and standards—and with a renewed commitment to performing our calling with greater excellence and higher objectives.

One way we reflect our Creator is by being creative right where we are with the talents and gifts he has given us. As Paul says, “Each one should remain in the condition in which he was called. So, brothers, in whatever condition each was called, there let him remain with God” (1 Corinthians 7:20,24). As we do this, we fulfill our God-given mandate to reform, to beautify, our various “stations” for God’s glory–giving this world an imperfect preview of the beautification that will be a perfect, universal actuality when Jesus returns to finish what he started.

For church leaders, this means that we make a huge mistake when we define a person’s “call” in terms of participation inside the church—nursery work, Sunday school teacher, youth worker, music leader, and so on. We need to help our people see that their calling is much bigger than how much time they put into church matters. By reducing the notion of calling to the exercise of spiritual gifts inside the church, we fail to help our people see that calling involves everything we are and everything we do—both inside and, more importantly, outside the church.

I once heard Os Guinness address a question about why the church in the late 20th century was not having a larger impact in our world when there were more people going to church than ever before. He said the main reason was not that Christians weren’t where they should be. There are plenty of artists, lawyers, doctors, and business owners that are Christians. Rather, the main reason is that Christians aren’t who they should be right where they are.

“Calling”, he said, “is the truth that God calls us to himself so decisively that everything we are, everything we do, and everything w eare, everything we do, and everything we have is invested with a special devotion, dynamism, and direction.”

via You’re Free To Stay Put – Tullian Tchividjian.

I urge you to go to the site and also consider the discussion in the comments.  Some people pushed back against the doctrine of vocation, insisting that spreading the Gospel is the only way we truly serve God, with others citing the influence of Lutheran theology on their evangelicalism (contrary to an earlier discussion about how that doesn’t happen much!).

By the way, do you see anything missing in this particular account of vocation?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • larry

    “insisting that spreading the Gospel is the only way we truly serve God”

    Yes, that is HUGE in the background, SB, I came from to the point of terror and despair. It was so pushed and implied that “this is what a real Christian does and loves doing it”. The implication is exactly clear if you don’t – hence the conscience binder that leads to despair. I/we were told more than once and in many ways that our only real calling and hence service to God was “evangelism/witnessing” and the conscience load became so heavy that in every situation, work included, that’s what you HAD to be doing or the implication (are you sure you really love the Lord, are a Christian) weighted upon you ALL the time. So, being a good workaholic, I did. I made a lot of folks mad in the process too. Looking back on it its embarassing but at the time the ‘spiritual pressure’ from the pulpit and SB leadership in their conferences/writings in general was overwhelming.

    What made me first reconsider it was being out with a few of the ministers/teachers that huffed and puffed this a lot, outside the church walls. I noted that they didn’t seem to be “on fire for the Lord” nor nearly as bold as they’d impress upon us. In fact I noted just how not bold they were (as they implied upon us) and just how they didn’t do it nearly as much or at all as some of us conscience stricken laity did. They were not ‘beating the streets’ three days a week or so. It made me question the whole shebang because they seemed to have a LOT of assurance of salvation/election for very little proof works in this activity for themselves, and I (and others) though we’d be pounding the pavement constantly were not only not having assurance but the harder we worked at it, the less we had.

    But that’s the way it goes in Christless Christ without a Cross for you church/denomination.

  • larry

    “insisting that spreading the Gospel is the only way we truly serve God”

    Yes, that is HUGE in the background, SB, I came from to the point of terror and despair. It was so pushed and implied that “this is what a real Christian does and loves doing it”. The implication is exactly clear if you don’t – hence the conscience binder that leads to despair. I/we were told more than once and in many ways that our only real calling and hence service to God was “evangelism/witnessing” and the conscience load became so heavy that in every situation, work included, that’s what you HAD to be doing or the implication (are you sure you really love the Lord, are a Christian) weighted upon you ALL the time. So, being a good workaholic, I did. I made a lot of folks mad in the process too. Looking back on it its embarassing but at the time the ‘spiritual pressure’ from the pulpit and SB leadership in their conferences/writings in general was overwhelming.

    What made me first reconsider it was being out with a few of the ministers/teachers that huffed and puffed this a lot, outside the church walls. I noted that they didn’t seem to be “on fire for the Lord” nor nearly as bold as they’d impress upon us. In fact I noted just how not bold they were (as they implied upon us) and just how they didn’t do it nearly as much or at all as some of us conscience stricken laity did. They were not ‘beating the streets’ three days a week or so. It made me question the whole shebang because they seemed to have a LOT of assurance of salvation/election for very little proof works in this activity for themselves, and I (and others) though we’d be pounding the pavement constantly were not only not having assurance but the harder we worked at it, the less we had.

    But that’s the way it goes in Christless Christ without a Cross for you church/denomination.

  • larry

    One of the most refreshing, and I cannot state that forceful enough, about Luther/Lutheranism, coming into it, IS the doctrine of vocation. It’s the “release” the Gospel gives to do actual good works as opposed to the “tightening” that you see in other such doctrines/confession (like the Pharisees constricting).

    Once one begins to say and find assurance in the Gospel for example of “I AM baptized” (and HAVE that assurance for me), then one can begin to say, “WOW, look at all the good works I’ve been missing out on, changing diapers, mowing the lawn, flipping hamburgers, being a teacher, eating, sleeping, reading to my kids, playing with them, etc…”. An almost sweet ENDLESS list of good works because they come from a bad tree MADE good in “I am baptized”.

    It’s like getting out of jail for the first time and all you can do is run laughing, smiling, kicking your heels up, screaning “Free at last, free at last, thank God almighty I’m free at last!” To borrow from the good Dr. King who bears Luther’s name sake.

  • larry

    One of the most refreshing, and I cannot state that forceful enough, about Luther/Lutheranism, coming into it, IS the doctrine of vocation. It’s the “release” the Gospel gives to do actual good works as opposed to the “tightening” that you see in other such doctrines/confession (like the Pharisees constricting).

    Once one begins to say and find assurance in the Gospel for example of “I AM baptized” (and HAVE that assurance for me), then one can begin to say, “WOW, look at all the good works I’ve been missing out on, changing diapers, mowing the lawn, flipping hamburgers, being a teacher, eating, sleeping, reading to my kids, playing with them, etc…”. An almost sweet ENDLESS list of good works because they come from a bad tree MADE good in “I am baptized”.

    It’s like getting out of jail for the first time and all you can do is run laughing, smiling, kicking your heels up, screaning “Free at last, free at last, thank God almighty I’m free at last!” To borrow from the good Dr. King who bears Luther’s name sake.

  • Pete

    “By the way, do you see anything missing in this particular account of vocation?”

    He left out the aspect that, in pursuing our vocation – say, making shoes – we are doing God’s work. Not just our own.

  • Pete

    “By the way, do you see anything missing in this particular account of vocation?”

    He left out the aspect that, in pursuing our vocation – say, making shoes – we are doing God’s work. Not just our own.

  • helen

    Thanks, Pete!
    That he makes a good shoe at a fair price will bless his neighbor.
    It is probably assumed, not being said in this little story, that he will be at Mass, hearing the Word and receiving Christ’s gift of forgiveness of his sins.

  • helen

    Thanks, Pete!
    That he makes a good shoe at a fair price will bless his neighbor.
    It is probably assumed, not being said in this little story, that he will be at Mass, hearing the Word and receiving Christ’s gift of forgiveness of his sins.

  • http://nbfzman.blogspot.com nbfzman

    After a cursory reading, I’d say the Gospel was missing. The only comfort offered seems to be based upon what we do–or rather what we don’t have to do.

  • http://nbfzman.blogspot.com nbfzman

    After a cursory reading, I’d say the Gospel was missing. The only comfort offered seems to be based upon what we do–or rather what we don’t have to do.

  • Joe

    Is the missing aspect an express acknowledgment that it is through these workaday activities that we love and serve our neighbors? God uses us to provide the daily bread for others, God meets our neighbors’ material needs though our vocations.

  • Joe

    Is the missing aspect an express acknowledgment that it is through these workaday activities that we love and serve our neighbors? God uses us to provide the daily bread for others, God meets our neighbors’ material needs though our vocations.

  • fws

    By the way, do you see anything missing in this particular account of vocation?

    Law and Gospel in the form of the Doctrine of the Two Kingdoms is missing.

    In the Earthly Kingdom, God rules in 3 ordos or earthly governments… family society and church. He rules in these by the Law.

    Then in the Heavenly Kingdom he rules alone by the righteousness of Faith in Christ. This kind of righeousness is meaningless on earth except to God and a troubled conscience.

  • fws

    By the way, do you see anything missing in this particular account of vocation?

    Law and Gospel in the form of the Doctrine of the Two Kingdoms is missing.

    In the Earthly Kingdom, God rules in 3 ordos or earthly governments… family society and church. He rules in these by the Law.

    Then in the Heavenly Kingdom he rules alone by the righteousness of Faith in Christ. This kind of righeousness is meaningless on earth except to God and a troubled conscience.

  • SKPeterson

    Joe and fws @ 6 and 7 – I’ll agree with your posts, but I also think that you have to start somewhere and that’s what Tullian appears to be doing. I think what you acknowledge in your posts is that he is incomplete in fleshing out the full theological import of the doctrine of vocation, but I don’t think that is his express purpose in his article. Perhaps he will explore it more in future posts.

  • SKPeterson

    Joe and fws @ 6 and 7 – I’ll agree with your posts, but I also think that you have to start somewhere and that’s what Tullian appears to be doing. I think what you acknowledge in your posts is that he is incomplete in fleshing out the full theological import of the doctrine of vocation, but I don’t think that is his express purpose in his article. Perhaps he will explore it more in future posts.

  • Kyle

    You might like some of the writings of Josemaria Escriva on this topic: holiness in everyday life. Many of his works are available at http://www.escrivaworks.org/

  • Kyle

    You might like some of the writings of Josemaria Escriva on this topic: holiness in everyday life. Many of his works are available at http://www.escrivaworks.org/

  • Carl Vehse

    I wonder about Luther’s exchange with the Christian cobbler; is this simply a legendary vignette similar to that of Luther throwing an inkwell at the devil? It is in agreement with statements Luther makes in his An Open Letter to The Christian Nobility of the German Nation Concerning the Reform of the Christian Estate,” (1520).

    However, the only “cobbler story” I found was a joke from Luther that Preserved Smith recounted in his book, The life and letters of Martin Luther (Houghton Miffin Co., 1911, p. 325):

    Rustics are not equal to public affairs and spectacles, as is proved by the passion play. When a cobbler began to say his lines he could only stammer out, “I am… I am…” at which the manager retorted, “What are you then?” He replied, “I am a cobbler,” and the manager rejoined, “What are you doing here, then? Go home and mend shoes.”

    Presumably Smith got that from “Luther’s Humor ein Stück seiner Religion” by Ernst Rolffs in Preussusche Jahrbücher (1904, Vol. 115, pp. 468-488).

    BTW, the Luther/cobbler vignette is even repeated in a book on Islamic finances, of all places.

  • Carl Vehse

    I wonder about Luther’s exchange with the Christian cobbler; is this simply a legendary vignette similar to that of Luther throwing an inkwell at the devil? It is in agreement with statements Luther makes in his An Open Letter to The Christian Nobility of the German Nation Concerning the Reform of the Christian Estate,” (1520).

    However, the only “cobbler story” I found was a joke from Luther that Preserved Smith recounted in his book, The life and letters of Martin Luther (Houghton Miffin Co., 1911, p. 325):

    Rustics are not equal to public affairs and spectacles, as is proved by the passion play. When a cobbler began to say his lines he could only stammer out, “I am… I am…” at which the manager retorted, “What are you then?” He replied, “I am a cobbler,” and the manager rejoined, “What are you doing here, then? Go home and mend shoes.”

    Presumably Smith got that from “Luther’s Humor ein Stück seiner Religion” by Ernst Rolffs in Preussusche Jahrbücher (1904, Vol. 115, pp. 468-488).

    BTW, the Luther/cobbler vignette is even repeated in a book on Islamic finances, of all places.

  • Joe

    Carl – I think this story falls into that well loved category of “if it ain’t true it oughta be”

  • Joe

    Carl – I think this story falls into that well loved category of “if it ain’t true it oughta be”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    It so happens that a descendant of that same cobbler, still working in the shoe trade, grew up in America. Like so many whose ancestors immigrated from Germany, his family had long ago stopped believing, but this man became a Christian and went to an Evangelical pastor to ask him what he should do.

    “Well, what is your work now?” asked the pastor.

    “I’m a shoe-maker,” the man answered.

    The pastor answered, “Then you should start up a Christian shoe ministry. You could make shoes with Bible verses on them, which would help people evangelize to others. No, even better, ‘WWJD’. Oh, I know! It could say ‘James 3′ on the inside of the tongue of the shoe! The shoes would have to be really fresh and up-to-date, so as to properly reflect God’s sovereignty. We could give a percentage of profits to Compassion International. And we could call the line ‘Saved Soles’. So, go and do all that.”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    It so happens that a descendant of that same cobbler, still working in the shoe trade, grew up in America. Like so many whose ancestors immigrated from Germany, his family had long ago stopped believing, but this man became a Christian and went to an Evangelical pastor to ask him what he should do.

    “Well, what is your work now?” asked the pastor.

    “I’m a shoe-maker,” the man answered.

    The pastor answered, “Then you should start up a Christian shoe ministry. You could make shoes with Bible verses on them, which would help people evangelize to others. No, even better, ‘WWJD’. Oh, I know! It could say ‘James 3′ on the inside of the tongue of the shoe! The shoes would have to be really fresh and up-to-date, so as to properly reflect God’s sovereignty. We could give a percentage of profits to Compassion International. And we could call the line ‘Saved Soles’. So, go and do all that.”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Ha! The Internet will teach me yet to come up with crazy ideas.

    Mainly by continuing to remind me that someone else will always come up with the idea before I did.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Ha! The Internet will teach me yet to come up with crazy ideas.

    Mainly by continuing to remind me that someone else will always come up with the idea before I did.

  • Tom Hering

    Sheesh. What’s next? Toilet paper printed with Bible verses? “”You are already clean because of the word which I have spoken to you” (John 5:13). Well, never mind then. Zip.

  • Tom Hering

    Sheesh. What’s next? Toilet paper printed with Bible verses? “”You are already clean because of the word which I have spoken to you” (John 5:13). Well, never mind then. Zip.

  • http://mark.veenman@gmail.com Mark Veenman

    ….and only support charter member vendors in the Good Shepherd association.

  • http://mark.veenman@gmail.com Mark Veenman

    ….and only support charter member vendors in the Good Shepherd association.

  • fws

    I have been thinking about this alot.

    what is missing here is love for neighbor. The focus is here all on me and God. So that is to say that the emphasis is all on me.

    We are to Love our neighbor and we are to love them as we would , in our highest aspirations and dreams and fantasies, want to be loved by others.

    And old adam doesnt like that. we respond with “who is our neighbor?” no. maybe not in that form, but we come up with all sorts of hedgings and excuses and legalisms to not do love in that over the top way I just described and that Jesus describes and st Paul describe over and over and over again. this looks like giving and not keeping any score at our getting back. it looks like forgiving 70 times … it looks like a woman washing the feet of someone with her hair and tears while that someone is in some meeting with dignitaries. It looks like making someone …. happy, joyful, wanting to praise God.

    This is what God has given us the Law to make us do for others. Nothing less than this. And we want it to be less because we dont do this. we are stingy with our praise and generous with our criticism because that is “fair”. ahem.

    “all the world needs is love sweet love” . Even pagans know this. And Christians insist in hedging that word love about with lots of rule clauses and fine print conditions because, well, it is just too dangerous a word. It is too permissive.

    Really someone should not just be a good shoemaker and make a good shoe that gives pleasure joy and happiness to those who buy them, the shoemaker is required to do this work with great joy and pleasure as though he were making shoes for Christ and all the angels, or for presidents and important dignitaries.

    And we cannot do this. So another thing that is missing. that is to be terrified over our best works, and to then put the Works of Christ to work, every minute, of every day, in pleading for God to not need to send punishments or take what we have been given for us to learn to do the Law of God in our vocations the way we ought.

    Be joyful always is a command of God. The wages of not being joyful always is death both temporal and eternal. And alone in Christ can we really have that joy restored.

    God cannot be an object of Love as long as the law is always accusing us. Christ makes a perfect shoe. and he does it for his Father with joy and eagerness, for the Life of others. And by hiding our own used tampon model shoe making in His, the Law no longer has anything at all to accuse us of.

    Lord have mercy! Christ have mercy! Lord have Mercy!

  • fws

    I have been thinking about this alot.

    what is missing here is love for neighbor. The focus is here all on me and God. So that is to say that the emphasis is all on me.

    We are to Love our neighbor and we are to love them as we would , in our highest aspirations and dreams and fantasies, want to be loved by others.

    And old adam doesnt like that. we respond with “who is our neighbor?” no. maybe not in that form, but we come up with all sorts of hedgings and excuses and legalisms to not do love in that over the top way I just described and that Jesus describes and st Paul describe over and over and over again. this looks like giving and not keeping any score at our getting back. it looks like forgiving 70 times … it looks like a woman washing the feet of someone with her hair and tears while that someone is in some meeting with dignitaries. It looks like making someone …. happy, joyful, wanting to praise God.

    This is what God has given us the Law to make us do for others. Nothing less than this. And we want it to be less because we dont do this. we are stingy with our praise and generous with our criticism because that is “fair”. ahem.

    “all the world needs is love sweet love” . Even pagans know this. And Christians insist in hedging that word love about with lots of rule clauses and fine print conditions because, well, it is just too dangerous a word. It is too permissive.

    Really someone should not just be a good shoemaker and make a good shoe that gives pleasure joy and happiness to those who buy them, the shoemaker is required to do this work with great joy and pleasure as though he were making shoes for Christ and all the angels, or for presidents and important dignitaries.

    And we cannot do this. So another thing that is missing. that is to be terrified over our best works, and to then put the Works of Christ to work, every minute, of every day, in pleading for God to not need to send punishments or take what we have been given for us to learn to do the Law of God in our vocations the way we ought.

    Be joyful always is a command of God. The wages of not being joyful always is death both temporal and eternal. And alone in Christ can we really have that joy restored.

    God cannot be an object of Love as long as the law is always accusing us. Christ makes a perfect shoe. and he does it for his Father with joy and eagerness, for the Life of others. And by hiding our own used tampon model shoe making in His, the Law no longer has anything at all to accuse us of.

    Lord have mercy! Christ have mercy! Lord have Mercy!

  • Lou

    For the record, Coral Ridge was formerly pastored by Dr. D. James Kennedy, not “William Kennedy”.

  • Lou

    For the record, Coral Ridge was formerly pastored by Dr. D. James Kennedy, not “William Kennedy”.

  • Lou

    fws, I also agree that the doctrine of the Two Kingdoms should be included here. One of the things that seem to plague those of us in the reformed community is this impetus to “be Christ” or “be the only version of the Bible” that our neighbors, co-workers, family members, etc.. will ever see.

    However, for me the concept of vocation and the Two Kingdoms helps me to see myself as being alongside of other people, instead of some sort of descending superhero who is going to save people and to be a god to them. It is a more humble approach to view our calling as loving our neighbor as we do ourselves. To serve them in a self-sacrifical way with love with a Two Kingdoms view of Law and Gospel keeps us from putting ourselves on some sort of pedestal in our vocation.

  • Lou

    fws, I also agree that the doctrine of the Two Kingdoms should be included here. One of the things that seem to plague those of us in the reformed community is this impetus to “be Christ” or “be the only version of the Bible” that our neighbors, co-workers, family members, etc.. will ever see.

    However, for me the concept of vocation and the Two Kingdoms helps me to see myself as being alongside of other people, instead of some sort of descending superhero who is going to save people and to be a god to them. It is a more humble approach to view our calling as loving our neighbor as we do ourselves. To serve them in a self-sacrifical way with love with a Two Kingdoms view of Law and Gospel keeps us from putting ourselves on some sort of pedestal in our vocation.

  • helen

    fws @ 16 : You want to make a Law out of joy!?

  • helen

    fws @ 16 : You want to make a Law out of joy!?

  • Lou

    tODD #12 and #13 – LOL! Now, that was the funniest thing I’ve read in a few days. Good one.

  • Lou

    tODD #12 and #13 – LOL! Now, that was the funniest thing I’ve read in a few days. Good one.

  • fws

    hele @ 19

    yes to be joyful is a command. isnt that amazing. and we are to be joyful about things like paying our taxes. and we arent.

    lord have mercy!

  • fws

    hele @ 19

    yes to be joyful is a command. isnt that amazing. and we are to be joyful about things like paying our taxes. and we arent.

    lord have mercy!

  • Dust
  • Dust
  • mark in tx

    Recently I had a conversation about 1 Cor 7 with a Reformed friend and he made the point that the disciples did leave their vocations. Curious how you folks respond to that.

  • mark in tx

    Recently I had a conversation about 1 Cor 7 with a Reformed friend and he made the point that the disciples did leave their vocations. Curious how you folks respond to that.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Well, they were still fishers–going back to their nets at every opportunity–even though Jesus also made them fishers of men. I think the disciples are parallel to those whom the Lord calls to the pastoral vocation. Those who were healed and so converted Jesus did send back to their callings.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Well, they were still fishers–going back to their nets at every opportunity–even though Jesus also made them fishers of men. I think the disciples are parallel to those whom the Lord calls to the pastoral vocation. Those who were healed and so converted Jesus did send back to their callings.

  • helen

    mark in tx @ 23

    The disciples left one vocation for another.
    It’s done quite a bit these days, even in Texas.

    fws @21
    yes to be joyful is a command. isnt that amazing. and we are to be joyful about things like paying our taxes. and we arent.

    I’ve always thought of the “rejoice” statements as invitations rather than orders.
    If I have to pay taxes, I’ve had an income. That isn’t something to be joyful about?

  • helen

    mark in tx @ 23

    The disciples left one vocation for another.
    It’s done quite a bit these days, even in Texas.

    fws @21
    yes to be joyful is a command. isnt that amazing. and we are to be joyful about things like paying our taxes. and we arent.

    I’ve always thought of the “rejoice” statements as invitations rather than orders.
    If I have to pay taxes, I’ve had an income. That isn’t something to be joyful about?

  • larry

    Todd, hilarious.

    One time when we had three kids at once in diapers I was tackling two at a time and attempting to not spread the mess. Of course I was not giggling about it all, but told my wife, “you know the reformers use to say that the angels of heaven cheer when the father changes the babies diaper…well they must be doing the crowd wave right now.”

  • larry

    Todd, hilarious.

    One time when we had three kids at once in diapers I was tackling two at a time and attempting to not spread the mess. Of course I was not giggling about it all, but told my wife, “you know the reformers use to say that the angels of heaven cheer when the father changes the babies diaper…well they must be doing the crowd wave right now.”

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “If I have to pay taxes, I’ve had an income. That isn’t something to be joyful about?”

    What about property taxes? You pay those even when you have no income.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “If I have to pay taxes, I’ve had an income. That isn’t something to be joyful about?”

    What about property taxes? You pay those even when you have no income.

  • Dust

    FWS in 21…

    Galatians 5:22-23

    New International Version (NIV)

    22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law.

    Amazing? Yes, amazing Grace!

  • Dust

    FWS in 21…

    Galatians 5:22-23

    New International Version (NIV)

    22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law.

    Amazing? Yes, amazing Grace!

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