Don’t cheat. Don’t even try it.

Here is a great, eloquent, and right-on discussion of academic dishonesty, in which a professor, who blogs as “Tenured Radical,” imagines what she would say to her college-aged child on the subject, if she had one.  I offer it as a celebration of Finals Week, which students and us professors are celebrating (if you can call it that) this week.  A sample, though you should read the whole post (if you can handle some vulgar language):

Tenured Radical and the returning college student are having a final cup of coffee at the airport while waiting out a flight delay. This is how it would go:

Spawn of the Radical: Esteemed Parental Unit, you have taught at a selective liberal arts college for two decades. What advice do you give for the hellish, final weeks of school?

Tenured Radical: I am so glad you asked, Spawn. (Ruminates briefly.) OK, here goes. First piece of advice? Don’t plagiarize, buy a paper off the internet, pay someone else to write for you, or retype an ancient term paper secreted away in the files of your Greek organization. I will be far more sympathetic if you simply fail the class, or get a bad grade, than I will be if you are hauled up before a disciplinary board and hung out to dry. . .

Spawn: Why? It seems like such an easy and obvious solution to not having done the work for the course. Besides, so many of my friends get away with it.

TR: True dat. And yet, if your friends jumped off the Brooklyn Bridge and managed to live, would you do it too? My point is this: because cheating is evidence of rank stupidity, many people do not get away with it. In fact, many people are no better at cheating than they are at doing the work for the course. Others spend time that might have gone into conventional studying devising elaborate systems for cheating (Profs, follow these links and track what your students already know.) It would be far better to fail a course, take an incomplete, or throw yourself on the mercy of the professor than to be expelled from college. As my dear friend Flavia Fescue points out, even though it “breaks her heart” she catches one or two plagiarists every semester and she takes them down. It is part of our job to take you down (think, selling crack on the steps of a police station, ok?) Historiann concurs. . . “In my experience, it never pays to give a plagiarist a break. Hang’em high, regretfully if you must, but hang’em high, friends.”

Spawn: Parental unit, have you ever caught a plagiarist?

TR: Indeed, and those who cheat on exams. Even though there are some who slip through my net, even before Turnitin.com I have always known when I have snagged a plagiarist that I was right, even prior to being able to prove it. And I can always prove it because I am a far better at research than an undergraduate is at covering up plagiarism.

via If I Had College-Age Children, I Would Give Them This Advice for the Final Weeks of School: Don’t Cheat – Tenured Radical – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

The Tenured Radical and I probably see eye to eye on few things, but we seem to agree on this one.

Yes, it’s possible to get away with it, as so many people do.  But attentive professors can catch it easily, if they take the effort.  (I have lots of small informal writing assignments over the course of my classes, and I get to know each student’s writing style.  I can tell if a paper is written in a different style.  I’m not saying that no one has ever pulled one over on me, but I sure have caught a lot of them in my day.)  And it only takes getting caught once to ruin your whole college career.  What’s significant to note about what Tenured Radical is saying is that now even ostensibly liberal academics like her and her linked colleagues are sick to death, as well as being insulted, by so much academic dishonesty.  So they are adopting a “hang ‘em high” policy.

Please, students reading this from whatever school you attend across this great land, don’t try it.  I mean, it’s wrong in itself, but it could also do you great harm.

HT:  Jackie

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Michael B.

    Speaking of academic dishonesty, when I was in college I had a real gripe against a lot of professors: They do almost nothing to stop cheating. For example, they would recycle old tests, so all the fraternities and sororities would keep their old tests on file. They would assign general, non-specific writing projects, so that people can easily find pre-written papers in foreign databases. They wouldn’t use any kind of anti-cheating system, such as turnitin.com. They made a large percentage of the grade based upon outside work with no exams, so cheaters could know they would never have to prove themselves. Basically, most college professors did the academic equivalent of leaving their car unlocked in an unlighted bad area of town, with their keys in the ignition and the engine idling, and then acted surprised that the car got stolen.

  • Michael B.

    Speaking of academic dishonesty, when I was in college I had a real gripe against a lot of professors: They do almost nothing to stop cheating. For example, they would recycle old tests, so all the fraternities and sororities would keep their old tests on file. They would assign general, non-specific writing projects, so that people can easily find pre-written papers in foreign databases. They wouldn’t use any kind of anti-cheating system, such as turnitin.com. They made a large percentage of the grade based upon outside work with no exams, so cheaters could know they would never have to prove themselves. Basically, most college professors did the academic equivalent of leaving their car unlocked in an unlighted bad area of town, with their keys in the ignition and the engine idling, and then acted surprised that the car got stolen.

  • Dennis Peskey

    The irony of cheating is the person who suffers most is the cheater – this is the person the cheater has harmed the most.
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • Dennis Peskey

    The irony of cheating is the person who suffers most is the cheater – this is the person the cheater has harmed the most.
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • Dan Kempin

    I find it interesting that the same “academia” (to paint with a ludicrously large brush) that pioneered the deconstruction of every type of morality and greets with hostility any attempt to impose external values rises up in indignation over plagiarism. No disrespect intended to the many fine professors who strive to serve and actually teach their students, but my instinct is to chuckle at the attempt to mount a high horse, and the struggle of a professor who takes a hard line on cheating to even explain WHY it is wrong.

  • Dan Kempin

    I find it interesting that the same “academia” (to paint with a ludicrously large brush) that pioneered the deconstruction of every type of morality and greets with hostility any attempt to impose external values rises up in indignation over plagiarism. No disrespect intended to the many fine professors who strive to serve and actually teach their students, but my instinct is to chuckle at the attempt to mount a high horse, and the struggle of a professor who takes a hard line on cheating to even explain WHY it is wrong.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    @ Dan, yeah your brush is a little large there.

    I think it is pretty sad. It’s easier and cheaper to spend a little time studying and/or working a head. If you are smart and disciplined about your study habits you still have lots of time to do the typical college student things. I never missed a football game, went out on Friday with my friends, vegged out Sunday afternoon (made it to church nearly every Sunday morning), stayed up to the wee hours playing video games, etc. When I was on my game, by the time finals came around, I was playing on my roommate’s Playstation and only doing a quick review of old tests to make sure it was fresh; meanwhile, all my friends were pretty much sleeping at the library because they were staying up 24 hours to cram.

    My Food Toxicology prof. had perfect recall and nobody believed that she could catch people plagiarizing 20 page papers in a class with nearly 100 students. Every year she caught at least 3 or 4. Sad really.

    Most of my profs took steps to prevent cheating. Many had multiple versions of the test so that you did not have the same test as the person sitting next to you. No hats allowed at all during a test, nothing on the desk and bags under the seat.

    A low point for me on my view of humanity, is when I caught a kid cheating on a test in my confirmation class. I only hope she learned her lesson that day, I really hope the humiliation of having her pastor talk to her parents with her there about why she was going to have to retake the final hammered home the don’t cheat lesson.

    My personal favorite was a kid who plagiarized Wikipedia while writing a short bio of Martin Luther. Did he really think, I hadn’t read Wikipedia.

    P.S. to any young adults and kids reading this, know this your teachers and profs were students once also and very likely have already seen or heard of the various ways to cheat. Oh and yes, if you are in college, you are an adult, act like it. Take responsibility and do the work.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    @ Dan, yeah your brush is a little large there.

    I think it is pretty sad. It’s easier and cheaper to spend a little time studying and/or working a head. If you are smart and disciplined about your study habits you still have lots of time to do the typical college student things. I never missed a football game, went out on Friday with my friends, vegged out Sunday afternoon (made it to church nearly every Sunday morning), stayed up to the wee hours playing video games, etc. When I was on my game, by the time finals came around, I was playing on my roommate’s Playstation and only doing a quick review of old tests to make sure it was fresh; meanwhile, all my friends were pretty much sleeping at the library because they were staying up 24 hours to cram.

    My Food Toxicology prof. had perfect recall and nobody believed that she could catch people plagiarizing 20 page papers in a class with nearly 100 students. Every year she caught at least 3 or 4. Sad really.

    Most of my profs took steps to prevent cheating. Many had multiple versions of the test so that you did not have the same test as the person sitting next to you. No hats allowed at all during a test, nothing on the desk and bags under the seat.

    A low point for me on my view of humanity, is when I caught a kid cheating on a test in my confirmation class. I only hope she learned her lesson that day, I really hope the humiliation of having her pastor talk to her parents with her there about why she was going to have to retake the final hammered home the don’t cheat lesson.

    My personal favorite was a kid who plagiarized Wikipedia while writing a short bio of Martin Luther. Did he really think, I hadn’t read Wikipedia.

    P.S. to any young adults and kids reading this, know this your teachers and profs were students once also and very likely have already seen or heard of the various ways to cheat. Oh and yes, if you are in college, you are an adult, act like it. Take responsibility and do the work.

  • Michael B.

    @Dennis@2
    “The irony of cheating is the person who suffers most is the cheater – this is the person the cheater has harmed the most.”

    I greatly disagree. Maybe that’s true if the cheater is dumb enough to get caught, and assuming he’s caught, we have to assume that there is going to be a substantial penalty. But the truth is that cheaters often flourish. Cheaters can get better grades, get into better schools, get better jobs, and make more money. We’re lying to ourselves if we say the devil always bites his own tail.

  • Michael B.

    @Dennis@2
    “The irony of cheating is the person who suffers most is the cheater – this is the person the cheater has harmed the most.”

    I greatly disagree. Maybe that’s true if the cheater is dumb enough to get caught, and assuming he’s caught, we have to assume that there is going to be a substantial penalty. But the truth is that cheaters often flourish. Cheaters can get better grades, get into better schools, get better jobs, and make more money. We’re lying to ourselves if we say the devil always bites his own tail.

  • Dust

    Have taught in a few Colleges and Universities for over 10 years and can tell you at least 2 things from my experiences. 1) most students are pretty honest and DO NOT cheat, at least on exams, and 2) most Deans will make it extremely difficult to prove any particular student is a cheater. The kind of evidence and process one must go thru and the kind of rights given to students make it not worthwhile to go down that road.

    And please don’t tell me, not at my school, we are a private Christian school and have high standards. Have taught there and it’s a crock. Because of the high tuition and the kinds of parents of the little darlings there, it’s even more difficult to prove cheating, and double that if it’s an athlete and double that again if they are on scholarship!

    Seems to me the cheap little public community colleges did a much better job of all this, and they require higher academic standards. The biggest problem they have, is no network of alums so the kids graduating have some help with great paying jobs or connections to other schools. Private schools coddle and protect and perpetuate the elite myth, well except maybe the very best ones.

    Sorry this is negative during this happy time of year :(

  • Dust

    Have taught in a few Colleges and Universities for over 10 years and can tell you at least 2 things from my experiences. 1) most students are pretty honest and DO NOT cheat, at least on exams, and 2) most Deans will make it extremely difficult to prove any particular student is a cheater. The kind of evidence and process one must go thru and the kind of rights given to students make it not worthwhile to go down that road.

    And please don’t tell me, not at my school, we are a private Christian school and have high standards. Have taught there and it’s a crock. Because of the high tuition and the kinds of parents of the little darlings there, it’s even more difficult to prove cheating, and double that if it’s an athlete and double that again if they are on scholarship!

    Seems to me the cheap little public community colleges did a much better job of all this, and they require higher academic standards. The biggest problem they have, is no network of alums so the kids graduating have some help with great paying jobs or connections to other schools. Private schools coddle and protect and perpetuate the elite myth, well except maybe the very best ones.

    Sorry this is negative during this happy time of year :(

  • –helen

    Because of the high tuition and the kinds of parents of the little darlings there, it’s even more difficult to prove cheating, and double that if it’s an athlete and double that again if they are on scholarship!
    Yes. :( If you do prove the cheating, (or complete lack of effort, papers not written, etc.) and are not a tenured prof, the student may be let go (altho that takes more than incompetence in one class) but so may the prof/adjunct/TA! for being so rude as to call attention to the cheating/etc. and force the administration’s hand!

    [I've met the equivalent of that confirmation child and I don't think she learned a thing, (though she went to summer school). Far as I could tell, it wasn't cheating if you got away with it, and if you didn't, it was all the teacher's fault for catching you, (as the parent would argue to the "guidance counselor"!]

  • –helen

    Because of the high tuition and the kinds of parents of the little darlings there, it’s even more difficult to prove cheating, and double that if it’s an athlete and double that again if they are on scholarship!
    Yes. :( If you do prove the cheating, (or complete lack of effort, papers not written, etc.) and are not a tenured prof, the student may be let go (altho that takes more than incompetence in one class) but so may the prof/adjunct/TA! for being so rude as to call attention to the cheating/etc. and force the administration’s hand!

    [I've met the equivalent of that confirmation child and I don't think she learned a thing, (though she went to summer school). Far as I could tell, it wasn't cheating if you got away with it, and if you didn't, it was all the teacher's fault for catching you, (as the parent would argue to the "guidance counselor"!]

  • Dust

    right on Helen….yes, Higher Ed is a joke! You can’t even tell the parents, who often pay the bills, how their child is doing in class. You can’t even discuss the student’s standing with another Prof…guess it’s none of their business and could influence their opinion? If you like will copy and paste certain sections of Students Rights out of the handbook and you’ll see even a tenured Prof will think twice about calling out a student for cheating. It’s not worth the extra trouble, and many times, especially if it’s a certain kind of well connected student, in the end the Admin will rule against you. The parents are paying too much to let it all go down the drain just for cheating. Besides everyone does it outside of the University setting, so what’s the big deal. No truly, my experience in Higher Ed has made me very cynical and worried about the future. There aren’t enough good students at good schools (perhaps PH) to make up for all the junk coming out of the schools now days and will be filling rank and file positions. Sooner or later, this mediocrity and corruption of middle class values could bring down much of our culture and economy?

    Cheers!

  • Dust

    right on Helen….yes, Higher Ed is a joke! You can’t even tell the parents, who often pay the bills, how their child is doing in class. You can’t even discuss the student’s standing with another Prof…guess it’s none of their business and could influence their opinion? If you like will copy and paste certain sections of Students Rights out of the handbook and you’ll see even a tenured Prof will think twice about calling out a student for cheating. It’s not worth the extra trouble, and many times, especially if it’s a certain kind of well connected student, in the end the Admin will rule against you. The parents are paying too much to let it all go down the drain just for cheating. Besides everyone does it outside of the University setting, so what’s the big deal. No truly, my experience in Higher Ed has made me very cynical and worried about the future. There aren’t enough good students at good schools (perhaps PH) to make up for all the junk coming out of the schools now days and will be filling rank and file positions. Sooner or later, this mediocrity and corruption of middle class values could bring down much of our culture and economy?

    Cheers!

  • Dennis Peskey

    Michael B (#5) I wasn’t thinking of the cheaters who are dumb enough or lucky enough to get caught; I had in mind those who don’t get caught. What have they learned? How to cheat! Is this the reason you send your children to a university; if so, you don’t need to pay all that tuition to learn how to steal. If you’re not going to college to learn, why bother (unless you vision of a university is a glorified trade school which is a whole different problem and much more serious in nature.)
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • Dennis Peskey

    Michael B (#5) I wasn’t thinking of the cheaters who are dumb enough or lucky enough to get caught; I had in mind those who don’t get caught. What have they learned? How to cheat! Is this the reason you send your children to a university; if so, you don’t need to pay all that tuition to learn how to steal. If you’re not going to college to learn, why bother (unless you vision of a university is a glorified trade school which is a whole different problem and much more serious in nature.)
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • Dust

    Dennis at 9….yes, that’s true for “blue collar” crime, you know, like shoplifting, carjacking, bank robbery? But white collar crime (like on Wall Street) requires a University degree, even for entry level work. And preferably a great University so you can work your way up to the tippy top and do some really serious cheating…and the degree will give you a better chance of figuring out how to get away with it :)

    The more I think about though, am somewhat convinced that our culture sort of romanticizes some crimes (bank robbers like Billy the Kid, Bonnie and Clyde, Butch Cassidy) and we watch movies about sexy crimes like jewel or expensive art heists. Why is that? What kind of message does it send? Dont’ get me wrong, am not complaining and we have free choice to watch whatever..am just saying it’s a mixed signal we send to the kids.

    Personally, cheating in school is sort of like bullying….most people do not do it, but we make an overly self righteous judgement of it and think we can eliminate it with tougher rules or sharper social awareness and/or stigma….it ain’t going to happen, sorry. My take is cheating will take place and eventually it will catch up with them, so go thru the motions of trying to stop it, but it’s not that big of a deal. What is a big deal is the hypocrisy and double standard of all of these kinds of things…the little people get hammered and the well connected get away with it, generally.

    Cheers!

  • Dust

    Dennis at 9….yes, that’s true for “blue collar” crime, you know, like shoplifting, carjacking, bank robbery? But white collar crime (like on Wall Street) requires a University degree, even for entry level work. And preferably a great University so you can work your way up to the tippy top and do some really serious cheating…and the degree will give you a better chance of figuring out how to get away with it :)

    The more I think about though, am somewhat convinced that our culture sort of romanticizes some crimes (bank robbers like Billy the Kid, Bonnie and Clyde, Butch Cassidy) and we watch movies about sexy crimes like jewel or expensive art heists. Why is that? What kind of message does it send? Dont’ get me wrong, am not complaining and we have free choice to watch whatever..am just saying it’s a mixed signal we send to the kids.

    Personally, cheating in school is sort of like bullying….most people do not do it, but we make an overly self righteous judgement of it and think we can eliminate it with tougher rules or sharper social awareness and/or stigma….it ain’t going to happen, sorry. My take is cheating will take place and eventually it will catch up with them, so go thru the motions of trying to stop it, but it’s not that big of a deal. What is a big deal is the hypocrisy and double standard of all of these kinds of things…the little people get hammered and the well connected get away with it, generally.

    Cheers!

  • Cincinnatus

    Maybe if we stopped hinging all future employment prospects on a respectable college GPA, there wouldn’t be as many incentives to cheat. Maybe if we stopped admitting even the most unprepared louts to post-secondary institutions, there wouldn’t be as many incentives to cheat. Etc. Moreover, it’s a cultural thing: most students today find little or no ethical problem with cheating (a purchased essay is worth it for the otherwise meaningless A on the transcript), so you can’t blame the professors for a widespread cultural failing. I.e., by the time professors are busy “indoctrinating” your kids with their “relativist” ideas (nice broad brush, Dan), they’ve already picked up from somewhere the idea that college is just a means to an end, and that any means are appropriate to achieve that end.

    Just some food for thought.

    It’s part of my job to catch cheaters, but any professor will tell you that it’s hopeless to let such a concern become consuming. Take precautions to prevent the typical methods–specify essay assignments, rework exams every year, make sure no one has an iPhone open during exams, mark blue books, etc.–but beyond that, it’s simply not worth it. I have teaching to do. And yes, it’s a total pain in the rear actually to call someone out for cheating. It involves parents, administrators, witnesses, sometimes even lawyers. And after all that, it’s often only possible to give the student an F for the assignment (rather than a deserved expulsion, etc.; too many tuition dollars at stake). You can thank university administrators, not tenured “radicals,” for this discouraging bureaucratic monstrosity.

  • Cincinnatus

    Maybe if we stopped hinging all future employment prospects on a respectable college GPA, there wouldn’t be as many incentives to cheat. Maybe if we stopped admitting even the most unprepared louts to post-secondary institutions, there wouldn’t be as many incentives to cheat. Etc. Moreover, it’s a cultural thing: most students today find little or no ethical problem with cheating (a purchased essay is worth it for the otherwise meaningless A on the transcript), so you can’t blame the professors for a widespread cultural failing. I.e., by the time professors are busy “indoctrinating” your kids with their “relativist” ideas (nice broad brush, Dan), they’ve already picked up from somewhere the idea that college is just a means to an end, and that any means are appropriate to achieve that end.

    Just some food for thought.

    It’s part of my job to catch cheaters, but any professor will tell you that it’s hopeless to let such a concern become consuming. Take precautions to prevent the typical methods–specify essay assignments, rework exams every year, make sure no one has an iPhone open during exams, mark blue books, etc.–but beyond that, it’s simply not worth it. I have teaching to do. And yes, it’s a total pain in the rear actually to call someone out for cheating. It involves parents, administrators, witnesses, sometimes even lawyers. And after all that, it’s often only possible to give the student an F for the assignment (rather than a deserved expulsion, etc.; too many tuition dollars at stake). You can thank university administrators, not tenured “radicals,” for this discouraging bureaucratic monstrosity.

  • Cincinnatus

    And, really, the cheater is the one who suffers most. The student who actually studied and understood Plato is better off, perhaps in an intangible way, than the student who ripped an essay on Plato off the internet.

  • Cincinnatus

    And, really, the cheater is the one who suffers most. The student who actually studied and understood Plato is better off, perhaps in an intangible way, than the student who ripped an essay on Plato off the internet.

  • Dust

    Well said Cincinnatus……used to tell students on opening day when handing out the syllabus, that they will be happy to know that it is ok to cheat in my class…..just don’t get caught!

    This whole cheating thing has got me thinking, just wish I was good at writing down my thoughts. But it starts with the expression “someone cheated death.” It gets me thinking that if you are clever enough to cheat and not get caught, then perhaps that is not so bad? Well, for sure in the case of death! But most folks really are not so bright or so clever (although they may be lucky), so the best advice for all of those folks is not to cheat. You are not that clever or that bright and you will be caught and it will be “your bad” as they say (can’t stand that expression by the way).

    Another thought, am sure everyone has heard the answer to the question “what’s the difference between amateurs and professionals?” One of the answers is that “amateurs BORROW ideas, and professionals STEAL them!” Folks in the creative fields (e.g. art, music) understand this concept intuitively and the ones who can afford the legal representation put out big bucks to protect their creative output. The little guy gets the shaft and is always vulnerable to someone else taking credit for their creation.

    If you think this happens only in regard to unethical and/or unsuccessful people, there is a famous line in the video series “Triumph of the Nerds” (for sure it’s in the original VCR version, but may have been removed from later DVD copies? Heard there was some censoring of the later versions) in which Steve Jobs says something along the lines of “we at Apple have always been unashamedly proud to say we have stolen lots of ideas!” Maybe he is saying, the other difference between amateurs and pros are that the amateurs don’t know the value of their ideas, or how to take them to the next level where they can be of benefit to many more people? And make a lot of money :)

    Another area in which some cheating is tolerated might be in the area of spies and double agents. As long as there is some higher good being done, then it’s ok to cheat the other guy? Something tells me our culture sort of respects (at least romanticizes and/or glamorizes) when someone cheats in a very clever way and gets away with it. We don’t like losers, and if you are dumb enough to cheat and get caught, then you’re a loser….that’s the really serious crime :)

    Cheers!

  • Dust

    Well said Cincinnatus……used to tell students on opening day when handing out the syllabus, that they will be happy to know that it is ok to cheat in my class…..just don’t get caught!

    This whole cheating thing has got me thinking, just wish I was good at writing down my thoughts. But it starts with the expression “someone cheated death.” It gets me thinking that if you are clever enough to cheat and not get caught, then perhaps that is not so bad? Well, for sure in the case of death! But most folks really are not so bright or so clever (although they may be lucky), so the best advice for all of those folks is not to cheat. You are not that clever or that bright and you will be caught and it will be “your bad” as they say (can’t stand that expression by the way).

    Another thought, am sure everyone has heard the answer to the question “what’s the difference between amateurs and professionals?” One of the answers is that “amateurs BORROW ideas, and professionals STEAL them!” Folks in the creative fields (e.g. art, music) understand this concept intuitively and the ones who can afford the legal representation put out big bucks to protect their creative output. The little guy gets the shaft and is always vulnerable to someone else taking credit for their creation.

    If you think this happens only in regard to unethical and/or unsuccessful people, there is a famous line in the video series “Triumph of the Nerds” (for sure it’s in the original VCR version, but may have been removed from later DVD copies? Heard there was some censoring of the later versions) in which Steve Jobs says something along the lines of “we at Apple have always been unashamedly proud to say we have stolen lots of ideas!” Maybe he is saying, the other difference between amateurs and pros are that the amateurs don’t know the value of their ideas, or how to take them to the next level where they can be of benefit to many more people? And make a lot of money :)

    Another area in which some cheating is tolerated might be in the area of spies and double agents. As long as there is some higher good being done, then it’s ok to cheat the other guy? Something tells me our culture sort of respects (at least romanticizes and/or glamorizes) when someone cheats in a very clever way and gets away with it. We don’t like losers, and if you are dumb enough to cheat and get caught, then you’re a loser….that’s the really serious crime :)

    Cheers!

  • Dust

    Link for Steve Jobs quote:

    and a Forbes article on stealing (a type of cheating, no?):

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/timothylee/2011/10/25/yes-google-stole-from-apple-and-thats-a-good-thing/

    Cheers!

  • Dust

    Link for Steve Jobs quote:

    and a Forbes article on stealing (a type of cheating, no?):

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/timothylee/2011/10/25/yes-google-stole-from-apple-and-thats-a-good-thing/

    Cheers!