TIME’s Person of the Year: The Protester

Time Magazine’s Person of the Year for 2011 is, once again, not a person but the personification of a category:  The Protester.   By which is meant the protesters in Egypt, the Middle East, Europe, Russia, and America.  That is to say, Occupy Wall Street.  Strangely, the Tea Party protesters do not count.

See TIME’s Person of the Year 2011 – TIME.

A fitting choice, or not?

Who would YOU nominate for person of the year?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • fws

    My particular christian sect called the Evangelical Lutheran Church was started by a protester. So how could I argue that protest is not important?

    And I note that the protest that blesses me to this day is one that rather rigerously persued all legal and legitimate paths and eschewed anything at all the smelled of end-justifies-means.

    To the extent that this is also true for protesters wherever, we see God’s hand at work in protest.

    God humbles the proud in their conceit and hears the cries of the poor and downtrodden. The two , seemingly polar opposites, of tradition/status quo vs protest/change are both God’s Law at work as it is written in the reason of all men, even those without Bibles.

    And God’s Eternal Will in all of this is for Fatherly Goodness and Mercy to be done among sinful men here on earth. (Luke 18 shows us how this works) . And ultimately, God’s will can be known only in the form of the Holy Cross, placed upon our forehead and breast , our mind and heart, in Holy Baptism, to turn sinful men , most mercifully in Christ, into spotless saints.

    This Baptismal Regeneration is nothing less than the fulfillment of prophecy in Jeremiah 33. Imagine that! ALL you baptized ones here who are reading this are the embodied fulfillment and evidence that that ancient prophecy is, even now in us, being fulfilled!

  • fws

    My particular christian sect called the Evangelical Lutheran Church was started by a protester. So how could I argue that protest is not important?

    And I note that the protest that blesses me to this day is one that rather rigerously persued all legal and legitimate paths and eschewed anything at all the smelled of end-justifies-means.

    To the extent that this is also true for protesters wherever, we see God’s hand at work in protest.

    God humbles the proud in their conceit and hears the cries of the poor and downtrodden. The two , seemingly polar opposites, of tradition/status quo vs protest/change are both God’s Law at work as it is written in the reason of all men, even those without Bibles.

    And God’s Eternal Will in all of this is for Fatherly Goodness and Mercy to be done among sinful men here on earth. (Luke 18 shows us how this works) . And ultimately, God’s will can be known only in the form of the Holy Cross, placed upon our forehead and breast , our mind and heart, in Holy Baptism, to turn sinful men , most mercifully in Christ, into spotless saints.

    This Baptismal Regeneration is nothing less than the fulfillment of prophecy in Jeremiah 33. Imagine that! ALL you baptized ones here who are reading this are the embodied fulfillment and evidence that that ancient prophecy is, even now in us, being fulfilled!

  • fws

    Cinncinatus:

    In a different thread you stated that the “burden of proof” for the rightness of change from the status quo falls upon those seeking change from that status quo.

    I now know that I disagree. The burden of proof for BOTH sides of this equation is two fold:

    1) BOTH sides must continually remain within legitimate means to achieve their ends. Both traditionalists and change agents must make all their actions captive to legitimate and lawful means and ends. The contrast to the rule of Law is the rule of men. This can also be called “Rule by decree.”

    More importantly than even this though is the second test:

    The “creative distruction” that happens on either side, the rules being urged and then enforced, and the change or status quo urged MUST result in evidential, anecdotal Mercy and Goodness being done.

    This evidence or fruit (by their fruit you will know who is being righteous according to God’s Will) is truly the acid test that God’s Law is not only being kept according to it’s killing letter, but also according to God’s Eternal Will even for sinful Old Adams.

    The story of the Good Samaritan is precisely the place to go to , to see how this Goodness and Mercy is made to happen and is providenced by God, even among the samaritans (read prostitutes, homosexuals, liberal ELCA Lutherans, Fag-loving Episcopalians, Atheists, and those who have no respect for either table of the Law as is the case of the Lawless Judge in Luke 18 driven by a conscience dead even to love).

  • fws

    Cinncinatus:

    In a different thread you stated that the “burden of proof” for the rightness of change from the status quo falls upon those seeking change from that status quo.

    I now know that I disagree. The burden of proof for BOTH sides of this equation is two fold:

    1) BOTH sides must continually remain within legitimate means to achieve their ends. Both traditionalists and change agents must make all their actions captive to legitimate and lawful means and ends. The contrast to the rule of Law is the rule of men. This can also be called “Rule by decree.”

    More importantly than even this though is the second test:

    The “creative distruction” that happens on either side, the rules being urged and then enforced, and the change or status quo urged MUST result in evidential, anecdotal Mercy and Goodness being done.

    This evidence or fruit (by their fruit you will know who is being righteous according to God’s Will) is truly the acid test that God’s Law is not only being kept according to it’s killing letter, but also according to God’s Eternal Will even for sinful Old Adams.

    The story of the Good Samaritan is precisely the place to go to , to see how this Goodness and Mercy is made to happen and is providenced by God, even among the samaritans (read prostitutes, homosexuals, liberal ELCA Lutherans, Fag-loving Episcopalians, Atheists, and those who have no respect for either table of the Law as is the case of the Lawless Judge in Luke 18 driven by a conscience dead even to love).

  • Matthew

    Person of the year? Definitely Peyton Manning. Who else can take a top-tier, Super Bowl contender team to winless in just under two years by simply not being there? He has easily got to be the NFL’s most valuable (to his own team, at least) player. Evidently they weren’t really top tier, just the essence of a one-man show.

    And if you don’t believe that particular people are truly unique, and perhaps more special than the rest of us, I offer here exhibit A as a counter-example.

    My friends, I do but jest.

  • Matthew

    Person of the year? Definitely Peyton Manning. Who else can take a top-tier, Super Bowl contender team to winless in just under two years by simply not being there? He has easily got to be the NFL’s most valuable (to his own team, at least) player. Evidently they weren’t really top tier, just the essence of a one-man show.

    And if you don’t believe that particular people are truly unique, and perhaps more special than the rest of us, I offer here exhibit A as a counter-example.

    My friends, I do but jest.

  • Tom Hering

    “Strangely, the Tea Party protesters do not count.”

    The Tea Party, as a protest movement, was confined to the U.S., never really “took it to the streets,” and peaked before December 17, 2010 – the date Mohamed Bouazizi sat himself on fire. That’s the date TIME rightly sees as the start of a global wave of street protests.

  • Tom Hering

    “Strangely, the Tea Party protesters do not count.”

    The Tea Party, as a protest movement, was confined to the U.S., never really “took it to the streets,” and peaked before December 17, 2010 – the date Mohamed Bouazizi sat himself on fire. That’s the date TIME rightly sees as the start of a global wave of street protests.

  • Tom Hering

    “Set” not “sat.” :-D

  • Tom Hering

    “Set” not “sat.” :-D

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I protest this decision.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    I protest this decision.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Lars – :)

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Lars – :)

  • Steve Billingsley

    FWIW, a list of previous persons of the year included
    1938- Adolf Hitler
    1939 – Joseph Stalin
    1942 – Joseph Stalin
    1957 – Nikita Kruschev
    1974 – King Faisal of Saudi Arabia
    1978 – Deng Xiopeng
    1979 – Ayatollah Khomeini
    1983 – Yuri Andropov
    1985 – Deng Xiopeng
    2007 – Vladimir Putin

    Why do I give a rat’s rear end what this rag thinks?

  • Steve Billingsley

    FWIW, a list of previous persons of the year included
    1938- Adolf Hitler
    1939 – Joseph Stalin
    1942 – Joseph Stalin
    1957 – Nikita Kruschev
    1974 – King Faisal of Saudi Arabia
    1978 – Deng Xiopeng
    1979 – Ayatollah Khomeini
    1983 – Yuri Andropov
    1985 – Deng Xiopeng
    2007 – Vladimir Putin

    Why do I give a rat’s rear end what this rag thinks?

  • Tom Hering

    Uh, Steve, you do get it, don’t you? TIME’s person of the year is the person who (in the editors’ estimation) had the most significant impact on the nation or world that year – not the most admirable person they could find?

  • Tom Hering

    Uh, Steve, you do get it, don’t you? TIME’s person of the year is the person who (in the editors’ estimation) had the most significant impact on the nation or world that year – not the most admirable person they could find?

  • SKPeterson

    I’d nominate Merkozy.

  • SKPeterson

    I’d nominate Merkozy.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    I don’t mind the “protesters” but did the Occupy people have any impact outside of making people mad at them? They didn’t affect my feelings or the feelings of others I know concerning big corporations or banks. Their most significant impact was hurting small businesses who just happened to be where the Occupiers squatted.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    I don’t mind the “protesters” but did the Occupy people have any impact outside of making people mad at them? They didn’t affect my feelings or the feelings of others I know concerning big corporations or banks. Their most significant impact was hurting small businesses who just happened to be where the Occupiers squatted.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    No, Tom, Steve doesn’t get it. But personally, I support SKP’s suggestion – their actions might have much longer lasting affects on the world than those of the protestors… Plus, the emergence of a Franco-German alliance (to the exclusion, and possible marginalization of the UK) was the last thing everybody expected.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    No, Tom, Steve doesn’t get it. But personally, I support SKP’s suggestion – their actions might have much longer lasting affects on the world than those of the protestors… Plus, the emergence of a Franco-German alliance (to the exclusion, and possible marginalization of the UK) was the last thing everybody expected.

  • Ned Moerbe

    If I protest their choice, does that get me included?

  • Ned Moerbe

    If I protest their choice, does that get me included?

  • Tom Hering

    Klasie, the Brits have pretty much excluded themselves, haven’t they? Which is why we aren’t talking about Camerkozy instead?

  • Tom Hering

    Klasie, the Brits have pretty much excluded themselves, haven’t they? Which is why we aren’t talking about Camerkozy instead?

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Tom – yes. It’s the ol’ island mentality kicking in…. personally, I think it is a mistake on their (the Brits’ part).

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Tom – yes. It’s the ol’ island mentality kicking in…. personally, I think it is a mistake on their (the Brits’ part).

  • Cincinnatus

    SKPeterson@10: “Merkozy” would indeed be an admirable choice, as she/he/it embodies the problems afflicting all industrialized economies at the moment.

    I don’t object to “the protester,” so long as we recognize that, like other members of Time’s esteemed pantheon, the protesters in mind aren’t particularly admirable, and the fruits of their protests have been of mixed value, at absolute best (I’m not sure that exchanging a tinpot despot for islamofascism is a fair trade).

    fws@2: You rang? I’m not sure specifically how you’re disagreeing with me, except in the statement that both innovators and traditionalists should justify their innovations and/or traditions. But I am unclear regarding your defense of this proposition. In the meantime, I stay by it. Political and social (and religious, etc.) life shouldn’t be an unceasing defense/attack of the status quo. I am not a dialectician. The status quo is, in most cases, operating admirably. Those who wish to innovate must justify well why they desire disruption. I am not thereby opposed to innovation as such. But tradition seldom needs to moderate its ambitions (it has none); innovation does. Sure, Mubarak wasn’t ideal. But I think we agree that the Egyptian protesters didn’t in the least justify the need for their innovations; in fact, they didn’t even have a coherent notion of what these innovations should be–which is often the case with innovators (cf., e.g., the recent healthcare debacle).

  • Cincinnatus

    SKPeterson@10: “Merkozy” would indeed be an admirable choice, as she/he/it embodies the problems afflicting all industrialized economies at the moment.

    I don’t object to “the protester,” so long as we recognize that, like other members of Time’s esteemed pantheon, the protesters in mind aren’t particularly admirable, and the fruits of their protests have been of mixed value, at absolute best (I’m not sure that exchanging a tinpot despot for islamofascism is a fair trade).

    fws@2: You rang? I’m not sure specifically how you’re disagreeing with me, except in the statement that both innovators and traditionalists should justify their innovations and/or traditions. But I am unclear regarding your defense of this proposition. In the meantime, I stay by it. Political and social (and religious, etc.) life shouldn’t be an unceasing defense/attack of the status quo. I am not a dialectician. The status quo is, in most cases, operating admirably. Those who wish to innovate must justify well why they desire disruption. I am not thereby opposed to innovation as such. But tradition seldom needs to moderate its ambitions (it has none); innovation does. Sure, Mubarak wasn’t ideal. But I think we agree that the Egyptian protesters didn’t in the least justify the need for their innovations; in fact, they didn’t even have a coherent notion of what these innovations should be–which is often the case with innovators (cf., e.g., the recent healthcare debacle).

  • Tom Hering

    Klasie, well, at least Sarkozy is in there. I think it was Kohl who warned that what we want is a Europeanized Germany, not a Germanized Europe.

  • Tom Hering

    Klasie, well, at least Sarkozy is in there. I think it was Kohl who warned that what we want is a Europeanized Germany, not a Germanized Europe.

  • Cincinnatus

    *Also, I admit to having a rather idiosyncratic view of the status quo. For instance, in the United States, I would be loathe to consider the New Deal artifice as the status quo, properly understood. It is a persisting innovation.

  • Cincinnatus

    *Also, I admit to having a rather idiosyncratic view of the status quo. For instance, in the United States, I would be loathe to consider the New Deal artifice as the status quo, properly understood. It is a persisting innovation.

  • Steve Billingsley

    I understand the criteria.

    But again, why should I care who they name as the person of the year?

  • Steve Billingsley

    I understand the criteria.

    But again, why should I care who they name as the person of the year?

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Steve @ 19 – well – apparently you do care enough to research it to show us how little you care –

    As the saying goes, methinks the lady protesteth too much…. :)

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Steve @ 19 – well – apparently you do care enough to research it to show us how little you care –

    As the saying goes, methinks the lady protesteth too much…. :)

  • Tom Hering

    Steve, if you’re saying it doesn’t matter to you who TIME names person of the year, that’s perfectly fine. If you’re saying it shouldn’t matter to anyone else, and we should all just ignore this yearly cultural ritual, then give us good reasons to dismiss it.

  • Tom Hering

    Steve, if you’re saying it doesn’t matter to you who TIME names person of the year, that’s perfectly fine. If you’re saying it shouldn’t matter to anyone else, and we should all just ignore this yearly cultural ritual, then give us good reasons to dismiss it.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Tom – well, I there was this funny line earlier this week about the Cypriot president who was a bit miffed about the overwhelming force of the Merkzy leadership – his words “we really need to organise revolution against them, but everyone of us need at least one of them for something or other!”. In other words, the age-old heart of Europe seems to be coming together by necessity, and the rest of it is being dragged along, by necessity. Charlemagne’s children are acknowledging their filial relationship again. Thus Kohl is half wrong, and half right :) – Europe has what it always had, but never wanted to acknowledge, a Franco-German heart, and the two sides are coming to terms with that, with Merkozy at their head. For the moment, at least. Will it last though, is the question. Time will tell.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Tom – well, I there was this funny line earlier this week about the Cypriot president who was a bit miffed about the overwhelming force of the Merkzy leadership – his words “we really need to organise revolution against them, but everyone of us need at least one of them for something or other!”. In other words, the age-old heart of Europe seems to be coming together by necessity, and the rest of it is being dragged along, by necessity. Charlemagne’s children are acknowledging their filial relationship again. Thus Kohl is half wrong, and half right :) – Europe has what it always had, but never wanted to acknowledge, a Franco-German heart, and the two sides are coming to terms with that, with Merkozy at their head. For the moment, at least. Will it last though, is the question. Time will tell.

  • John

    Lame. I think I’d probably go with Grover Norquist.

  • John

    Lame. I think I’d probably go with Grover Norquist.

  • DonS

    “Who would YOU nominate for person of the year?”

    Picking “The Protester” is a typical recent, lame, TIME ploy. When the police finally broke up the Occupy L.A. encampment, they had to wear hazmat suits and cleared 36 tons of hazardous waste from the park. Wasted lives is nothing to celebrate. In some other countries, where government oppression is an issue, and the protesters are bravely fighting for individual liberty against that oppression (i.e. Iran), rather than simply whining that they’re entitled to the stuff of other people, I’m all for celebrating them. But they are a small minority, willing to sacrifice their lives for the principle of human rights and opportunity.

    Steve Jobs would have been a much better pick. We have completely lost sight of celebrating those who are productive and make honest contributions to society, and that’s a shame.

  • DonS

    “Who would YOU nominate for person of the year?”

    Picking “The Protester” is a typical recent, lame, TIME ploy. When the police finally broke up the Occupy L.A. encampment, they had to wear hazmat suits and cleared 36 tons of hazardous waste from the park. Wasted lives is nothing to celebrate. In some other countries, where government oppression is an issue, and the protesters are bravely fighting for individual liberty against that oppression (i.e. Iran), rather than simply whining that they’re entitled to the stuff of other people, I’m all for celebrating them. But they are a small minority, willing to sacrifice their lives for the principle of human rights and opportunity.

    Steve Jobs would have been a much better pick. We have completely lost sight of celebrating those who are productive and make honest contributions to society, and that’s a shame.

  • SAL

    I think it’s a bit premature to suggest protesters will be the most influential group in 2011.

    What’s certain is who was not the most influential Person of 2011. The 2008 pick.

  • SAL

    I think it’s a bit premature to suggest protesters will be the most influential group in 2011.

    What’s certain is who was not the most influential Person of 2011. The 2008 pick.

  • –helen

    Plus, the emergence of a Franco-German alliance (to the exclusion, and possible marginalization of the UK) was the last thing everybody expected.
    But the Time cover was possibly at print when that finally emerged.

    “The Protestor” is not only the “Occupy [US]“, is it?
    The protest groups in the middle east have probably changed things more in their area… at least for awhile.

  • –helen

    Plus, the emergence of a Franco-German alliance (to the exclusion, and possible marginalization of the UK) was the last thing everybody expected.
    But the Time cover was possibly at print when that finally emerged.

    “The Protestor” is not only the “Occupy [US]“, is it?
    The protest groups in the middle east have probably changed things more in their area… at least for awhile.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Helen – you are likely quite right.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Helen – you are likely quite right.

  • trotk

    I have no idea why TIME didn’t pick Tim Tebow.

  • trotk

    I have no idea why TIME didn’t pick Tim Tebow.

  • Mary

    I thought it would have been Gabby Giffords. I guess when it was revealed that the shooter was mentally ill and not a person who was set off by those “nasty Republicans” and their “dangerous” rhetoric, it dropped down on the importance scale. For a while though the rhetoric did cool off a bit. Now it’s back to full scale attack from both sides.

  • Mary

    I thought it would have been Gabby Giffords. I guess when it was revealed that the shooter was mentally ill and not a person who was set off by those “nasty Republicans” and their “dangerous” rhetoric, it dropped down on the importance scale. For a while though the rhetoric did cool off a bit. Now it’s back to full scale attack from both sides.

  • Lou G.

    I agreed with most everyone else here. Occupy Wall Street protesters are an unfortunate exclusion to the influence that protesters have had worldwide over the past year. American occupiers are mostly the butt of popular jokes and will likely not influence any significant change. In fact, the Occupy Wall Street ppl will likely put the fire out of populist outrage over corporate greed. The result will be highly counterproductive (but then again, we may be saying the same thing about countries in the Middle East soon, although I hope not.)

  • Lou G.

    I agreed with most everyone else here. Occupy Wall Street protesters are an unfortunate exclusion to the influence that protesters have had worldwide over the past year. American occupiers are mostly the butt of popular jokes and will likely not influence any significant change. In fact, the Occupy Wall Street ppl will likely put the fire out of populist outrage over corporate greed. The result will be highly counterproductive (but then again, we may be saying the same thing about countries in the Middle East soon, although I hope not.)

  • http://seeingbeauty.wordpress.com Noelle Elise

    Person of the Year?
    The Advocate. This is the human rights generation.

  • http://seeingbeauty.wordpress.com Noelle Elise

    Person of the Year?
    The Advocate. This is the human rights generation.

  • Lou G.

    On a side note, (but with regard to protesters), we might have a whole new group of protesters crop up from federal government workers, if Congress doesn’t pass a budget by tomorrow:

    http://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/2011/12/15/house-republicans-introduce-15b-spending-bill-as-government-shutdown-looms/

  • Lou G.

    On a side note, (but with regard to protesters), we might have a whole new group of protesters crop up from federal government workers, if Congress doesn’t pass a budget by tomorrow:

    http://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/2011/12/15/house-republicans-introduce-15b-spending-bill-as-government-shutdown-looms/

  • SKPeterson

    Noelle @ 31- Help me out here. Who exactly? Generally, Time considers the person(s) who have had the most influence on the news cycle, however loosely defined that may be. Hence the 2008 pick SAL disparagingly notes. Also, it is why I think Merkozy is a better choice, as this entity dominates much of the world news cycle (at least outside the US), but are also of far more lasting and substantial importance than The Protestor. The Protestor is a cutesy choice, and an unfortunate reminder that Time is rapidly taking its place alongside the National Enquirer in informing the national discourse.

    So, taking “newsworthiness” into consideration, why The Advocate? This is something I have apparently missed in reading/watching the news. I’m curious as to your suggestion.

  • SKPeterson

    Noelle @ 31- Help me out here. Who exactly? Generally, Time considers the person(s) who have had the most influence on the news cycle, however loosely defined that may be. Hence the 2008 pick SAL disparagingly notes. Also, it is why I think Merkozy is a better choice, as this entity dominates much of the world news cycle (at least outside the US), but are also of far more lasting and substantial importance than The Protestor. The Protestor is a cutesy choice, and an unfortunate reminder that Time is rapidly taking its place alongside the National Enquirer in informing the national discourse.

    So, taking “newsworthiness” into consideration, why The Advocate? This is something I have apparently missed in reading/watching the news. I’m curious as to your suggestion.

  • http://seeingbeauty.wordpress.com Noelle Elise

    SKPeterson @33 -

    “Tech giant Google announced Wednesday it is donating $11.5 million to several coalitions fighting to end the modern-day slavery of some 27 million people around the world.” (ABC)

    This was “the largest-ever corporate grant devoted to the advocacy, intervention and rescue of people being held, forced to work or provide sex against their will.”

    This, and Nicholas Kristof’s influential human rights journalism (especially his coverage of a Cambodian brothel raid this fall) brought advocacy immediately to mind (my mind, at least) as a highlight of news and culture in 2011. I concur; advocacy may not have had more influence on the news than protest, but I believe it HAS had more influence on people.

  • http://seeingbeauty.wordpress.com Noelle Elise

    SKPeterson @33 -

    “Tech giant Google announced Wednesday it is donating $11.5 million to several coalitions fighting to end the modern-day slavery of some 27 million people around the world.” (ABC)

    This was “the largest-ever corporate grant devoted to the advocacy, intervention and rescue of people being held, forced to work or provide sex against their will.”

    This, and Nicholas Kristof’s influential human rights journalism (especially his coverage of a Cambodian brothel raid this fall) brought advocacy immediately to mind (my mind, at least) as a highlight of news and culture in 2011. I concur; advocacy may not have had more influence on the news than protest, but I believe it HAS had more influence on people.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    The PERSON of the year is a generic “protester”?

    Time’s Person of the Year has jumped the shark.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    The PERSON of the year is a generic “protester”?

    Time’s Person of the Year has jumped the shark.

  • http://marcusampe.wordpress.com/ Marcus Ampe

    For Christians the happenings of protest and the climatological changes and disasters are clearly signs of the End Times predicted in the Word of God, the Bible. Either we can ignore it or listen to what we do have to do next and take the right action.

  • http://marcusampe.wordpress.com/ Marcus Ampe

    For Christians the happenings of protest and the climatological changes and disasters are clearly signs of the End Times predicted in the Word of God, the Bible. Either we can ignore it or listen to what we do have to do next and take the right action.

  • Pingback: The Protester named 2011 Person of the Year by Time Magazine | Marcus' s Space

  • Pingback: The Protester named 2011 Person of the Year by Time Magazine | Marcus' s Space

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    I protest mr Ampe’s occuption of this thread….

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    I protest mr Ampe’s occuption of this thread….

  • SKPeterson

    Noelle @ 34 – Okay, I can see your point. I might not call it The Advocate, though. I would also hesitate to put it as a Person of the Year – it’s too transitory a designation for the things you bring up. Third World poverty, sex trafficking, slavery, disease and starvation are long-term problems and will require continued, sustained efforts to alleviate.

    Marcus @ 36 – Wars and rumors of wars, etc., etc. We’ve been in the End Times for 2000 years. Maybe it will wrap up with the Eschaton tomorrow, maybe in another 2000 years. What’s your point?

    KK @ 37 – don’t worry. Remember the U.S. will occupy Ottawa very, very soon and throw the monarchist tyrants out. You really do want to be free don’t you?

  • SKPeterson

    Noelle @ 34 – Okay, I can see your point. I might not call it The Advocate, though. I would also hesitate to put it as a Person of the Year – it’s too transitory a designation for the things you bring up. Third World poverty, sex trafficking, slavery, disease and starvation are long-term problems and will require continued, sustained efforts to alleviate.

    Marcus @ 36 – Wars and rumors of wars, etc., etc. We’ve been in the End Times for 2000 years. Maybe it will wrap up with the Eschaton tomorrow, maybe in another 2000 years. What’s your point?

    KK @ 37 – don’t worry. Remember the U.S. will occupy Ottawa very, very soon and throw the monarchist tyrants out. You really do want to be free don’t you?


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X