Political developments

Michele Bachmann Drops Out of Presidential Race – ABC News.  If her 6% were to go to Santorum, he’d be a big winner in the Iowa caucus.  Won’t her fans go to him rather than to Romney?

Rick Perry will stay in the race for now.  He went back to Texas to consider his next move, but he announced that he will run in South Carolina.  What I want to know is how a state governor can just take off and run for president.  I come back to the office after a few days off for Christmas and I’m swamped just getting caught up with e-mails!  What must it be like to drop back in to a governor’s office?

John McCain will endorse Mitt Romney. Just what Romney needs!  Won’t Republicans see his similarities to their last losing candidate?

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “What I want to know is how a state governor can just take off and run for president.”

    Governor of Texas is a pretty weak position with very little authority. His main authority and source of power now is in making appointments especially for judicial vacancies. The Lieutenant Governor is the power position in Texas, as is the Railroad commission chairman.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “What I want to know is how a state governor can just take off and run for president.”

    Governor of Texas is a pretty weak position with very little authority. His main authority and source of power now is in making appointments especially for judicial vacancies. The Lieutenant Governor is the power position in Texas, as is the Railroad commission chairman.

  • SKPeterson

    McCain and Romney – a perfect example of the intellectual bankruptcy of the Republican establishment. I understand they think Romney is “electable” but do they think he has coattails? I think Romney is pretty much a no-tail candidate. Perhaps after a defeat at the hands of the 4th worst president ever, the rank and file Republicans will ignore these people going forward.

  • SKPeterson

    McCain and Romney – a perfect example of the intellectual bankruptcy of the Republican establishment. I understand they think Romney is “electable” but do they think he has coattails? I think Romney is pretty much a no-tail candidate. Perhaps after a defeat at the hands of the 4th worst president ever, the rank and file Republicans will ignore these people going forward.

  • Larry Wilson

    Yes, I think you’re right that Michele Bachmann’s supporters would prefer Santorum to Romney. But what I’d like to know is, what is the substantial difference between Rick Santorum and George W. Bush, and will it really be helpful (or conservative) to go back there? As Rick Santorum’s nephew, John Garver, put it, “If you want another big-government politician who supports the status quo to run our country, you should vote for my uncle, Rick Santorum. America is based on a strong belief in individual liberty. My uncle’s interventionist policies, both domestic and foreign, stem from his irrational fear of freedom not working. It is not the government’s job to dictate to individuals how they must live. The Constitution was designed to protect individual liberty. My Uncle Rick cannot fathom a society in which people cooperate and work with each other freely. When Republicans were spending so much money under President Bush, my uncle was right there along with them as a senator. The reason we have so much debt is not only because of Democrats, but also because of big-spending Republicans like my Uncle Rick.” From: http://dailycaller.com/2012/01/03/the-trouble-with-my-uncle-rick-santorum/#ixzz1iUaE4ooM

  • Larry Wilson

    Yes, I think you’re right that Michele Bachmann’s supporters would prefer Santorum to Romney. But what I’d like to know is, what is the substantial difference between Rick Santorum and George W. Bush, and will it really be helpful (or conservative) to go back there? As Rick Santorum’s nephew, John Garver, put it, “If you want another big-government politician who supports the status quo to run our country, you should vote for my uncle, Rick Santorum. America is based on a strong belief in individual liberty. My uncle’s interventionist policies, both domestic and foreign, stem from his irrational fear of freedom not working. It is not the government’s job to dictate to individuals how they must live. The Constitution was designed to protect individual liberty. My Uncle Rick cannot fathom a society in which people cooperate and work with each other freely. When Republicans were spending so much money under President Bush, my uncle was right there along with them as a senator. The reason we have so much debt is not only because of Democrats, but also because of big-spending Republicans like my Uncle Rick.” From: http://dailycaller.com/2012/01/03/the-trouble-with-my-uncle-rick-santorum/#ixzz1iUaE4ooM

  • http://www.semicolonblog.com Sherry Early

    sg is right. We don’t allow our governor or our legislature in Texas to do too much, a style of governing that Perry wants to apply to the U.S. Congress as well. I don’t think it would work too well to have Congress only meet for a couple of months every other year, but it might be worth trying. Maybe Governor Perry thinks that if he becomes president and if he can limit Congress, he will get all of the power he’s missing in Texas.

  • http://www.semicolonblog.com Sherry Early

    sg is right. We don’t allow our governor or our legislature in Texas to do too much, a style of governing that Perry wants to apply to the U.S. Congress as well. I don’t think it would work too well to have Congress only meet for a couple of months every other year, but it might be worth trying. Maybe Governor Perry thinks that if he becomes president and if he can limit Congress, he will get all of the power he’s missing in Texas.

  • Dan

    Larry –

    It’s legitimate to ask Santorum where he is different from Bush on policy. Santorum supported Bush. Did he do that solely because he’s politically pragmatic, or because he was on board 100%? I think he’s begun to map that out, but will need to answer more.

    Much more interesting to me is the debate on the nature of liberty between Paul and Santorum. Santorum wrote, “True liberty is not ‘the freedom to be left alone,’ but ‘the freedom to attend to one’s duties to God, to family, and to neighbors.’” Discussing what true liberty is, I think will be good for the country.

    And along those lines, I think Santorum is raising a great point about the connection between our country’s moral trends and the viability of small government. In NH, Santourm was asked about laws to stop congress from insider trading. Santorum pointed out that there shouldn’t need to be a law, but because congress has acted unethically, now there will need to be 1) a law and 2) enforcers of the law monitoring congress, and so government grows.

  • Dan

    Larry –

    It’s legitimate to ask Santorum where he is different from Bush on policy. Santorum supported Bush. Did he do that solely because he’s politically pragmatic, or because he was on board 100%? I think he’s begun to map that out, but will need to answer more.

    Much more interesting to me is the debate on the nature of liberty between Paul and Santorum. Santorum wrote, “True liberty is not ‘the freedom to be left alone,’ but ‘the freedom to attend to one’s duties to God, to family, and to neighbors.’” Discussing what true liberty is, I think will be good for the country.

    And along those lines, I think Santorum is raising a great point about the connection between our country’s moral trends and the viability of small government. In NH, Santourm was asked about laws to stop congress from insider trading. Santorum pointed out that there shouldn’t need to be a law, but because congress has acted unethically, now there will need to be 1) a law and 2) enforcers of the law monitoring congress, and so government grows.

  • SKPeterson

    Dan @ 5 – I’d like to know if Santorum really thinks that those two versions of liberty are mutually exclusive. I don’t. Try this out:

    True liberty is the freedom to be left alone to do whatever we want, tempered by the wisdom not to. In being left alone by the government, we are then freed to attend to our vocations and responsibilities to our neighbor as ordained by God.

    I just don’t see Santorum as much of a freedom from government kind of guy. Not that Romney or Obama are any different, mind you.

  • SKPeterson

    Dan @ 5 – I’d like to know if Santorum really thinks that those two versions of liberty are mutually exclusive. I don’t. Try this out:

    True liberty is the freedom to be left alone to do whatever we want, tempered by the wisdom not to. In being left alone by the government, we are then freed to attend to our vocations and responsibilities to our neighbor as ordained by God.

    I just don’t see Santorum as much of a freedom from government kind of guy. Not that Romney or Obama are any different, mind you.

  • Dan

    SKP -

    It (the liberty definition) is a good question and why I think it would be a good debate. My view is that conservatives like Santorum want freedom from government to an extent. They still believe the government has a role. Romans 13 tells the government has a role. But setting the line of which wrongdoers should be punished and which cannot will and should be debated.

    But I don’t want someone who thinks the government has no role. I won’t be (as) free to follow my vocation if a gang takes over my neighborhood. I won’t be free if a hostile country nukes my city.

    I think Santorum and Obama are significantly different. I’m not sure where Romney stands personally, but I suspect the party will hold him close to his currently stated positions if elected.

  • Dan

    SKP -

    It (the liberty definition) is a good question and why I think it would be a good debate. My view is that conservatives like Santorum want freedom from government to an extent. They still believe the government has a role. Romans 13 tells the government has a role. But setting the line of which wrongdoers should be punished and which cannot will and should be debated.

    But I don’t want someone who thinks the government has no role. I won’t be (as) free to follow my vocation if a gang takes over my neighborhood. I won’t be free if a hostile country nukes my city.

    I think Santorum and Obama are significantly different. I’m not sure where Romney stands personally, but I suspect the party will hold him close to his currently stated positions if elected.

  • Cincinnatus

    Romney is a sociopath.

    I rather like this characterization I just stumbled across from Daniel Larison (responding to a critic) over at The American Conservative:

    “Romney is such a monumental fraud that the last six years of his life have been little more than an elaborate con done for the sake of acquiring enormous power. Romney is a monumental fraud, but that is not something anyone should want. Romney is a political chameleon, which makes him completely untrustworthy. No one has any idea where he stands with Romney, because where Romney stands is never the same place for very long. It is a given that Romney will govern in whatever way is most advantageous to him, but that is not reassuring at all. It means that Romney will play the demagogue as often as he thinks it is useful. If he somehow won the general election, he would conclude that the public approved of a campaign organized around a glaring lie, and he would govern with the same contempt for the truth and the intelligence of his audience. What Kristof seems to miss here is that this makes him more likely to endorse convenient ideological fictions rather than less, and it makes him more likely to go along with whatever the prevailing view in his party happens to be whether he ‘really’ agrees with it or not.”

    Of course, the same words could probably apply to Obama. Such is the state of contemporary American mass politics.

  • Cincinnatus

    Romney is a sociopath.

    I rather like this characterization I just stumbled across from Daniel Larison (responding to a critic) over at The American Conservative:

    “Romney is such a monumental fraud that the last six years of his life have been little more than an elaborate con done for the sake of acquiring enormous power. Romney is a monumental fraud, but that is not something anyone should want. Romney is a political chameleon, which makes him completely untrustworthy. No one has any idea where he stands with Romney, because where Romney stands is never the same place for very long. It is a given that Romney will govern in whatever way is most advantageous to him, but that is not reassuring at all. It means that Romney will play the demagogue as often as he thinks it is useful. If he somehow won the general election, he would conclude that the public approved of a campaign organized around a glaring lie, and he would govern with the same contempt for the truth and the intelligence of his audience. What Kristof seems to miss here is that this makes him more likely to endorse convenient ideological fictions rather than less, and it makes him more likely to go along with whatever the prevailing view in his party happens to be whether he ‘really’ agrees with it or not.”

    Of course, the same words could probably apply to Obama. Such is the state of contemporary American mass politics.

  • Cincinnatus

    Dan@7:

    “But I don’t want someone who thinks the government has no role. I won’t be (as) free to follow my vocation if a gang takes over my neighborhood.”

    I do. Where can I find such a candidate, because I know of none in American politics?

  • Cincinnatus

    Dan@7:

    “But I don’t want someone who thinks the government has no role. I won’t be (as) free to follow my vocation if a gang takes over my neighborhood.”

    I do. Where can I find such a candidate, because I know of none in American politics?

  • Bob

    McCain endorsing Romney?

    One loser endorsing another?

    Is this really gonna help The Cause?

    Truth is, Romney will be a loser. He might as well be a Scientologist, and most Americans wouldn’t vote for one of them for president, either.

    Only 5.4% of Iowans even gave a damn and showed up to vote.

    I like what James Carville said — getting Repubs. to vote for Mitt is like trying to get your dog to take a pill — they keep vomiting it up.

    Have fun, righties.

  • Bob

    McCain endorsing Romney?

    One loser endorsing another?

    Is this really gonna help The Cause?

    Truth is, Romney will be a loser. He might as well be a Scientologist, and most Americans wouldn’t vote for one of them for president, either.

    Only 5.4% of Iowans even gave a damn and showed up to vote.

    I like what James Carville said — getting Repubs. to vote for Mitt is like trying to get your dog to take a pill — they keep vomiting it up.

    Have fun, righties.

  • Grace

    Bob @10

    “Truth is, Romney will be a loser. He might as well be a Scientologist, and most Americans wouldn’t vote for one of them for president, either. “

    Right you are. Many individuals KNOW what Scientology is, BUT don’t understand the core beliefs of Mormons. If they did KNOW, I doubt they would ever vote for Romney.

  • Grace

    Bob @10

    “Truth is, Romney will be a loser. He might as well be a Scientologist, and most Americans wouldn’t vote for one of them for president, either. “

    Right you are. Many individuals KNOW what Scientology is, BUT don’t understand the core beliefs of Mormons. If they did KNOW, I doubt they would ever vote for Romney.

  • Grace

    Larry @ 3

    Rick Santorum’s nephew, John Garver, is a 19 year old kid. His remarks have a distinctive bad smell of intense jealousy, and a need for attention.

  • Grace

    Larry @ 3

    Rick Santorum’s nephew, John Garver, is a 19 year old kid. His remarks have a distinctive bad smell of intense jealousy, and a need for attention.

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace@12:

    In fact, I do know and understand the core beliefs of Mormons. They have nothing to do with my assessment of Romney as a political candidate.

    In fact again, I have several Mormon friends and colleagues.

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace@12:

    In fact, I do know and understand the core beliefs of Mormons. They have nothing to do with my assessment of Romney as a political candidate.

    In fact again, I have several Mormon friends and colleagues.

  • Cincinnatus

    Also, Grace, I love how anyone who critiques anyone or anything you like is “jealous.”

    Why don’t I relish Tebow? Because I was mocked as a child and am envious of his football prowess, of course. Why would Santorum’s nephew criticize his policies? Obviously because he is a jealous little ingrate who thinks he should be President instead.

    So how about it, Grace? Are you just jealous of Romney and his Mormonism?

  • Cincinnatus

    Also, Grace, I love how anyone who critiques anyone or anything you like is “jealous.”

    Why don’t I relish Tebow? Because I was mocked as a child and am envious of his football prowess, of course. Why would Santorum’s nephew criticize his policies? Obviously because he is a jealous little ingrate who thinks he should be President instead.

    So how about it, Grace? Are you just jealous of Romney and his Mormonism?

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus @ 14

    Your guesses as to what I believe or think are immature.

    “So how about it, Grace? Are you just jealous of Romney and his Mormonism?”

    Another witless comment!

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus @ 14

    Your guesses as to what I believe or think are immature.

    “So how about it, Grace? Are you just jealous of Romney and his Mormonism?”

    Another witless comment!

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace@15:

    Similarly, I would suggest that it is equally witless to assign baselessly John Garver’s motives to petty “jealousy.” Maybe he is jealous, but you certainly have no way of knowing that, and that’s absolutely not an acceptable reason to dismiss his entire argument (which is actually rather insightful).

    Just like it’s “witless” to dismiss my entire argument against Tebow by labeling it jealousy, etc.

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace@15:

    Similarly, I would suggest that it is equally witless to assign baselessly John Garver’s motives to petty “jealousy.” Maybe he is jealous, but you certainly have no way of knowing that, and that’s absolutely not an acceptable reason to dismiss his entire argument (which is actually rather insightful).

    Just like it’s “witless” to dismiss my entire argument against Tebow by labeling it jealousy, etc.

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus @ 16

    When kids are but 19 years of age, they often rebel against any and all authority. Nasty public outbursts, when aimed at a family member who’s reputation and family life is stellar, .. amounts to questions and a critical view of many who exhibit jealousy – gleaning for themselves public attention. Public attention is just what John Garver is receiving, however RESPECT isn’t in the mix.

    If John Garver were my son, my husband and I would be embarrassed at such remarks, aimed at one of our siblings. Jealousy is a big part of many peoples lives. When it shows its ugly head at such a young age, it’s a shame.

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus @ 16

    When kids are but 19 years of age, they often rebel against any and all authority. Nasty public outbursts, when aimed at a family member who’s reputation and family life is stellar, .. amounts to questions and a critical view of many who exhibit jealousy – gleaning for themselves public attention. Public attention is just what John Garver is receiving, however RESPECT isn’t in the mix.

    If John Garver were my son, my husband and I would be embarrassed at such remarks, aimed at one of our siblings. Jealousy is a big part of many peoples lives. When it shows its ugly head at such a young age, it’s a shame.


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