The chicken’s name was Colin

Have you seen Portlandia, the TV sketch show that skewers today’s fashions and mores, as manifested in Portland, Oregon?

Nothing against locavores!  Or localism!  Or Portland!   It’s just the pose and the righteousness that begs for satire.  (And if you care so much for Colin, why are you going to eat him?)

HT:  Joanna

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • DRG

    Chicken = Female
    Colin = male name
    So concerned about every detail and yet so blind to the gender of the name—or maybe Colin had a sex change!

    too funny!

  • DRG

    Chicken = Female
    Colin = male name
    So concerned about every detail and yet so blind to the gender of the name—or maybe Colin had a sex change!

    too funny!

  • Jimmy Veith

    Good point DRG. But I, for one, insist that the chickens that I eat be raised gender neutral.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Good point DRG. But I, for one, insist that the chickens that I eat be raised gender neutral.

  • SKPeterson

    You can’t see him in this shot, but just off to the right is Todd, holding sway with a locally grown avocado (named Pepe) salad.

  • SKPeterson

    You can’t see him in this shot, but just off to the right is Todd, holding sway with a locally grown avocado (named Pepe) salad.

  • SKPeterson

    And, Todd, I’ve never seen the show, so I’m asking from ignorance. Is the dark-haired actress the (ex?) lead guitarist from Sleater-Kinney? Sure looks like her, and this scene sure is rock-n-roll fun.

  • SKPeterson

    And, Todd, I’ve never seen the show, so I’m asking from ignorance. Is the dark-haired actress the (ex?) lead guitarist from Sleater-Kinney? Sure looks like her, and this scene sure is rock-n-roll fun.

  • Tom Hering

    I buy eggs that come from cage-free chickens fed a vegetarian diet. Now I’m always going to wonder what the names of those twelve brown ovoids were going to be. Thanks a lot.

    (In my non-trendy defense, I buy cage-free eggs, and all my vegetarian items, at the WalMart SuperCenter. The local WalMart SuperCenter.)

  • Tom Hering

    I buy eggs that come from cage-free chickens fed a vegetarian diet. Now I’m always going to wonder what the names of those twelve brown ovoids were going to be. Thanks a lot.

    (In my non-trendy defense, I buy cage-free eggs, and all my vegetarian items, at the WalMart SuperCenter. The local WalMart SuperCenter.)

  • Kirk

    @SK

    Yes, it’s Carrie Brownstein.

    And Portlandia is amazing.

    My fav:

  • Kirk

    @SK

    Yes, it’s Carrie Brownstein.

    And Portlandia is amazing.

    My fav:

  • SKPeterson

    Thanks, Kirk! I’m not losing it, then. At least not too much.

  • SKPeterson

    Thanks, Kirk! I’m not losing it, then. At least not too much.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    Love it! People like that (almost) come into the store where I work and ask such questions about…the pastrami.

  • http://theoldadam.wordpress.com Steve Martin

    Love it! People like that (almost) come into the store where I work and ask such questions about…the pastrami.

  • Chelly

    I live in Portland and I love the show. Portlandia is satire but from my vantage point it looks more like a documentary.

  • Chelly

    I live in Portland and I love the show. Portlandia is satire but from my vantage point it looks more like a documentary.

  • Dennis Peskey

    Aaaahhhhh……………..???????????? The problem with satire is the grain of truth contained therein; or as my dear, departed daddy instructed me – If you don’t want to hear the answer, don’t ask the question.
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • Dennis Peskey

    Aaaahhhhh……………..???????????? The problem with satire is the grain of truth contained therein; or as my dear, departed daddy instructed me – If you don’t want to hear the answer, don’t ask the question.
    Pax,
    Dennis

  • http://pseudepigraphic.blogspot.com Trent

    I’m from Corvallis, Portland’s uppity little cousin ninety-miles to the south. Portland was the “big city” growing up and a frequent destination for any number of reasons (chief among them being the airport). I have to agree with Chelly @9; this particular scene especially is quite plausible in real life, right down the waitress holding the seats while they rush to check out the farm. It’s like she’s conscious that she thinks it’s a little excessive, yet she feels bad for feeling that way at the very same time…

    Ah, the infinite regression of West Coast weirdness…

  • http://pseudepigraphic.blogspot.com Trent

    I’m from Corvallis, Portland’s uppity little cousin ninety-miles to the south. Portland was the “big city” growing up and a frequent destination for any number of reasons (chief among them being the airport). I have to agree with Chelly @9; this particular scene especially is quite plausible in real life, right down the waitress holding the seats while they rush to check out the farm. It’s like she’s conscious that she thinks it’s a little excessive, yet she feels bad for feeling that way at the very same time…

    Ah, the infinite regression of West Coast weirdness…

  • Cincinnatus

    Great show. I also like the clips about the feminist bookstore, though I’m too lazy to post. Youtube it.

  • Cincinnatus

    Great show. I also like the clips about the feminist bookstore, though I’m too lazy to post. Youtube it.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Let’s see … let me just check my outrage primer real quick and …

    Why, the nerve! How dare they! This show is mocking the good and normal people of Portland, Oregon, and it is hateful! Just hateful! Petty parochialism, this is!

    Ahem. Is that about right?

    Anyhow, once again, we see how the game is played. People from small towns have no problem mocking people from the big(ger) cities. “It’s just the pose and the righteousness that begs for satire.” But mock the pose and righteousness of rural types, and you’re a hate-filled, Left-Coast elitist.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Let’s see … let me just check my outrage primer real quick and …

    Why, the nerve! How dare they! This show is mocking the good and normal people of Portland, Oregon, and it is hateful! Just hateful! Petty parochialism, this is!

    Ahem. Is that about right?

    Anyhow, once again, we see how the game is played. People from small towns have no problem mocking people from the big(ger) cities. “It’s just the pose and the righteousness that begs for satire.” But mock the pose and righteousness of rural types, and you’re a hate-filled, Left-Coast elitist.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Anyhow, like most Portlanders I know, I enjoy the show. Or, well, the few clips of it I’ve seen on the Internet. The humor tends to drag in the second halves of the skits, and the writers occasionally forget to write actual jokes (apparently just hoping that you’ll find a straightforward depiction of other people humorous enough), but then, that’s no different than most SNL fare over the years, is it?

    And you laugh, SK (@3), but they did film a scene on my street. As I was walking home, there was Fred Armisen. I think he was wearing an orange safety vest — I’ve never seen the skit, so I don’t know what the context was. I did go up and say hi to him, and though he was a bit nervous about my taking photos (something about giving away jokes), he was still very nice.

    Also, my boss signed up to be an extra, and can be seen in the background of “Mixologist, Part 2″ (which is an odd skit, since it appears to be mocking suburban eateries, which are kind of the opposite of Portland).

    Also, SK (@4), I am impressed by your indie rock knowledge, but for full credit, you also should have asked, “And isn’t that the drummer from Trenchmouth?”

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Anyhow, like most Portlanders I know, I enjoy the show. Or, well, the few clips of it I’ve seen on the Internet. The humor tends to drag in the second halves of the skits, and the writers occasionally forget to write actual jokes (apparently just hoping that you’ll find a straightforward depiction of other people humorous enough), but then, that’s no different than most SNL fare over the years, is it?

    And you laugh, SK (@3), but they did film a scene on my street. As I was walking home, there was Fred Armisen. I think he was wearing an orange safety vest — I’ve never seen the skit, so I don’t know what the context was. I did go up and say hi to him, and though he was a bit nervous about my taking photos (something about giving away jokes), he was still very nice.

    Also, my boss signed up to be an extra, and can be seen in the background of “Mixologist, Part 2″ (which is an odd skit, since it appears to be mocking suburban eateries, which are kind of the opposite of Portland).

    Also, SK (@4), I am impressed by your indie rock knowledge, but for full credit, you also should have asked, “And isn’t that the drummer from Trenchmouth?”

  • http://pseudepigraphic.blogspot.com Trent

    So, is Todd the troll-in-residence in the comment sections of your blog, Dr. Veith?

    “But mock the pose and righteousness of rural types, and you’re a hate-filled, Left-Coast elitist.”

    Did this happen recently?

    Oh, Todd…not again! Surely you’re not trying to make an analogy between Stephen G. Bloom’s piece of shoddy journalism, expertly roasted by my friend Mollie Hemingway (yes, dropping her name — proud to know her), and the good-natured send-up of Portland hipsters, beloved by Portlanders and everyone else?

    You must thrive on inciting petty conflict. Since I do thrive (somewhat) on responding to such incitements, I suppose a curious symbiosis could develop here.

  • http://pseudepigraphic.blogspot.com Trent

    So, is Todd the troll-in-residence in the comment sections of your blog, Dr. Veith?

    “But mock the pose and righteousness of rural types, and you’re a hate-filled, Left-Coast elitist.”

    Did this happen recently?

    Oh, Todd…not again! Surely you’re not trying to make an analogy between Stephen G. Bloom’s piece of shoddy journalism, expertly roasted by my friend Mollie Hemingway (yes, dropping her name — proud to know her), and the good-natured send-up of Portland hipsters, beloved by Portlanders and everyone else?

    You must thrive on inciting petty conflict. Since I do thrive (somewhat) on responding to such incitements, I suppose a curious symbiosis could develop here.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Also, DRG (@1), I’m not a chicken farmer, but in my world, “chicken” refers to the species, not a particular gender. If you want to refer to a female chicken, you call them “hens”. Also, you can eat roosters.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Also, DRG (@1), I’m not a chicken farmer, but in my world, “chicken” refers to the species, not a particular gender. If you want to refer to a female chicken, you call them “hens”. Also, you can eat roosters.

  • Kirk

    @tODD Successful troll is successful

  • Kirk

    @tODD Successful troll is successful

  • SKPeterson

    Somewhere there is a show that is a loving satire of middle America similar to that of Portlandia. I know this because I read about it and, like Portlandia, have never seen it. Something like Parks and Rec? Is that it? That blonde from SNL from the seasons I never watched is in it. And probably Steve Carell, too.

    I think what most people in the middle are actually tired of, Todd, are the almost immediate invocations of “Dueling Banjos” and allusions to Deliverance whenever the Great Middle is discussed by Coastalites.

    And, I do remember, the great Fred Armisen experience you had. One of your first brushes with Density in the PNW.

  • SKPeterson

    Somewhere there is a show that is a loving satire of middle America similar to that of Portlandia. I know this because I read about it and, like Portlandia, have never seen it. Something like Parks and Rec? Is that it? That blonde from SNL from the seasons I never watched is in it. And probably Steve Carell, too.

    I think what most people in the middle are actually tired of, Todd, are the almost immediate invocations of “Dueling Banjos” and allusions to Deliverance whenever the Great Middle is discussed by Coastalites.

    And, I do remember, the great Fred Armisen experience you had. One of your first brushes with Density in the PNW.

  • Dust

    Colin is the name of one of the bartenders at the Gilt Restaurant:

    http://giltclub.com/people.html#Colin

    Cheers!

  • Dust

    Colin is the name of one of the bartenders at the Gilt Restaurant:

    http://giltclub.com/people.html#Colin

    Cheers!

  • SKPeterson

    Besides everyone in the Great Middle is more interested in the possibility of a Katy Perry – Tim Tebow tie-up than the fortunes of Colin and his chicken compatriots.

  • SKPeterson

    Besides everyone in the Great Middle is more interested in the possibility of a Katy Perry – Tim Tebow tie-up than the fortunes of Colin and his chicken compatriots.

  • http://www.wordoflifelbc.org Pastor Ed

    DRG @1
    You’ve got the hen and you’ve got the rooster. They’re all chickens.
    Reminds me of a Seinfeld eposide:

  • http://www.wordoflifelbc.org Pastor Ed

    DRG @1
    You’ve got the hen and you’ve got the rooster. They’re all chickens.
    Reminds me of a Seinfeld eposide:

  • –helen

    tODD @16
    We did raise chickens, pullets to be laying hens; the roosters ended up as Sunday dinner. (That picture went by in a second but it looked like a hen to me.)
    Year old, or sometimes two year old hens were sold for “stewing”, (or I suspect, chicken noodle soup and frozen dinners. ;)

  • –helen

    tODD @16
    We did raise chickens, pullets to be laying hens; the roosters ended up as Sunday dinner. (That picture went by in a second but it looked like a hen to me.)
    Year old, or sometimes two year old hens were sold for “stewing”, (or I suspect, chicken noodle soup and frozen dinners. ;)

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Wouldn’t it make more sense to ridicule people for their failings rather than their virtues?

    As for self righteousness, I doubt the Portland SWPL hipsters are any more self righteous than anyone else.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Wouldn’t it make more sense to ridicule people for their failings rather than their virtues?

    As for self righteousness, I doubt the Portland SWPL hipsters are any more self righteous than anyone else.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I seem to remember a discussion that for poultry older males and younger females were for eating. As young males and old females were tougher.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I seem to remember a discussion that for poultry older males and younger females were for eating. As young males and old females were tougher.

  • http://pseudepigraphic.blogspot.com Trent

    Dave Barry on humor impairment.

    Stay strong. There’s hope.

  • http://pseudepigraphic.blogspot.com Trent

    Dave Barry on humor impairment.

    Stay strong. There’s hope.

  • Tom Hering

    Well, two things you can say for Portland: (1.) they have some creative and talented people there – especially in the field of satire; (2.) they have an audience that can laugh at itself.

    Is there a city elsewhere that can claim the same? (Examples requested.) I’d also be interested to know how many of the people responsible for Portlandia are non-native Portlanders, the way Stephen Bloom is a non-native Iowan. (Of course, Bloom wasn’t trying to be humorous. Or if he was, it certainly wasn’t himself he was laughing at.)

  • Tom Hering

    Well, two things you can say for Portland: (1.) they have some creative and talented people there – especially in the field of satire; (2.) they have an audience that can laugh at itself.

    Is there a city elsewhere that can claim the same? (Examples requested.) I’d also be interested to know how many of the people responsible for Portlandia are non-native Portlanders, the way Stephen Bloom is a non-native Iowan. (Of course, Bloom wasn’t trying to be humorous. Or if he was, it certainly wasn’t himself he was laughing at.)

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom (@26) asked:

    Is there a city elsewhere that can claim the same?

    Well, New York City is a pretty obvious example. I mean, Woody Allen?

    Also, neither of the lead actors/co-creators are Portland natives, though Brownstein is from the NW and has lived here several years. Of course, as a non-native Portlander, I can tell you that native Portlanders are something of a rarity, in my experience. There’s been a lot of immigration here in the past decade.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom (@26) asked:

    Is there a city elsewhere that can claim the same?

    Well, New York City is a pretty obvious example. I mean, Woody Allen?

    Also, neither of the lead actors/co-creators are Portland natives, though Brownstein is from the NW and has lived here several years. Of course, as a non-native Portlander, I can tell you that native Portlanders are something of a rarity, in my experience. There’s been a lot of immigration here in the past decade.

  • SKPeterson

    Tom @ 26 – I’m pretty sure Saskatoon fits your bill. KK can validate.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/story/2011/10/04/sk-comedy-dress-code-police-111004.html

    Or maybe not.

  • SKPeterson

    Tom @ 26 – I’m pretty sure Saskatoon fits your bill. KK can validate.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/story/2011/10/04/sk-comedy-dress-code-police-111004.html

    Or maybe not.

  • Tom Hering

    SK, it doesn’t appear to be Saskatooners making fun of themselves. The CBC is in Toronto, and the object of This Is That’s satire is public radio itself.

  • Tom Hering

    SK, it doesn’t appear to be Saskatooners making fun of themselves. The CBC is in Toronto, and the object of This Is That’s satire is public radio itself.

  • Helen K.

    I enjoyed reading all the comments and I haven’t utilized some of the links as of yet. I’m one of those odd types that that would rather read than watch, but anyway…I will… when I take time.

    Just have to say I grew up in southern Oregon when the state was considered somewhat primitive and backward. My dad’s (long deceased now) dream was that I depart Oregon altogether upon high school graduation and attend school at UC Berkeley. (we were from CA originally). I’m glad I didn’t. (:

    Interesting how Portland and much of the state is a destination area. Oregon is a beautiful state and I’m happy I grew up there.

    Just my nostalgia to bore you smart folks. And I do love tODD’s Oregon insights. lol

    P. S. We had chickens, too, Helen. Must have been organic. Free roaming, well-fed, and laid lovely, large brown eggs in their clean, straw-filled beds in the coop.

  • Helen K.

    I enjoyed reading all the comments and I haven’t utilized some of the links as of yet. I’m one of those odd types that that would rather read than watch, but anyway…I will… when I take time.

    Just have to say I grew up in southern Oregon when the state was considered somewhat primitive and backward. My dad’s (long deceased now) dream was that I depart Oregon altogether upon high school graduation and attend school at UC Berkeley. (we were from CA originally). I’m glad I didn’t. (:

    Interesting how Portland and much of the state is a destination area. Oregon is a beautiful state and I’m happy I grew up there.

    Just my nostalgia to bore you smart folks. And I do love tODD’s Oregon insights. lol

    P. S. We had chickens, too, Helen. Must have been organic. Free roaming, well-fed, and laid lovely, large brown eggs in their clean, straw-filled beds in the coop.

  • helen

    I was at Berkeley (one summer) before the hippies got there. Lovely place!

    They hadn’t thought of penning things up so tightly they lost the ability to move when I was a farm child. So, yes, all of that, Helen K. ;)

    sg, That’s “interesting”!

  • helen

    I was at Berkeley (one summer) before the hippies got there. Lovely place!

    They hadn’t thought of penning things up so tightly they lost the ability to move when I was a farm child. So, yes, all of that, Helen K. ;)

    sg, That’s “interesting”!

  • Dust

    Helen ….right on! The “real” Portlanders have very little in common with the Hollywood (make that Hollow wood) version…they tend to live in the West Hills and work out at the MAC (while the rest of the portland slobs watch the Timber whatever next door at PGE park, now owned by none other than Paulsen’s son, the Paulsen from the Bush admin that brought us TARP…put that in your pipe and smoke it tOOD, ha!)…what a weird scene here.

    We moved down from the hick towns of Palo Alto and San Francisco , CA a bit over 10 years ago, and was blown away at the hubris and self absorption of the oh so hip folks here. Not withstanding the brutality of the local police force, and the whiter than white, less diversity than even perhaps Weed, CA…but you won’t see that on Portlandia, perhaps produced by the Hollow wood-Industrial complex :)

    Cheers!

  • Dust

    Helen ….right on! The “real” Portlanders have very little in common with the Hollywood (make that Hollow wood) version…they tend to live in the West Hills and work out at the MAC (while the rest of the portland slobs watch the Timber whatever next door at PGE park, now owned by none other than Paulsen’s son, the Paulsen from the Bush admin that brought us TARP…put that in your pipe and smoke it tOOD, ha!)…what a weird scene here.

    We moved down from the hick towns of Palo Alto and San Francisco , CA a bit over 10 years ago, and was blown away at the hubris and self absorption of the oh so hip folks here. Not withstanding the brutality of the local police force, and the whiter than white, less diversity than even perhaps Weed, CA…but you won’t see that on Portlandia, perhaps produced by the Hollow wood-Industrial complex :)

    Cheers!

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ C-Christian Soldier

    don’t watch much TV except
    -Person of Interest-and Red Wing Hockey games-sometimes FOX-
    SO-
    thank your for introducing me to this show—on second thought—-
    : – )
    Carol-CS

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ C-Christian Soldier

    don’t watch much TV except
    -Person of Interest-and Red Wing Hockey games-sometimes FOX-
    SO-
    thank your for introducing me to this show—on second thought—-
    : – )
    Carol-CS

  • Dust

    Carol CS…right on, one of the things I love most about this blog is the fantastic links to sites and books and other this and that, that would never had heard of otherwise…it’s made me a better person too :)

    cheers!

  • Dust

    Carol CS…right on, one of the things I love most about this blog is the fantastic links to sites and books and other this and that, that would never had heard of otherwise…it’s made me a better person too :)

    cheers!

  • Booklover

    tODD at 13~~You need to check out Jeff Foxworthy’s redneck humor.

  • Booklover

    tODD at 13~~You need to check out Jeff Foxworthy’s redneck humor.

  • Booklover

    Dear Helen and helen~~

    I, too, grew up on a farm where we raised chickens. There was nothing clean about them. :-) I remember reaching under the hens to gather the eggs and getting pecked to death. We fed them the proper food (I think it was dark alfalfa?) to make the yolks good and dark, the darker the better. Now, store egg yolks are almost as white as the eggwhite.

    Once my mother came home from a hospital stay and I had wanted to welcome her with a yummy fried chicken dinner for our family of seven. I had grabbed one of many frozen chicken packages from the freezer, and the family ate it politely. Many years later my mother recounted that it tasted like an old shoe–I had grabbed the old stewing hen from the freezer! (I don’t ever remember eating a rooster, and we never named our chickens.)

    And the memory of butchering chicken day, with the headless chickens flopping about, is kind of funny, but not particularly fond.

    Thanks for the humorous video.

  • Booklover

    Dear Helen and helen~~

    I, too, grew up on a farm where we raised chickens. There was nothing clean about them. :-) I remember reaching under the hens to gather the eggs and getting pecked to death. We fed them the proper food (I think it was dark alfalfa?) to make the yolks good and dark, the darker the better. Now, store egg yolks are almost as white as the eggwhite.

    Once my mother came home from a hospital stay and I had wanted to welcome her with a yummy fried chicken dinner for our family of seven. I had grabbed one of many frozen chicken packages from the freezer, and the family ate it politely. Many years later my mother recounted that it tasted like an old shoe–I had grabbed the old stewing hen from the freezer! (I don’t ever remember eating a rooster, and we never named our chickens.)

    And the memory of butchering chicken day, with the headless chickens flopping about, is kind of funny, but not particularly fond.

    Thanks for the humorous video.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    Generally speaking people don’t mind being made fun of by one of their own.

    The problem with most humor about middle americans is that it comes from outside. It’s seen as foreign antagonism not native critic.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    Generally speaking people don’t mind being made fun of by one of their own.

    The problem with most humor about middle americans is that it comes from outside. It’s seen as foreign antagonism not native critic.

  • kerner

    sg @24:

    “As young males and old females were tougher.”

    You ARE talking about poultry, right? :D

  • kerner

    sg @24:

    “As young males and old females were tougher.”

    You ARE talking about poultry, right? :D

  • helen

    I’ve never gotten the bit about “headless chickens flopping about”. I learned to hold legs and wing tips in one hand and the hatchet in the other. Letting them bleed on the edge of the chopping block makes for a cleaner ‘de feathering’.
    Day old chicks can be sorted for gender (tho not by me) and so you might eat pullets, I suppose, if that’s all you bought. Cockerels were cheap, as I remember; my cousin usually raised a hundred, some for her freezer, and some for friends.
    I don’t understand the “we never ate roosters” ; if you hatched eggs from your own hens you would have both pullets and cockerels. What would you do with the roosters?
    (Have we gotten slightly off topic here?)

  • helen

    I’ve never gotten the bit about “headless chickens flopping about”. I learned to hold legs and wing tips in one hand and the hatchet in the other. Letting them bleed on the edge of the chopping block makes for a cleaner ‘de feathering’.
    Day old chicks can be sorted for gender (tho not by me) and so you might eat pullets, I suppose, if that’s all you bought. Cockerels were cheap, as I remember; my cousin usually raised a hundred, some for her freezer, and some for friends.
    I don’t understand the “we never ate roosters” ; if you hatched eggs from your own hens you would have both pullets and cockerels. What would you do with the roosters?
    (Have we gotten slightly off topic here?)

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    SAL said (@37):

    Generally speaking people don’t mind being made fun of by one of their own.

    Well, yes and no.

    Keep in mind that Stephen Bloom, whose article so irked Iowans, has lived in Iowa for two decades. The mere fact that he was still implicated by many outraged people as somehow being an outsider, even after all that time, certainly says something about Iowans. (For my money, what it says is that Iowans aren’t really used to having people move to their state, such that only people who were born there can be considered True Iowans.)

    Another point against your hypothesis is the show in question, Portlandia. Neither of the main actors/creators are Portland natives, and only one (Brownstein) actually lives here, having moved here from Seattle/Olympia less than a decade ago. I’d consider her “one of our own”, but then, by that standard, I’d think that Bloom would also be an Iowan.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    SAL said (@37):

    Generally speaking people don’t mind being made fun of by one of their own.

    Well, yes and no.

    Keep in mind that Stephen Bloom, whose article so irked Iowans, has lived in Iowa for two decades. The mere fact that he was still implicated by many outraged people as somehow being an outsider, even after all that time, certainly says something about Iowans. (For my money, what it says is that Iowans aren’t really used to having people move to their state, such that only people who were born there can be considered True Iowans.)

    Another point against your hypothesis is the show in question, Portlandia. Neither of the main actors/creators are Portland natives, and only one (Brownstein) actually lives here, having moved here from Seattle/Olympia less than a decade ago. I’d consider her “one of our own”, but then, by that standard, I’d think that Bloom would also be an Iowan.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “by that standard, I’d think that Bloom would also be an Iowan.”

    That’s fair, but does Bloom consider himself an Iowan?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “by that standard, I’d think that Bloom would also be an Iowan.”

    That’s fair, but does Bloom consider himself an Iowan?

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #40 Different communities have differing criteria from what makes someone an insider.

    I’m originally from an archaic rural part of Maryland. I’ve lived in Alabama for a few years. I assume if I live here another 20 I still won’t be an insider.

    The cultural chasm is simply too wide between where I came from (a quasi-English part of Maryland) and where I’ve come (the Deep South).

    I’ll wager that transplants never actually fully feel the rhythm, tune and unspoken stories of their non-native land. A native feels these things so continually they likely can’t imagine any other way.

    Perhaps this is less obvious when you come from a part of the US that doesn’t have a long history as cohesive place but instead is composed mostly of people who aren’t native.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #40 Different communities have differing criteria from what makes someone an insider.

    I’m originally from an archaic rural part of Maryland. I’ve lived in Alabama for a few years. I assume if I live here another 20 I still won’t be an insider.

    The cultural chasm is simply too wide between where I came from (a quasi-English part of Maryland) and where I’ve come (the Deep South).

    I’ll wager that transplants never actually fully feel the rhythm, tune and unspoken stories of their non-native land. A native feels these things so continually they likely can’t imagine any other way.

    Perhaps this is less obvious when you come from a part of the US that doesn’t have a long history as cohesive place but instead is composed mostly of people who aren’t native.

  • Matt

    The overarching point of satire can be to show something that’s truly funny, or it can be used to demean. Obiously, these aren’t exclusive and both can be important, but one ususually shines through.

    In my opinion the difference is the difference between the Colbert Report and The Daily Show. As a very conservative person, their are times I can’t stand The Daily Show. It often seems like being funny is John Stewert’s secondary purpose to demeaning conservative ideals. I rarely watch anymore. On the other hand, I can’t get enough of The Colbert Report. Yes, he’s liberal. And yes you can tell. But he’s not going to demean conservatives if it means the joke he wants to tell isn’t going to work as well. Likewise, he won’t pass up a chance of making fun of what he truly believes, if he knows it’ll get laughs. While I think John Stewert obviously (it seems to me at least) thinks of himself as a social commentator first and foremost, Stephen Colbert just wants to be funny.

    The point is that when your city or state or culture or ideals are the subject of satire, it’s easy to laugh along when the you’re being made fun of for the primary purpose of getting laughs. But you just get angry when you’re being joked about in order to show just how dumb or backwards you really are. It matters if the goal of the satire is primarily laughs or biting social commentary, in other words.

  • Matt

    The overarching point of satire can be to show something that’s truly funny, or it can be used to demean. Obiously, these aren’t exclusive and both can be important, but one ususually shines through.

    In my opinion the difference is the difference between the Colbert Report and The Daily Show. As a very conservative person, their are times I can’t stand The Daily Show. It often seems like being funny is John Stewert’s secondary purpose to demeaning conservative ideals. I rarely watch anymore. On the other hand, I can’t get enough of The Colbert Report. Yes, he’s liberal. And yes you can tell. But he’s not going to demean conservatives if it means the joke he wants to tell isn’t going to work as well. Likewise, he won’t pass up a chance of making fun of what he truly believes, if he knows it’ll get laughs. While I think John Stewert obviously (it seems to me at least) thinks of himself as a social commentator first and foremost, Stephen Colbert just wants to be funny.

    The point is that when your city or state or culture or ideals are the subject of satire, it’s easy to laugh along when the you’re being made fun of for the primary purpose of getting laughs. But you just get angry when you’re being joked about in order to show just how dumb or backwards you really are. It matters if the goal of the satire is primarily laughs or biting social commentary, in other words.

  • Tom Hering

    So, after decades of complaining that liberals have created a society where everyone is much too sensitive, conservative culture warriors are complaining that liberals aren’t sensitive enough?

    I agree that many of us don’t have the same sympathy for some people that we have for others. But this is a failing shared by everyone.

    I’m currently reading Timothy Egan’s The Worst Hard Time, a history of the Dust Bowl. I was struck by the way certain “elites” believed rural whites were subhuman. (This really jumped out at me after reading Edwin Black’s history of the American eugenics movement, War Against The Weak.) But I was also struck by the way those same rural whites treated blacks. Dust Bowl communities posted signs like “Keep moving niggers or you go to jail” and “No niggers hired until every white man has a job.”

    Anyways, I guess I’ve changed my mind. Rural Iowans have as much right to protest prejudice – and to decide what is and isn’t prejudice – as anyone else. And to be overly sensitive sometimes.

    Welcome to the club.

  • Tom Hering

    So, after decades of complaining that liberals have created a society where everyone is much too sensitive, conservative culture warriors are complaining that liberals aren’t sensitive enough?

    I agree that many of us don’t have the same sympathy for some people that we have for others. But this is a failing shared by everyone.

    I’m currently reading Timothy Egan’s The Worst Hard Time, a history of the Dust Bowl. I was struck by the way certain “elites” believed rural whites were subhuman. (This really jumped out at me after reading Edwin Black’s history of the American eugenics movement, War Against The Weak.) But I was also struck by the way those same rural whites treated blacks. Dust Bowl communities posted signs like “Keep moving niggers or you go to jail” and “No niggers hired until every white man has a job.”

    Anyways, I guess I’ve changed my mind. Rural Iowans have as much right to protest prejudice – and to decide what is and isn’t prejudice – as anyone else. And to be overly sensitive sometimes.

    Welcome to the club.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    If someone intends to offend (which I think liberals often do when they attack middle America) then they ought not to feign surprise when middle Americans are offended.

    That’s what you intended and its what you accomplished. That doesn’t call for liberals to be sensitive, it calls for middle Americans to point out when liberals are hypocritical. I recall when the President made bigoted comments about rural Pennsylvanians that wouldn’t have been tolerated about inner city blacks. Or when journalists made sexually degrading “tea bagger” comments that wouldn’t have been tolerated for a participants of a NAACP march or a La Raza protest.

    You don’t need to be “sensitive” to observe a double standard of who can be vilified and who cannot in POLITE public discourse. You simply need to be honest.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    If someone intends to offend (which I think liberals often do when they attack middle America) then they ought not to feign surprise when middle Americans are offended.

    That’s what you intended and its what you accomplished. That doesn’t call for liberals to be sensitive, it calls for middle Americans to point out when liberals are hypocritical. I recall when the President made bigoted comments about rural Pennsylvanians that wouldn’t have been tolerated about inner city blacks. Or when journalists made sexually degrading “tea bagger” comments that wouldn’t have been tolerated for a participants of a NAACP march or a La Raza protest.

    You don’t need to be “sensitive” to observe a double standard of who can be vilified and who cannot in POLITE public discourse. You simply need to be honest.

  • Tom Hering

    SAL, do I understand your last argument correctly, i.e., that if you’re honest, then yes, you can observe a double standard?

  • Tom Hering

    SAL, do I understand your last argument correctly, i.e., that if you’re honest, then yes, you can observe a double standard?

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #46 Of course. You will observe a double standard in your own attitudes if you’re honest (as will I). If you’re dishonest you’ll ignore it or deny that it exists.

    The inclination to have double standards is human nature not a particular characteristics of any group or individual. In America the double standards that predominate among liberals have become mainstream because liberals are the majority in entertainment, the media and many large institutions. Of course it rankles folks when liberals deny that like they hold double standards and adopt a stance of self-righteousness.

    Liberal double standards often involve adopting a self-righteous, preachy posture and impugning others as racists, homophobes, or deluded fools. Of course conservatives and moderates have their own dark inclinations but neither group is in a strong position to widely distribute them in popular entertainment or most forms of popular culture. Their darker assumptions/prejudices largely impact nothing in the culture besides politics.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #46 Of course. You will observe a double standard in your own attitudes if you’re honest (as will I). If you’re dishonest you’ll ignore it or deny that it exists.

    The inclination to have double standards is human nature not a particular characteristics of any group or individual. In America the double standards that predominate among liberals have become mainstream because liberals are the majority in entertainment, the media and many large institutions. Of course it rankles folks when liberals deny that like they hold double standards and adopt a stance of self-righteousness.

    Liberal double standards often involve adopting a self-righteous, preachy posture and impugning others as racists, homophobes, or deluded fools. Of course conservatives and moderates have their own dark inclinations but neither group is in a strong position to widely distribute them in popular entertainment or most forms of popular culture. Their darker assumptions/prejudices largely impact nothing in the culture besides politics.

  • Joe

    This show looks very funny.

    I am about as midwestern as a guy can get and I love Parks and Rec. No one minds getting a little good natured ribbing, the question is whether the ribbing is in fact good natured.

  • Joe

    This show looks very funny.

    I am about as midwestern as a guy can get and I love Parks and Rec. No one minds getting a little good natured ribbing, the question is whether the ribbing is in fact good natured.

  • Joanne

    I’ve watched a few episodes of Portlandia. They were cute, funny but a little goes a long way. I’ve especially enjoyed the good-natured ribbing of tODD, our very own Portlandian and his on-the-spot insider info.

    Everywhere I’ve ever lived has had an “esoteric” community. In the 60s and 70s they were almost impossible to miss, though there were very few in Winfield, Kansas in the mid 60s.

    And the responses from you all about living in rooted communities as opposed to rootless, everybody just moved here, communities matches my experiences with those two phenomena.

    The joke in Jacksonville, Florida was that Jacksonville is the largest city in south Georgia. Everyone’s parents or grandparents had come from there.

    When I lived in south Florida, in the middle of that 100 mile long conurbation, it was like living at the United Nations. The world has moved to that 15 mile wide coral ridge, built huge walls of concrete, and asphalted over paradise. It is such a pile of ants that one can’t get anything done till someone else moves out of the way.

    But everywhere I went I met the locals, sooner or later. Rare as hen’s teeth as they might have been. The people who had been the tomato farmers before the monster lava flow of concrete covered over their very productive fields. We were drawn to the locals as if to long lost relatives. We’d sometimes drive out to the Redlands near Homestead to see what it all had looked like when it was mostly agricultural. Groves of avacados, mangos, and manioc. We loved the Redlands Fruit and Spice Park. If a fruit fell to the ground, you could take it home.

    A colony of Pennsylvania German Dunkers maintained a large winter compound out there where you could buy fresh strawberries and baked goods all winter long. Their fresh strawberry milk shakes were highly sought after, but you had to drive way out to the compound store to get ‘em.

    At any rate, about 20 years ago we moved back home near New Orleans, to a home town that like so many towns that had the misfortune to be too near a large city, had become a bedroom suburb and lost then never developed its very own “there.” We grieve for the sleepy little southern town with the one traffic signal that now is crisscrossed by 3 Interstates. Our marshes are dredged and dumped on so city folk can park a large boat behind their monster houses.

    But we were talking about killing chickens, weren’t we. I’m a town person, so I’ve never killed one myself, but Mama has and all my aunts. The one time I saw a killin’ was when a friend knew that a lady down the street with a chicken coop was going to kill one for dinner. She and I sneaked into the adjoining yard and found a spot behind a board fence to watch.

    Sure enough the elderly, very thin lady came out, selected a chicken, put it on a chopping block and hatcheted off its head. I thought that would be it, but the head-less chicken got up and ran round and round the yard, much to my horror, till it kealed over, really really dead.

    My Mama and my aunts, I had eight aunts then, all preferred the neck-jerk way to kill the chicken. They’d discuss which one of them had done the most and was the best at it, best being the quickest kill with the least noise or awareness from the chicken. And none of them would ever mistake a baking hen from a frying chicken.

    It is a good thing for children to learn that life lives off of life, that for me to live something has to die, be it Colin the chicken or Walter the carrot (we didn’t usually name our vegetables unless they got really big or produced an unusually large number of baby bods.)

    Peter and Nance should be more interested in the freshness of the kill, you know, like in Asia where the live food is kept on hand at the restaurant until ordered-up. Fresh is best. All my aunts swear by that.

  • Joanne

    I’ve watched a few episodes of Portlandia. They were cute, funny but a little goes a long way. I’ve especially enjoyed the good-natured ribbing of tODD, our very own Portlandian and his on-the-spot insider info.

    Everywhere I’ve ever lived has had an “esoteric” community. In the 60s and 70s they were almost impossible to miss, though there were very few in Winfield, Kansas in the mid 60s.

    And the responses from you all about living in rooted communities as opposed to rootless, everybody just moved here, communities matches my experiences with those two phenomena.

    The joke in Jacksonville, Florida was that Jacksonville is the largest city in south Georgia. Everyone’s parents or grandparents had come from there.

    When I lived in south Florida, in the middle of that 100 mile long conurbation, it was like living at the United Nations. The world has moved to that 15 mile wide coral ridge, built huge walls of concrete, and asphalted over paradise. It is such a pile of ants that one can’t get anything done till someone else moves out of the way.

    But everywhere I went I met the locals, sooner or later. Rare as hen’s teeth as they might have been. The people who had been the tomato farmers before the monster lava flow of concrete covered over their very productive fields. We were drawn to the locals as if to long lost relatives. We’d sometimes drive out to the Redlands near Homestead to see what it all had looked like when it was mostly agricultural. Groves of avacados, mangos, and manioc. We loved the Redlands Fruit and Spice Park. If a fruit fell to the ground, you could take it home.

    A colony of Pennsylvania German Dunkers maintained a large winter compound out there where you could buy fresh strawberries and baked goods all winter long. Their fresh strawberry milk shakes were highly sought after, but you had to drive way out to the compound store to get ‘em.

    At any rate, about 20 years ago we moved back home near New Orleans, to a home town that like so many towns that had the misfortune to be too near a large city, had become a bedroom suburb and lost then never developed its very own “there.” We grieve for the sleepy little southern town with the one traffic signal that now is crisscrossed by 3 Interstates. Our marshes are dredged and dumped on so city folk can park a large boat behind their monster houses.

    But we were talking about killing chickens, weren’t we. I’m a town person, so I’ve never killed one myself, but Mama has and all my aunts. The one time I saw a killin’ was when a friend knew that a lady down the street with a chicken coop was going to kill one for dinner. She and I sneaked into the adjoining yard and found a spot behind a board fence to watch.

    Sure enough the elderly, very thin lady came out, selected a chicken, put it on a chopping block and hatcheted off its head. I thought that would be it, but the head-less chicken got up and ran round and round the yard, much to my horror, till it kealed over, really really dead.

    My Mama and my aunts, I had eight aunts then, all preferred the neck-jerk way to kill the chicken. They’d discuss which one of them had done the most and was the best at it, best being the quickest kill with the least noise or awareness from the chicken. And none of them would ever mistake a baking hen from a frying chicken.

    It is a good thing for children to learn that life lives off of life, that for me to live something has to die, be it Colin the chicken or Walter the carrot (we didn’t usually name our vegetables unless they got really big or produced an unusually large number of baby bods.)

    Peter and Nance should be more interested in the freshness of the kill, you know, like in Asia where the live food is kept on hand at the restaurant until ordered-up. Fresh is best. All my aunts swear by that.

  • Joe

    My kids learned what an animal says and what kind of food it becomes when they were toddlers:

    Dad: “What is this?”
    Kid” “cow.”
    Dad: “what does a cow say?”
    Kid: “moo”
    Dad: “what does a cow make?”
    Kid: “milk and beef”

  • Joe

    My kids learned what an animal says and what kind of food it becomes when they were toddlers:

    Dad: “What is this?”
    Kid” “cow.”
    Dad: “what does a cow say?”
    Kid: “moo”
    Dad: “what does a cow make?”
    Kid: “milk and beef”

  • Joanne

    Did you rub the blood from their first kill on their cheeks?

  • Joanne

    Did you rub the blood from their first kill on their cheeks?

  • Joe

    Joanne – no, but my 9 year old got his first kill this year. He shot two gray squirrels. We ate them and are just about finished tanning the pelts. Not sure what we are going to do with the pelts … may be make a muff for a Christmas gift or something.

  • Joe

    Joanne – no, but my 9 year old got his first kill this year. He shot two gray squirrels. We ate them and are just about finished tanning the pelts. Not sure what we are going to do with the pelts … may be make a muff for a Christmas gift or something.


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