Earl Scruggs and other influential musicians

Remember my brother Jimmy?  He  is an accomplished bluegrass musician, among his many talents, and he sent me this notice and this suggestion:

I have an idea for your blog. I don’t know if you have heard, but Earl Scruggs died yesterday at age 88. I submit that he is one of the most influential musicians of our generation. He defined how one is supposed to play a five string banjo today, and bluegrass music did not really did not become bluegrass until Earl Scruggs joined Bill Monroe’s band in 1945. In many respects, he can be seen as the co-founder of bluegrass music, along with Bill Monroe.

This may be an opportunity for your bloggers to get into an interesting debate as to who they think are the most 20 most influential musicians of our generation.. To limit the scope of the discussion, you may want to limit the list to American born musicians.  Just a thought.

And a very good thought, I might add.  We need to pay tribute to Earl Scruggs.  Bluegrass music is one of the great American art forms.  Who else would you list as among America’s most influential musicians?  (Note:  not greatest, as such, but most influential.  Think widely about the different kinds and styles  of music America has come up with.)

In the meantime, here is Earl, who pretty much invented this way of playing the banjo,  playing one of his break-downs:

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Les Paul, Chet Atkins, Ernest Tubb, Duke Ellington.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Les Paul, Chet Atkins, Ernest Tubb, Duke Ellington.

  • SKPeterson

    Steve got three on my list: Paul, Atkins and Ellington.

    Miles Davis
    John Coltrane
    Thelonious Monk
    Dave Brubeck
    Henry Mancini
    Burt Bacharach

  • SKPeterson

    Steve got three on my list: Paul, Atkins and Ellington.

    Miles Davis
    John Coltrane
    Thelonious Monk
    Dave Brubeck
    Henry Mancini
    Burt Bacharach

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Steve and SK got some I could mention – I would add Armstrong and Dylan.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Steve and SK got some I could mention – I would add Armstrong and Dylan.

  • Mary

    Going further back, how about what I learned in grade school? John Philip Sousa, Stephen Foster? The Gershwins?

  • Mary

    Going further back, how about what I learned in grade school? John Philip Sousa, Stephen Foster? The Gershwins?

  • norman teigen

    Yes, interesting. Your readers might be interested in a 4-CD boxed set titled “Roots Music. An American Journey.” I secured my copy at a Barnes and Noble store in Eden Prairie MN.

  • norman teigen

    Yes, interesting. Your readers might be interested in a 4-CD boxed set titled “Roots Music. An American Journey.” I secured my copy at a Barnes and Noble store in Eden Prairie MN.

  • Patrick Morgan

    Obviously, by the above posts, there are so many. Here’s mine with regard to influence in rock music:

    1. Bob Dylan
    2. Miles Davis
    3. Robert Johnson
    4. Chuck Berry
    5. Brian Wilson

    Here’s an example of a string of influence using Chuck Berry:

    Chuck Berry – Keith Richards – Johnny Thunders – Sex Pistols/The Clash and so on. Each person/group in the string is also a major influence (though one can disagree on the kind of influence that is perpetrated!)

  • Patrick Morgan

    Obviously, by the above posts, there are so many. Here’s mine with regard to influence in rock music:

    1. Bob Dylan
    2. Miles Davis
    3. Robert Johnson
    4. Chuck Berry
    5. Brian Wilson

    Here’s an example of a string of influence using Chuck Berry:

    Chuck Berry – Keith Richards – Johnny Thunders – Sex Pistols/The Clash and so on. Each person/group in the string is also a major influence (though one can disagree on the kind of influence that is perpetrated!)

  • Jimmy Veith

    Here is my list of the most influential. At the top of my list is Louis Armstrong, who is probably the most influential American musician of all time. The rest are not in any particular order.

    Louis Armstrong
    Bill Monroe
    Earl Scruggs
    Bob Wills
    Bob Dylan
    Robert Johnson
    Chet Atkins
    Hank Williams Sr.
    Chuck Berry
    Jim Hendrix

    This is only 10.. There may be others that should be on this list. However, I defy anyone to argue that any of these musicians should not be on a top 20 list.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Here is my list of the most influential. At the top of my list is Louis Armstrong, who is probably the most influential American musician of all time. The rest are not in any particular order.

    Louis Armstrong
    Bill Monroe
    Earl Scruggs
    Bob Wills
    Bob Dylan
    Robert Johnson
    Chet Atkins
    Hank Williams Sr.
    Chuck Berry
    Jim Hendrix

    This is only 10.. There may be others that should be on this list. However, I defy anyone to argue that any of these musicians should not be on a top 20 list.

  • Jon

    Edward Van Halen
    Kurt Cobain
    Chuck Mangione
    Kenny “G” Gorelick

  • Jon

    Edward Van Halen
    Kurt Cobain
    Chuck Mangione
    Kenny “G” Gorelick

  • Jon

    “Weird” Al Yankovic

  • Jon

    “Weird” Al Yankovic

  • http://dwaynephillips.net Dwayne Phillips

    1. Les Paul
    2. Les Paul
    3. Les Paul

  • http://dwaynephillips.net Dwayne Phillips

    1. Les Paul
    2. Les Paul
    3. Les Paul

  • Tom Hering

    Madonna. Like it or not. (I don’t.)

  • Tom Hering

    Madonna. Like it or not. (I don’t.)

  • Rob

    Another like it or not: Michael Jackson

  • Rob

    Another like it or not: Michael Jackson

  • Kirk

    Hmmm… this is tough.

    I’m not going to make a list, but a few suggestions for the top 20:

    Buddy Holly – the man who made the rock band.

    Jimi Hendrix – pioneering guitar effects, subsuming other genres into rock and roll and for general contributions to panache

    Muddy Waters – father of Chicago blues, expanded blues’ appeal beyond African Americans, laid the groundwork for blues’ integration into rock.

    Ray Charles – for many of the same reasons as Muddy Waters, but for soul and R&B.

    Berry Gordy – not a popular musician, per se, but he founded Motown Records and signed basically everyone great, including: Diana Ross, the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, the Jackson 5, and Gladys Knight. Unbelievable.

  • Kirk

    Hmmm… this is tough.

    I’m not going to make a list, but a few suggestions for the top 20:

    Buddy Holly – the man who made the rock band.

    Jimi Hendrix – pioneering guitar effects, subsuming other genres into rock and roll and for general contributions to panache

    Muddy Waters – father of Chicago blues, expanded blues’ appeal beyond African Americans, laid the groundwork for blues’ integration into rock.

    Ray Charles – for many of the same reasons as Muddy Waters, but for soul and R&B.

    Berry Gordy – not a popular musician, per se, but he founded Motown Records and signed basically everyone great, including: Diana Ross, the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, the Jackson 5, and Gladys Knight. Unbelievable.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Kurt Cobain was neither a lyricist or a musician. Discuss.

    Just about everybody I’d name is already on another list. You made it tough on me, because I have a gap that goes from about 1820-1950 and largely ignores American influence until the 50′s.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Kurt Cobain was neither a lyricist or a musician. Discuss.

    Just about everybody I’d name is already on another list. You made it tough on me, because I have a gap that goes from about 1820-1950 and largely ignores American influence until the 50′s.

  • Kirk

    Oh, and Billie Holiday. How has no one said Billie Holiday, yet?

  • Kirk

    Oh, and Billie Holiday. How has no one said Billie Holiday, yet?

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Finally thought of one not on a list already – Stevie Ray Vaughn.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Finally thought of one not on a list already – Stevie Ray Vaughn.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Jimmy @7
    Love Bob Wills. Every time we went to my grandparents house, they would play old Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys records. Great music. I actually had a math teacher in 7th grade (Casey Dickens), who played drums for the Texas Playboys in the 1950s.

    Great music.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Jimmy @7
    Love Bob Wills. Every time we went to my grandparents house, they would play old Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys records. Great music. I actually had a math teacher in 7th grade (Casey Dickens), who played drums for the Texas Playboys in the 1950s.

    Great music.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Steve: Thanks for agreeing with me about Bob Wills. My grandmother actually danced with Bob at the Cains Ball Room in Tulsa. At least in Oklahoma and Texas, Bob Wills is still the King!

    By the way, Cain’s Ball Room is still a great place to hear good music. In a couple of weeks my wife and I, my sister and nephew are going to go see Bella Fleck and the Fleck Tones at Cain’s Ball Room. Yea for Me! (To my big brother, “Dr. Veith”, Don’t you wish you still lived in Oklahoma and could with us?)

  • Jimmy Veith

    Steve: Thanks for agreeing with me about Bob Wills. My grandmother actually danced with Bob at the Cains Ball Room in Tulsa. At least in Oklahoma and Texas, Bob Wills is still the King!

    By the way, Cain’s Ball Room is still a great place to hear good music. In a couple of weeks my wife and I, my sister and nephew are going to go see Bella Fleck and the Fleck Tones at Cain’s Ball Room. Yea for Me! (To my big brother, “Dr. Veith”, Don’t you wish you still lived in Oklahoma and could with us?)

  • Tom Hering

    Everyone on this list.

  • Tom Hering

    Everyone on this list.

  • SKPeterson

    I forgot James Brown. And probably Curtis Mayfield. I don’t think Michael Jackson would have been Michael Jackson without those two.

    Also – two men who helped transition “black” music into the white mainstream. For jazz – Bing Crosby and for rock n’ roll, Elvis Presley.

  • SKPeterson

    I forgot James Brown. And probably Curtis Mayfield. I don’t think Michael Jackson would have been Michael Jackson without those two.

    Also – two men who helped transition “black” music into the white mainstream. For jazz – Bing Crosby and for rock n’ roll, Elvis Presley.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Here are a few more people I would add to my list that I started @7.

    Jimmie Rogers
    George & Ira Gershwin
    Frank Sinatra
    James Brown
    Michael Jackson

    Anyone disagree with my contention that Louis Armstrong should be listed as the number one most influential American musician?

  • Jimmy Veith

    Here are a few more people I would add to my list that I started @7.

    Jimmie Rogers
    George & Ira Gershwin
    Frank Sinatra
    James Brown
    Michael Jackson

    Anyone disagree with my contention that Louis Armstrong should be listed as the number one most influential American musician?

  • Kirk

    It looks like thusfar there’s consensus on Armstrong, Dylan and Hendrix, at the very least.

  • Kirk

    It looks like thusfar there’s consensus on Armstrong, Dylan and Hendrix, at the very least.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To SKPeterson. You listed Bing Crosby and I listed Frank Sinatra. I actually like Crosby’s singing better than Sinatra’s. However, I thought that Sinatra became famous before Crosby, so I gave Sinatra the edge on who was the most influential. But I may be wrong on that, as I am no expert in the history of big band singers. Anyone out there that could help me out?

  • Jimmy Veith

    To SKPeterson. You listed Bing Crosby and I listed Frank Sinatra. I actually like Crosby’s singing better than Sinatra’s. However, I thought that Sinatra became famous before Crosby, so I gave Sinatra the edge on who was the most influential. But I may be wrong on that, as I am no expert in the history of big band singers. Anyone out there that could help me out?

  • SKPeterson

    Jimmy – I thought of Sinatra right after I posted that. I think Crosby began earlier – in the 30′s as opposed to Sinatra who is more of a post-war phenom. Both are somewhere on that list. Johnny Cash probably belongs in there somewhere, too. And Benny Goodman.

    When you think about the creative energies in American music over the four decade period of 1935 to 1975, the breadth and depth of the artistry is absolutely astounding across multiple genres of music.

  • SKPeterson

    Jimmy – I thought of Sinatra right after I posted that. I think Crosby began earlier – in the 30′s as opposed to Sinatra who is more of a post-war phenom. Both are somewhere on that list. Johnny Cash probably belongs in there somewhere, too. And Benny Goodman.

    When you think about the creative energies in American music over the four decade period of 1935 to 1975, the breadth and depth of the artistry is absolutely astounding across multiple genres of music.

  • Jimmy Veith

    I am at work now, so when I get a chance I will research the issue of Crosby vs. Sinatra and get back with you.

    I thought of Benny Goodman too, but if you include him, why not Tommy Dorsey, or Duke Ellington? Maybe all three, but where do you end? There were so many great musicians in that era. Is there someone who everyone acknowledges as being the “King of Swing”?

    I agree that Johnny Cash was very influential, and deserves to be mentioned as well.

  • Jimmy Veith

    I am at work now, so when I get a chance I will research the issue of Crosby vs. Sinatra and get back with you.

    I thought of Benny Goodman too, but if you include him, why not Tommy Dorsey, or Duke Ellington? Maybe all three, but where do you end? There were so many great musicians in that era. Is there someone who everyone acknowledges as being the “King of Swing”?

    I agree that Johnny Cash was very influential, and deserves to be mentioned as well.

  • Tom Hering

    Tiny Tim?

  • Tom Hering

    Tiny Tim?

  • Dan Kempin

    Boy, there are some very insightful contributions here. The challenge is to identify the greatest influences, not necessarily the best or most successful. Great food for thought, Jimmy, and thanks. I love this blog for provoking thought.

    I was pleased to see Robert Johnson make the list for Patrick #6 and Jimmy #7. Blues would not be the same without him.

    I might argue for Dizzy Gillespie over Miles Davis on the jazz scene, but that would be a pointless argument. They both belong on the list.

    Hendrix, of course, for pioneering the electic guitar in rock.

    Roy Rogers, and Hank Williams Sr. for country, and, well, maybe I should just submit this from Tex Ritter. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEL3GaEER_U

    For folk music, I suppose I would have to grudgingly admit Bob Dylan, though I wonder if John Denver should be considered.

    I second the votes for Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Chet Atkins and Elvis. Michael Jackson and Madonna were huge, but I’m not sure they really influenced their genre meaningfully. Perhaps if there was a category for most influential stage show . . .

    I don’t know much about bluegrass, so I appreciate the lesson here. I wish I knew more about the motown/soul influences.

    This is fun. Will there be a judge for the final list?

  • Dan Kempin

    Boy, there are some very insightful contributions here. The challenge is to identify the greatest influences, not necessarily the best or most successful. Great food for thought, Jimmy, and thanks. I love this blog for provoking thought.

    I was pleased to see Robert Johnson make the list for Patrick #6 and Jimmy #7. Blues would not be the same without him.

    I might argue for Dizzy Gillespie over Miles Davis on the jazz scene, but that would be a pointless argument. They both belong on the list.

    Hendrix, of course, for pioneering the electic guitar in rock.

    Roy Rogers, and Hank Williams Sr. for country, and, well, maybe I should just submit this from Tex Ritter. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEL3GaEER_U

    For folk music, I suppose I would have to grudgingly admit Bob Dylan, though I wonder if John Denver should be considered.

    I second the votes for Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Chet Atkins and Elvis. Michael Jackson and Madonna were huge, but I’m not sure they really influenced their genre meaningfully. Perhaps if there was a category for most influential stage show . . .

    I don’t know much about bluegrass, so I appreciate the lesson here. I wish I knew more about the motown/soul influences.

    This is fun. Will there be a judge for the final list?

  • Bryan Lindemood

    What about the women?
    I would certainly like to see Dolly Parton and Emmy Lou Harris mentioned, here.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    What about the women?
    I would certainly like to see Dolly Parton and Emmy Lou Harris mentioned, here.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Jimmy, one of these days I’ll be back in home sweet Oklahoma. To hear Bela Fleck and the Flecktones in the Cain Ballroom! How great that would be.

    You and others mentioned Bob Dylan. I am a huge Dylan fan and he is very, very great. But was he so influential? How many other Bob Dylans are there? Isn’t he “sui generis,” that is, a species unto himself? Could this be said of some of the other great artists listed here?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Jimmy, one of these days I’ll be back in home sweet Oklahoma. To hear Bela Fleck and the Flecktones in the Cain Ballroom! How great that would be.

    You and others mentioned Bob Dylan. I am a huge Dylan fan and he is very, very great. But was he so influential? How many other Bob Dylans are there? Isn’t he “sui generis,” that is, a species unto himself? Could this be said of some of the other great artists listed here?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fair enough, Bryan. Mother Maybelle Carter invented a whole new way to play the guitar, picking out the melody while at the same time harmonizing on the lower strings. Patsy Cline, vocalist unsurpassed who brought country and glamour together and pioneered the “big voice” combined with aching passion. Judy Collins (?) for the long haired folky singer-songwriter. (Was there someone she was imitating?) And all those great jazz singers: Ella Fitzgerald and Billy Holiday. Who were some of those big band singers?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Fair enough, Bryan. Mother Maybelle Carter invented a whole new way to play the guitar, picking out the melody while at the same time harmonizing on the lower strings. Patsy Cline, vocalist unsurpassed who brought country and glamour together and pioneered the “big voice” combined with aching passion. Judy Collins (?) for the long haired folky singer-songwriter. (Was there someone she was imitating?) And all those great jazz singers: Ella Fitzgerald and Billy Holiday. Who were some of those big band singers?

  • SKPeterson

    Some famous big band singers would be Peggy Lee, Doris Day, Dinah Shore, the Andrews Sisters, Lena Horne, Holiday, Patti Page, and Rosemary Clooney. But they fronted the bands in which the music was composed, arranged and directed by the likes of Armstrong, Dorsey, Shaw, et al. Another addition: Nat King Cole.

    Almost too many to mention or give adequate attention to.

  • SKPeterson

    Some famous big band singers would be Peggy Lee, Doris Day, Dinah Shore, the Andrews Sisters, Lena Horne, Holiday, Patti Page, and Rosemary Clooney. But they fronted the bands in which the music was composed, arranged and directed by the likes of Armstrong, Dorsey, Shaw, et al. Another addition: Nat King Cole.

    Almost too many to mention or give adequate attention to.

  • Dan Kempin

    Revealing my ignorance of soul music, was Aretha Franklin the master of an established style, or did she provide the influence that has touched so many of the great female pop vocalists? (Including the recently deceased Whitney Houston.) Just wondering.

  • Dan Kempin

    Revealing my ignorance of soul music, was Aretha Franklin the master of an established style, or did she provide the influence that has touched so many of the great female pop vocalists? (Including the recently deceased Whitney Houston.) Just wondering.

  • Tom Hering

    Terry Scott Taylor (Daniel Amos, Swirling Eddies, Lost Dogs).

  • Tom Hering

    Terry Scott Taylor (Daniel Amos, Swirling Eddies, Lost Dogs).

  • Jimmy Veith

    To SKPeterson: I did my research, and I was wrong. Bing Crosby beats Frank Sinatra hands down. He was probably even more popular than Sinatra, and Sinatra was influenced by Crosby rather than the other way around.

    It is interesting that there are not too many women who made the most influential list. Here is my theory:

    To be the most influential you had to be an early pioneer. Popular music relied on the radio and the record industry to become popular. Because of the primitive technology, the female voice did not record or transmit over the radio as well as a male baritone voice. This may be one reason why artists like Bing Crosby did so well in the early years. Now singers like Billie Holliday were great, and probably sounded great live. But her voice did not translate that well on the early recordings in my opinion. There may be a few exceptions maybe. I really like Ella Fitzgerald, but her voice was so rich, it sounded good even with the primitive recording technology. Does anyone agree with me?

  • Jimmy Veith

    To SKPeterson: I did my research, and I was wrong. Bing Crosby beats Frank Sinatra hands down. He was probably even more popular than Sinatra, and Sinatra was influenced by Crosby rather than the other way around.

    It is interesting that there are not too many women who made the most influential list. Here is my theory:

    To be the most influential you had to be an early pioneer. Popular music relied on the radio and the record industry to become popular. Because of the primitive technology, the female voice did not record or transmit over the radio as well as a male baritone voice. This may be one reason why artists like Bing Crosby did so well in the early years. Now singers like Billie Holliday were great, and probably sounded great live. But her voice did not translate that well on the early recordings in my opinion. There may be a few exceptions maybe. I really like Ella Fitzgerald, but her voice was so rich, it sounded good even with the primitive recording technology. Does anyone agree with me?

  • Jimmy Veith

    To my brother @ 29. Good point about Dylan. I had the same thought about Johnny Cash.

    However, this is my counter argument. In the 50’s and early 60’s most of rock and folk music was about teenage love and the lyrics were just fun and often just silly. Nothing really serious going on. Dylan was one of the first of his generation to take his lyrics seriously and addressed other issues, in a much more profound way. He became the voice of his generation. For that reason, I think he needs to be on the list of most influential.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To my brother @ 29. Good point about Dylan. I had the same thought about Johnny Cash.

    However, this is my counter argument. In the 50’s and early 60’s most of rock and folk music was about teenage love and the lyrics were just fun and often just silly. Nothing really serious going on. Dylan was one of the first of his generation to take his lyrics seriously and addressed other issues, in a much more profound way. He became the voice of his generation. For that reason, I think he needs to be on the list of most influential.

  • Booklover

    Aaron Copland

  • Booklover

    Aaron Copland

  • Julian

    I’ll throw a nod to Frank Zappa, who merged Edgard Varese with gutbucket rock-n-roll and composed some of the most complex, fascinating music I’ve ever heard. You could argue that he often sabotaged himself by giving even his serious musical creations goofy names (ditto with his kids), but at his best, he was one of the most inventive, forward-thinking minds out there. Self-taught, to boot.
    Pity that so many people think of him only for his few novelty songs, if they think of him at all anymore.

  • Julian

    I’ll throw a nod to Frank Zappa, who merged Edgard Varese with gutbucket rock-n-roll and composed some of the most complex, fascinating music I’ve ever heard. You could argue that he often sabotaged himself by giving even his serious musical creations goofy names (ditto with his kids), but at his best, he was one of the most inventive, forward-thinking minds out there. Self-taught, to boot.
    Pity that so many people think of him only for his few novelty songs, if they think of him at all anymore.

  • http://www.twitter.com/cruver_steve Steve Cruver

    John Williams – arguably the greatest movie soundtrack composer.
    Glenn Miller – Big Band music
    Stan kenton – big band/progressive Jazz(the beginning of progressive jazz)
    The Four Freshmen – were a big influence on the Beach Boys who had a huge influence on pop music.
    George and Ira Gershwin
    Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II – musicals/broadway.
    Mel Torme – 20th century Christmas music
    John Rutter – choral music.
    Andre Segovia – the single most influential guitarist.
    Bill Gaither – I think you could trace all christian contemporary music to he and his wife.
    Bob Dylan
    Singers – Frank Sinatra, Pavarotti, Andy Williams, Whitney Houston to name just a few…

  • http://www.twitter.com/cruver_steve Steve Cruver

    John Williams – arguably the greatest movie soundtrack composer.
    Glenn Miller – Big Band music
    Stan kenton – big band/progressive Jazz(the beginning of progressive jazz)
    The Four Freshmen – were a big influence on the Beach Boys who had a huge influence on pop music.
    George and Ira Gershwin
    Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II – musicals/broadway.
    Mel Torme – 20th century Christmas music
    John Rutter – choral music.
    Andre Segovia – the single most influential guitarist.
    Bill Gaither – I think you could trace all christian contemporary music to he and his wife.
    Bob Dylan
    Singers – Frank Sinatra, Pavarotti, Andy Williams, Whitney Houston to name just a few…

  • http://www.twitter.com/cruver_steve Steve Cruver

    oops! I put put some foreigners on my list.

  • http://www.twitter.com/cruver_steve Steve Cruver

    oops! I put put some foreigners on my list.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom Hering (@33), !!!

    Man, you’re the first person I’ve met that’s known about either Daniel Amos or the Swirling Eddies (!) in, like, a decade! Takes me back.

    Not sure he’s influential outside of a fairly insular crowd, but within that segment of the population, he most assuredly is/was.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom Hering (@33), !!!

    Man, you’re the first person I’ve met that’s known about either Daniel Amos or the Swirling Eddies (!) in, like, a decade! Takes me back.

    Not sure he’s influential outside of a fairly insular crowd, but within that segment of the population, he most assuredly is/was.

  • SKPeterson

    I like Copland, but I’m not sure about his influence. He seems more derivative to me. Not that that is bad, but I don’t think of him as a particular original. The same with John Williams. Often high quality output, but it is not what I would call original. That would be Cage or Glass, but they are so outre that I cannot say they have any influence either. In regards to classical music, we still take our cues largely from our European predecessors: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven and the rest.

  • SKPeterson

    I like Copland, but I’m not sure about his influence. He seems more derivative to me. Not that that is bad, but I don’t think of him as a particular original. The same with John Williams. Often high quality output, but it is not what I would call original. That would be Cage or Glass, but they are so outre that I cannot say they have any influence either. In regards to classical music, we still take our cues largely from our European predecessors: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven and the rest.

  • Helen K.

    Am glad to see the notes about Bing Crosby. I never could stand Frank Sinatra (a huge point of contention in our home) mostly I believe, due to the type of tunes he sings. I’m one of the un-Americans who doesn’t like big band music. I’m not that much of a music buff but I like some folk and of course country (another point of contention with my DH) who is a big jazz fan. I always liked Frank Sinatra’s acting far better than his singing. Anyway, sorry to be rather off topic but good for Bing Crosby. Yes to Johnny Cash-no to Elvis. Yes to George Jones, Alan Jackson and George Strait. I agree-this is fun!

  • Helen K.

    Am glad to see the notes about Bing Crosby. I never could stand Frank Sinatra (a huge point of contention in our home) mostly I believe, due to the type of tunes he sings. I’m one of the un-Americans who doesn’t like big band music. I’m not that much of a music buff but I like some folk and of course country (another point of contention with my DH) who is a big jazz fan. I always liked Frank Sinatra’s acting far better than his singing. Anyway, sorry to be rather off topic but good for Bing Crosby. Yes to Johnny Cash-no to Elvis. Yes to George Jones, Alan Jackson and George Strait. I agree-this is fun!

  • Sherry

    Two more come to mind that I “think” introduced new styles into American music

    Carlos Santana – Latin, rock
    Bob Marley – Jamaican

  • Sherry

    Two more come to mind that I “think” introduced new styles into American music

    Carlos Santana – Latin, rock
    Bob Marley – Jamaican

  • Tony McCargar

    An unsung innovator of the peddle steel guitar, Noel Boggs. He and Leo Fender worked to develop the modern electric (peddle) guitar. Played with original playboys and others I don’t remember; also Spade Cooley, before and after his demise.

  • Tony McCargar

    An unsung innovator of the peddle steel guitar, Noel Boggs. He and Leo Fender worked to develop the modern electric (peddle) guitar. Played with original playboys and others I don’t remember; also Spade Cooley, before and after his demise.

  • Tony McCargar

    To Jimmy Veith; ditto on Ella How ’bout Sarah Vaughn?

  • Tony McCargar

    To Jimmy Veith; ditto on Ella How ’bout Sarah Vaughn?

  • Dan Kempin

    Well, since no one seems able or willing to refute me, I’m going to go ahead and vote for Aretha Franklin due to the tremendous influence she has had on female vocal stylings. (Consider how dry and boring the national anthem at sporting events would be if not for her influence.)

  • Dan Kempin

    Well, since no one seems able or willing to refute me, I’m going to go ahead and vote for Aretha Franklin due to the tremendous influence she has had on female vocal stylings. (Consider how dry and boring the national anthem at sporting events would be if not for her influence.)

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy, #34,

    That’s an interesting take about the recording technology and female voices. It never occurred to me, but now that you mention it I wonder if it might not be the case. A strong female voice does sound rather shrill in those early recordings, though I guess they would knock your socks off at a live performance.

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy, #34,

    That’s an interesting take about the recording technology and female voices. It never occurred to me, but now that you mention it I wonder if it might not be the case. A strong female voice does sound rather shrill in those early recordings, though I guess they would knock your socks off at a live performance.

  • Pete

    An unrepentant Dylanophile – I don’t see too many of the folks cited above as having initiated any musical categories like Dylan has done. Sure, Bing Crosby might be the platonic ideal of the crooner, or Louis Armstrong of the jazz trumpeter/vocalist but they didn’t really alter the game or the rules. Instrumental solos in the rock format antedated Jimi Hendrix’ taking it to a new plane. Dylan took “rock and roll”, which in its Buddy Holly/early Beatles form was fundamentally frivolous, blended it with folk music and introduced a genre that was actually serious – possessing some gravitas. Analogous to what Beethoven did with the symphony.

  • Pete

    An unrepentant Dylanophile – I don’t see too many of the folks cited above as having initiated any musical categories like Dylan has done. Sure, Bing Crosby might be the platonic ideal of the crooner, or Louis Armstrong of the jazz trumpeter/vocalist but they didn’t really alter the game or the rules. Instrumental solos in the rock format antedated Jimi Hendrix’ taking it to a new plane. Dylan took “rock and roll”, which in its Buddy Holly/early Beatles form was fundamentally frivolous, blended it with folk music and introduced a genre that was actually serious – possessing some gravitas. Analogous to what Beethoven did with the symphony.

  • Pete

    And did all that despite not being able to carry a tune in a bucket. (Sorry – just added that to needle our host who has courageously stood up for Dylan’s vocal abilities.)

  • Pete

    And did all that despite not being able to carry a tune in a bucket. (Sorry – just added that to needle our host who has courageously stood up for Dylan’s vocal abilities.)

  • helen

    (Consider how dry and boring the national anthem at sporting events would be if not for her influence.)

    Thanks for a name to blame for all that!

    Time was everyone in the stands sang the Star Spangled Banner.
    ( A few of us still do. We don’t need the “cheat sheet” on the scoreboard for that or “Take me out to the ball game”.) :)

    What about Harry Belafonte?

  • helen

    (Consider how dry and boring the national anthem at sporting events would be if not for her influence.)

    Thanks for a name to blame for all that!

    Time was everyone in the stands sang the Star Spangled Banner.
    ( A few of us still do. We don’t need the “cheat sheet” on the scoreboard for that or “Take me out to the ball game”.) :)

    What about Harry Belafonte?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Good points about Dylan, Jimmy and Pete, about how he found a way for rock music to be “serious.” (I’ll set aside Pete’s comment about how he couldn’t sing!) He’s back on my list.

    We need to include the blues, which begat rhythm & blues, which, married to country instrumentation, begat rock ‘n’ roll. (Elvis Presley played a big role in that, and he definitely needs to be on our list.)

    Who was the pioneer of the blues guitar solo, which is emulated in all of that rock noodling? The Faustian Robert Johnson?

    And we mustn’t forget Jimmie Rodgers. He was not only “the father of country music,” he was the one, back in segregation days, who brought together “white” and “black” music. His “blue yodels” brought together the blues and Western yodels (that sounds unpromising, but they were great). He made records with said Louie Armstrong! Also, I believe he is the model for Bob Dylan’s unusual but pleasant and expressive singing style!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Good points about Dylan, Jimmy and Pete, about how he found a way for rock music to be “serious.” (I’ll set aside Pete’s comment about how he couldn’t sing!) He’s back on my list.

    We need to include the blues, which begat rhythm & blues, which, married to country instrumentation, begat rock ‘n’ roll. (Elvis Presley played a big role in that, and he definitely needs to be on our list.)

    Who was the pioneer of the blues guitar solo, which is emulated in all of that rock noodling? The Faustian Robert Johnson?

    And we mustn’t forget Jimmie Rodgers. He was not only “the father of country music,” he was the one, back in segregation days, who brought together “white” and “black” music. His “blue yodels” brought together the blues and Western yodels (that sounds unpromising, but they were great). He made records with said Louie Armstrong! Also, I believe he is the model for Bob Dylan’s unusual but pleasant and expressive singing style!

  • Tom Hering

    Todd @ 40, now we’re brothers for sure. I’m a huge fan of Terry Scott Taylor. I listened to DA, Swirling Eddies, and Lost Dogs in the ’90s – as well as Dogs member Michael Roe and his band, The 77s (pray naked!). Also, R.E.X. Music had an alternative label from ’93 to ’95 called Storyville Records, and I’ve got every disc they put out (including samplers). Favorite artists from them are Eden Burning (not the current EB), Phil and John, and Nicholas Giaconia.

    Here’s a You Tube channel dedicated to that little golden age of Christian Alternative Music.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/stripcyclemusic

  • Tom Hering

    Todd @ 40, now we’re brothers for sure. I’m a huge fan of Terry Scott Taylor. I listened to DA, Swirling Eddies, and Lost Dogs in the ’90s – as well as Dogs member Michael Roe and his band, The 77s (pray naked!). Also, R.E.X. Music had an alternative label from ’93 to ’95 called Storyville Records, and I’ve got every disc they put out (including samplers). Favorite artists from them are Eden Burning (not the current EB), Phil and John, and Nicholas Giaconia.

    Here’s a You Tube channel dedicated to that little golden age of Christian Alternative Music.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/stripcyclemusic

  • Booklover

    Here’s the list from the Atlantic’s 100 Most Influential Figures in American History:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2006/12/influential-musicians/5387/

  • Booklover

    Here’s the list from the Atlantic’s 100 Most Influential Figures in American History:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2006/12/influential-musicians/5387/

  • Jimmy Veith

    I have considered all the arguments above, and here is my list of the top 20 most influential American born musicians.

    To make the list, they needed to have high marks in all three of the following categories:

    1. They needed to be pioneers of a music genre which they either created or helped make famous. I gave a lot of weight to those musicians that were considered the “Father” or the “King” of a particular music genre.

    2. They needed to be very famous with the general public, not just other musicians. For example, although I included Robert Johnson in my first list for obvious reasons, he did not make my top 20 list because he never reached a significant level of fame with the general public during his life time.

    3. They needed to have a significant impact on the history of American Music.

    Although Louis Armstrong is at the top of the list, the rest are in no particular order.

    Louis Armstrong
    Stephen Foster
    George and Ira Gershwin
    Aaron Copland
    Jimmie Rogers
    Benny Goodman
    Duke Ellington
    Bing Crosby
    Bob Wills
    Gene Autry
    Bill Monroe
    Bob Dylan
    Chet Atkins
    Hank Williams Sr.
    Chuck Berry
    Jimi Hendrix
    James Brown
    Michael Jackson
    Elvis Presley
    Patsy Cline

    Honorable mention goes to the following:

    Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II
    John Philip Sousa
    Earl Scruggs
    Johnny Cash
    Robert Johnson
    Loretta Lynn
    Woody Guthrie
    Ella Fitzgerald
    Scott Joplin
    Nat King Cole
    Aretha Franklin
    George Jones
    Ray Charles
    Judy Garland
    Garth Brooks
    Frank Sinatra
    Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys
    Glenn Miller
    Stevie Wonder
    Madonna
    Prince
    Buddy Holly
    James Taylor
    Charlie Parker
    Miles Davis
    John Coltrane
    Thelonious Monk
    B.B. King
    Roy Rogers
    Janice Joplin

  • Jimmy Veith

    I have considered all the arguments above, and here is my list of the top 20 most influential American born musicians.

    To make the list, they needed to have high marks in all three of the following categories:

    1. They needed to be pioneers of a music genre which they either created or helped make famous. I gave a lot of weight to those musicians that were considered the “Father” or the “King” of a particular music genre.

    2. They needed to be very famous with the general public, not just other musicians. For example, although I included Robert Johnson in my first list for obvious reasons, he did not make my top 20 list because he never reached a significant level of fame with the general public during his life time.

    3. They needed to have a significant impact on the history of American Music.

    Although Louis Armstrong is at the top of the list, the rest are in no particular order.

    Louis Armstrong
    Stephen Foster
    George and Ira Gershwin
    Aaron Copland
    Jimmie Rogers
    Benny Goodman
    Duke Ellington
    Bing Crosby
    Bob Wills
    Gene Autry
    Bill Monroe
    Bob Dylan
    Chet Atkins
    Hank Williams Sr.
    Chuck Berry
    Jimi Hendrix
    James Brown
    Michael Jackson
    Elvis Presley
    Patsy Cline

    Honorable mention goes to the following:

    Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II
    John Philip Sousa
    Earl Scruggs
    Johnny Cash
    Robert Johnson
    Loretta Lynn
    Woody Guthrie
    Ella Fitzgerald
    Scott Joplin
    Nat King Cole
    Aretha Franklin
    George Jones
    Ray Charles
    Judy Garland
    Garth Brooks
    Frank Sinatra
    Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys
    Glenn Miller
    Stevie Wonder
    Madonna
    Prince
    Buddy Holly
    James Taylor
    Charlie Parker
    Miles Davis
    John Coltrane
    Thelonious Monk
    B.B. King
    Roy Rogers
    Janice Joplin

  • Jimmy Veith

    Oops, I forgot to list in the honorable mention category Billie Holliday

  • Jimmy Veith

    Oops, I forgot to list in the honorable mention category Billie Holliday

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Rick Astley. We simply must include Rick Astley

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    Rick Astley. We simply must include Rick Astley

  • SKPeterson

    If we are going to include Hendrix we should probably also find some place for the other 60′s rock n’ roll Jim – Mr. Morrison from the Doors.

    And, for all his considerable influence on modern pop culture, Rick Astley is disqualified due to his innate, un-American Englishness.

  • SKPeterson

    If we are going to include Hendrix we should probably also find some place for the other 60′s rock n’ roll Jim – Mr. Morrison from the Doors.

    And, for all his considerable influence on modern pop culture, Rick Astley is disqualified due to his innate, un-American Englishness.

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy, #54,

    This has been a great discussion and we owe it to you, but you kinda just changed the rules! I mean, to discuss influential musicians, and then have as a qualification that they can’t just have influence on musicians but also broad popularity . . . doesn’t that kind of change the whole deal? It’s hard to identify a musician who had more musical influence AND impact on the history of the genre than Robert Johnson, for instance. Is it really fair to expect a juke joint bluesman from the segregated south to have gained broad appeal in the 1930s?

    If that’s the measure, then James Brown should certainly be on the secondary list. He never had a #1, after all. Surely the “Queen of Soul” Aretha should have his spot on the top list. Name a song by James Brown that everybody would know. I could probably name a dozen for Aretha.

    (This is the part I enjoy, by the way–arguing the specific list!)

    And I think Dizzy Gillespie should at least get an honorable mention.

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy, #54,

    This has been a great discussion and we owe it to you, but you kinda just changed the rules! I mean, to discuss influential musicians, and then have as a qualification that they can’t just have influence on musicians but also broad popularity . . . doesn’t that kind of change the whole deal? It’s hard to identify a musician who had more musical influence AND impact on the history of the genre than Robert Johnson, for instance. Is it really fair to expect a juke joint bluesman from the segregated south to have gained broad appeal in the 1930s?

    If that’s the measure, then James Brown should certainly be on the secondary list. He never had a #1, after all. Surely the “Queen of Soul” Aretha should have his spot on the top list. Name a song by James Brown that everybody would know. I could probably name a dozen for Aretha.

    (This is the part I enjoy, by the way–arguing the specific list!)

    And I think Dizzy Gillespie should at least get an honorable mention.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Point well taken. The only way I figured out how to trim down the list to 20, is to more narrowly define what I meant by “influential”. Also, I wanted to interject some objectivity, and their popularity is something that could be measured by the number of hits, record sales, etc. For example, I don’t really like Elvis Presley, but I can’t deny that he has been very influential, not only in music but popular culture. I could not keep him off the list.

    There is a James Brown song that everybody knows: “I feel good, da da da da da da dat” However, I admit that a contest for the top 20 between James Brown and Aretha Franklin was a close call. Maybe I should just change the rules again and make it the top 21.

    You are right that Dizzy Gillespie should at least get an honorable mention. Fortunately, I did not put a limit on the number of honorable mentions.

    I was the only that came up with Gene Autry for the top 20. It did not occur to me until late last night that he should was a possible candidate, then I looked up a list of his hits, and I could not keep him off. What do you think?

  • Jimmy Veith

    Point well taken. The only way I figured out how to trim down the list to 20, is to more narrowly define what I meant by “influential”. Also, I wanted to interject some objectivity, and their popularity is something that could be measured by the number of hits, record sales, etc. For example, I don’t really like Elvis Presley, but I can’t deny that he has been very influential, not only in music but popular culture. I could not keep him off the list.

    There is a James Brown song that everybody knows: “I feel good, da da da da da da dat” However, I admit that a contest for the top 20 between James Brown and Aretha Franklin was a close call. Maybe I should just change the rules again and make it the top 21.

    You are right that Dizzy Gillespie should at least get an honorable mention. Fortunately, I did not put a limit on the number of honorable mentions.

    I was the only that came up with Gene Autry for the top 20. It did not occur to me until late last night that he should was a possible candidate, then I looked up a list of his hits, and I could not keep him off. What do you think?

  • Helen K.

    Jimmy Veith @ 59. Gene Autry popped into my mind a couple of days ago even though I do not recall much of his singing. I’m glad you added him. I grew up more with Roy Rogers. Don’t recall the time period for Gene Autry. There are some real music buffs around here!

  • Helen K.

    Jimmy Veith @ 59. Gene Autry popped into my mind a couple of days ago even though I do not recall much of his singing. I’m glad you added him. I grew up more with Roy Rogers. Don’t recall the time period for Gene Autry. There are some real music buffs around here!

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy,

    Point taken about the James Brown song! Now that will be in my head all afternoon. James Brown and Aretha Franklin–that’s a happy thought. (You know, I haven’t watched “The Blues Brothers” in a long time . . .)

    I can’t really argue with any of the points you raise, except maybe to wonder if a “top 20 overall” is an impossible task. You almost have to break it down by style and era. I end up arguing with myself not so much about the influence of the musician, but the influence of the style. It is hard to compare Stephen Foster and Aaron Copland with Robert Johnson and Elvis Presley. Their influences were huge, but very different.

    Perhaps we should ask for the three (or one) most influential in each category: Jazz, Country, Blues, Bluegrass, Orchestral, Pop, Rock, Soul, etc.

    Or perhaps we could argue which style or era of music was the greatest American contribution. (Well, that’s too easy. All American music has roots in jazz.)

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy,

    Point taken about the James Brown song! Now that will be in my head all afternoon. James Brown and Aretha Franklin–that’s a happy thought. (You know, I haven’t watched “The Blues Brothers” in a long time . . .)

    I can’t really argue with any of the points you raise, except maybe to wonder if a “top 20 overall” is an impossible task. You almost have to break it down by style and era. I end up arguing with myself not so much about the influence of the musician, but the influence of the style. It is hard to compare Stephen Foster and Aaron Copland with Robert Johnson and Elvis Presley. Their influences were huge, but very different.

    Perhaps we should ask for the three (or one) most influential in each category: Jazz, Country, Blues, Bluegrass, Orchestral, Pop, Rock, Soul, etc.

    Or perhaps we could argue which style or era of music was the greatest American contribution. (Well, that’s too easy. All American music has roots in jazz.)

  • Jimmy Veith

    Good idea about asking the question as to who had the most influence in a particular category of music.

    Another idea is to think about how popular culture of any particular era impacted the music of the time, and also how music impacted the popular culture. I have a love for history and music, and I think that it is unfortunate that history and music are too often studied separately.

    Just as a sound track to a good movie can help bring the movie to life, I think that listening to contemporary music of the time can bring history to life. It helps you understand both the history and the music.

    There is not only a time dimension to all this, but a geographic dimension as well. Just a thought.

    By the way, I am very impressed with how knowledgeable you Lutherans are about music. I thought that all you listened to was Polka music!

    I’m Just kidding. I know that Bach was a Lutheran. Have you read “Evening in the Palace of Reason” by , James R. Gaines. My brother, “Dr. Veith”, recommended it to me personally and through this blog. See his post dated 10-15-09 entitled “Bach’s Smackdown of Frederick the Great.” The book really illustrates my point about how music needs to be understood in its historical context.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Good idea about asking the question as to who had the most influence in a particular category of music.

    Another idea is to think about how popular culture of any particular era impacted the music of the time, and also how music impacted the popular culture. I have a love for history and music, and I think that it is unfortunate that history and music are too often studied separately.

    Just as a sound track to a good movie can help bring the movie to life, I think that listening to contemporary music of the time can bring history to life. It helps you understand both the history and the music.

    There is not only a time dimension to all this, but a geographic dimension as well. Just a thought.

    By the way, I am very impressed with how knowledgeable you Lutherans are about music. I thought that all you listened to was Polka music!

    I’m Just kidding. I know that Bach was a Lutheran. Have you read “Evening in the Palace of Reason” by , James R. Gaines. My brother, “Dr. Veith”, recommended it to me personally and through this blog. See his post dated 10-15-09 entitled “Bach’s Smackdown of Frederick the Great.” The book really illustrates my point about how music needs to be understood in its historical context.

  • Dan Kempin

    Just for fun, I’ll start us off,

    Jazz: Satchmo
    Be Bop: Bird (And Dizzy)

    Ragtime: Scott Joplin
    Folk/protest: Woody Guthrie (Yes, I propose him as the archetype and Dylan as the type. There, I said it.)
    Soul: Aretha Franklin
    Blues: Robert Johnson
    Country: Jimmie Rodgers
    (Both country and Rock should probably be divided into sub categories, don’t you think?)

    Someone want to take it from here?

    Btw, Jimmy, your brother says you are an accomplished bluegrass musician. What is it that you play?

  • Dan Kempin

    Just for fun, I’ll start us off,

    Jazz: Satchmo
    Be Bop: Bird (And Dizzy)

    Ragtime: Scott Joplin
    Folk/protest: Woody Guthrie (Yes, I propose him as the archetype and Dylan as the type. There, I said it.)
    Soul: Aretha Franklin
    Blues: Robert Johnson
    Country: Jimmie Rodgers
    (Both country and Rock should probably be divided into sub categories, don’t you think?)

    Someone want to take it from here?

    Btw, Jimmy, your brother says you are an accomplished bluegrass musician. What is it that you play?

  • Jimmy Veith

    No argument with me on any of your selections. I think that you would also need to add the following categories:

    Big Band/Swing: Benny Goodman
    Western Swing: Bob Wills
    Cowboy Music: Gene Autry
    Bluegrass: Bill Monroe and Earl Scruggs

    I play the mandolin and guitar. A couple of years ago I took up the fiddle. At this point I’m not good enough to call myself a fiddle player yet, but I am working on it. Three months ago I started taking lessons on-line from Darol Anger at the Academy of Bluegrass. On-line lessons is a relatively new and interesting way to learn to play an instrument. It is working well for me.

  • Jimmy Veith

    No argument with me on any of your selections. I think that you would also need to add the following categories:

    Big Band/Swing: Benny Goodman
    Western Swing: Bob Wills
    Cowboy Music: Gene Autry
    Bluegrass: Bill Monroe and Earl Scruggs

    I play the mandolin and guitar. A couple of years ago I took up the fiddle. At this point I’m not good enough to call myself a fiddle player yet, but I am working on it. Three months ago I started taking lessons on-line from Darol Anger at the Academy of Bluegrass. On-line lessons is a relatively new and interesting way to learn to play an instrument. It is working well for me.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Another thing we could do is make a list of genius musicians that have taken their instrument to a new level. Here is a start:

    Electric Guitar: Jimi Hendrix
    Acoustic Guitar: Tony Rice
    Resonator Guitar (Dobro): Jerry Douglas
    Mandolin: Chris Thile
    Banjo: Bela Fleck

  • Jimmy Veith

    Another thing we could do is make a list of genius musicians that have taken their instrument to a new level. Here is a start:

    Electric Guitar: Jimi Hendrix
    Acoustic Guitar: Tony Rice
    Resonator Guitar (Dobro): Jerry Douglas
    Mandolin: Chris Thile
    Banjo: Bela Fleck

  • SKPeterson

    Buddy Holly. In forgot Buddy Holly. Even though he died young, he had an enormous influence on the early country-tinged rock n’ roll.

  • SKPeterson

    Buddy Holly. In forgot Buddy Holly. Even though he died young, he had an enormous influence on the early country-tinged rock n’ roll.

  • Patrick Morgan

    Response to Gene Veith # 29 re: Bob Dylan’s influence. I remember seeing a rock documentary once that had a section on Bob Dylan. The number and variety of rock stars who cited Dylan was impressive. It has been a long time since I saw that documentary but I remember it included Bruce Springsteen and Mick Jagger. The Grateful Dead was also known as one of the great interpreters of Dylan’s songs (see their CD “Postcards of the Hanging”).

  • Patrick Morgan

    Response to Gene Veith # 29 re: Bob Dylan’s influence. I remember seeing a rock documentary once that had a section on Bob Dylan. The number and variety of rock stars who cited Dylan was impressive. It has been a long time since I saw that documentary but I remember it included Bruce Springsteen and Mick Jagger. The Grateful Dead was also known as one of the great interpreters of Dylan’s songs (see their CD “Postcards of the Hanging”).

  • Dan Kempin

    Early Rock: Chuck Berry (Tough call over Buddy Holly)
    Rockabilly: Elvis (Who would probably get the overall award for American influence on rock.)
    Punk: The Ramones
    Hard Rock: Ted Nugent
    Metal: Metallica (Though perhaps I should say David Eleffson)
    Pop Rock: Michael Jackson
    Progressive Rock: Not sure. I wish RUSH wasn’t Canadian.
    Glam/Hair: Guns ‘n Roses (Well, Hanoi Rocks is Finnish)

    How many other categories of rock can be distinguished?

    And here’s a bonus statement for you to evaluate, Jimmy:

    The social unrest and cultural transition that took hold in the 1960s dramatically influenced almost all genres of American music. In particular the idealization of the rebel and outlaw led to an almost compulsive need to develop new styles that were ideally misunderstood and unappreciated by the mainstream. (Once it becomes mainstream it is no longer valid.)

    This is most easily seen in rock and the extreme subgenres, but it also changed the core of country and folk music.

  • Dan Kempin

    Early Rock: Chuck Berry (Tough call over Buddy Holly)
    Rockabilly: Elvis (Who would probably get the overall award for American influence on rock.)
    Punk: The Ramones
    Hard Rock: Ted Nugent
    Metal: Metallica (Though perhaps I should say David Eleffson)
    Pop Rock: Michael Jackson
    Progressive Rock: Not sure. I wish RUSH wasn’t Canadian.
    Glam/Hair: Guns ‘n Roses (Well, Hanoi Rocks is Finnish)

    How many other categories of rock can be distinguished?

    And here’s a bonus statement for you to evaluate, Jimmy:

    The social unrest and cultural transition that took hold in the 1960s dramatically influenced almost all genres of American music. In particular the idealization of the rebel and outlaw led to an almost compulsive need to develop new styles that were ideally misunderstood and unappreciated by the mainstream. (Once it becomes mainstream it is no longer valid.)

    This is most easily seen in rock and the extreme subgenres, but it also changed the core of country and folk music.

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy, #65,

    The only offering I have for that list is Toots Thielmans on the harmonica.

  • Dan Kempin

    Jimmy, #65,

    The only offering I have for that list is Toots Thielmans on the harmonica.

  • Helen K.

    Unusual voice…..Roy Orbison? Love Buddy Holly too. Oh Peggy…My Peggy Sue…..

  • Helen K.

    Unusual voice…..Roy Orbison? Love Buddy Holly too. Oh Peggy…My Peggy Sue…..


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