Tornado hits my old stomping ground

I was born in Alva, Oklahoma.  I have memories of going to Woodward, the biggest town within an hour’s drive, to go to the movies.  I had to have been younger than five.  Anyway, Woodward was hit by a tornado early yesterday morning, killing five people.

This video is especially eerie.  It’s dark, but when the lightning flashes you get just a glimpse of this massively wide funnel.

 

 

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Tom Hering

    When the next warning is issued, you can follow dozens of tornado hunters by watching live video from their chase vehicles. I watched as Saturday afternoon’s tornadoes in Kansas and Oklahoma formed, touched down, and tracked across the landscape. The site is Severe Studios. (Note: active intercepts move to the top of the page.)

  • Tom Hering

    When the next warning is issued, you can follow dozens of tornado hunters by watching live video from their chase vehicles. I watched as Saturday afternoon’s tornadoes in Kansas and Oklahoma formed, touched down, and tracked across the landscape. The site is Severe Studios. (Note: active intercepts move to the top of the page.)

  • kirk

    Damn, nature! You scary!

  • kirk

    Damn, nature! You scary!

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Brings back childhood memories… Every storm during this time of year when I was growing up was accompanied by the inevitable tornado warning. Thankfully, they were all in sparsely populated areas.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Brings back childhood memories… Every storm during this time of year when I was growing up was accompanied by the inevitable tornado warning. Thankfully, they were all in sparsely populated areas.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    I didn’t read all your comments, Veith. I missed the reported fatalities, now I feel bad. My prayers for the families.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    I didn’t read all your comments, Veith. I missed the reported fatalities, now I feel bad. My prayers for the families.

  • helen

    Welcome to the club!
    The farm place I was born on was leveled two years ago this June, down to stumps of trees, and so were all the neighbors for a couple of miles around by a series of tornadoes one day.
    I can’t go home again, if I wanted to; it isn’t there.

  • helen

    Welcome to the club!
    The farm place I was born on was leveled two years ago this June, down to stumps of trees, and so were all the neighbors for a couple of miles around by a series of tornadoes one day.
    I can’t go home again, if I wanted to; it isn’t there.

  • JunkerGeorg

    The ‘selective’ destruction of tornadoes is sometimes inexplicable–had one last summer that somehow passed over our house untouched. As I’m a listed spotter, even had a call from National Weather service about a minute before it went through asking what was happening in our immediate area. Dummy that I was, I went outside the front door to have a quick look. I told them that while my ears were popping, there strangely was no wind at all on the ground, and yet the tops of the tall maple trees in our front yard were whirling like hula hoops. (Some suggest that was a vacuum updraft effect from a tornado just before it touches down). Then it went through seconds after getting off the phone. A 1/2 block on each side of our house, it did damage–on one side uprooting a huge tree and moving it about 20 yards to land on the road, while on the other side of the house, a big dumpster was somehow lifted and thrown into the field on the other side of the road, about 75 yards. Yet our house itself had no damage. Very strange. The only thing I can think of was that it was at least two smaller tornadoes going through that must’ve eventually come together at some point after it passed our house. Sadly, as the tornado traveled across the field, it ended up destroying a farmers house and truck wash facility about a mile directly south of our house across that field. I only mention all this to point out how unpredictable they are, and to take every Tornado “Watch” seriously, even if it isn’t a “warning” yet.

  • JunkerGeorg

    The ‘selective’ destruction of tornadoes is sometimes inexplicable–had one last summer that somehow passed over our house untouched. As I’m a listed spotter, even had a call from National Weather service about a minute before it went through asking what was happening in our immediate area. Dummy that I was, I went outside the front door to have a quick look. I told them that while my ears were popping, there strangely was no wind at all on the ground, and yet the tops of the tall maple trees in our front yard were whirling like hula hoops. (Some suggest that was a vacuum updraft effect from a tornado just before it touches down). Then it went through seconds after getting off the phone. A 1/2 block on each side of our house, it did damage–on one side uprooting a huge tree and moving it about 20 yards to land on the road, while on the other side of the house, a big dumpster was somehow lifted and thrown into the field on the other side of the road, about 75 yards. Yet our house itself had no damage. Very strange. The only thing I can think of was that it was at least two smaller tornadoes going through that must’ve eventually come together at some point after it passed our house. Sadly, as the tornado traveled across the field, it ended up destroying a farmers house and truck wash facility about a mile directly south of our house across that field. I only mention all this to point out how unpredictable they are, and to take every Tornado “Watch” seriously, even if it isn’t a “warning” yet.


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