Doc Watson

The great guitarist Doc Watson, who pioneered flat-picking and who was the master of finger-picking, died at age 89. I also love his singing. By the way, he was blind.

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About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Thank you for this video.

    He was very influential. In my youth, I spent many hours with my guitar and record player, lifting the needle up and down, trying to figure out Doc Watson guitar licks.

    From all accounts, he was also a very kind and humble gentleman. Check out the tribute written by Mike Marshall at Bluegrass Academy. (I don’t know how to create a direct link, but google Mike Marshall and Doc Watson and you will find it.)

  • Jimmy Veith

    Thank you for this video.

    He was very influential. In my youth, I spent many hours with my guitar and record player, lifting the needle up and down, trying to figure out Doc Watson guitar licks.

    From all accounts, he was also a very kind and humble gentleman. Check out the tribute written by Mike Marshall at Bluegrass Academy. (I don’t know how to create a direct link, but google Mike Marshall and Doc Watson and you will find it.)

  • Stephen

    Like Jimmy, I had a Doc Watson phase. I saw him play in a little bar in Dallas about 20 years ago. He seemed old even then, but man . . . he could play!!! He was also so very self depricating, light hearted and humble in my memory. A lot of joy there.

    Much is made of guitar players with speed and agility. He had all that. He practically invented a kind of subtly thrilling playing style called flat picking. Subdued magic. Graceful. He was an authentic American treasure. I still have some vinyls (we used to call them records).

    I’m heading to iTunes

  • Stephen

    Like Jimmy, I had a Doc Watson phase. I saw him play in a little bar in Dallas about 20 years ago. He seemed old even then, but man . . . he could play!!! He was also so very self depricating, light hearted and humble in my memory. A lot of joy there.

    Much is made of guitar players with speed and agility. He had all that. He practically invented a kind of subtly thrilling playing style called flat picking. Subdued magic. Graceful. He was an authentic American treasure. I still have some vinyls (we used to call them records).

    I’m heading to iTunes

  • Marie

    I used to think Johnny Cash had the best voice in country music until I heard Doc Watson’s. I was fortunate to see him play live twice, once 4 years ago in my hometown, at our prized and restored 1920′s theater. What a wonderful musician and performer. My husband sang “Shady Grove” to our kids at bed time the other night, and only found out later that Doc had died earlier that day.

  • Marie

    I used to think Johnny Cash had the best voice in country music until I heard Doc Watson’s. I was fortunate to see him play live twice, once 4 years ago in my hometown, at our prized and restored 1920′s theater. What a wonderful musician and performer. My husband sang “Shady Grove” to our kids at bed time the other night, and only found out later that Doc had died earlier that day.

  • formerly just steve

    Doc Watson’s talent was legendary. Listening to him and trying to figure out how all that sound came out of one man with a guitar was amazing. That he got from good to great without being able to look down to see where his hands were was is mind-boggling.

  • formerly just steve

    Doc Watson’s talent was legendary. Listening to him and trying to figure out how all that sound came out of one man with a guitar was amazing. That he got from good to great without being able to look down to see where his hands were was is mind-boggling.


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