New online classical Lutheran school

One of the promising developments in homeschooling is the advent of on-line courses.  Parents can now enroll their children in an entire on-line school or in individual hard-to-teach-on-your-own classes.  A promising venture that many Lutheran homeschoolers are excited about is  Wittenberg Academy, an online classical Lutheran school, featuring strong confessional theology and an academically-rich curriculum for high-schoolers.  After long preparation, Wittenberg Academy is now taking registrations for the Fall.  (Sorry, for the “Michaelmas Term.”  Isn’t that cool, having a “Michaelmas Term”?)  Here is the notice I received:

Christ is risen! He is risen indeed! Alleluia! It is with exceeding joy that I share with you the news that registration for the 2012-13 academic year is live!

After much ado about much, we decided to go the simple route for the time being and explore better options in the future for accepting online payments, etc. For now, you can go to http://www.wittenbergacademy.org/registration.html and fill out the online form. Once we receive your registration, we will email you with payment options and a summary of your registration.

As the form is very simple, be sure to check out http://www.wittenbergacademy.org/2012-13course_descriptions.html for any prerequisites and in which term a class is being offered.

At each step of this journey of bringing you the best in online Classical Lutheran education, we trust God for his timing and provision. While our timing would have included live registration several months ago, we trust that this is God’s best for Wittenberg Academy and thank you for your patience.

Here are a few items for your consideration: Michaelmas Term runs September 4, 2012- November 21, 2012 Christmas Term runs November 26, 2012- March 1, 2013 with Christmas break from December 22, 2012- January 6, 2013 Easter Term runs March 11, 2013- May 31, 2013 with Easter break from March 28- April 1 and no class on Memorial Day (May 27)

Each class is one credit with the exception of the Paideia courses, which are three credits. Each credit (class) is $400. Thus, all classes, with the exception of the Paideia courses, are $400.

The Paideia courses are $1200. If you have any questions about registration, be sure to contact me! Again, we thank you for your patience and look forward to partnering with you during the 2012-13 academic year!

Jocelyn

Mrs. Jocelyn Benson, Head Teacher Wittenberg Academy

mrsbenson@wittenbergacademy.org www.wittenbergacademy.org

Courses offered this term include Math (Algebra I, pre-Calculus, & Calculus I&II), Languages (Latin, Greek, & German), Science (biology & chemistry), Liberal Arts (beginning and intermediate courses in grammar, logic, & rhetoric; also several music courses), Theology (“Liturgical Theology & Sacramental Piety”), four levels of “Paideia” (an integrated humanities curriculum, studying history, literature, philosophy, etc.), and electives (Physical Education, Psychology, & Personal Finance).

Another option is for parochial schools to supplement their offerings with some of these online courses.

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Dan Kempin

    Trying-to-resist-impulse-to-introduce-irrelevant-quibble.

    Sigh.

    First of all, this sounds awesome. I mean, this is really exciting. Please don’t take my point as in any way negative to the venture, the idea, or the people involved, but I just have to say. . .

    Michaelmas? What is Michaelmas? I mean, as an LCMS lutheran I have never used this term before. It’s not even in the old hymnal–the one with all the old titles like “whitsunday” and “quinquagesima.” Or is the Wittenberg academy somewhat ironically located in England?

    Sorry. I know that this is a truly unimportant point, but along the way someone said, “let’s go with Michaelmas.” And yes, it is cool. I’m just curious why. Can anyone help with that?

  • Dan Kempin

    Trying-to-resist-impulse-to-introduce-irrelevant-quibble.

    Sigh.

    First of all, this sounds awesome. I mean, this is really exciting. Please don’t take my point as in any way negative to the venture, the idea, or the people involved, but I just have to say. . .

    Michaelmas? What is Michaelmas? I mean, as an LCMS lutheran I have never used this term before. It’s not even in the old hymnal–the one with all the old titles like “whitsunday” and “quinquagesima.” Or is the Wittenberg academy somewhat ironically located in England?

    Sorry. I know that this is a truly unimportant point, but along the way someone said, “let’s go with Michaelmas.” And yes, it is cool. I’m just curious why. Can anyone help with that?

  • Matthaeus Glyptes

    Hmmm… Good question. You’d prefer “St. Michael and All Angels’ Term”? (cf. TLH 254–257; ELHB 285–287). You might also wonder why immigrant Lutherans should have chosen to adopt the word Christmas instead of Holy Christ Day when switching to English.

  • Matthaeus Glyptes

    Hmmm… Good question. You’d prefer “St. Michael and All Angels’ Term”? (cf. TLH 254–257; ELHB 285–287). You might also wonder why immigrant Lutherans should have chosen to adopt the word Christmas instead of Holy Christ Day when switching to English.

  • trotk

    I believe “classical school” and “online school” are mutually exclusive terms.

  • trotk

    I believe “classical school” and “online school” are mutually exclusive terms.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Online Schooling is not homeschooling. You are still being taught by a school. That said these distance learning opportunities could be useful. I will have to look into them as my wife educational practice with our kids is heavily influenced by Classical Ed. philosophy.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Online Schooling is not homeschooling. You are still being taught by a school. That said these distance learning opportunities could be useful. I will have to look into them as my wife educational practice with our kids is heavily influenced by Classical Ed. philosophy.

  • formerly just steve

    trotk, to the extent you were serious, I don’t see the conflict. “Classical” refers to the curriculum, not the medium. Too bad it appears to be just for kids.

  • formerly just steve

    trotk, to the extent you were serious, I don’t see the conflict. “Classical” refers to the curriculum, not the medium. Too bad it appears to be just for kids.

  • kerner

    ok, so cranach is back up online, and I just have not been able to connect with it. the address I have been using still comes up with an error message. By searching hard, I have been able to find the individual posts (with comments) such as this one, but not the home page. Can someone give me the link to the home page please?

  • kerner

    ok, so cranach is back up online, and I just have not been able to connect with it. the address I have been using still comes up with an error message. By searching hard, I have been able to find the individual posts (with comments) such as this one, but not the home page. Can someone give me the link to the home page please?

  • SKPeterson
  • SKPeterson
  • Dan Kempin

    Matthaeus, #2,

    I don’t mean that I don’t know what “Michaelmas” means. I mean that it is not a lutheran word. It is not a part of lutheran heritage. There is nothing wrong with it, but it is an Anglican word. A Church of England word. We are very free to use new words, or in this case new old words, but I’m still curious about the “why.” It seems rather eclectic to me.

  • Dan Kempin

    Matthaeus, #2,

    I don’t mean that I don’t know what “Michaelmas” means. I mean that it is not a lutheran word. It is not a part of lutheran heritage. There is nothing wrong with it, but it is an Anglican word. A Church of England word. We are very free to use new words, or in this case new old words, but I’m still curious about the “why.” It seems rather eclectic to me.

  • #4 Kitty

    It’d be awesome if this were a boarding school instead of an online school. We’d have the equivalent of a Lutheran Hogwarts. We’d need a sorting hat, a forbidden forest, a dark arts teacher, ghosts, and oh yeah, don’t forget Quidditch!

  • #4 Kitty

    It’d be awesome if this were a boarding school instead of an online school. We’d have the equivalent of a Lutheran Hogwarts. We’d need a sorting hat, a forbidden forest, a dark arts teacher, ghosts, and oh yeah, don’t forget Quidditch!

  • trotk

    formerly just steve, I was serious. The idea that “classical” only refers to the curriculum is a very shallow understanding of classical. The reason why the curriculum is different in classical education is because of a fundamentally different view of the world, the child, and education itself. That view is incompatible with online learning.

  • trotk

    formerly just steve, I was serious. The idea that “classical” only refers to the curriculum is a very shallow understanding of classical. The reason why the curriculum is different in classical education is because of a fundamentally different view of the world, the child, and education itself. That view is incompatible with online learning.

  • http://www.whenisayrunrun.blogspot.com Andrew

    I could see implementing some of this in our school, especially with Latin. I teach rhetoric and logic in the middle school. Pretty neat.

  • http://www.whenisayrunrun.blogspot.com Andrew

    I could see implementing some of this in our school, especially with Latin. I teach rhetoric and logic in the middle school. Pretty neat.

  • Joanne

    Kitty,
    The LC-MS used to have a series of “Hogwarts” pretty much where all the LC-MS colleges are today. These synodical academies were boarding schools meant to produce church workers. Back in the 1970s they closed the Academies and made the colleges 4 year to blend into American culture better. I attended 2 of the LC-MS Hogwarts. They had very small enrollments toward the end and the synod had done a study that indicated it was not getting many church workers from the Academies.

    All our Lutheran schools were originally organized as German Lateinschule/Gymnasia, i.e., 6 year schools that were equivalent to high school and junior college in America. There are 3 today: St. Paul’s in Concordia, Missouri, which I think dropped the college instead of the academy. And two in the WELS, one at Watertown, Wisconsin, and the other in Michigan, Michigan Lutheran Seminary.

    Now, talk about using Lutheran traditional terminology instead of Anglican, the terms would be as above historically a Lateinschule but today a Gymnasium, and the names of the classes. Starting at the 9th grade they are named by the Latin numerals, sexta, quinta, quarta, tertia, secunda, and prima, with secunda and prima actually being the first 2 years of college.

    Much of it already had been Americanized even in my day, but there is a very rich history of rigorous German education in the Synodical Conference synods.

    I’m very happy to see the development of Wittenberg Academy and wish them much success. It would be nice to see them working hand in glove with the 3 remaining Lutheran academies (er, Hogwarts) for teaching and academic resources. I love the sight of Confessional Lutherans sharing their expertise. And also interacting with all the Lutheran High Schools spread out across the country.

  • Joanne

    Kitty,
    The LC-MS used to have a series of “Hogwarts” pretty much where all the LC-MS colleges are today. These synodical academies were boarding schools meant to produce church workers. Back in the 1970s they closed the Academies and made the colleges 4 year to blend into American culture better. I attended 2 of the LC-MS Hogwarts. They had very small enrollments toward the end and the synod had done a study that indicated it was not getting many church workers from the Academies.

    All our Lutheran schools were originally organized as German Lateinschule/Gymnasia, i.e., 6 year schools that were equivalent to high school and junior college in America. There are 3 today: St. Paul’s in Concordia, Missouri, which I think dropped the college instead of the academy. And two in the WELS, one at Watertown, Wisconsin, and the other in Michigan, Michigan Lutheran Seminary.

    Now, talk about using Lutheran traditional terminology instead of Anglican, the terms would be as above historically a Lateinschule but today a Gymnasium, and the names of the classes. Starting at the 9th grade they are named by the Latin numerals, sexta, quinta, quarta, tertia, secunda, and prima, with secunda and prima actually being the first 2 years of college.

    Much of it already had been Americanized even in my day, but there is a very rich history of rigorous German education in the Synodical Conference synods.

    I’m very happy to see the development of Wittenberg Academy and wish them much success. It would be nice to see them working hand in glove with the 3 remaining Lutheran academies (er, Hogwarts) for teaching and academic resources. I love the sight of Confessional Lutherans sharing their expertise. And also interacting with all the Lutheran High Schools spread out across the country.

  • #4 Kitty

    @Joanne,

    The LC-MS used to have a series of “Hogwarts” pretty much where all the LC-MS colleges are today. These synodical academies were boarding schools meant to produce church workers.

    It’s an interesting concept but it would be difficult to do today~ we’d miss our children!

  • #4 Kitty

    @Joanne,

    The LC-MS used to have a series of “Hogwarts” pretty much where all the LC-MS colleges are today. These synodical academies were boarding schools meant to produce church workers.

    It’s an interesting concept but it would be difficult to do today~ we’d miss our children!

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I see Jocelyn Benson will be at CCLE. Is she going to talk about the Wittenberg Academy?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I see Jocelyn Benson will be at CCLE. Is she going to talk about the Wittenberg Academy?

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  • rlewer

    @Joanne
    The original LCMS gymnasii were for boys only and were basically for students wanting to be full time church workers (teachers or pastors) although there were others there just seeking a good education. At the time it would have been very difficult to become an LCMS teacher or pastor without attending a prep school. I attended Concordia, Austin which at the time (’51-’55) didn’t have girls in the junior college either. We had 4 years of Latin and German and the pastoral students began Greek their senior year.

    The President of Concordia, Austin was George Beto who later became President of Concordia Theological Seminary, Springfield IL, and then became the head of the Texas prison system.

  • rlewer

    @Joanne
    The original LCMS gymnasii were for boys only and were basically for students wanting to be full time church workers (teachers or pastors) although there were others there just seeking a good education. At the time it would have been very difficult to become an LCMS teacher or pastor without attending a prep school. I attended Concordia, Austin which at the time (’51-’55) didn’t have girls in the junior college either. We had 4 years of Latin and German and the pastoral students began Greek their senior year.

    The President of Concordia, Austin was George Beto who later became President of Concordia Theological Seminary, Springfield IL, and then became the head of the Texas prison system.

  • Joanne

    Kitty,
    I still remember my mother crying everytime my sister and I left for St. John’s in Kansas or she left us there. She never got used to missing us.

    Most parents preferred a local Lutheran High School so the children could stay at home and we didn’t have the option. But, just like Hogwarts there were definite advantages; those big white owls were super.

  • Joanne

    Kitty,
    I still remember my mother crying everytime my sister and I left for St. John’s in Kansas or she left us there. She never got used to missing us.

    Most parents preferred a local Lutheran High School so the children could stay at home and we didn’t have the option. But, just like Hogwarts there were definite advantages; those big white owls were super.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    SG@14: Yes, Jocelyn Benson will be at the CCLE and will talk about Wittenberg Academy.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    SG@14: Yes, Jocelyn Benson will be at the CCLE and will talk about Wittenberg Academy.

  • Ryan

    Here is a link to one of the last (or is it the last?) LCMS boarding school: http://www.splhs.org/

  • Ryan

    Here is a link to one of the last (or is it the last?) LCMS boarding school: http://www.splhs.org/

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ C-Christian Soldier

    When I first started Homeschooling in the early 80′s -I got many ‘eye rolls’ from fellow Lutherans–
    So glad the attitude has changed among Lutherans…
    Carol-CS
    LA LFL

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ C-Christian Soldier

    When I first started Homeschooling in the early 80′s -I got many ‘eye rolls’ from fellow Lutherans–
    So glad the attitude has changed among Lutherans…
    Carol-CS
    LA LFL

  • WebMonk

    Oh dear. I had passed it over before, but someone IRL mentioned something that brought this to mind, so I went to look at their website.

    1995 is calling and wants its website back.

    I’m having trouble getting past the form of the website to pay attention to the content. I realize they are just starting out, and probably didn’t have a professional website designer available. That needs to be one of their first priorities, though.

    Black and white = way too stark.

    Fat side areas = not suitable for their communication needs. Things like a blog, sure. For an organization website – no.

    Menu on left = NEVER use with side areas and center-aligned content!!!!!

    Donate = get online payments for goodness sake!!!!!

    Mr. Jeremy Staub = get a vaguely professional picture.

    On the good side – a Twitter account is good, as is a Facebook page. They’re even making semi-regular Twitter posts. A few more posts on topic would be an item to improve.

    Another would be to have a stream on the site showing their Twitter activity instead of just a link to their Twitter account. Possibly do that for Facebook too.

    In general, side bar menus shouldn’t be used for large sites, and though they aren’t “large” yet, the menu style does reinforce the image of a small, fly-by-night organization. The almost total lack of dynamic interaction is also something that suggests “small” and “new”.

    They are small and new, but it’s something that should probably be fixed quickly.

  • WebMonk

    Oh dear. I had passed it over before, but someone IRL mentioned something that brought this to mind, so I went to look at their website.

    1995 is calling and wants its website back.

    I’m having trouble getting past the form of the website to pay attention to the content. I realize they are just starting out, and probably didn’t have a professional website designer available. That needs to be one of their first priorities, though.

    Black and white = way too stark.

    Fat side areas = not suitable for their communication needs. Things like a blog, sure. For an organization website – no.

    Menu on left = NEVER use with side areas and center-aligned content!!!!!

    Donate = get online payments for goodness sake!!!!!

    Mr. Jeremy Staub = get a vaguely professional picture.

    On the good side – a Twitter account is good, as is a Facebook page. They’re even making semi-regular Twitter posts. A few more posts on topic would be an item to improve.

    Another would be to have a stream on the site showing their Twitter activity instead of just a link to their Twitter account. Possibly do that for Facebook too.

    In general, side bar menus shouldn’t be used for large sites, and though they aren’t “large” yet, the menu style does reinforce the image of a small, fly-by-night organization. The almost total lack of dynamic interaction is also something that suggests “small” and “new”.

    They are small and new, but it’s something that should probably be fixed quickly.

  • Jim Woelmer

    Faith Lutheran High School in Plano, Texas is one of the few classical high schools in the LCMS. The website is:
    http://www.flsplano.org/High%20School

    We currenlty have an enrollment of 18 students in grades 9-12. We hope to put our classes on-line soon. It will be live with interaction between the professor and the students. We support all efforts to advance the classical model of education. We will also attend the CCLE conference this summer.

  • Jim Woelmer

    Faith Lutheran High School in Plano, Texas is one of the few classical high schools in the LCMS. The website is:
    http://www.flsplano.org/High%20School

    We currenlty have an enrollment of 18 students in grades 9-12. We hope to put our classes on-line soon. It will be live with interaction between the professor and the students. We support all efforts to advance the classical model of education. We will also attend the CCLE conference this summer.

  • Rev. H. R. Curtis

    Trotk,

    If we could all have our ‘druthers, we would indeed all have local, stick and stone classical Lutheran schools for our kids. Alas, we can’t all have our ‘druthers. We hope that Wittenberg Academy will provide excellent opportunities to deep the classical education experience of homeschooling families – and give parents without access to a local Lutheran High School the ability to keep homeschooling through 12th grade.

    Web Monk,

    As the Evangelicals say: “It sounds like you have a heart for that ministry – would you like to volunteer?” Drop Mr. or Mrs. Benson a line and lend a hand, or at least give them a quote on your cost to fix up the website nicely.

    +HRC

  • Rev. H. R. Curtis

    Trotk,

    If we could all have our ‘druthers, we would indeed all have local, stick and stone classical Lutheran schools for our kids. Alas, we can’t all have our ‘druthers. We hope that Wittenberg Academy will provide excellent opportunities to deep the classical education experience of homeschooling families – and give parents without access to a local Lutheran High School the ability to keep homeschooling through 12th grade.

    Web Monk,

    As the Evangelicals say: “It sounds like you have a heart for that ministry – would you like to volunteer?” Drop Mr. or Mrs. Benson a line and lend a hand, or at least give them a quote on your cost to fix up the website nicely.

    +HRC

  • WebMonk

    I’ve already got too much on my plate as it is doing various volunteer issues for churches. I did drop them a line before writing the comment, though. One of the comments in what I wrote them was how hard it was to track down their Contact link.

  • WebMonk

    I’ve already got too much on my plate as it is doing various volunteer issues for churches. I did drop them a line before writing the comment, though. One of the comments in what I wrote them was how hard it was to track down their Contact link.

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