The two trees

Pastor Douthwaite, preaching from John 15:9-17 and 1 John 5:1-8:

And speaking of Adam, he’s another one God gave but a single command to, remember? Just: don’t eat from this one tree. Just this one! You can eat from all the others: apples, oranges, pears, pomagranites, figs, cherries, you name it – they’re all yours to eat and enjoy. Just not this one, please. Reserve this one for me.

Now, the scriptures don’t say what kind of fruit was on that tree. Was it a different fruit than all the others? Unique and special and one-of-a-kind, that God was holding back from Adam? I don’t think so. I think it was just one of many, let’s say, fig trees. So by not eating it, Adam isn’t missing out on anything. He’s not deprived of anything. He’s simply loving God by keeping, by honoring, this one request.

But he couldn’t do it. Eve was deceived; Adam did it willfully. Because he couldn’t have it, it was the tree he desired most of all. And the more time goes on, the harder it gets. For that’s the way of it with sin. We want what we can’t, or shouldn’t, have, or what has not been given to us. And taking it, going after it, or desiring it hurts our love for one another. Because we’re thinking of me, not them. Helping me, not them. Loving me, not them. And then Jesus’ command, His request: Love one another, which sounds so simple, becomes: what about me? And then it’s all about me, which is tyranny of the worst kind. It’s what Luther wrote of in the hymn we sang today (LSB #556, v. 2): Fast bound in satan’s chains I lay. When it’s all about me, what’s all about me, are chains. The chains of sin and death.

But Jesus said: These things I have spoken to you, that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be full. Jesus is not imposing on us. He wants us to have joy. But when we love only ourselves there is not this joy, not a joy that lasts anyway. But one that caves to the insatiable desire for more. For that one tree of which God said: please, no.

So what’s a God to do? Give us more rules, more laws, more commandments? That’s what some think, but that’s doesn’t work. For how you doing with that one: Love one another? If we can’t even keep one, how we gonna keep more? No, more rules, more laws, more commandments is the way of servants and slaves. But do you remember what Jesus said today instead? No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.

Friends, not slaves. Friends, not servants. Friends, to whom Jesus has revealed a better way, telling us not more that we have to do, but what He has come to do. That that one tree that Adam and all of us cannot resist, is now a one tree that Jesus cannot resist. But for Jesus it is not in sin, but in love. For that one tree that He cannot resist is the tree of the cross. For greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.

Jesus is that someone, who has come to lay down His life for you. For what comes welling up from within His heart is not sin, but love. And so He comes to not only show us, but give us, the love we need. Calling us friends – not because we deserve it, ‘cuz we most certainly don’t! And calling us friends not because He’s describing us, but because that’s what He’s naming us; that’s what He’s making us, that’s what He’s doing in us. For what God calls something, that’s what it is. God’s Word does what it says. We did not choose Him, He chose us. Or in other words, we’re not His friends because of what we do – we’re His friends because of what He did. Because of His tree. Because of the cross.

That just as one tree made us all sinners, so one tree would make us all righteous again. As one tree made us slaves to sin, so one tree would set us free. As one tree brought death into the world, so one tree would bring life to the world.

via St. Athanasius Lutheran Church: Easter 6 Sermon.

Read it all.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Pete

    A couple of months ago we had a discussion in our adult Bible class about how the fundamental conflict in the Bible is related to the other tree – the tree of Life. The Bible begins with access to the tree of life being cut off because of the fall of Adam and Eve into sin, then ends, in the last chapter of Revelation, with the tree growing right there on the bank of the river running through the New Jerusalem. Everything in between is about restoring access to the tree of Life.

  • Pete

    A couple of months ago we had a discussion in our adult Bible class about how the fundamental conflict in the Bible is related to the other tree – the tree of Life. The Bible begins with access to the tree of life being cut off because of the fall of Adam and Eve into sin, then ends, in the last chapter of Revelation, with the tree growing right there on the bank of the river running through the New Jerusalem. Everything in between is about restoring access to the tree of Life.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    Great sermon!

    ___

    Interesting Bible class discussion, Pete.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    Great sermon!

    ___

    Interesting Bible class discussion, Pete.

  • http://joyouslysavedbygracethroughfaith.blogspot.com Joyously Saved

    Beautiful post! I don’t come across many Lutheran blogs, and, as I share that most special faith that I inherited from many many of my ancestors, it was nice to find yours. I especially liked “For that one tree that He cannot resist is the tree of the cross. For greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.” Stunning analogy!

  • http://joyouslysavedbygracethroughfaith.blogspot.com Joyously Saved

    Beautiful post! I don’t come across many Lutheran blogs, and, as I share that most special faith that I inherited from many many of my ancestors, it was nice to find yours. I especially liked “For that one tree that He cannot resist is the tree of the cross. For greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.” Stunning analogy!


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