Happy Augsburg Confession Day!

On this day 482 years ago–June 25, 1530–the Reformation princes and free cities confessed their faith before Emperor Charles V at the Diet (the governing assembly of the Imperial states) held in Augsburg, Germany.  The 28 articles drawn up by Philipp Melanchthon (not Luther!) became known as the Augsburg Confession.  It was the first confession of faith of the Reformation and, to this day, it is perhaps the most succinct and definitive summaries of Lutheran theology.

Part of its genius is that it spells out what did NOT change in the Reformation churches–the continuity with historical Christianity that later protestants would throw out–as well as precisely what elements in the medieval church did need to be reformed.  The Augsburg Confession is still startlingly relevant to today’s controversies of theology and practice.

Honor the day by reading it:  Augsburg Confession – Book of Concord.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Maybe I am miss remembering my history, but I thought Luther at least consulted on the writing of the Augsburg confession. Or was it the Apology that he was in almost daily correspondence with Melanchthon?

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Maybe I am miss remembering my history, but I thought Luther at least consulted on the writing of the Augsburg confession. Or was it the Apology that he was in almost daily correspondence with Melanchthon?

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    He did, and he agreed with it and thought highly of it. But whereas he was the only one saying “here I stand” at the earlier Diet in Wurms, at Augsburg he was not alone at all, with entire principalities, cities, and other theologians standing with him. The Augsburg Confession shows that Lutheranism is not just about Luther, but that what he emphasized was a concern of the whole historic Christian church. That Melanchthon, the great Renaissance scholar, wrote it shows again that Lutherans do not just follow the one man Luther.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    He did, and he agreed with it and thought highly of it. But whereas he was the only one saying “here I stand” at the earlier Diet in Wurms, at Augsburg he was not alone at all, with entire principalities, cities, and other theologians standing with him. The Augsburg Confession shows that Lutheranism is not just about Luther, but that what he emphasized was a concern of the whole historic Christian church. That Melanchthon, the great Renaissance scholar, wrote it shows again that Lutherans do not just follow the one man Luther.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Just making sure my memory hadn’t failed me. The way the OP is written it makes it sound like the AC is solely the work of Melancthon. Your follow up comment, I think, fits your purpose better than the brief statement in the OP.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    Just making sure my memory hadn’t failed me. The way the OP is written it makes it sound like the AC is solely the work of Melancthon. Your follow up comment, I think, fits your purpose better than the brief statement in the OP.

  • fws

    Read the apology too while your at it.

    Keep in mind that the Apology is a polemic against St Thomas’ Scholastic system. Thomist Natural Law.

  • fws

    Read the apology too while your at it.

    Keep in mind that the Apology is a polemic against St Thomas’ Scholastic system. Thomist Natural Law.

  • Pingback: Do I have true faith? Thoughts on Announcing For Communion, Self-Examination, and Infant Communion « De Profundis Clamavi ad Te, Domine

  • Pingback: Do I have true faith? Thoughts on Announcing For Communion, Self-Examination, and Infant Communion « De Profundis Clamavi ad Te, Domine

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