Into the wilderness

Today we head out for a little cabin in the big woods.  We will have no internet connection, no cell phone reception, no cable television, and no newspapers.  If we survive, we will crawl out of the wilderness like Rip Van Winkle, if Rip Van Winkle only slept for five days.   Still, we have been looking forward to this for a long time.  That does mean that I won’t be doing any blogging for the rest of the week.

If we can avoid dying of exposure or getting eaten by wild animals, I’ll be back the first of July.  In the meantime, if something happens in the world that you think I would normally blog about–for example, if the Supremes rule on Obamacare–please make a comment to that effect here and discuss as you think appropriate.

If all goes well, I’ll be posting again on July 2.  By then I’ll probably be grateful again for the blessings of civilization, technology, and the information age.  In the meantime, I’ll enjoy being without them.

[Updated by tODD: Actually, at the risk of presuming on our good host's hospitality, I'm going to create at least one new post for the discussion of the Supreme Court ruling in Arizona v. United States, as I assume that's one topic we'll want to discuss here, and it might keep discussion a bit tidier than having it all in one thread. And, come Thursday, I'll set up another one specifically for the Supreme Court ruling on the health care law.

Feel free to discuss other matters here, or to propose topics we could discuss in separate posts this week. I'll do my best to create posts on topics that seem of general interest. I know I'm often wrong about everything you hold dear, but I'll try to be impartial here -- at least, in the creation of discussion posts. I just don't want us all trying to discuss everything in one thread for four days. I know how whiny you guys can get when you're not getting your Cranach fix.]

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    O’ how I envy you.

    Have a wonderful, relaxing vacation.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    O’ how I envy you.

    Have a wonderful, relaxing vacation.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com John

    Unbeknownst to the general population, Dr. Veith has been stockpiling M193 and K-rations in preparation for the coming zombie apocalypse. This week he tests his survivalist skills, bivouacing in the great expanse of nature with only a 14″ bowie knife and several yards of fishing line…

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com John

    Unbeknownst to the general population, Dr. Veith has been stockpiling M193 and K-rations in preparation for the coming zombie apocalypse. This week he tests his survivalist skills, bivouacing in the great expanse of nature with only a 14″ bowie knife and several yards of fishing line…

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    I hope he’s got some shoes on…

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    I hope he’s got some shoes on…

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Enjoy, Dr. Veith! Just got back from a little vacation myself.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Enjoy, Dr. Veith! Just got back from a little vacation myself.

  • Jimmy Veith

    John @2. I don’t think that we have to worry about a zombie apocalypse. I think Lincoln took care of that problem when he killed all the vampires.

    However, my brother may be preparing for an alien invasion. Fortunately, we are in good hands. A recent survey revealed that 65% of Americans think that President Obama could better handle an alien invasion than Romney. I concur.

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-obama-alien-invasion-20120627,0,6297016.story

  • Jimmy Veith

    John @2. I don’t think that we have to worry about a zombie apocalypse. I think Lincoln took care of that problem when he killed all the vampires.

    However, my brother may be preparing for an alien invasion. Fortunately, we are in good hands. A recent survey revealed that 65% of Americans think that President Obama could better handle an alien invasion than Romney. I concur.

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-obama-alien-invasion-20120627,0,6297016.story

  • PStad

    After today’s SCOTUS ruling on the ACA, I think all of us are in the wilderness! Hope you enjoy your time away from the news media!

  • PStad

    After today’s SCOTUS ruling on the ACA, I think all of us are in the wilderness! Hope you enjoy your time away from the news media!

  • Grace

    Have a great time Dr. Veith – you’ve earned it!

  • Grace

    Have a great time Dr. Veith – you’ve earned it!

  • Dan Kempin

    If anyone is bored, we can go back over an old argument that we had here:

    http://www.geneveith.com/2011/05/04/urban-legends-pastors-tell/

    I took issue with the fact that Mary’s (the mother of our Lord) age at the time of marriage is taught AS FACT to be quite young–in the 12-13 year old range. I was upbraided by Bror, Cincinnatus, and others who managed to admit that such a young age was not established, but nevertheless seemed to think that the preponderance of evidence was so overwhelming that it might as well be. Puzzlingly, they offered no textual or historical evidence beyond the assertion that there was evidence.

    (Bear in mind that I did not and I do not say that a young age is impossible or problematic. I rather maintain that it is unsubstantiated and unlikely.)

    Well, throw this extra log on the fire: In reviewing Sunday’s gospel reading one more time (Mark 5:21-43), I noticed that Jesus called Jairus’s daughter, “talitha,” which means, “little girl.” Not just “girl,” as opposed to woman, but the diminutive, “little girl.”

    That I knew, of course, but what struck me this time through is that her age is given. She was 12. That would mean, according to some, that she was just reaching the age of marriage. Why then would she be called “little girl?” Could it be because the Jews were NOT in the habit of marrying early teen girls? That seems reasonable to me. In any case, I think this particular text tends to support my side of the argument.

    For what it is worth. Now back to summer.

  • Dan Kempin

    If anyone is bored, we can go back over an old argument that we had here:

    http://www.geneveith.com/2011/05/04/urban-legends-pastors-tell/

    I took issue with the fact that Mary’s (the mother of our Lord) age at the time of marriage is taught AS FACT to be quite young–in the 12-13 year old range. I was upbraided by Bror, Cincinnatus, and others who managed to admit that such a young age was not established, but nevertheless seemed to think that the preponderance of evidence was so overwhelming that it might as well be. Puzzlingly, they offered no textual or historical evidence beyond the assertion that there was evidence.

    (Bear in mind that I did not and I do not say that a young age is impossible or problematic. I rather maintain that it is unsubstantiated and unlikely.)

    Well, throw this extra log on the fire: In reviewing Sunday’s gospel reading one more time (Mark 5:21-43), I noticed that Jesus called Jairus’s daughter, “talitha,” which means, “little girl.” Not just “girl,” as opposed to woman, but the diminutive, “little girl.”

    That I knew, of course, but what struck me this time through is that her age is given. She was 12. That would mean, according to some, that she was just reaching the age of marriage. Why then would she be called “little girl?” Could it be because the Jews were NOT in the habit of marrying early teen girls? That seems reasonable to me. In any case, I think this particular text tends to support my side of the argument.

    For what it is worth. Now back to summer.

  • Tom Hering

    I hope the little cabin (in the Big Woods State Forest?) survived the superstorm okay:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_2012_Mid-Atlantic_and_Midwest_derecho

  • Tom Hering

    I hope the little cabin (in the Big Woods State Forest?) survived the superstorm okay:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_2012_Mid-Atlantic_and_Midwest_derecho

  • Helen K

    I second what Tom @9 writes. Welcome back, Dr. Veith! The blog has been lively as you can see.

  • Helen K

    I second what Tom @9 writes. Welcome back, Dr. Veith! The blog has been lively as you can see.

  • Grace

    Dr. Veith,

    WELCOME HOME – I know all of us, who post on your blog are happy to have you back.

    Please tell us about your vacation, and what you learned while being away from us.

  • Grace

    Dr. Veith,

    WELCOME HOME – I know all of us, who post on your blog are happy to have you back.

    Please tell us about your vacation, and what you learned while being away from us.


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