Andy Griffith, Moravian

Andy Griffith died at age 86.  It turns out, he was Moravian, a church with Reformation roots going back to John Hus, with a big influence of Lutheran Pietists.  From journalist Andrew Herrmann:

Griffith’s story was rooted in the Moravian Church, a Christian sect started in Eastern Europe that sent missionaries to the U.S. in the 1700s — one group founded Winston-Salem, N.C. As a teenager, Griffith was attracted to Grace Moravian Church in Mount Airy, N.C. because the minister gave music lessons. Grace had a brass band and Griffith wanted to play the trombone.

Griffith studied to become a Moravian clergyman at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and, after a semester or two, he asked his bishop if he could prepare for the ministry by majoring in music. The bishop said no.

Griffith dropped the idea of becoming a pastor, but he eventually took his brand of preaching to a different venue: “The Andy Griffith Show,” a weekly, half-hour morality play about life in a small town.

There were winks and nods to his faith: The local All Souls Church was led by the Rev. Hobart M. Tucker — he of the unforgettable sermon: “Dice Are Loaded Against the Evil Doer.” Another episode featured American and Russian diplomats meeting in the basement of Mayberry’s Moravian Church.

On Tuesday, hours after the news of Griffith’s death, Tony Haywarth, Grace Moravian Church’s current pastor, put out a statement thanking God “for the place Andy has in our hearts, for his wonderful Christian ministry, and for the joy he continues to bring into this world.”

via ‘Do the right thing’ — Andy Griffith left lessons for the greater good – Chicago Sun-Times.

I would argue that The Andy Griffith Show–with Sheriff Taylor, Barney Fife, Aunt Bee, Opie, Gomer, and even more brilliant comic characters–was NOT mere cornpone nostalgia, as it is often portrayed, but one of the greatest comedies in the history of television.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Pete

    Blasphemy for me to say, as a North Carolinian, but “Dobie Gillis” was better.

  • Pete

    Blasphemy for me to say, as a North Carolinian, but “Dobie Gillis” was better.

  • Pete

    (I think it was, more accurately, “The Adventures of Dobie Gillis”)

  • Pete

    (I think it was, more accurately, “The Adventures of Dobie Gillis”)

  • LAJ

    I totally agree that it was the best show ever made. And I think Sherriff Taylor should have been #1 TV dad ever rather than #8.

  • LAJ

    I totally agree that it was the best show ever made. And I think Sherriff Taylor should have been #1 TV dad ever rather than #8.

  • Mary

    My husband remembers it as “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” I don’t think I ever saw that series.

  • Mary

    My husband remembers it as “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” I don’t think I ever saw that series.

  • Pete

    Yes – “Many Loves…” I think that was it.

    And the theme song to the Andy Griffith show could get stuck rattling around your head, big time – but not nearly as bad as the one for “Green Acres”. Ugh – I shudder to even mention it – there it goes again: “.. Keep Manhattan just gimme that countryside..”. Ugh!

  • Pete

    Yes – “Many Loves…” I think that was it.

    And the theme song to the Andy Griffith show could get stuck rattling around your head, big time – but not nearly as bad as the one for “Green Acres”. Ugh – I shudder to even mention it – there it goes again: “.. Keep Manhattan just gimme that countryside..”. Ugh!

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    I think what drew so many into Mayberry was a combination of humor, which was superb, truly outstanding comedic acting, and the undercurrent of decency, gentleness and a morality that we today seldom, if ever, see so effectively combined on TV today.

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    I think what drew so many into Mayberry was a combination of humor, which was superb, truly outstanding comedic acting, and the undercurrent of decency, gentleness and a morality that we today seldom, if ever, see so effectively combined on TV today.

  • Tom Hering

    I’ll never forgive the Andy Griffith Show for adding Gomer Pyle to the pointless sufferings of a fallen world.

  • Tom Hering

    I’ll never forgive the Andy Griffith Show for adding Gomer Pyle to the pointless sufferings of a fallen world.

  • Jack

    I was a big fan of “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” during its original run, and am enjoying reruns on MeTV.

    Andy Griffith was a different type of show, so it’s hard for me to compare the two.

  • Jack

    I was a big fan of “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” during its original run, and am enjoying reruns on MeTV.

    Andy Griffith was a different type of show, so it’s hard for me to compare the two.

  • Jon

    What about Matlock?

  • Jon

    What about Matlock?

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Dobie Gillis… didn’t that have Gilligan on there (Bob Denver)?

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Dobie Gillis… didn’t that have Gilligan on there (Bob Denver)?

  • Rich

    I have all eight seasons on DVD. Each episode is practically memorized, but I still laugh just as heartily as I did when I first saw them. My kids love the show as much as I do. TAGS is truly a masterpiece of comedy and a showcase for some of the greatest character actors in television history.

  • Rich

    I have all eight seasons on DVD. Each episode is practically memorized, but I still laugh just as heartily as I did when I first saw them. My kids love the show as much as I do. TAGS is truly a masterpiece of comedy and a showcase for some of the greatest character actors in television history.

  • Pete

    J. Dean @10

    Yes – Bob Denver played a great role – Maynard G Krebs, who was a beatnik. Hilarious.

  • Pete

    J. Dean @10

    Yes – Bob Denver played a great role – Maynard G Krebs, who was a beatnik. Hilarious.

  • Stephen

    Barney Fife is still a favorite. I love that he was allowed only one bullet and he had to carry it in his pocket instead of loaded in the gun. There’s great theology about the Law in the contrast of him and Andy. Barney is the strict legalist while Andy is an expression of the true work of the law – that ultimately love and mercy should happen. What was the name of that drunk he let sleep in the jail? Oh yeah, Otis. Otis is the town sinner.

    And then of course, we all know that Floyd the hairdresser . . . er . . . “barber” was TV’s first gay character.

    Made you look! :)

  • Stephen

    Barney Fife is still a favorite. I love that he was allowed only one bullet and he had to carry it in his pocket instead of loaded in the gun. There’s great theology about the Law in the contrast of him and Andy. Barney is the strict legalist while Andy is an expression of the true work of the law – that ultimately love and mercy should happen. What was the name of that drunk he let sleep in the jail? Oh yeah, Otis. Otis is the town sinner.

    And then of course, we all know that Floyd the hairdresser . . . er . . . “barber” was TV’s first gay character.

    Made you look! :)

  • Bob

    How sad that Andy Griffith’s legacy is already being trashed by right wingers who apparently can’t accept that Griffith was a big supporter of President Obama and ObamaCare.

    Yet another reason to avoid conservative blogsites that promote hate and intolerance. Fortunately, it’s not a problem for nearly everyone.

    “Progressive POS. Have fun burning in Hell for eternity.” — Red Meat

    “Good people don’t promote laws that will directly lead to the death of millions, hope someday I get to spit on his grave.” — Swampy

    So long Andy [smiley emoticon] You are a total sell out to this great nation. You are a communist piece of garbage and you will not be missed. — Truthbeliever2

    http://www.alan.com/2012/07/04/conservative-blog-commenters-memorialize-andy-griffith-by-remembering-him-as-a-communist-piece-of-garbage/

  • Bob

    How sad that Andy Griffith’s legacy is already being trashed by right wingers who apparently can’t accept that Griffith was a big supporter of President Obama and ObamaCare.

    Yet another reason to avoid conservative blogsites that promote hate and intolerance. Fortunately, it’s not a problem for nearly everyone.

    “Progressive POS. Have fun burning in Hell for eternity.” — Red Meat

    “Good people don’t promote laws that will directly lead to the death of millions, hope someday I get to spit on his grave.” — Swampy

    So long Andy [smiley emoticon] You are a total sell out to this great nation. You are a communist piece of garbage and you will not be missed. — Truthbeliever2

    http://www.alan.com/2012/07/04/conservative-blog-commenters-memorialize-andy-griffith-by-remembering-him-as-a-communist-piece-of-garbage/

  • Cincinnatus

    Bob,

    We were having a nice conversation lauding Griffith’s faith and career–until you showed up. Honestly, who cares what political points Alan Colmes is trying to score by collating the ignorant ravings of anonymous internet commenters?

    Anyway, the Andy Griffith show was a childhood favorite, and I plan to share it with my children. Unlike a lot of the nostalgic old television that reappears on MeTV and TV Land, TAGS has stood the test of time.

  • Cincinnatus

    Bob,

    We were having a nice conversation lauding Griffith’s faith and career–until you showed up. Honestly, who cares what political points Alan Colmes is trying to score by collating the ignorant ravings of anonymous internet commenters?

    Anyway, the Andy Griffith show was a childhood favorite, and I plan to share it with my children. Unlike a lot of the nostalgic old television that reappears on MeTV and TV Land, TAGS has stood the test of time.

  • reg

    For fun I asked Google Maps for directions from Mayberry, NC to Mount Pilot, NC. Apparently its a 12.7 mile drive which should take 19 minutes. And here I thought those were fictional towns! :-)

  • reg

    For fun I asked Google Maps for directions from Mayberry, NC to Mount Pilot, NC. Apparently its a 12.7 mile drive which should take 19 minutes. And here I thought those were fictional towns! :-)

  • formerly just steve

    +1 @ Cincinnatus #15

  • formerly just steve

    +1 @ Cincinnatus #15

  • WebMonk

    +2 @ Cincinnatus #15

  • WebMonk

    +2 @ Cincinnatus #15

  • Helen K

    +3 @ Cincinnatus #15

    I’ve probably one of the few who never watched Andy Griffith. I don’t even know the years he was on. It was not because I didn’t like the program, it’s that I hadn’t heard of it. Didn’t have TV for quite some time and then, when I did, didn’t watch much.

    Now, with my DH, I’m learning what I missed. I wasn’t under a rock but maybe close to it. All those books and outdoor activity kept me occupied. I’m enjoying all your comments. And now I have seen a few reruns. Nice.

  • Helen K

    +3 @ Cincinnatus #15

    I’ve probably one of the few who never watched Andy Griffith. I don’t even know the years he was on. It was not because I didn’t like the program, it’s that I hadn’t heard of it. Didn’t have TV for quite some time and then, when I did, didn’t watch much.

    Now, with my DH, I’m learning what I missed. I wasn’t under a rock but maybe close to it. All those books and outdoor activity kept me occupied. I’m enjoying all your comments. And now I have seen a few reruns. Nice.

  • formerly just steve

    Helen K grew up in Steve’s Bizzarro World (which, ironically, means she probably won’t get the reference). ;)

  • formerly just steve

    Helen K grew up in Steve’s Bizzarro World (which, ironically, means she probably won’t get the reference). ;)

  • George A. Marquart

    “It turns out, he was Moravian, a church with Reformation roots going back to John Hus…” It so happens that tomorrow it will be 597 years since Jan Hus was burned at the stake in Constance. He was a true martyr, who went to his death singing praises to his Lord. Various sources report that even as the fires were being lit, he said words to the effect that, ““They will silence the goose, but in 100 years I will raise a swan from your ashes that no one will be able to silence.”

    To understand what he meant, we have to know that the letter “H”, in those Slavic languages that use the Latin alphabet, is pronounced as a “G”. So we have “Praha”, which is pronounced, “Praga”, Hitler, which is pronounced “Gitler”, and Bohdan (a name which means “gift of God” or Theodore, in Latin), which is pronounced Bogdan. So “Hus” is pronounced “Goos”, which, if you add the “e” in English, it also means.

    Luther understood himself to be that swan. Quoting the words of Hus and commenting on them, Luther wrote in 1541, “After 100 years you will answer to God and me. You are going to roast a goose. A swan will come after me. You will not roast him. And that is what has happened.” 102 years after the martyrdom of Jan Hus, Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses on to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg.

    Peace and Joy!
    George A. Marquart

  • George A. Marquart

    “It turns out, he was Moravian, a church with Reformation roots going back to John Hus…” It so happens that tomorrow it will be 597 years since Jan Hus was burned at the stake in Constance. He was a true martyr, who went to his death singing praises to his Lord. Various sources report that even as the fires were being lit, he said words to the effect that, ““They will silence the goose, but in 100 years I will raise a swan from your ashes that no one will be able to silence.”

    To understand what he meant, we have to know that the letter “H”, in those Slavic languages that use the Latin alphabet, is pronounced as a “G”. So we have “Praha”, which is pronounced, “Praga”, Hitler, which is pronounced “Gitler”, and Bohdan (a name which means “gift of God” or Theodore, in Latin), which is pronounced Bogdan. So “Hus” is pronounced “Goos”, which, if you add the “e” in English, it also means.

    Luther understood himself to be that swan. Quoting the words of Hus and commenting on them, Luther wrote in 1541, “After 100 years you will answer to God and me. You are going to roast a goose. A swan will come after me. You will not roast him. And that is what has happened.” 102 years after the martyrdom of Jan Hus, Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses on to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg.

    Peace and Joy!
    George A. Marquart

  • http://www.caryschwarz.com saddler

    Right on Cinicinnatus.

  • http://www.caryschwarz.com saddler

    Right on Cinicinnatus.

  • fws

    stephen @ 13

    very cool.

  • fws

    stephen @ 13

    very cool.

  • kerner

    One of the best tv dialogue lines ever:

    Opie wants to write a school theme paper about his dad, and asks him an intentionally serious question to Andy, who is reading the newspaper and unaware of Opie’s reason for asking:

    Opie: “Dad, what do you think about life?”

    Andy: “Oh, I’m all for it.”

  • kerner

    One of the best tv dialogue lines ever:

    Opie wants to write a school theme paper about his dad, and asks him an intentionally serious question to Andy, who is reading the newspaper and unaware of Opie’s reason for asking:

    Opie: “Dad, what do you think about life?”

    Andy: “Oh, I’m all for it.”

  • http://dimlamp.wordpress.com/ dimlamp

    North of the 49th we Canadians also watched the Andy Griffith Show. I too appreciated the humour, along with the kind and gentle motifs of the show.

  • http://dimlamp.wordpress.com/ dimlamp

    North of the 49th we Canadians also watched the Andy Griffith Show. I too appreciated the humour, along with the kind and gentle motifs of the show.

  • Helen K

    Formerly Just Steve @ 20….you are correct. Please enlighten me and help bring me into the 21st century. I’m ill informed when it comes to pop culture. (:

  • Helen K

    Formerly Just Steve @ 20….you are correct. Please enlighten me and help bring me into the 21st century. I’m ill informed when it comes to pop culture. (:

  • Grace

    Andy Griffith was a fun show to watch, but was not a top show. It was sometimes corny in it’s appeal.

  • Grace

    Andy Griffith was a fun show to watch, but was not a top show. It was sometimes corny in it’s appeal.

  • Stephen

    Frank,

    You’ll notice Barney’s animosity towards Otis the drunk. It is a constant theme on the show. He thinks he should be punished more severely. Andy grants mercy.

    There’s a great episode where Barney gets ahold of a city regulation book of some sort and ends up putting the whole town under arrest for violating various ordinances. Andy, of course, has to teach Barney that this is not the purpose of the law. Barney is livid when Andy lets everyone out of jail.

    I think that the title “peace officer” says a great deal about the whole purpose of the law.

  • Stephen

    Frank,

    You’ll notice Barney’s animosity towards Otis the drunk. It is a constant theme on the show. He thinks he should be punished more severely. Andy grants mercy.

    There’s a great episode where Barney gets ahold of a city regulation book of some sort and ends up putting the whole town under arrest for violating various ordinances. Andy, of course, has to teach Barney that this is not the purpose of the law. Barney is livid when Andy lets everyone out of jail.

    I think that the title “peace officer” says a great deal about the whole purpose of the law.

  • SKPeterson

    What were the top shows in your opinion Grace? Did you go more for the crime shows like Dragnet, or the variety shows like Dean Martin? When did Carol Burnett’s show start?

  • SKPeterson

    What were the top shows in your opinion Grace? Did you go more for the crime shows like Dragnet, or the variety shows like Dean Martin? When did Carol Burnett’s show start?

  • Grace

    SKPeterson

    As for Carol Burnett I have no idea when it started, my mother watched it. As for Dragnet? I’ve seen a few re-runs. I watched a few Dean Martin shows.

    I have never been a real fan of TV variety shows. I always watched news, and so did my father. I was much more interested in politics, and what was going on in this country and abroad.

  • Grace

    SKPeterson

    As for Carol Burnett I have no idea when it started, my mother watched it. As for Dragnet? I’ve seen a few re-runs. I watched a few Dean Martin shows.

    I have never been a real fan of TV variety shows. I always watched news, and so did my father. I was much more interested in politics, and what was going on in this country and abroad.

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace,

    Most television from the 1960′s appears corny, even campy, to “modern” viewers, steeped as they are in a culture of irony and authenticity (and yet simultaneously gritty, “unflinching” realism).

    How is TAGS different from its peers? How is it more corny than, say, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Gilligan’s Island, Leave It to Beaver, Marvin the Martian, or any other comparable sitcom from that era?

    Sure, when compared with, say, HBO’s The Wire, Mayberry doesn’t look all that believable. But that wasn’t the point of TAGS, nor was it the point of most television shows at the time. Television from the middle part of the twentieth century often presented an idealized reality for those who, having been raised in the Great Depression, experienced enough “gritty realism” and “authenticity” in their daily lives, and thus had no interest in being immersed in fictional accounts of the same.

    In short, Grace, do you actually have a substantive comparative evaluation of TAGS or do you simply dislike all television from that time period? It’s fine if old television doesn’t appeal to you, but it kind of disqualifies you from offering a meaningful opinion about TAGS specifically. I hate the show American Idol–simply because I hate all reality shows. So I’m not qualified to offer a particular evaluation of American Idol as compared with other television shows in the same genre. My prejudice is that they all suck. I worry that you’re treating TAGS the same way.

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace,

    Most television from the 1960′s appears corny, even campy, to “modern” viewers, steeped as they are in a culture of irony and authenticity (and yet simultaneously gritty, “unflinching” realism).

    How is TAGS different from its peers? How is it more corny than, say, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Gilligan’s Island, Leave It to Beaver, Marvin the Martian, or any other comparable sitcom from that era?

    Sure, when compared with, say, HBO’s The Wire, Mayberry doesn’t look all that believable. But that wasn’t the point of TAGS, nor was it the point of most television shows at the time. Television from the middle part of the twentieth century often presented an idealized reality for those who, having been raised in the Great Depression, experienced enough “gritty realism” and “authenticity” in their daily lives, and thus had no interest in being immersed in fictional accounts of the same.

    In short, Grace, do you actually have a substantive comparative evaluation of TAGS or do you simply dislike all television from that time period? It’s fine if old television doesn’t appeal to you, but it kind of disqualifies you from offering a meaningful opinion about TAGS specifically. I hate the show American Idol–simply because I hate all reality shows. So I’m not qualified to offer a particular evaluation of American Idol as compared with other television shows in the same genre. My prejudice is that they all suck. I worry that you’re treating TAGS the same way.

  • Cincinnatus

    I meant irony and inauthenticity…i.e., nothing is sacred on modern television.

  • Cincinnatus

    I meant irony and inauthenticity…i.e., nothing is sacred on modern television.

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus

    TV has never been very important to me, except news, current events, and some special reports – and of course, sports. I enjoy watching, Masterpiece Theatre, and others just like it. I find British humor very clever and interesting, and watch it when I have time.

    Living in a warmer climate probably has a lot to do with my choices. There is so much to do.

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus

    TV has never been very important to me, except news, current events, and some special reports – and of course, sports. I enjoy watching, Masterpiece Theatre, and others just like it. I find British humor very clever and interesting, and watch it when I have time.

    Living in a warmer climate probably has a lot to do with my choices. There is so much to do.

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace@33:

    So obviously you don’t like television. What’s the point in telling us you don’t like The Andy Griffith Show, then? Seems a bit spiteful for no particular reason.

  • Cincinnatus

    Grace@33:

    So obviously you don’t like television. What’s the point in telling us you don’t like The Andy Griffith Show, then? Seems a bit spiteful for no particular reason.

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus

    I’m expressing my opinion, just as you are giving yours. That happens all the time on a blog – you do understand that, don’t you? :roll:

    Lighten up Cincinnatus, this is just a conversation about likes and dislikes – what people do or don’t watch on TV!

  • Grace

    Cincinnatus

    I’m expressing my opinion, just as you are giving yours. That happens all the time on a blog – you do understand that, don’t you? :roll:

    Lighten up Cincinnatus, this is just a conversation about likes and dislikes – what people do or don’t watch on TV!

  • kerner

    Somewhere in this exchange, the question got lost.

    If the Andy Griffith Show was not a “top show”, Grace, what WAS a top show to you? Although you may have answered it to an extent by saying that you liked Masterpiece Theater, and current events shows (60 minutes?) and sports (NFL football? Wide World of Sports?). These are all valid preferences of course, as they are basically a matter of taste. And to each her own.

  • kerner

    Somewhere in this exchange, the question got lost.

    If the Andy Griffith Show was not a “top show”, Grace, what WAS a top show to you? Although you may have answered it to an extent by saying that you liked Masterpiece Theater, and current events shows (60 minutes?) and sports (NFL football? Wide World of Sports?). These are all valid preferences of course, as they are basically a matter of taste. And to each her own.

  • Cincinnatus

    kerner@36:

    Right, that’s the question I was posing. If you don’t like television at all, except for the odd sports event or Masterpiece Theather, then chances are you won’t have any special affection for Andy Griffith either.

    But some of us like television on a broader basis. Admittedly, I wasn’t alive in the 1960s, but I’ve watched quite a lot of 1960s television, for better or worse–especially as a child. Looking back–and flipping back occasionally to MeTV–most of those old shows, while still retaining some charm, are…well, not nearly as hilarious, interesting, or well-crafted as they seemed when I was young. The same is not true of the Andy Griffith show. It still shines forth as a really great show in comparison with its peers.

    In short, TAGS–even though it doesn’t really cohere with my current tastes in small-screen entertainment–is a “top show” by relatively objective metrics. Great scripts, great character acting, great storytelling, great “messages.” It’s a wonderful show, especially for children–again, if, unlike Grace, one actually watches/likes television (for better or worse). If TAGS isn’t a “top show,” especially for its time period, then what is a top show? Not many come to mind. Maybe everything from the 1960s was just terrible.

  • Cincinnatus

    kerner@36:

    Right, that’s the question I was posing. If you don’t like television at all, except for the odd sports event or Masterpiece Theather, then chances are you won’t have any special affection for Andy Griffith either.

    But some of us like television on a broader basis. Admittedly, I wasn’t alive in the 1960s, but I’ve watched quite a lot of 1960s television, for better or worse–especially as a child. Looking back–and flipping back occasionally to MeTV–most of those old shows, while still retaining some charm, are…well, not nearly as hilarious, interesting, or well-crafted as they seemed when I was young. The same is not true of the Andy Griffith show. It still shines forth as a really great show in comparison with its peers.

    In short, TAGS–even though it doesn’t really cohere with my current tastes in small-screen entertainment–is a “top show” by relatively objective metrics. Great scripts, great character acting, great storytelling, great “messages.” It’s a wonderful show, especially for children–again, if, unlike Grace, one actually watches/likes television (for better or worse). If TAGS isn’t a “top show,” especially for its time period, then what is a top show? Not many come to mind. Maybe everything from the 1960s was just terrible.

  • Helen K

    So as not to be left out in the cold, I do remember The Carol Burnett Show and watched when TV was available. I really did. (:

    And Grace, I also, enjoy some British tv. We just finished Upstairs/Downstairs which apparently ran in the early 70′s. DH ordered it from Netflix. Lots of interesting characters. I guess there is a “modern” version, but haven’t seen that. Hard to improve on some of the originals.

    So I’m not completely in a no woman’s land of popular culture. Whoever said they didn’t care for American Idol has my vote. Had not heard of it either until DH came along. He likes Twenty-Four (not sure if that’s the correct title) and I just tune it out. Watched a few episodes in an attempt to appreciate his taste. Not for me.

  • Helen K

    So as not to be left out in the cold, I do remember The Carol Burnett Show and watched when TV was available. I really did. (:

    And Grace, I also, enjoy some British tv. We just finished Upstairs/Downstairs which apparently ran in the early 70′s. DH ordered it from Netflix. Lots of interesting characters. I guess there is a “modern” version, but haven’t seen that. Hard to improve on some of the originals.

    So I’m not completely in a no woman’s land of popular culture. Whoever said they didn’t care for American Idol has my vote. Had not heard of it either until DH came along. He likes Twenty-Four (not sure if that’s the correct title) and I just tune it out. Watched a few episodes in an attempt to appreciate his taste. Not for me.

  • Grace

    Helen @ 38

    My husband and I used to watch “Lord of the Manor” (special edition 2007) – very intertaining, they haven’t been on for 3 or 4 years.

    Jeeves and Wooster is another funny program, what a duo, all their nutty adventures.

    “Keeping up Appearances” was silly but fun.

  • Grace

    Helen @ 38

    My husband and I used to watch “Lord of the Manor” (special edition 2007) – very intertaining, they haven’t been on for 3 or 4 years.

    Jeeves and Wooster is another funny program, what a duo, all their nutty adventures.

    “Keeping up Appearances” was silly but fun.

  • Helen K

    @Grace 39…oh yes, Jeeves and Wooster. To me, Stephen Fry made the show. Lord of the Manor sounds vaguely familiar, not sure about that. I did begin Downton Abby, but it seemed to be getting less interesting at the end of the last season. I believe another season is coming out in January. We see most everything on Netflix.

  • Helen K

    @Grace 39…oh yes, Jeeves and Wooster. To me, Stephen Fry made the show. Lord of the Manor sounds vaguely familiar, not sure about that. I did begin Downton Abby, but it seemed to be getting less interesting at the end of the last season. I believe another season is coming out in January. We see most everything on Netflix.

  • SKPeterson

    Well, many British series did not make it to the U.S. until the mid-70′s. For example, Monty Python did not air in America until 1975. By then, Happy Days was in full stride and had yet to jump the shark. I’m fuzzy on what actually was on the air in the 60′s – I was just a baby and remember most of these shows only from reruns after 1972 or so, so actual placement of a series in time is somewhat scrambled for me. Leave It to Beaver and Andy Griffith occupy the same space for me – black and white, even though they are primarily from two different tv eras – while shows in color from the 60′s are of the same mold as the early 70′s shows for me. Even now, as I think about it, I’m not sure what shows I actively watched, and which shows I was mostly just aware of from the surrounding popular culture. Did I really watch Sanford and Sons or Chico and the Man that much, or were they reruns? I remember watching Laugh-In with my parents, most of which was way over my head, but Ruth Buzzi wailing away on Arte Johnson always induced paroxysms of laughter on my part. That was top level entertainment.

  • SKPeterson

    Well, many British series did not make it to the U.S. until the mid-70′s. For example, Monty Python did not air in America until 1975. By then, Happy Days was in full stride and had yet to jump the shark. I’m fuzzy on what actually was on the air in the 60′s – I was just a baby and remember most of these shows only from reruns after 1972 or so, so actual placement of a series in time is somewhat scrambled for me. Leave It to Beaver and Andy Griffith occupy the same space for me – black and white, even though they are primarily from two different tv eras – while shows in color from the 60′s are of the same mold as the early 70′s shows for me. Even now, as I think about it, I’m not sure what shows I actively watched, and which shows I was mostly just aware of from the surrounding popular culture. Did I really watch Sanford and Sons or Chico and the Man that much, or were they reruns? I remember watching Laugh-In with my parents, most of which was way over my head, but Ruth Buzzi wailing away on Arte Johnson always induced paroxysms of laughter on my part. That was top level entertainment.

  • Tom Hering

    I think Griffith will be remembered, above all else, for achieving greatness in Elia Kazan’s 1958 film, A Face In the Crowd. Here’s a taste:

  • Tom Hering

    I think Griffith will be remembered, above all else, for achieving greatness in Elia Kazan’s 1958 film, A Face In the Crowd. Here’s a taste:

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    George (@21), having traveled to Prague/Praha several times, I can tell you that your story is off. “Praha” is quite certainly pronounced, well, as “praha”. However, the city is known as “Praga” in several other languages. More to the point, “Hus” is simply Czech for “goose”.

    No idea of the provenance or veracity of the “goose” prediction you offer — care to point us to a reliable source?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    George (@21), having traveled to Prague/Praha several times, I can tell you that your story is off. “Praha” is quite certainly pronounced, well, as “praha”. However, the city is known as “Praga” in several other languages. More to the point, “Hus” is simply Czech for “goose”.

    No idea of the provenance or veracity of the “goose” prediction you offer — care to point us to a reliable source?


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