How teenagers buy music today

The music industry is struggling because so much of its product can be accessed for free, what with YouTube and “radio” sites such as Pandora (setting aside illegal downloads).  But even when a person wants to buy music, it’s hard if you aren’t old enough for a credit card.  And it’s even harder if you want to buy music your parents wouldn’t approve of.  From Aaron Leitko:

The Internet has given kids boundless opportunities to hear music gratis, but few ways to pay for it.

To shop for mp3s on iTunes or Amazon, you need a credit card or debit card. If you’re a minor with an allowance, you probably don’t have either. . . .

If your tastes don’t align with Best Buy’s music buyer, you’ll have to turn to iTunes. And your folks, who control the purse strings.

“Right now, most kids are using parents’ iTunes accounts or otherwise relying on parental permission to make their purchases,” says Mary Madden, a researcher at the Pew Internet and American Life Project. The only hiccup: The songs that teenagers want to hear and the songs their parents let them hear are often very different. Leveraging chores in exchange for Kanye West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” (uncensored version, of course), the Tool discography or anything Odd Future-related is for brazen teens with particularly liberal or oblivious parents. For the rest, an awkward conversation about the record’s content is inevitable — unless they get their hands on a gift card.

“This is kind of the untold genius of iTunes that’s not spoken about, when it comes to teenagers, is the gift card,” says Crupnick, who estimates that two-thirds of the money teens spend online is with such cards. . . .

“They only ever pay for music out of respect for the artist,” MTV researcher Mariana Agathoklis says. “They almost view that as a way to show off their fandom, where it used to be that you would follow an artist on tour, you would look like them and wear their T-shirts.” A record is no longer an impulse buy — it’s patronage.

via How can you be a rebel if you use Mom’s iTunes account? – The Washington Post.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Dan Kempin

    “Right now, most kids are using parents’ iTunes accounts or otherwise relying on parental permission to make their purchases,”

    This is an upside that I had not noticed. There are ways around it, of course, but this is overall good, right?

    Besides, isn’t youtube violating copyrights by airing all of those copyrighted songs for “free?”

  • Dan Kempin

    “Right now, most kids are using parents’ iTunes accounts or otherwise relying on parental permission to make their purchases,”

    This is an upside that I had not noticed. There are ways around it, of course, but this is overall good, right?

    Besides, isn’t youtube violating copyrights by airing all of those copyrighted songs for “free?”

  • formerly just steve

    I find it hard to have sympathy for kids who have all this music almost at their fingertips. Back when I was young (after walking 5 miles to school, in the snow, uphill, both ways) I had to hitch a ride to the next town over to find the closest independent record store in order to buy the latest Joy Division import album with money I earned working after school at the local dime store.

  • formerly just steve

    I find it hard to have sympathy for kids who have all this music almost at their fingertips. Back when I was young (after walking 5 miles to school, in the snow, uphill, both ways) I had to hitch a ride to the next town over to find the closest independent record store in order to buy the latest Joy Division import album with money I earned working after school at the local dime store.

  • Pete

    To fjs’s point @2, the music in his day was likely worth the snowy uphill trek. In light of what passes for music these days, a more pertinent question than “how kids are buying music” would be “why are kids buying this drivel.” (Is that off the charts on the curmudgeon- meter, or what? Don’t know what got into me.)

  • Pete

    To fjs’s point @2, the music in his day was likely worth the snowy uphill trek. In light of what passes for music these days, a more pertinent question than “how kids are buying music” would be “why are kids buying this drivel.” (Is that off the charts on the curmudgeon- meter, or what? Don’t know what got into me.)

  • Jon

    We’ve been giving nieces and nephews iTunes cards for presents.

    Is that bad?

  • Jon

    We’ve been giving nieces and nephews iTunes cards for presents.

    Is that bad?

  • Joe

    Jon — it is neither good nor bad. It all depends on how involved their parents are. My two oldest kids have iTunes accounts of their own and we give them gift cards from time to time or let them buy gift cards from us, but we are still involved in the decision of what they purchase.

  • Joe

    Jon — it is neither good nor bad. It all depends on how involved their parents are. My two oldest kids have iTunes accounts of their own and we give them gift cards from time to time or let them buy gift cards from us, but we are still involved in the decision of what they purchase.

  • http://www.facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    “The music industry is struggling because …”

    By that, I guess we really mean “the music recorded onto physical media distribution industry.”

    Buggy whips, I tell ya’.

  • http://www.facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    “The music industry is struggling because …”

    By that, I guess we really mean “the music recorded onto physical media distribution industry.”

    Buggy whips, I tell ya’.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    So nothing has changed. The number of songs I taped off the radio. Maybe they need to acknowledge their music isn’t worth buying. I don’t buy unless I want to listen over and over. I know I am not a teen, but I wouldn’t be surprised to hear something similar from them. They want kids to buy music, write good music that parents won’t object to them buying. There I solved their problem.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century

    So nothing has changed. The number of songs I taped off the radio. Maybe they need to acknowledge their music isn’t worth buying. I don’t buy unless I want to listen over and over. I know I am not a teen, but I wouldn’t be surprised to hear something similar from them. They want kids to buy music, write good music that parents won’t object to them buying. There I solved their problem.

  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century
  • Dr. Luther in the 21st Century
  • Klasie Kraalogies

    My middle daughter is a serious music fundi, specializing in the music of the ’80′s (and she is only 13….).

    Her preferred form of recorded music, other than the free stuff off the internet: Vinyl.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    My middle daughter is a serious music fundi, specializing in the music of the ’80′s (and she is only 13….).

    Her preferred form of recorded music, other than the free stuff off the internet: Vinyl.

  • Dan Kempin

    “The music industry is struggling because so much of its product can be accessed for free, what with YouTube and “radio” sites such as Pandora”

    Wait a tic, Pandora pays for their music, as does Rhapsody. They are not among the “freeloaders.”

    Personally, I like the new business model for music. I would rather pay for “access” to a large body of music for a set time on Rhapsody than pay for “ownership” of a cd, which must be physically maintained and will eventually either be lost, scratched beyond use, or added to the pile of cds that I will probably never listen to again.

    So yeah, Mike, #6. Buggy whips.

  • Dan Kempin

    “The music industry is struggling because so much of its product can be accessed for free, what with YouTube and “radio” sites such as Pandora”

    Wait a tic, Pandora pays for their music, as does Rhapsody. They are not among the “freeloaders.”

    Personally, I like the new business model for music. I would rather pay for “access” to a large body of music for a set time on Rhapsody than pay for “ownership” of a cd, which must be physically maintained and will eventually either be lost, scratched beyond use, or added to the pile of cds that I will probably never listen to again.

    So yeah, Mike, #6. Buggy whips.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I realize this wasn’t the thrust of the post, but I take issue with the opening line here:

    The music industry is struggling because so much of its product can be accessed for free, what with YouTube and “radio” sites such as Pandora

    No, the music industry is struggling because its leadership has been overwhelmingly gob-smackingly clueless when it came to how to deal with the Internet over the past fifteen years.

    And, setting aside illegal downloads, it’s a fairly qualified kind of free access that currently exists. Many songs are still not on YouTube (I noticed this when I considered posting to the “favorite song” thread a few days ago — Sufjan Stevens is somewhat represented, but not the songs I was looking for). And if you access YouTube from a mobile device, you will find that you can only view a subset of the videos you’re used to watching from a laptop or desktop.

    Most of the “free” access you can get these days is in the form of “Internet radio”, by which I mean that you don’t completely control what you’re listening to. Certainly this has been the case when I’ve used Pandora, Last.fm, and Spotify for my iPhone. But then, back before the Internet, kids were listening for “free” to the regular radio. So has anything really changed there? You hear some of the songs you like, some songs you don’t like, and irrelevant ads you hate. All in the hopes that you’ll actually purchase the music you hear.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    I realize this wasn’t the thrust of the post, but I take issue with the opening line here:

    The music industry is struggling because so much of its product can be accessed for free, what with YouTube and “radio” sites such as Pandora

    No, the music industry is struggling because its leadership has been overwhelmingly gob-smackingly clueless when it came to how to deal with the Internet over the past fifteen years.

    And, setting aside illegal downloads, it’s a fairly qualified kind of free access that currently exists. Many songs are still not on YouTube (I noticed this when I considered posting to the “favorite song” thread a few days ago — Sufjan Stevens is somewhat represented, but not the songs I was looking for). And if you access YouTube from a mobile device, you will find that you can only view a subset of the videos you’re used to watching from a laptop or desktop.

    Most of the “free” access you can get these days is in the form of “Internet radio”, by which I mean that you don’t completely control what you’re listening to. Certainly this has been the case when I’ve used Pandora, Last.fm, and Spotify for my iPhone. But then, back before the Internet, kids were listening for “free” to the regular radio. So has anything really changed there? You hear some of the songs you like, some songs you don’t like, and irrelevant ads you hate. All in the hopes that you’ll actually purchase the music you hear.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan asked (@1):

    Besides, isn’t youtube violating copyrights by airing all of those copyrighted songs for “free?”

    Well, technically, no. Some of their users are, for sure. But I can assure you that YouTube can and does work with copyright holders to pull down or restrict material they don’t want on YouTube.

    I know this from experience, as my company once had a video produced by a third party, which we posted to YouTube. The third party used some old Django Reinhardt recording for the soundtrack, which they erroneously assumed was public domain. It was not. This resulted in our video being restricted only to viewers in the US (not a huge deal for my company, really). Also, the video was tagged with a note saying who the music was by, with a link to purchase an MP3 of the recording at various music sites. So they both restricted its distribution and tried to make some money off it, too. All this done with some fairly impressive software that apparently scans all uploaded videos for signs of copyright violations.

    Point being, if there are apparently illegal videos on YouTube, then either the software scan hasn’t gotten to them yet, or the copyright holder hasn’t bothered to work with YouTube. (Or, as often happens, the video is in some way inferior to the original product — someone filming a TV set, say, or an upload of a foreign-language dub — so the copyright holder doesn’t care.)

    And then, of course, there are all those (mildly forward-thinking) companies that intentionally put their videos on YouTube on purpose (e.g. any video put up by a user with “VEVO” in its name), in order to make you want to purchase the artist’s work.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan asked (@1):

    Besides, isn’t youtube violating copyrights by airing all of those copyrighted songs for “free?”

    Well, technically, no. Some of their users are, for sure. But I can assure you that YouTube can and does work with copyright holders to pull down or restrict material they don’t want on YouTube.

    I know this from experience, as my company once had a video produced by a third party, which we posted to YouTube. The third party used some old Django Reinhardt recording for the soundtrack, which they erroneously assumed was public domain. It was not. This resulted in our video being restricted only to viewers in the US (not a huge deal for my company, really). Also, the video was tagged with a note saying who the music was by, with a link to purchase an MP3 of the recording at various music sites. So they both restricted its distribution and tried to make some money off it, too. All this done with some fairly impressive software that apparently scans all uploaded videos for signs of copyright violations.

    Point being, if there are apparently illegal videos on YouTube, then either the software scan hasn’t gotten to them yet, or the copyright holder hasn’t bothered to work with YouTube. (Or, as often happens, the video is in some way inferior to the original product — someone filming a TV set, say, or an upload of a foreign-language dub — so the copyright holder doesn’t care.)

    And then, of course, there are all those (mildly forward-thinking) companies that intentionally put their videos on YouTube on purpose (e.g. any video put up by a user with “VEVO” in its name), in order to make you want to purchase the artist’s work.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (again, @10):

    I would rather pay for “access” to a large body of music for a set time on Rhapsody than pay for “ownership” of a cd, which must be physically maintained …

    Okay, but just realize that your access is only ever for today, not in perpetuity. Companies like Rhapsody have gone under before, you know. And when they’re gone, all the money you’ve thrown at them won’t let you listen to any of that music anymore. You don’t own anything.

    Now perhaps the economics of it work out for you, but for me, I’d rather at least own a file (e.g. MP3) that, once purchased, can never be taken away from me (unless, of course, I accidentally delete it, which is still a fear for me).

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (again, @10):

    I would rather pay for “access” to a large body of music for a set time on Rhapsody than pay for “ownership” of a cd, which must be physically maintained …

    Okay, but just realize that your access is only ever for today, not in perpetuity. Companies like Rhapsody have gone under before, you know. And when they’re gone, all the money you’ve thrown at them won’t let you listen to any of that music anymore. You don’t own anything.

    Now perhaps the economics of it work out for you, but for me, I’d rather at least own a file (e.g. MP3) that, once purchased, can never be taken away from me (unless, of course, I accidentally delete it, which is still a fear for me).

  • Kathy

    I don’t see an issue with teens having any trouble buying music. iTunes gift cards are readily available, much more so than music stores used to be. I don’t even think there’s an issue with today’s bad music, as just about any type and age of music can be bought online these days.

    KK @9, middle son came home from a garage sale with an old record player. He now scouts used/collectable stores for records as cheap as 25 cents. He even found a used music store his first weekend at college.

  • Kathy

    I don’t see an issue with teens having any trouble buying music. iTunes gift cards are readily available, much more so than music stores used to be. I don’t even think there’s an issue with today’s bad music, as just about any type and age of music can be bought online these days.

    KK @9, middle son came home from a garage sale with an old record player. He now scouts used/collectable stores for records as cheap as 25 cents. He even found a used music store his first weekend at college.

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #13,

    “Okay, but just realize that your access [on Rhapsody] is only ever for today, not in perpetuity. ”

    Agreed. That’s one of the things I like. I don’t have to buy permanent forms of music that I will probably only listen to this month, and I can try out a whole lot more music at will than I was ever able to before, from new releases to out of print old albums. If I find something with enduring quality, I can always buy it, but let’s face it–most of the music I listen to is not enduring. (Plus, I have already purchased mp3s that I can no longer access due to the “copy protection” that will only let me play it on the original computer. Whatever.)

    I’m not saying it is the great solution or that it is for everyone, but I really like it.

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #13,

    “Okay, but just realize that your access [on Rhapsody] is only ever for today, not in perpetuity. ”

    Agreed. That’s one of the things I like. I don’t have to buy permanent forms of music that I will probably only listen to this month, and I can try out a whole lot more music at will than I was ever able to before, from new releases to out of print old albums. If I find something with enduring quality, I can always buy it, but let’s face it–most of the music I listen to is not enduring. (Plus, I have already purchased mp3s that I can no longer access due to the “copy protection” that will only let me play it on the original computer. Whatever.)

    I’m not saying it is the great solution or that it is for everyone, but I really like it.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@15), I think we listen to music differently. You appear to be always in search of something new. Or at least new to you. Now maybe that it’s that I already have hundreds of CDs (most of which are now in MP3 form), but I tend to listen to the stuff I have over and over, occasionally adding new things as I discover them.

    But, just to explore this, Rhapsody appears to cost $10/month. Is that correct? So, very roughly, you’re saying that temporary access to millions of songs is worth the permanent purchase of one album’s worth of MP3s, every month? I’m not saying that’s a bad decision, I’m just saying that’s what it works out to. For me, that decision would make more sense in the time immediately after signing up, but become less and less advantageous several years down the road (five years of paying for Rhapsody would, in theory, let you own 600 MP3s).

    Whatever, I’m not here to convince you either way. I will tell you, however, that there should be several methods for you to reclaim those MP3s you purchased. If you bought them using iTunes (in which case they really weren’t MP3s, but whatever), you should be able to transfer them to your new computer. There’s some setting in iTunes to do that, you’d have to Google it. Barring that, you can always burn your MP3s to an audio CD (note: not a data CD, but one like you’d put in your stereo), and then rip that CD to create new MP3s. FYI.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@15), I think we listen to music differently. You appear to be always in search of something new. Or at least new to you. Now maybe that it’s that I already have hundreds of CDs (most of which are now in MP3 form), but I tend to listen to the stuff I have over and over, occasionally adding new things as I discover them.

    But, just to explore this, Rhapsody appears to cost $10/month. Is that correct? So, very roughly, you’re saying that temporary access to millions of songs is worth the permanent purchase of one album’s worth of MP3s, every month? I’m not saying that’s a bad decision, I’m just saying that’s what it works out to. For me, that decision would make more sense in the time immediately after signing up, but become less and less advantageous several years down the road (five years of paying for Rhapsody would, in theory, let you own 600 MP3s).

    Whatever, I’m not here to convince you either way. I will tell you, however, that there should be several methods for you to reclaim those MP3s you purchased. If you bought them using iTunes (in which case they really weren’t MP3s, but whatever), you should be able to transfer them to your new computer. There’s some setting in iTunes to do that, you’d have to Google it. Barring that, you can always burn your MP3s to an audio CD (note: not a data CD, but one like you’d put in your stereo), and then rip that CD to create new MP3s. FYI.

  • http://jdueck.net Joel D.

    A free Spotify account gives you unlimited access to 90% of the music there is to be had. Search for any album, odd’s are it’s there, and you just stream it for free whenever you want, no storage needed. It’s only a matter of time before people stop “buying downloads” of music.

  • http://jdueck.net Joel D.

    A free Spotify account gives you unlimited access to 90% of the music there is to be had. Search for any album, odd’s are it’s there, and you just stream it for free whenever you want, no storage needed. It’s only a matter of time before people stop “buying downloads” of music.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Joel (@17), however, Spotify only lets you listen to “radio” from your smartphone. It’s only a solution if you listen to your music from a laptop or desktop.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Joel (@17), however, Spotify only lets you listen to “radio” from your smartphone. It’s only a solution if you listen to your music from a laptop or desktop.

  • formerly just steve

    Plus, Spotify, at least last I checked, required signing in with a Facebook account which is silly because there are still a few of us who don’t feel the need to be on Facebook.

  • formerly just steve

    Plus, Spotify, at least last I checked, required signing in with a Facebook account which is silly because there are still a few of us who don’t feel the need to be on Facebook.

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #16,

    I’m not trying to convince you. I just thought it was a neat idea that broke the mold of my thinking a bit. I have generally bought the stuff I really liked and listened to it a lot because, well, I HAD it and I liked it. I also liked a lot of music that I didn’t buy and know a lot of music that I wouldn’t buy, but would still listen to, given the mood. That seems like a decent service for a reasonable fee.

    To be honest, I don’t see myself keeping a subscription ad infinitum, since my music listening tends to go in spurts, but it was something I discovered right before vacation. For the price of a single cd, I was pretty much able to listen to whatever I wanted when I traveled.

    The thrill will wear off, I am sure, but right now it is still fun to think of old songs and be able to listen to call them up. (See? I’m listening to “teenage lobotomy” by the Ramones right now. I just remembered it while typing! Not sure it was the most flattering song to admit I know, though . . .)

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #16,

    I’m not trying to convince you. I just thought it was a neat idea that broke the mold of my thinking a bit. I have generally bought the stuff I really liked and listened to it a lot because, well, I HAD it and I liked it. I also liked a lot of music that I didn’t buy and know a lot of music that I wouldn’t buy, but would still listen to, given the mood. That seems like a decent service for a reasonable fee.

    To be honest, I don’t see myself keeping a subscription ad infinitum, since my music listening tends to go in spurts, but it was something I discovered right before vacation. For the price of a single cd, I was pretty much able to listen to whatever I wanted when I traveled.

    The thrill will wear off, I am sure, but right now it is still fun to think of old songs and be able to listen to call them up. (See? I’m listening to “teenage lobotomy” by the Ramones right now. I just remembered it while typing! Not sure it was the most flattering song to admit I know, though . . .)

  • JonathanH

    I just recently deleted all music files from my phone because I realized I hadn’t opened the Music app in years. I’ve been using Pandora for quite a while. I also tried Spotify Radio (non-radio streaming costs you on mobile), but I’m not as satisfied.
    Now I regret purchasing the handful of songs on iTunes back in the day.

  • JonathanH

    I just recently deleted all music files from my phone because I realized I hadn’t opened the Music app in years. I’ve been using Pandora for quite a while. I also tried Spotify Radio (non-radio streaming costs you on mobile), but I’m not as satisfied.
    Now I regret purchasing the handful of songs on iTunes back in the day.

  • Dan Kempin

    JonathanH,

    Rhapsody lets you download onto your device so that you have no streaming delay or data charge. With a valid subscription, of course.

    They offer a 7 day free trial w/no credit card.

    (I’m not big on the “radio” option. I like to choose my own music.)

  • Dan Kempin

    JonathanH,

    Rhapsody lets you download onto your device so that you have no streaming delay or data charge. With a valid subscription, of course.

    They offer a 7 day free trial w/no credit card.

    (I’m not big on the “radio” option. I like to choose my own music.)

  • Dan Kempin

    By the way, I am not a shill for Rhapsody company. I just obsess about new discoveries. So sorry if I have offended anyone with my product enthusiasm.

  • Dan Kempin

    By the way, I am not a shill for Rhapsody company. I just obsess about new discoveries. So sorry if I have offended anyone with my product enthusiasm.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@20), you mentioned “when you traveled” — were you using Rhapsody on your phone, or your laptop?

    And, for the record, you completely caught me off-guard with that Ramones song. I only know their biggest hits, but I remember a long time ago a friend in Boy Scouts repeating the line to me about “guess I’m gonna have to tell ‘em / I ain’t got no cerebellum”. Color me surprised that it’s a song you know.

    In fact, this only reminds me how old I am now, if pastors’ (fondly recalled?) musical tastes are starting to look more and more like my own. Time was, pastors all could safely be assumed to be listening to my parents’ music.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@20), you mentioned “when you traveled” — were you using Rhapsody on your phone, or your laptop?

    And, for the record, you completely caught me off-guard with that Ramones song. I only know their biggest hits, but I remember a long time ago a friend in Boy Scouts repeating the line to me about “guess I’m gonna have to tell ‘em / I ain’t got no cerebellum”. Color me surprised that it’s a song you know.

    In fact, this only reminds me how old I am now, if pastors’ (fondly recalled?) musical tastes are starting to look more and more like my own. Time was, pastors all could safely be assumed to be listening to my parents’ music.

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #24,

    “were you using Rhapsody on your phone, or your laptop?”

    I was running my phone through the vehicle sound system.
    I had first used the computer to select albums and create playlists that we might want, (including some new music that I admit with chagrin came at the suggestion of my children,) and downloaded it all to my phone. Any afterthoughts could be either streamed or downloaded though a 3g data connection.

  • Dan Kempin

    tODD, #24,

    “were you using Rhapsody on your phone, or your laptop?”

    I was running my phone through the vehicle sound system.
    I had first used the computer to select albums and create playlists that we might want, (including some new music that I admit with chagrin came at the suggestion of my children,) and downloaded it all to my phone. Any afterthoughts could be either streamed or downloaded though a 3g data connection.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@25), okay, that sounds better than I’d expected. But how were the Rhapsody songs downloaded to your phone? Are they only playable through a Rhapsody app?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Dan (@25), okay, that sounds better than I’d expected. But how were the Rhapsody songs downloaded to your phone? Are they only playable through a Rhapsody app?

  • Dan Kempin

    “But how were the Rhapsody songs downloaded to your phone? Are they only playable through a Rhapsody app?”

    Yes, or at least I did not try to access them by any other means. The download was a nice feature, because 3g data coverage munches power and can be spotty at times on the road.

    Actually, we had music downloaded on three different devices with a single account. That ability costs $15, though.

  • Dan Kempin

    “But how were the Rhapsody songs downloaded to your phone? Are they only playable through a Rhapsody app?”

    Yes, or at least I did not try to access them by any other means. The download was a nice feature, because 3g data coverage munches power and can be spotty at times on the road.

    Actually, we had music downloaded on three different devices with a single account. That ability costs $15, though.

  • Dan Kempin

    “How were they downloaded to your phone?”

    I missed that. I mostly used my in home wifi to load the phones.

  • Dan Kempin

    “How were they downloaded to your phone?”

    I missed that. I mostly used my in home wifi to load the phones.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X