Anthony Sacramone is back and making fun of Batman

The blogging maestro Anthony Sacramone, who used to be Luther at the Movies, is back, after one of his intermittent long blog vacations.  Read his notes on the new Batman movie.  Read them all, but here is a random sampling:

Ah! Some real action. Finally. Selina Kyle, aka Cat Womyn, played by Anne Hathaway, granddaughter of Miss Jane Hathaway, late of The Beverly Hillbillies, a true fact I found on Wikipedia after I cut-and-pasted it there, puts one in mind of what a young Sean Young would have done with the role had she not gone batcrap crazy. With legs long enough to make a crane fly cry and a freakishly narrow skull, Hathaway is both terrifying and strangely alluring, a wastrel who cat burgles in order to “feed herself,” although her 14-inch waist would lead one to believe she’s not very good at her job. Desperate to wipe the criminal-record slate clean and start again, this time as a medical transcriptionist in Scarsdale, Cat Person is obviously seeking both redemption and a spinoff movie to make us forget Halle Berry’s calamitous effort. Coming in at a weight of 125 pounds, Selina is nevertheless able to kick several 6-foot-6, 350-pound gangsters unconscious in a matter of seconds, when it took the 135-pound Bruce Lee a good while to take out Kareem Abdul Jabbar. Must be something in those Flintstone vitamins these gals take nowadays. . . .

Lionized by the conservative press as something of an anti-Occupy movie, The Dark Night Mooneth does demonstrate in vivid color what a revolution really looks like — a lot of show trials, explosions, hangings, and an added 45 minutes to everyone’s commute. Makes one feel sorry for Michael Moore and other Hollywood socialists, who I’m sure will be accosted on the streets with copies of Hayek and Burke after young libertarians leave the theaters on fire for counterrevolutionary activity.

(Progressive commentators, however, have bemoaned Citizen Bane’s failure to implement a “green” policy that would have demanded the purchase of carbon credits before setting off the big bang-bang. If you’re going to hold a city hostage, a la certain public-worker unions, you must at least have a recycling plan in place for all the attendant debris.) . . . .

This film is very loud. I tried signaling the projectionist with a sign (PROJECTIONIST: THIS FILM IS VERY LOUD) I always keep on my person, but my efforts were met with catcalls and boos from my fellow auditors. One even got up and screamed, “Sit the eff down you effing eff or I’ll effing eff you up!” That’s literally what he said. Must be a Baptist . . . .

Why is it that filmmakers love to blow up New York City? It must be the skyline, or maybe Mayor Bloomberg has decided to ban something again, like Mentos or something.

via A Strange Review: The Dark Knight Stinketh « Strange Herring.

Mr. Sacramone also posts about an upcoming movie about Hell, that guy who texted as he drove off a cliff, and much more.

You should bookmark his blog, Strange Herring, and visit it regularly.  I have been doing so for five months, just to see if he might have started posting again.  He finally has.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Pete

    I thought it was Pittsburgh – not New York.

  • Pete

    I thought it was Pittsburgh – not New York.

  • http://strangeherring.com Anthony Sacramone

    You are too kind, Herr Veith.

    Pittsburgh? PITTSBURGH? Who would blow up Pittsburgh? And who would notice if someone did?

  • http://strangeherring.com Anthony Sacramone

    You are too kind, Herr Veith.

    Pittsburgh? PITTSBURGH? Who would blow up Pittsburgh? And who would notice if someone did?

  • fjsteve

    Interesting. I saw this movie over the weekend and one of my many misgivings about it was that it’s pretty cliche to see New York get blown up once again. I remember seeing the pockets of smoke rising up over several areas of the city skyline and just rolling my eyes. Every such film, it seems, has to blow the city up in a bigger and more spectacular way than the last. Because we so lack originality that when the scenes of the skyline in ruins–complete with the somber sounds of a woman singing something in Arabic or some such language that’s so stirring you’re sure she’s singing something so profound that no words exist for it in the English language–all intended to inflame passions of the movie goer just bring ambivalence, the next movie has to take it one level beyond.

    Beyond that, it wasn’t a horrible movie but the plot was so contrive, the characters so shallow, the storyline so conveniently packaged, that it was not on any level equal to The Dark Knight.

  • fjsteve

    Interesting. I saw this movie over the weekend and one of my many misgivings about it was that it’s pretty cliche to see New York get blown up once again. I remember seeing the pockets of smoke rising up over several areas of the city skyline and just rolling my eyes. Every such film, it seems, has to blow the city up in a bigger and more spectacular way than the last. Because we so lack originality that when the scenes of the skyline in ruins–complete with the somber sounds of a woman singing something in Arabic or some such language that’s so stirring you’re sure she’s singing something so profound that no words exist for it in the English language–all intended to inflame passions of the movie goer just bring ambivalence, the next movie has to take it one level beyond.

    Beyond that, it wasn’t a horrible movie but the plot was so contrive, the characters so shallow, the storyline so conveniently packaged, that it was not on any level equal to The Dark Knight.

  • Tom Hering

    Still haven’t seen Rises, but I hope it’s not as annoying as another NYC-wrecking movie, Cloverfield, which was annoying in a number of ways – characters, cinematography, the monster’s motivation (or lack thereof).

  • Tom Hering

    Still haven’t seen Rises, but I hope it’s not as annoying as another NYC-wrecking movie, Cloverfield, which was annoying in a number of ways – characters, cinematography, the monster’s motivation (or lack thereof).

  • http://thinkingwithareformedmind.blogspot.com/ Steven Mitchell

    Of course, the ‘young libertarians’ are themselves revolutionary in their own direction, rather than truly counterrevolutionary — to the chagrin of Hayek and Burke, ironically enough.

  • http://thinkingwithareformedmind.blogspot.com/ Steven Mitchell

    Of course, the ‘young libertarians’ are themselves revolutionary in their own direction, rather than truly counterrevolutionary — to the chagrin of Hayek and Burke, ironically enough.

  • Tom Hering

    The still-striking Julie Newmar on the Dark Knight trilogy.

  • Tom Hering

    The still-striking Julie Newmar on the Dark Knight trilogy.


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