Photo of the Loch Ness monster

A Scottish monster hunter named George Edwards has claimed to have caught the Loch Ness Monster on film.

I am skeptical about such things, but I get a kick out of cryptozoology–all of those Big Foot stories, Yeti sightings, and other mysterious creatures that allegedly live in the depths of lakes or forests or jungles and are sometimes glimpsed but never found.  Do any of you believe in that stuff?  Have any of you encountered, first or second or third hand, in person or in an oral tradition, any of the “cryptids” on this list?

 

Has the Loch Ness monster finally been caught on camera? – Telegraph.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Cranach Liberal Lapdog

    Why, after 26 years, doesn’t this “professional Nessie hunter” carry a better camera than a compact Samsung? You know, something with a telephoto lens? Doesn’t his Samsung take movies as well, and didn’t he have time to make one? The claim is that the thing was visible for 5 to 10 minutes (according to one of the slideshow captions). But he could only take one photograph. Why is it always a single, indistinct photo? Is that what best serves a hoax?

  • Cranach Liberal Lapdog

    Why, after 26 years, doesn’t this “professional Nessie hunter” carry a better camera than a compact Samsung? You know, something with a telephoto lens? Doesn’t his Samsung take movies as well, and didn’t he have time to make one? The claim is that the thing was visible for 5 to 10 minutes (according to one of the slideshow captions). But he could only take one photograph. Why is it always a single, indistinct photo? Is that what best serves a hoax?

  • Tom Hering

    Look carefully at the photo. Notice the high angle. How was it achieved by a photographer who claims he was standing at the back of his boat, 1/2 mile away?

  • Tom Hering

    Look carefully at the photo. Notice the high angle. How was it achieved by a photographer who claims he was standing at the back of his boat, 1/2 mile away?

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    No, no…that’s the real monster.

    I mean it’s right there. Elvis and I saw a similar creature a few weeks ago near my local bar, as we were leaving.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    No, no…that’s the real monster.

    I mean it’s right there. Elvis and I saw a similar creature a few weeks ago near my local bar, as we were leaving.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    Tom,

    A very high-masted schooner was obviously used by this very fortunate boater.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    Tom,

    A very high-masted schooner was obviously used by this very fortunate boater.

  • WebMonk

    And obviously, in his excitement he dropped his camera after the first picture. We’re lucky that he was able to recover any pictures at all off that shattered memory card!

  • WebMonk

    And obviously, in his excitement he dropped his camera after the first picture. We’re lucky that he was able to recover any pictures at all off that shattered memory card!

  • larry

    I think you can see big foot way up in the far right corner standing on that castle tower.

  • larry

    I think you can see big foot way up in the far right corner standing on that castle tower.

  • Tom Hering

    And then there’s the Scottish castle on the right of this postcard-perfect composition. It makes me want to take a cruise on Loch Ness. I wonder if the photographer, George Edwards, could recommend anyone?

  • Tom Hering

    And then there’s the Scottish castle on the right of this postcard-perfect composition. It makes me want to take a cruise on Loch Ness. I wonder if the photographer, George Edwards, could recommend anyone?

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    I don’t know whether or not this photo is doctored or not, but I don’t rule out the possibility of such creatures still existing.

    We are arrogant enough to think that things don’t exist because we haven’t seen them, yet we have explored less than ten percent of the known ocean, and glimpses of some of the things I’ve seen on some diving cameras tells me we know very little about what’s out there.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    I don’t know whether or not this photo is doctored or not, but I don’t rule out the possibility of such creatures still existing.

    We are arrogant enough to think that things don’t exist because we haven’t seen them, yet we have explored less than ten percent of the known ocean, and glimpses of some of the things I’ve seen on some diving cameras tells me we know very little about what’s out there.

  • Joe

    I don’t know that whether there is anything odd or unique in Loc Ness part of me would like to believe there are still things here on earth that we haven’t found.

    These legends tend to have deep roots. Go Hodags!

    http://holidayacres.com/hodag.htm

  • Joe

    I don’t know that whether there is anything odd or unique in Loc Ness part of me would like to believe there are still things here on earth that we haven’t found.

    These legends tend to have deep roots. Go Hodags!

    http://holidayacres.com/hodag.htm

  • SKPeterson

    Are we sure this is Nessie and not a merman/mermaid? I mean – there is a whole host of documentary evidence that points to this being more of a merman/mermaid sighting instead of some sort of dinosaur or overgrown sea snake. http://press.discovery.com/ekits/monster-week-mermaids/press-release.html.

  • SKPeterson

    Are we sure this is Nessie and not a merman/mermaid? I mean – there is a whole host of documentary evidence that points to this being more of a merman/mermaid sighting instead of some sort of dinosaur or overgrown sea snake. http://press.discovery.com/ekits/monster-week-mermaids/press-release.html.

  • Joe

    So let’s get this straight. We (“collectively”) think it makes tons of sense to spend billions of dollars searching for evidence of water, which might be evidence of life on a planet we have no realistic way of sending people to, but we laugh at the thought that there might be things we have not discovered on this planet. I just want to make sure I understand the rules.

    Again, I don’t know if there really is a Nessie, it would seem that the Loc has been explored quite a bit without finding any evidence, but I think the original question was broader than Nessie.

    After all the Kraken listed on the link in the post, started out as an old Norse myth of a strange sea monster with large tentacles that could sink a boat. And, it turned these Norsemen were probably telling tales about things they really saw with the normal amount of embellishment that makes for a good story. Of course, today we call the Kraken by a different name, the giant squid.

  • Joe

    So let’s get this straight. We (“collectively”) think it makes tons of sense to spend billions of dollars searching for evidence of water, which might be evidence of life on a planet we have no realistic way of sending people to, but we laugh at the thought that there might be things we have not discovered on this planet. I just want to make sure I understand the rules.

    Again, I don’t know if there really is a Nessie, it would seem that the Loc has been explored quite a bit without finding any evidence, but I think the original question was broader than Nessie.

    After all the Kraken listed on the link in the post, started out as an old Norse myth of a strange sea monster with large tentacles that could sink a boat. And, it turned these Norsemen were probably telling tales about things they really saw with the normal amount of embellishment that makes for a good story. Of course, today we call the Kraken by a different name, the giant squid.

  • Tom Hering

    Joe, when it comes to Wisconsin cryptids, hodags ain’t got nothin’ on the Beast of Bray Road.

  • Tom Hering

    Joe, when it comes to Wisconsin cryptids, hodags ain’t got nothin’ on the Beast of Bray Road.

  • WebMonk

    J. Dean, in general, I agree that there could be some small pockets of “dinosaurs” that have been hidden away, especially in the oceans, because as you’ve mentioned, we’ve not explored the ocean depths in any sort of completeness.

    On the flip side, the types of water where dinosaurs lived has been much better explored, and Loch Ness in particular has been extremely well explored. The possibility of finding a large aquatic dinosaur hidden away in some obscure bay, lake, or inland sea is extremely improbable. Not impossible, but definitely improbable.

  • WebMonk

    J. Dean, in general, I agree that there could be some small pockets of “dinosaurs” that have been hidden away, especially in the oceans, because as you’ve mentioned, we’ve not explored the ocean depths in any sort of completeness.

    On the flip side, the types of water where dinosaurs lived has been much better explored, and Loch Ness in particular has been extremely well explored. The possibility of finding a large aquatic dinosaur hidden away in some obscure bay, lake, or inland sea is extremely improbable. Not impossible, but definitely improbable.

  • larry

    Joe maybe this will help on the “rules”. First you have to unconfound the structure of the rules you just confused between “collective” general versus “individual” particular.

    Individually particularly you will find that some think both of these efforts are a waste.

    Individually particularly you will find that some think both of these efforts are not a waste.

    Individually particularly you will find that some think one of these efforts is as waste and one of these efforts are not a waste.

    Collectively generally, independant of what individuals particulary think, space funding is space funded and approved.

    Collectively generally, independant of what individuals particulary think, this kind of research, Lochness Monster, is funded and approved.

    Finally, most I’ve read here are not saying this, Lochness Monster, is not something that should not be done, their problem and as I scientist I agree, is with the methodology being so hoaky. Which was basically the point of everyone. If NASA published pictures of Mars with a lighting boom caught in the upper right hand corner, you’d get the same reaction. Its methodology not “should we do it”.

  • larry

    Joe maybe this will help on the “rules”. First you have to unconfound the structure of the rules you just confused between “collective” general versus “individual” particular.

    Individually particularly you will find that some think both of these efforts are a waste.

    Individually particularly you will find that some think both of these efforts are not a waste.

    Individually particularly you will find that some think one of these efforts is as waste and one of these efforts are not a waste.

    Collectively generally, independant of what individuals particulary think, space funding is space funded and approved.

    Collectively generally, independant of what individuals particulary think, this kind of research, Lochness Monster, is funded and approved.

    Finally, most I’ve read here are not saying this, Lochness Monster, is not something that should not be done, their problem and as I scientist I agree, is with the methodology being so hoaky. Which was basically the point of everyone. If NASA published pictures of Mars with a lighting boom caught in the upper right hand corner, you’d get the same reaction. Its methodology not “should we do it”.

  • helen

    In college, taking a biology degree, I was taught about the coelacanth, a primitive form of fish, supposedly extinct 65 million years ago. Some years later they pulled one, alive, out of the Indian ocean. There have been more since, in the vicinity of the Comoros Islands.
    In this century, coelacanths are also being caught by fishermen off Indonesia, where (if an alert researcher is not at hand) they go to the local fish market. DNA proves them to be a related but distinct species to the Comoros Island fish, or so it’s reported.

    All that we know about God’s creation is dwarfed by what we don’t know, or have gotten wrong!

  • helen

    In college, taking a biology degree, I was taught about the coelacanth, a primitive form of fish, supposedly extinct 65 million years ago. Some years later they pulled one, alive, out of the Indian ocean. There have been more since, in the vicinity of the Comoros Islands.
    In this century, coelacanths are also being caught by fishermen off Indonesia, where (if an alert researcher is not at hand) they go to the local fish market. DNA proves them to be a related but distinct species to the Comoros Island fish, or so it’s reported.

    All that we know about God’s creation is dwarfed by what we don’t know, or have gotten wrong!

  • Julian

    Legend has it that right before Judgment Day, John Knox will ride Nessie out of the loch like a Ken Ham-exhibit, bring fiery devastation to the unbelieving Scots for rejecting their glorious Calvinist heritage.
    Well, it’s not really a legend per se, but some old drunk elderly man at a pub in Inverness swears he thinks it will happen. He also threatened to kick my ass if I didn’t keep buying him pints of Innis & Gunn.
    I will not go back to Scotland.

  • Julian

    Legend has it that right before Judgment Day, John Knox will ride Nessie out of the loch like a Ken Ham-exhibit, bring fiery devastation to the unbelieving Scots for rejecting their glorious Calvinist heritage.
    Well, it’s not really a legend per se, but some old drunk elderly man at a pub in Inverness swears he thinks it will happen. He also threatened to kick my ass if I didn’t keep buying him pints of Innis & Gunn.
    I will not go back to Scotland.

  • Tom Hering

    It occured to me that Turok, Son of Stone was cryptozoological, Dr. Veith – what with its valley of dinosaurs, cut off from the rest of the world. Maybe the root of your interest?

  • Tom Hering

    It occured to me that Turok, Son of Stone was cryptozoological, Dr. Veith – what with its valley of dinosaurs, cut off from the rest of the world. Maybe the root of your interest?

  • Sharon Philp

    I once read an article in a Canadian magazine about Sasquatch. It was a very convincing article discussing how it could be possible Sasquatch could exist and why no one sees much evidence of them. I procured the magazine and would use it with my writing classes as an example of persuasive writing. I wish I could remember the name of the article or magazine.

  • Sharon Philp

    I once read an article in a Canadian magazine about Sasquatch. It was a very convincing article discussing how it could be possible Sasquatch could exist and why no one sees much evidence of them. I procured the magazine and would use it with my writing classes as an example of persuasive writing. I wish I could remember the name of the article or magazine.

  • Joe

    Larry — this is where you lose me. “Collectively generally, independant of what individuals particulary think, this kind of research, Lochness Monster, is funded and approved.”

    Funded and approved by who? — not the collective. The dissenters are not forced to fund Nessie or Bigfoot hunters, those folks are self-funded, but dissenters are forced to fund NASA.

  • Joe

    Larry — this is where you lose me. “Collectively generally, independant of what individuals particulary think, this kind of research, Lochness Monster, is funded and approved.”

    Funded and approved by who? — not the collective. The dissenters are not forced to fund Nessie or Bigfoot hunters, those folks are self-funded, but dissenters are forced to fund NASA.

  • larry

    Joe,

    Not by gov. Bout independent groups. The real point is not opinions yea or nay, but the quality of the data. Which id what the earlier, rightly do jabs were about…not should it be done or not. Sure do it any scientist with a sense of abventure functions that way.

  • larry

    Joe,

    Not by gov. Bout independent groups. The real point is not opinions yea or nay, but the quality of the data. Which id what the earlier, rightly do jabs were about…not should it be done or not. Sure do it any scientist with a sense of abventure functions that way.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    Photos like that have been surfacing of people who claim to have seen conservative California State legislators in Sacramento.

    Those photos are obviously doctored. As evidenced by our debt that is deeper than Loch Ness.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ Steve Martin

    Photos like that have been surfacing of people who claim to have seen conservative California State legislators in Sacramento.

    Those photos are obviously doctored. As evidenced by our debt that is deeper than Loch Ness.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    In my homeland we have Chessie.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chessie_%28sea_monster%29

    Fairly common to have foggy areas where the brackish water places tricks on you.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    In my homeland we have Chessie.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chessie_%28sea_monster%29

    Fairly common to have foggy areas where the brackish water places tricks on you.

  • TE Schroeder

    Larry @20, stop typing with your mittens on!

    I kid, I kid….

  • TE Schroeder

    Larry @20, stop typing with your mittens on!

    I kid, I kid….

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Yes, Tom, that’s it! Turok, son of Stone. I’m glad to find someone else who remembers that comic book (about an Indian–sorry, Native American–who gets lost in a valley of dinosaurs, or, as he called them, “honkers”). Thanks for your analysis of this photo, which, yes, now that you mention it, looks pretty bogus.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Yes, Tom, that’s it! Turok, son of Stone. I’m glad to find someone else who remembers that comic book (about an Indian–sorry, Native American–who gets lost in a valley of dinosaurs, or, as he called them, “honkers”). Thanks for your analysis of this photo, which, yes, now that you mention it, looks pretty bogus.

  • Joanne

    First I thought it looked like a seal; then I thought it looked like a manatee; then I thought it looked like a floating plastic bag of yard debris. And then I stopped thinking about it.

  • Joanne

    First I thought it looked like a seal; then I thought it looked like a manatee; then I thought it looked like a floating plastic bag of yard debris. And then I stopped thinking about it.

  • Dan Kempin

    “Have any of you encountered, first or second or third hand, in person or in an oral tradition, any of the “cryptids” on this list?”

    I happen to know for a fact that the Jackalope is for real. I have SEEN a mounted specimen, so there really cannot be any doubt.

    One little known fact about Jackalopes is that manner in which they obtain their antlers. Contrary to conventional wisdom, they do not grow them over the course of the summer, but take them from buck deer in the fall of the year. Many is the hunter in Wisconsin who rejoices at shooting a fine buck, only to find that by the time he has arrived at the carcass, the Jackalope has taken his prize. The biological manner in which they do this has yet to be studied, because no scar appears on the head of the animal and the antlerless buck is nearly identical to a doe.

    It beggars belief, I know, but hey–it has happened to me personally. Plus my friends uncle has one mounted on the wall of his tavern up north. So don’t tell me.

    They also have Snipe up there, but I’ve never succeeded in catching one despite years of effort.

  • Dan Kempin

    “Have any of you encountered, first or second or third hand, in person or in an oral tradition, any of the “cryptids” on this list?”

    I happen to know for a fact that the Jackalope is for real. I have SEEN a mounted specimen, so there really cannot be any doubt.

    One little known fact about Jackalopes is that manner in which they obtain their antlers. Contrary to conventional wisdom, they do not grow them over the course of the summer, but take them from buck deer in the fall of the year. Many is the hunter in Wisconsin who rejoices at shooting a fine buck, only to find that by the time he has arrived at the carcass, the Jackalope has taken his prize. The biological manner in which they do this has yet to be studied, because no scar appears on the head of the animal and the antlerless buck is nearly identical to a doe.

    It beggars belief, I know, but hey–it has happened to me personally. Plus my friends uncle has one mounted on the wall of his tavern up north. So don’t tell me.

    They also have Snipe up there, but I’ve never succeeded in catching one despite years of effort.

  • Other Gary

    Concerning Nessie: IF there’s more than just a legend and a hoax going on (a big if, indeed), it isn’t a dinosaur–Loch Ness would have been solid ice during the last Ice Age.

    I do feel a little different about Big Foot, due to the fact that the Native Americans had stories about giant Sasquatch before Europeans ever arrived. Europeans, knowing at least slightly about chimps and gorillas, might dream up a hairy, ape-like creature, but what would give Indians such ideas, especially since they knew the territory?

  • Other Gary

    Concerning Nessie: IF there’s more than just a legend and a hoax going on (a big if, indeed), it isn’t a dinosaur–Loch Ness would have been solid ice during the last Ice Age.

    I do feel a little different about Big Foot, due to the fact that the Native Americans had stories about giant Sasquatch before Europeans ever arrived. Europeans, knowing at least slightly about chimps and gorillas, might dream up a hairy, ape-like creature, but what would give Indians such ideas, especially since they knew the territory?

  • Tom Hering

    Dr. Veith @ 24, Gold Key (1962-1984) had some of the best comics of the ’60s, in my oddball opinion. Original series like Turok, with their beautiful cover paintings, and licensed comic book versions of movies, TV shows, Walt Disney, and Walter Lantz. The only comics I enjoyed more were from Harvey (especially Baby Huey, Stumbo the Giant, and Hot Stuff the Little Devil.) The DC and Marvel superhero stuff didn’t grab me, though DC’s science fiction anthologies like Mystery In Space did.

  • Tom Hering

    Dr. Veith @ 24, Gold Key (1962-1984) had some of the best comics of the ’60s, in my oddball opinion. Original series like Turok, with their beautiful cover paintings, and licensed comic book versions of movies, TV shows, Walt Disney, and Walter Lantz. The only comics I enjoyed more were from Harvey (especially Baby Huey, Stumbo the Giant, and Hot Stuff the Little Devil.) The DC and Marvel superhero stuff didn’t grab me, though DC’s science fiction anthologies like Mystery In Space did.

  • fws

    I think it is definately the Loch Ness Monster. My catholic friend joey saw the Virgin in a tortilla chip a last thursday and she told him this was so. He was not wearing his tinfold cap at the time either. Promise.

    Since most here like Fox since it is fair and balanced along these lines , I though I should bring joeys comments into the mix to counter people who seem to be sceptical about everything whom I won´t name here (TOM!).

  • fws

    I think it is definately the Loch Ness Monster. My catholic friend joey saw the Virgin in a tortilla chip a last thursday and she told him this was so. He was not wearing his tinfold cap at the time either. Promise.

    Since most here like Fox since it is fair and balanced along these lines , I though I should bring joeys comments into the mix to counter people who seem to be sceptical about everything whom I won´t name here (TOM!).

  • http://blog.captainthin.net/ Captain Thin

    Up here in Canada we have plenty of First Nations legends about lake “monsters” (and I’ve known people who spoke of seeing abnormally large “somethings” when out on big water in northern Canada). And when someone pulls out a monstrous fish like this one recently landed in British Columbia, you have to wonder if there might be some truth to some of the stories. At 3.8 meters (that’s more than 12 feet, for you American folk), it’s an animal that could certainly be mistaken for a good old fashioned lake monster.

  • http://blog.captainthin.net/ Captain Thin

    Up here in Canada we have plenty of First Nations legends about lake “monsters” (and I’ve known people who spoke of seeing abnormally large “somethings” when out on big water in northern Canada). And when someone pulls out a monstrous fish like this one recently landed in British Columbia, you have to wonder if there might be some truth to some of the stories. At 3.8 meters (that’s more than 12 feet, for you American folk), it’s an animal that could certainly be mistaken for a good old fashioned lake monster.

  • aletheist

    Captain Thin

    Whoa.
    If it had been Fox news that had reported this, I would have simply dismissed it as “just another fish story”.

    Absolutely amazing.

  • aletheist

    Captain Thin

    Whoa.
    If it had been Fox news that had reported this, I would have simply dismissed it as “just another fish story”.

    Absolutely amazing.

  • Lochy

    First off this chap isnt a professional nessie hunter. He is nothing more nothing less than a tourist guide on his boat. He has NEVER been associated with any professional org looking into nessie or the surrounding myth.
    The Loch Ness Project has never had him on the “books” . He takes folk out on his boat, and like many of us would do, keeps an eye out for things in the water.
    Now the most important part of this is that he has now been outed as a hoaxer. This is the SECOND time he has tried it and claims to have seen nessie 19 times.
    Guy is a joke.

  • Lochy

    First off this chap isnt a professional nessie hunter. He is nothing more nothing less than a tourist guide on his boat. He has NEVER been associated with any professional org looking into nessie or the surrounding myth.
    The Loch Ness Project has never had him on the “books” . He takes folk out on his boat, and like many of us would do, keeps an eye out for things in the water.
    Now the most important part of this is that he has now been outed as a hoaxer. This is the SECOND time he has tried it and claims to have seen nessie 19 times.
    Guy is a joke.

  • Lochy

    As a follow up to my comment please see the website below;

    http://www.lochnessinvestigation.com/georgeedwardsclaims.html

  • Lochy

    As a follow up to my comment please see the website below;

    http://www.lochnessinvestigation.com/georgeedwardsclaims.html


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