Spike Lee on fatherhood & the black church

Filmmaker Spike Lee has a new movie out, Red Hook Summer, about a middle-class black teenager from Atlanta who spends the summer with his grandfather, a no-nonsense preacher in poverty-stricken Brooklyn.  Both comedy and social commentary ensue.  The movie sounds quite good and very pro-church.  In an interview with Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post, Lee himself does some preaching:

TWP: Bishop Enoch fulminates against a number of ills that plague the black community — from violence to coarsening pop culture to gentrification. In one pivotal conversation, he and Sister Sharon (Heather Alicia Simms) speak candidly about the pressures on African American parents trying to bring kids up, often alone. Those sequences felt like very personal statements from Spike Lee.

SL: Three out of four African American families are headed by a single mom. That’s 75 percent. And I will put my left hand on 10 Bibles and my right hand to God and say that’s the main correlation to the highest drop-out rate and the highest prison rate, and it manifests itself ultimately with these young brothers killing each other with this insane pathological genocide that’s happening, whether it’s in D.C., New Orleans, Brooklyn, Chicago. It all comes back the fact that — and I’m not trying to demonize these single moms, they’re doing the best they can, working two or three jobs to keep it together. But these young boys, and young women, with no father in their lives, how can that not affect their relationship with black men? It’s the domino effect.

I feel for these single moms and I feel for the children of single moms because they’re crying out for help and they need their daddy and Daddy ain’t around. Daddy ain’t been around. So where are these daddies? A lot of these guys are locked up or just out on the street. It’s not a good look, okay? All I’m saying. It’s not a good look.

via Spike Lee talks about ‘Red Hook Summer’ – The Washington Post.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Pete

    The Republicans really need to play this one up. It has been said that the African-American family, as an institution, was an extraordinarily strong thing. It survived forced repatriation, institutionalized slavery, the depression, the Civil War, emancipation, Jim Crow laws and two world wars. But it was unable to survive welfare policies – established by the Democratic Party – which incentivized out-of-wedlock birth and dis-incentivized working for a living. “It’s not a good look”, indeed.

  • Pete

    The Republicans really need to play this one up. It has been said that the African-American family, as an institution, was an extraordinarily strong thing. It survived forced repatriation, institutionalized slavery, the depression, the Civil War, emancipation, Jim Crow laws and two world wars. But it was unable to survive welfare policies – established by the Democratic Party – which incentivized out-of-wedlock birth and dis-incentivized working for a living. “It’s not a good look”, indeed.

  • fjsteve

    Pete, I think it started long before the welfare state began in full swing. It started with the migration of single black men out of the south looking for work during the early and mid 20th Century. They found work but also found discrimination and a loss of the family structure. That combined with counter-cultural attitudes that were so very destructive to these men to break down the family even further and in came the government welfare programs to save the day–read, put them back into a different sort of bondage.

  • fjsteve

    Pete, I think it started long before the welfare state began in full swing. It started with the migration of single black men out of the south looking for work during the early and mid 20th Century. They found work but also found discrimination and a loss of the family structure. That combined with counter-cultural attitudes that were so very destructive to these men to break down the family even further and in came the government welfare programs to save the day–read, put them back into a different sort of bondage.

  • Michael B.

    @Pete
    “But it was unable to survive welfare policies”

    You’ve got to be a little more specific on how you think this should work. So you’re going to cut all these benefits to moms and their children, and that’s somehow going to help them?

  • Michael B.

    @Pete
    “But it was unable to survive welfare policies”

    You’ve got to be a little more specific on how you think this should work. So you’re going to cut all these benefits to moms and their children, and that’s somehow going to help them?

  • Pete

    @Michael B.

    Somewhat counter-intuitive, isn’t it. It’s the old “give a man a fish versus teaching him (in this case, incentivizing him/ her) to fish” dilemma.
    Cut the programs – you bet. Seen the national debt figures lately? Helping the underprivileged needs to be done by private citizens and the churches – not the government. Analogous to the levels of charitable giving of Romney and his “religious” ilk versus that of Obama and his “progressive” ilk. We are being “progressed” into economic meltdown which really tends to increase the underprivileged slice of the pie. Makes the whole pie go bad.

  • Pete

    @Michael B.

    Somewhat counter-intuitive, isn’t it. It’s the old “give a man a fish versus teaching him (in this case, incentivizing him/ her) to fish” dilemma.
    Cut the programs – you bet. Seen the national debt figures lately? Helping the underprivileged needs to be done by private citizens and the churches – not the government. Analogous to the levels of charitable giving of Romney and his “religious” ilk versus that of Obama and his “progressive” ilk. We are being “progressed” into economic meltdown which really tends to increase the underprivileged slice of the pie. Makes the whole pie go bad.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    There’s gotta be something more than just the availability of welfare benefits to blame. After all, the same welfare system didn’t cause all the other segments of society to fall apart likewise.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall

    There’s gotta be something more than just the availability of welfare benefits to blame. After all, the same welfare system didn’t cause all the other segments of society to fall apart likewise.

  • Carl Vehse

    A subculture that accepts illegitimacy, as “normal,” is a big factor to the problem. And when such a subculture infects other subcultures, particularly the Hollywood subculture, with this notion, it becomes cancerous in our society.

    Now, not even having a father/mother is required to be “normal,” but “two daddies” or “two mommies” is being promoted as “normal” in TV shows kids watch… and in school indoctrinations.

  • Carl Vehse

    A subculture that accepts illegitimacy, as “normal,” is a big factor to the problem. And when such a subculture infects other subcultures, particularly the Hollywood subculture, with this notion, it becomes cancerous in our society.

    Now, not even having a father/mother is required to be “normal,” but “two daddies” or “two mommies” is being promoted as “normal” in TV shows kids watch… and in school indoctrinations.

  • Jon

    What percentage of these families are solid church going types?

    Hard to believe that those with a solid church foundation would opt for such a lifestyle.

    I dunno, maybe poverty forces them into that lifestyle regardless of their faith and morals instilled through church upbringing.

    Still it’s hard to grasp why, if they are solid church going types, why a father would abandon his family, why a woman would throw herself at and bear children for multiple men such as these.

    It’s hard not to look at the welfare culture and poverty without hope as the root cause.

  • Jon

    What percentage of these families are solid church going types?

    Hard to believe that those with a solid church foundation would opt for such a lifestyle.

    I dunno, maybe poverty forces them into that lifestyle regardless of their faith and morals instilled through church upbringing.

    Still it’s hard to grasp why, if they are solid church going types, why a father would abandon his family, why a woman would throw herself at and bear children for multiple men such as these.

    It’s hard not to look at the welfare culture and poverty without hope as the root cause.

  • fjsteve

    Jon, it’s a complex issue. The African American community is much more church-going than other communities; they’re also socially conservative. But as in most communities, but moreso than in most, men are far less likely than women to attend church services. Additionally, the theology of many black churches is heterodox. They’re more likely to embrace a social gospel or liberation gospel or a wealth and prosperity gospel than other communities.

    http://www.pewforum.org/A-Religious-Portrait-of-African-Americans.aspx

  • fjsteve

    Jon, it’s a complex issue. The African American community is much more church-going than other communities; they’re also socially conservative. But as in most communities, but moreso than in most, men are far less likely than women to attend church services. Additionally, the theology of many black churches is heterodox. They’re more likely to embrace a social gospel or liberation gospel or a wealth and prosperity gospel than other communities.

    http://www.pewforum.org/A-Religious-Portrait-of-African-Americans.aspx

  • Jon

    @fjs

    I get that the churches are heterodox. But they all, by and large, preach a heavy moralism, no? I mean, there’s a lot of “you’ve gotta, you’ve gotta, you’ve gotta” heard there. Especially in the name-it-claim-it, holiness, and baptimethocostal pelagianism.

    And you would think in that construct that such families would get the picture that “they haven’t, they haven’t, they haven’t.” So they either keep trying harder to live by the moral code preached at them, or they give up.

    So, maybe its incongruent for them when despite it all at church preaching and teaching, they find they still haven’t broken out of the rut.

    But why aren’t the men attending church? If the moms are raising up young men in their churches, then where are they going off to, and why? Have they given up on the moralism as a way out, since it’s not working?

  • Jon

    @fjs

    I get that the churches are heterodox. But they all, by and large, preach a heavy moralism, no? I mean, there’s a lot of “you’ve gotta, you’ve gotta, you’ve gotta” heard there. Especially in the name-it-claim-it, holiness, and baptimethocostal pelagianism.

    And you would think in that construct that such families would get the picture that “they haven’t, they haven’t, they haven’t.” So they either keep trying harder to live by the moral code preached at them, or they give up.

    So, maybe its incongruent for them when despite it all at church preaching and teaching, they find they still haven’t broken out of the rut.

    But why aren’t the men attending church? If the moms are raising up young men in their churches, then where are they going off to, and why? Have they given up on the moralism as a way out, since it’s not working?

  • fjsteve

    Jon,

    I don’t know that there is a lot of heavy moralism in a lot of the black churches. I’m not an expert, but the sense I get from liberation theology, insofar as it relates to the black church, is that you are where you are because of what others did to you and Jesus set the example of how to fight the power. The prosperity gospel teaches that you deserve the literal riches of God’s blessing. Both are more or less about realizing temporal victory and say little about original sin or atonement.

    On the other hand, I do know that Baptist churches teach heavy moralism and, as you rightly point out, this is a recipe for despair. It kind of makes sense that poor single mothers would latch on to moralism, especially as a way to help raise their children. But it also makes sense that those children, faced with a moralistic mother and the very loose morality of the culture, would run to the latter.

  • fjsteve

    Jon,

    I don’t know that there is a lot of heavy moralism in a lot of the black churches. I’m not an expert, but the sense I get from liberation theology, insofar as it relates to the black church, is that you are where you are because of what others did to you and Jesus set the example of how to fight the power. The prosperity gospel teaches that you deserve the literal riches of God’s blessing. Both are more or less about realizing temporal victory and say little about original sin or atonement.

    On the other hand, I do know that Baptist churches teach heavy moralism and, as you rightly point out, this is a recipe for despair. It kind of makes sense that poor single mothers would latch on to moralism, especially as a way to help raise their children. But it also makes sense that those children, faced with a moralistic mother and the very loose morality of the culture, would run to the latter.

  • helen

    Pete @ 4
    Helping the underprivileged needs to be done by private citizens and the churches – not the government.

    Good idea. How much are you planning to contribute?

    I ask because most of the people who say this (or send it to me on the internet) tend to mean, “Let somebody else do it and get out of my pocket.” (And quite often they’ve got the deeper pockets.)

    Employ your talents at 1. bringing back jobs at something more than food stamp wages and 2. stopping the flow of illegals into and remittances out of this country so that the money circulates in the US economy.
    Most people want to work at job with a future. How many of you would want to spend a life flipping burgers at Mickey D’s?

    Romney’s hundreds of millions would do some real good, if he was building businesses instead of destroying them.

    [What really brings me to depression is when I get a spreader load of Republican diatribes about people who "don't work" from someone who was on Social Security disability payments before she was 50 (and while she was still able to do a number of other things). Another one is collecting for "back problems" but she lives in a second floor flat with stairs I couldn't climb 10-12 years ago (because I do have problems).] Neither is black, BTW

  • helen

    Pete @ 4
    Helping the underprivileged needs to be done by private citizens and the churches – not the government.

    Good idea. How much are you planning to contribute?

    I ask because most of the people who say this (or send it to me on the internet) tend to mean, “Let somebody else do it and get out of my pocket.” (And quite often they’ve got the deeper pockets.)

    Employ your talents at 1. bringing back jobs at something more than food stamp wages and 2. stopping the flow of illegals into and remittances out of this country so that the money circulates in the US economy.
    Most people want to work at job with a future. How many of you would want to spend a life flipping burgers at Mickey D’s?

    Romney’s hundreds of millions would do some real good, if he was building businesses instead of destroying them.

    [What really brings me to depression is when I get a spreader load of Republican diatribes about people who "don't work" from someone who was on Social Security disability payments before she was 50 (and while she was still able to do a number of other things). Another one is collecting for "back problems" but she lives in a second floor flat with stairs I couldn't climb 10-12 years ago (because I do have problems).] Neither is black, BTW

  • Pete

    Helen @11

    I don’t have specific plans for future contribution, although I’m confident that they’ll be there. In terms of past contributions, my wife and I started our married life as house parents for four girls with Down syndrome. Did that for a year and a half after which I began my surgery training, during which time we took in a succession of foster children (lost count – eight or nine, maybe) and the last of these we adopted, since a nine year old Hispanic child going up for adoption in San Francisco at that time was more than likely to have been placed with a gay couple. She is the oldest of our four children, the other three of which are biological. (Well, they’re all biological, but you know what I mean.) Subsequent to completing my surgery training, I have (for 26 years now – don’t be fooled by my photo) consistently provided surgical care for anyone who came my way regardless of ability to pay. I have done occasional medical mission work, mostly local, once in Uganda. My wife has been involved in numerous charitable endeavors including guardian ad litem work. Both of us are also active in churches that have vigorous and active social programs. Through her church, my wife has been actively involved in a program tutoring and mentoring underprivileged minority children. I regularly donate blood (plan to do it tomorrow, as a matter of fact) as well as administering units in the OR that have been donated by others. With two parents in the home for the duration of their upbringing, three of our four children are net producers for society – not consumers – and are beginning to engage in charitable endeavors of their own. The fourth is still in college and jury is still out on him but our bet is he’ll be the best of the bunch.
    I’m pretty certain that none of this is enough – despite our efforts there are still people out there in need of help. But I harbor the strong suspicion that that number would be much smaller if the private model of helping the poor rather than the public model prevailed.

  • Pete

    Helen @11

    I don’t have specific plans for future contribution, although I’m confident that they’ll be there. In terms of past contributions, my wife and I started our married life as house parents for four girls with Down syndrome. Did that for a year and a half after which I began my surgery training, during which time we took in a succession of foster children (lost count – eight or nine, maybe) and the last of these we adopted, since a nine year old Hispanic child going up for adoption in San Francisco at that time was more than likely to have been placed with a gay couple. She is the oldest of our four children, the other three of which are biological. (Well, they’re all biological, but you know what I mean.) Subsequent to completing my surgery training, I have (for 26 years now – don’t be fooled by my photo) consistently provided surgical care for anyone who came my way regardless of ability to pay. I have done occasional medical mission work, mostly local, once in Uganda. My wife has been involved in numerous charitable endeavors including guardian ad litem work. Both of us are also active in churches that have vigorous and active social programs. Through her church, my wife has been actively involved in a program tutoring and mentoring underprivileged minority children. I regularly donate blood (plan to do it tomorrow, as a matter of fact) as well as administering units in the OR that have been donated by others. With two parents in the home for the duration of their upbringing, three of our four children are net producers for society – not consumers – and are beginning to engage in charitable endeavors of their own. The fourth is still in college and jury is still out on him but our bet is he’ll be the best of the bunch.
    I’m pretty certain that none of this is enough – despite our efforts there are still people out there in need of help. But I harbor the strong suspicion that that number would be much smaller if the private model of helping the poor rather than the public model prevailed.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    How many of you would want to spend a life flipping burgers at Mickey D’s?

    Honorable work. Far better than not working.

    Also, what is wrong with that job exactly?

    Is it just the low pay? Is that it?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    How many of you would want to spend a life flipping burgers at Mickey D’s?

    Honorable work. Far better than not working.

    Also, what is wrong with that job exactly?

    Is it just the low pay? Is that it?

  • reg

    Helen,
    As they used to say, right on!

  • reg

    Helen,
    As they used to say, right on!

  • helen

    Pete, I congratulate you. You have been practicing what you are preaching.
    But I don’t think there are enough of you.

    sg, Work is better than no work, which is why McDonald’s will always have cooks and countermen. But I doubt is a wage to “save for your old age” on, which is what is also expected of everyone.
    [We should all die the day before we're too old to support ourselves, I suppose.]

  • helen

    Pete, I congratulate you. You have been practicing what you are preaching.
    But I don’t think there are enough of you.

    sg, Work is better than no work, which is why McDonald’s will always have cooks and countermen. But I doubt is a wage to “save for your old age” on, which is what is also expected of everyone.
    [We should all die the day before we're too old to support ourselves, I suppose.]

  • Michael B.

    Helen, +1
    @Pete@4
    “the underprivileged needs to be done by private citizens and the churches ”

    I often hear this argument. I sometimes ask: Do the churches know this? I mean, if you went in to your pastor and told him he needs to take over the health care of its members, how do you think that would go over?

  • Michael B.

    Helen, +1
    @Pete@4
    “the underprivileged needs to be done by private citizens and the churches ”

    I often hear this argument. I sometimes ask: Do the churches know this? I mean, if you went in to your pastor and told him he needs to take over the health care of its members, how do you think that would go over?

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Nice to see him say this, but it’s hard to take him seriously seeing as how he proposed Charlton Heston should be shot with a 44 Bulldog a few years ago.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Nice to see him say this, but it’s hard to take him seriously seeing as how he proposed Charlton Heston should be shot with a 44 Bulldog a few years ago.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    sg, Work is better than no work, which is why McDonald’s will always have cooks and countermen. But I doubt is a wage to “save for your old age” on, which is what is also expected of everyone.
    [We should all die the day before we're too old to support ourselves, I suppose.]

    Oh, wow, where to start. So much cultural baggage is embedded in there. What is wrong with living with your children and staying in a spare bedroom or sleeping on the sofa? I mean what besides status? I mean, a person would be just fine doing that. It isn’t cool, I guess. He couldn’t show off his affluence, but there is nothing morally wrong with living with your kids and not buying non essentials. It isn’t some horrible existence. It is probably better than living alone in an apartment. All that does is support the landlord. Why is this generation so special that the old people just can’t live with their kids like every other generation in history? What is the great value of being independent from age 18-death? Whose needs are really so well served by this system? I mean, it is great for those renting property and selling services, and that is okay, if it works, but what about for lower wage people who can’t afford to have all their needs met by paid workers? As for churches helping, okay, fine, but do churches even preach that we should show charity to our very closest neighbors aka our parents, children and siblings? We have just come off an anomalous era of prosperity, the post WWII era. There was enormous economic growth and the small generation just before the boomers got to ride the wave. There is no wave for the boomers to ride. So, no, most people will be indigent in their old age and need to live with their children and their children will need them to help them make it. This may be humbling, but it is not wretched.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    sg, Work is better than no work, which is why McDonald’s will always have cooks and countermen. But I doubt is a wage to “save for your old age” on, which is what is also expected of everyone.
    [We should all die the day before we're too old to support ourselves, I suppose.]

    Oh, wow, where to start. So much cultural baggage is embedded in there. What is wrong with living with your children and staying in a spare bedroom or sleeping on the sofa? I mean what besides status? I mean, a person would be just fine doing that. It isn’t cool, I guess. He couldn’t show off his affluence, but there is nothing morally wrong with living with your kids and not buying non essentials. It isn’t some horrible existence. It is probably better than living alone in an apartment. All that does is support the landlord. Why is this generation so special that the old people just can’t live with their kids like every other generation in history? What is the great value of being independent from age 18-death? Whose needs are really so well served by this system? I mean, it is great for those renting property and selling services, and that is okay, if it works, but what about for lower wage people who can’t afford to have all their needs met by paid workers? As for churches helping, okay, fine, but do churches even preach that we should show charity to our very closest neighbors aka our parents, children and siblings? We have just come off an anomalous era of prosperity, the post WWII era. There was enormous economic growth and the small generation just before the boomers got to ride the wave. There is no wave for the boomers to ride. So, no, most people will be indigent in their old age and need to live with their children and their children will need them to help them make it. This may be humbling, but it is not wretched.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I often hear this argument. I sometimes ask: Do the churches know this? I mean, if you went in to your pastor and told him he needs to take over the health care of its members, how do you think that would go over?

    The church could probably do it and do it better if they, like our government, were able to tax people like the government does. People like to compare to Europe, but the fact is that in Europe, the average person actually receives in services most of what he puts in to the system. An audit of the Swedish system revealed that the citizens get back over 90% on average. That is real wage value coming back to them directly. Our taxes fund insanity like foreign wars, not health care. If the churches could just get the $$ flushed down the drains of Iraq and Afghanistan, they like the gov’t could provide for the citizenry. We don’t get much of a return on our $$. The average American has a negative net worth and owes $100k on the national debt. So, no, there is no way to get more money out of the churches to cover health care because parishioners are paying for stupid foreign wars and a gigantic globally deployed military.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I often hear this argument. I sometimes ask: Do the churches know this? I mean, if you went in to your pastor and told him he needs to take over the health care of its members, how do you think that would go over?

    The church could probably do it and do it better if they, like our government, were able to tax people like the government does. People like to compare to Europe, but the fact is that in Europe, the average person actually receives in services most of what he puts in to the system. An audit of the Swedish system revealed that the citizens get back over 90% on average. That is real wage value coming back to them directly. Our taxes fund insanity like foreign wars, not health care. If the churches could just get the $$ flushed down the drains of Iraq and Afghanistan, they like the gov’t could provide for the citizenry. We don’t get much of a return on our $$. The average American has a negative net worth and owes $100k on the national debt. So, no, there is no way to get more money out of the churches to cover health care because parishioners are paying for stupid foreign wars and a gigantic globally deployed military.

  • Stone the Crows

    J.Dean, I agree, Spike’s comments remind me of an old ’60′s protest song; long on bellyaching and point out the faults but no answers but simplistic wishing and hoping. I used to live in Missouri and briefly was involved in Promse Keepers. One of our projects was to send a group of men from our church to do maintenance and repars at an AME church. The story was the same as this article, mom was working sometimes two or more jobs, Grandma raised the kids and dad (er.. the spermdoaner) was nowhere to be found and the only positive male figure in these kid’s lives was their pastor. That was over a decade ago and it hasn’t gotten any better, and it is becoming more and more the norm in predominantly WASP communities as well. How often do you see grandma and grandpa taking care of kids whose mom or dad is in prison, an addict or simply not interested in the responsibilities of being a parent?
    “It’s not a good look” how profound. How many mil will Spike make off of this exploitation? The culture of the inner city black community must be changed. It is the heart that needs the change and it is Christ that does the changing.

  • Stone the Crows

    J.Dean, I agree, Spike’s comments remind me of an old ’60′s protest song; long on bellyaching and point out the faults but no answers but simplistic wishing and hoping. I used to live in Missouri and briefly was involved in Promse Keepers. One of our projects was to send a group of men from our church to do maintenance and repars at an AME church. The story was the same as this article, mom was working sometimes two or more jobs, Grandma raised the kids and dad (er.. the spermdoaner) was nowhere to be found and the only positive male figure in these kid’s lives was their pastor. That was over a decade ago and it hasn’t gotten any better, and it is becoming more and more the norm in predominantly WASP communities as well. How often do you see grandma and grandpa taking care of kids whose mom or dad is in prison, an addict or simply not interested in the responsibilities of being a parent?
    “It’s not a good look” how profound. How many mil will Spike make off of this exploitation? The culture of the inner city black community must be changed. It is the heart that needs the change and it is Christ that does the changing.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    The culture of the inner city black community must be changed. It is the heart that needs the change and it is Christ that does the changing.

    So, let’s see. If they continue in this pattern they get lots of government freebies and if they straighten up and fly right, they get taxed on their meager earnings and have to compete with illegal immigrants that employers can abuse at will with impunity. Yeah, I don’t see any way out of this with the current government imposed incentives.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    The culture of the inner city black community must be changed. It is the heart that needs the change and it is Christ that does the changing.

    So, let’s see. If they continue in this pattern they get lots of government freebies and if they straighten up and fly right, they get taxed on their meager earnings and have to compete with illegal immigrants that employers can abuse at will with impunity. Yeah, I don’t see any way out of this with the current government imposed incentives.

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