The great soda grants

George Will describes how a stimulus program that became part of Obamacare shelled out millions of dollars worth of grants to lobby lawmakers against soft drinks:

Because nothing is as immortal as a temporary government program, Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW), a creature of the stimulus, was folded into the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, a.k.a. Obamacare. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), working through the CPPW, disbursed money to 25 states to fight, among other things, the scourge of soda pop.

In Cook County, Ill., according to an official report, recipients using some of a $16 million CDC grant “educated policymakers on link between SSBs [sugar-sweetened beverages] and obesity, economic impact of an SSB tax, and importance of investing revenue into prevention.” According to a Philadelphia city Web site, a $15 million CDC grant funded efforts to “campaign” for a “two-cent per ounce excise tax” on SSBs. In California, an official report says that a $2.2 million CDC grant for obesity prevention funded “training for grantees on media advocacy” against SSBs. A New York report says that a $3 million grant was used to “educate leaders and decision-makers about, and promote the effective implementation of . . . a tax to substantially increase the price of beverages containing caloric sweetener.” The Rhode Island Department of Health used a $3 million grant for “educating key decision-makers to serve as champions of specific . . . pricing and procurement strategies to reduce consumption of” SSBs. In government-speak, “educating” is synonymous with “lobbying.”

Clearly some of the $230 million in CDC/CPPW anti-obesity grants was spent in violation of the law, which prohibits the use of federal funds “to influence in any manner . . . an official of any government, to favor, adopt, or oppose, by vote or otherwise, any legislation, law, ratification, policy, or appropriation.” But leaving legality aside, is such “nutrition activism” effective? . . .

Research indicates that overweight individuals have “reasonably close” to accurate estimates of the increased health risks and decreased life expectancy associated with obesity. Hence the weakness of mandated information as a modifier of behavior. A study conducted after New York City mandated posting calorie counts in restaurant chains concluded that, while 28 percent of patrons said the information influenced their choices, researchers could not detect a change in calories purchased after the law.

Other research findings include: A study of nearly 20,000 students from kindergarten through eighth grade found that among those with easy access to high-calorie snacks in schools, 35.5 percent were overweight — compared with 34.8 percent of children in schools without such snacks. Nutrition policy is replicating a familiar pattern: Increased taxes on alcohol and tobacco mostly decrease consumption by light users, not the heavy users who are the social problem and whose demand is relatively inelastic.

The robust market in diet books, weight-loss centers, exercise equipment, athletic clubs, health foods — between 1987 and 2004, 35,272 new food products were labeled “no fat” or “low fat” — refutes the theory that there is some “market failure” government must correct. But as long as there are bureaucrats who consider themselves completely rational and informed, there will be policies to substitute government supervision of individuals for individuals’ personal responsibility.

As the soft paternalism of incentives fails, there will be increasing resort to the hard paternalism of mandates and proscriptions. Hence the increasing need to supervise our supervisors, the government.

via George Will: Why government needs a diet – The Washington Post.

Another thing, besides it being illegal for the government to fund efforts to lobby the government.  Who is getting these grants, and how are they spending that $15 million?  Educating  policymakers should require some handouts, a PowerPoint set up, and maybe some coffee and doughnuts.  How could that cost $15 million?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Michael B.

    Is that necessarily a waste of money? Diabetes is an epidemic in this country. It’s got to be putting a drain on things like Medicare and Medicaid. Not to mention it’s actually hurting our citizens.

  • Michael B.

    Is that necessarily a waste of money? Diabetes is an epidemic in this country. It’s got to be putting a drain on things like Medicare and Medicaid. Not to mention it’s actually hurting our citizens.

  • SKPeterson

    And what exactly is the “scourge” of soda pop? The sugar content. A sugar made from corn syrup derived from heavily government subsidized corn, produced by farmers who have their own America Corn Growers Association, which gets federal research dollars for studies to claim that corn syrup sugars don’t contribute to obesity or have other adverse health impacts. Now that is the real meaning of “bipartisanship.”

  • SKPeterson

    And what exactly is the “scourge” of soda pop? The sugar content. A sugar made from corn syrup derived from heavily government subsidized corn, produced by farmers who have their own America Corn Growers Association, which gets federal research dollars for studies to claim that corn syrup sugars don’t contribute to obesity or have other adverse health impacts. Now that is the real meaning of “bipartisanship.”

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Shorter, heavier women have more children than thinner taller women. Can you see where this is going? Why don’t evolutionists believe in selection? Why do they always think it is environment causing outcomes? You would think that Darwin would have made at least a dent in their worldview, but no, they act more like creationists than creationists do.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Shorter, heavier women have more children than thinner taller women. Can you see where this is going? Why don’t evolutionists believe in selection? Why do they always think it is environment causing outcomes? You would think that Darwin would have made at least a dent in their worldview, but no, they act more like creationists than creationists do.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Entire libraries could be filled with evidence of the ridiculous way our federal government budgets and spends money. That isn’t a partisan point, either. It is just a fever swamp of boondoggles. That’s why people that get the vapors at the thought of cutting spending need a reality check.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Entire libraries could be filled with evidence of the ridiculous way our federal government budgets and spends money. That isn’t a partisan point, either. It is just a fever swamp of boondoggles. That’s why people that get the vapors at the thought of cutting spending need a reality check.

  • helen

    Yes, but that’s not the spending that would be cut!
    We’ll cut bridge maintenance (till they fall down) and farm toll roads out to foreign countries, but boondoggles like this will go on forever. They are somebody’s pet hobby horse (Michele’s in this case?)

  • helen

    Yes, but that’s not the spending that would be cut!
    We’ll cut bridge maintenance (till they fall down) and farm toll roads out to foreign countries, but boondoggles like this will go on forever. They are somebody’s pet hobby horse (Michele’s in this case?)

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    Why is it “my body” when I want to have an abortion or gay sex, but not “my body” when I want to drink a nice big slurpy?

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    Why is it “my body” when I want to have an abortion or gay sex, but not “my body” when I want to drink a nice big slurpy?

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    SKP has it right: This is a problem of the government’s own making.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    SKP has it right: This is a problem of the government’s own making.


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