Back under the knife

Having completed several weeks of recovery from cataract surgery, we do it all again starting today, as my left eye gets operated on.

Despite the forced inactivity, I was able to keep the blog going pretty well, so I hope can do the same this time.  This eye, though, will be corrected for near vision–the other one was for distant vision–so this operation may affect me more in reading and blogging, at least for a few days until the vision stabilizes.  When that happens, I should see really well in both eyes.  But if I’m not able to blog at my normal pace, you’ll know what has happened.

The plan, after taking out the cataracts, is to put in new artificial lenses that will correct my vision so that I might not even need glasses.   But it will work like this:   My right eye will be for distant vision. My left eye will be for near vision.  My brain supposedly will work the board, cutting from one camera/eye to the other.  This is called “monovision,” and I’m told that quite a few people with contact lenses have this arrangement.

But isn’t “stereo” better than “mono”?  If I just use one eye at a time, won’t that throw off my depth perception?  Will I be able to see 3-D movies?  If not, I don’t really mind, since I have never seen 3-D effects in a movie that I liked, with the exception of the Michael Jackson short film at Disneyland, and this will save me a lot of money in extra ticket prices.  But I’d sort of like to see 3-D effects in real life.

Would glasses let me use both eyes together?  I haven’t been wearing them since the first surgery since the prescription isn’t valid anymore, and I realize that I feel weird not wearing the things.  I actually like wearing glasses.  I hate to give them up, especially since the styles I first wore in 7th grade have finally come back in fashion and are defined as “hipster” frames.

I know, I know, I should have asked my doctor about all of this, but I always want to get out of the doctor’s office as soon as possible.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://acroamaticus.blogspot.com Pr Mark Henderson

    You could always get fashion frames with plain lenses, Dr Veith.
    I believe lots of hipsters do.
    ;0)

  • http://acroamaticus.blogspot.com Pr Mark Henderson

    You could always get fashion frames with plain lenses, Dr Veith.
    I believe lots of hipsters do.
    ;0)

  • Rose

    Prayers for another successful surgery for you, Dr. Veith.
    BTS, my contacts are monovision and they have worked beautifully for years.

  • Rose

    Prayers for another successful surgery for you, Dr. Veith.
    BTS, my contacts are monovision and they have worked beautifully for years.

  • Julian

    Whatever happens, at least you’ll be bionic.

  • Julian

    Whatever happens, at least you’ll be bionic.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    These are questions I’m qualified to answer, as I have the very same kind of vision arrangement after Lasik surgery.

    No, you do not use depth perception. Your dominant eye will see things clearly in the distance. Your non-dominant eye will see things clearly up close. But you’ll constantly see with both eyes. Your brain (perhaps after a period of getting used to it, though it worked for me from the git-go) will automatically prefer the eye that sees best for the distance you’re viewing, so your perception will be that you’re seeing clearly, both near and far.

    Trust me, it works.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    These are questions I’m qualified to answer, as I have the very same kind of vision arrangement after Lasik surgery.

    No, you do not use depth perception. Your dominant eye will see things clearly in the distance. Your non-dominant eye will see things clearly up close. But you’ll constantly see with both eyes. Your brain (perhaps after a period of getting used to it, though it worked for me from the git-go) will automatically prefer the eye that sees best for the distance you’re viewing, so your perception will be that you’re seeing clearly, both near and far.

    Trust me, it works.

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    Correction: I meant to say, “No, you do not *lose” depth perception.”

  • http://www.brandywinebooks.net Lars Walker

    Correction: I meant to say, “No, you do not *lose” depth perception.”

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    Ed, may our gracious Lord bless and keep you. My father had the same/similar procedures done and it was nothing short of miraculous.

    I had laser eye surgery and, like you, I have a “close in” and “far” eye, and yes, they do work amazingly well together. In fact, it’s kind of funny, when I really want to focus in on something in the distance, I just close my left eye and I almost feel like the Six Million Dollar man and wish I had the sound effect handy for his “super vision.”

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    Ed, may our gracious Lord bless and keep you. My father had the same/similar procedures done and it was nothing short of miraculous.

    I had laser eye surgery and, like you, I have a “close in” and “far” eye, and yes, they do work amazingly well together. In fact, it’s kind of funny, when I really want to focus in on something in the distance, I just close my left eye and I almost feel like the Six Million Dollar man and wish I had the sound effect handy for his “super vision.”

  • Pete

    What Rose @2 and Lars @4 said. You’ll wish you’d done it sooner. Hope it goes well.

  • Pete

    What Rose @2 and Lars @4 said. You’ll wish you’d done it sooner. Hope it goes well.

  • Helen K

    Prayers for a very successful surgery and recovery, Dr. Veith. And when my time cometh, I will have an idea of the possibilities. Is there an operation for brain fade? I could benefit from that. (:

  • Helen K

    Prayers for a very successful surgery and recovery, Dr. Veith. And when my time cometh, I will have an idea of the possibilities. Is there an operation for brain fade? I could benefit from that. (:

  • Grace

    Praying for you Dr. Veith.

    God bless you

  • Grace

    Praying for you Dr. Veith.

    God bless you

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Prayers for successful surgery & speedy healing for you.

    Wouldn’t binocular implants be fun?!

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Prayers for successful surgery & speedy healing for you.

    Wouldn’t binocular implants be fun?!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Bryan, you can actually get binocular implants that will make your vision perfect, but insurance doesn’t cover them. They’d cost several thousand bucks.

    Thanks, everybody, for your kind words and for your prayers. The doctor strictly charged me to not read and to not get on the internet for a day. (I’m cheating here. I just hope he is one of the few people who doesn’t read my blog!)

    With the other eye, it took me nearly a week for my vision to get better, but this time I am already seeing much, much better. I can even read without my magnifying drugstore classes. (Cheating again, I know.)

    I can ease back into reading and blogging after today, and I’m planning to go in to work on Friday, though I’m supposed to take it easy with all of that for at least a week. (All kinds of things can strain the eyes and build up the pressure in them–picking up things, bending over, strenuous activity, etc.) But I’ve got some interesting stuff that I’ll put up on this blog tomorrow!

    Again, I really appreciate your support. And thanks for the encouraging words on monovision. I went in for my post-op exam today, and in reading the eye chart, I really did do better with both eyes than I did with one at a time, coming close to 20/20 vision!

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Bryan, you can actually get binocular implants that will make your vision perfect, but insurance doesn’t cover them. They’d cost several thousand bucks.

    Thanks, everybody, for your kind words and for your prayers. The doctor strictly charged me to not read and to not get on the internet for a day. (I’m cheating here. I just hope he is one of the few people who doesn’t read my blog!)

    With the other eye, it took me nearly a week for my vision to get better, but this time I am already seeing much, much better. I can even read without my magnifying drugstore classes. (Cheating again, I know.)

    I can ease back into reading and blogging after today, and I’m planning to go in to work on Friday, though I’m supposed to take it easy with all of that for at least a week. (All kinds of things can strain the eyes and build up the pressure in them–picking up things, bending over, strenuous activity, etc.) But I’ve got some interesting stuff that I’ll put up on this blog tomorrow!

    Again, I really appreciate your support. And thanks for the encouraging words on monovision. I went in for my post-op exam today, and in reading the eye chart, I really did do better with both eyes than I did with one at a time, coming close to 20/20 vision!

  • Gary

    Praying for you, Dr. Veith! Missed you after only one day!

  • Gary

    Praying for you, Dr. Veith! Missed you after only one day!


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