Look who’s waging the culture war

Christian conservatives and Republicans in general have been criticized for waging the so-called “culture wars,” making political issues out of  abortion, gay marriage, and other divisive moral issues.  But now it’s the Democrats who are raising those divisive issues.

At the Republican National Convention, hardly anything was said about abortion or gay marriage.  But at the Democratic National Convention, speakers wouldn’t shut up about the goodness of abortion and gay marriage.

It sounds like both sides believe being pro-life and pro-traditional marriage are losing propositions.  The Democrats apparently think they can win voters by emphasizing the Republicans’ official stance on these issues.

Are they right? Have conservatives lost the “culture wars”?  Or are Democrats over-reaching?  Should Republicans be more assertive about their usual pro-life, pro-traditional-family stand?  Or would that doom their chances and put the Democrats in power?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Other Gary

    “It sounds like both sides believe being pro-life and pro-traditional marriage are losing propositions.”
    I agree, that’s how I’d interpret the stances of the parties as well. Republicans are running away from social issues because the majority of Americans are unwilling to support the social-conservative position that’s been staked out by the Right, and that goes for a decent percentage of Christian Americans as well.

    The Culture War is over if by that you mean using courts and arms of government to preserve traditional (Judeo-Christian) values. However, if that “War” is fought (please come up with a better metaphor) by _persuading_ people to think through what the consequences will be for society, then it may not yet be a lost cause.

    Better still, present Jesus’ idea of the Kingdom of God as something to _inspire_ culture, because it alone offers hope and redemption.

  • Other Gary

    “It sounds like both sides believe being pro-life and pro-traditional marriage are losing propositions.”
    I agree, that’s how I’d interpret the stances of the parties as well. Republicans are running away from social issues because the majority of Americans are unwilling to support the social-conservative position that’s been staked out by the Right, and that goes for a decent percentage of Christian Americans as well.

    The Culture War is over if by that you mean using courts and arms of government to preserve traditional (Judeo-Christian) values. However, if that “War” is fought (please come up with a better metaphor) by _persuading_ people to think through what the consequences will be for society, then it may not yet be a lost cause.

    Better still, present Jesus’ idea of the Kingdom of God as something to _inspire_ culture, because it alone offers hope and redemption.

  • Pete

    To the extent that what appears on television is an accurate metric of how the Culture War is going (content, philosophical/religious underpinnings, conservative versus progressive, willingness of sponsors to sponsor certain views, etc.) the good guys would appear to be losing. Even more telling is the realization that each TV show is a little “candidate”, put up for election that then gets voted in or out. Ultimately, it’s a democracy – sponsors won’t sponsor what people won’t watch. And it would appear that the people want what the Democrats are selling. Unfortunately (for the country) the Democrats are accurately assessing the way the wind is blowing on this one.

  • Pete

    To the extent that what appears on television is an accurate metric of how the Culture War is going (content, philosophical/religious underpinnings, conservative versus progressive, willingness of sponsors to sponsor certain views, etc.) the good guys would appear to be losing. Even more telling is the realization that each TV show is a little “candidate”, put up for election that then gets voted in or out. Ultimately, it’s a democracy – sponsors won’t sponsor what people won’t watch. And it would appear that the people want what the Democrats are selling. Unfortunately (for the country) the Democrats are accurately assessing the way the wind is blowing on this one.

  • Michael B.

    “It sounds like both sides believe being pro-life and pro-traditional marriage are losing propositions. The Democrats apparently think they can win voters by emphasizing the Republicans’ official stance on these issues..”

    If that were true, that would be a very bad proposition, because that would mean that social conservatives are actually helping Obama get into office by giving him ammunition to use on his Republican opponents. If on the other hand issues like gay marriage and abortion weren’t part of the Republican platform, Obama wouldn’t be able to use those attacks.

    I’ll say this: If it is true that social conservatives are costing the Republicans swing votes, social conservatives had better show up in large numbers and vote for Romney if they expect their issues on the Republican platform in the future.

  • Michael B.

    “It sounds like both sides believe being pro-life and pro-traditional marriage are losing propositions. The Democrats apparently think they can win voters by emphasizing the Republicans’ official stance on these issues..”

    If that were true, that would be a very bad proposition, because that would mean that social conservatives are actually helping Obama get into office by giving him ammunition to use on his Republican opponents. If on the other hand issues like gay marriage and abortion weren’t part of the Republican platform, Obama wouldn’t be able to use those attacks.

    I’ll say this: If it is true that social conservatives are costing the Republicans swing votes, social conservatives had better show up in large numbers and vote for Romney if they expect their issues on the Republican platform in the future.

  • mikeb

    This year the culture war doesn’t matter. The only issue that matters is the economy and jobs (and I’d say the debt and deficit are part and parcel to that). What was so frustrating for me about Todd Akin is that it wasn’t just that he said something stupid, he was talking about the wrong subject.

  • mikeb

    This year the culture war doesn’t matter. The only issue that matters is the economy and jobs (and I’d say the debt and deficit are part and parcel to that). What was so frustrating for me about Todd Akin is that it wasn’t just that he said something stupid, he was talking about the wrong subject.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Pete @ 2
    I am afraid you’re correct. It sounds glum and pessimistic, but the culture is tilted toward a culture of death and hedonism. That doesn’t mean that Democrats will win this election or any election – Republicans are right about abortion (and gay marriage IMO) but they have their own problems.

    But I’m not truly pessimistic because my ultimate hope isn’t in some political goal. The Gospel doesn’t just transform lives – it can transform and influence cultures as well. It has before and it can again.

  • Steve Billingsley

    Pete @ 2
    I am afraid you’re correct. It sounds glum and pessimistic, but the culture is tilted toward a culture of death and hedonism. That doesn’t mean that Democrats will win this election or any election – Republicans are right about abortion (and gay marriage IMO) but they have their own problems.

    But I’m not truly pessimistic because my ultimate hope isn’t in some political goal. The Gospel doesn’t just transform lives – it can transform and influence cultures as well. It has before and it can again.

  • helen

    As long as savings interest is being bled from the accounts of the middle class to make the 1% richer yet, that money won’t circulate (at least, not in America). Thirty years of “trickle down” theory have proven that the “job creators” only destroy jobs in this country.

    What have you heard from the Republicans that would lead you to believe they will change either of those?
    Supply sound of crickets (which is the only thing we have plenty of here, this summer!)

    If the issues are economy and jobs… Republicans lose.

  • helen

    As long as savings interest is being bled from the accounts of the middle class to make the 1% richer yet, that money won’t circulate (at least, not in America). Thirty years of “trickle down” theory have proven that the “job creators” only destroy jobs in this country.

    What have you heard from the Republicans that would lead you to believe they will change either of those?
    Supply sound of crickets (which is the only thing we have plenty of here, this summer!)

    If the issues are economy and jobs… Republicans lose.

  • JB
  • JB
  • Jon

    Recently on here we remarked that about 51% of the public identify as pro-life, that the pro-choice position was on its way out.

    So why all the pessimism sparked by the “LOUD NOISES” made at the DNC?

    The Republicans didn’t make a spiel about culture issues, because that’s not where the important votes are this election.

    Culture stuff really only plays to the base. And the election is not going to be one by getting out the base. Both sides are going to get out their base. No advantage there.

    I think it is the few moderate independents who are going to decide the race. For them, it’s not the culture that counts so much.

    I think the RNC were wise not to play into the culture thing. Anyway, they are on the 51% majority side, at least with abortion. So why should they join the DNC’s frothy shout-fest?

    The RNC needs to stay on message about the horrible state of the economy and the Democrats’ failed policies that have driven the country to the brink of disaster–only to beg us for four more years to be sure we cross that brink.

  • Jon

    Recently on here we remarked that about 51% of the public identify as pro-life, that the pro-choice position was on its way out.

    So why all the pessimism sparked by the “LOUD NOISES” made at the DNC?

    The Republicans didn’t make a spiel about culture issues, because that’s not where the important votes are this election.

    Culture stuff really only plays to the base. And the election is not going to be one by getting out the base. Both sides are going to get out their base. No advantage there.

    I think it is the few moderate independents who are going to decide the race. For them, it’s not the culture that counts so much.

    I think the RNC were wise not to play into the culture thing. Anyway, they are on the 51% majority side, at least with abortion. So why should they join the DNC’s frothy shout-fest?

    The RNC needs to stay on message about the horrible state of the economy and the Democrats’ failed policies that have driven the country to the brink of disaster–only to beg us for four more years to be sure we cross that brink.

  • Abby

    Pete @2: It will be interesting to see how the new NBC TV show does and for how long: “The New Normal” about a gay couple. “Will and Grace” did well for quite a long time. But that was a show young kids wouldn’t understand very well. When I saw the trailer for it being advertised during the Olympics, I couldn’t help but think how this will influence children for the future generations. This looks like it is a “family” show.

  • Abby

    Pete @2: It will be interesting to see how the new NBC TV show does and for how long: “The New Normal” about a gay couple. “Will and Grace” did well for quite a long time. But that was a show young kids wouldn’t understand very well. When I saw the trailer for it being advertised during the Olympics, I couldn’t help but think how this will influence children for the future generations. This looks like it is a “family” show.

  • trotk

    Jon @8,
    I still can’t fathom the naivety that believes that the Republicans will be good for the economy. While I agree that Obama is fiscally a disaster, what hope exists in the party of Bush that we will get less centrally planned garbage or fewer massive expenditures like wars and bailouts?

    Romney is every bit the statist that Bush was and Obama is. And besides, other than get out of the way (which Romney doesn’t know how to do and probably can’t stomach doing), what can be done to help the economy? Until we blow up the fed and elect someone who wants more than just the extension of his own power, we will be stuck in a federally-planned mess.

  • trotk

    Jon @8,
    I still can’t fathom the naivety that believes that the Republicans will be good for the economy. While I agree that Obama is fiscally a disaster, what hope exists in the party of Bush that we will get less centrally planned garbage or fewer massive expenditures like wars and bailouts?

    Romney is every bit the statist that Bush was and Obama is. And besides, other than get out of the way (which Romney doesn’t know how to do and probably can’t stomach doing), what can be done to help the economy? Until we blow up the fed and elect someone who wants more than just the extension of his own power, we will be stuck in a federally-planned mess.

  • Morgan

    @helen #6:
    “As long as savings interest is being bled from the accounts of the middle class to make the 1% richer yet, that money won’t circulate (at least, not in America).”

    I’ll apologize for being prickly before I even start. But you have absolutely no earthly clue how financial markets work. Or how banks make money. Or the concept of interest. Or bank fees. Or how money circulates. Or how economies work. Or how jobs are created and lost.

    Yep, the banks “bleed” “savings interest” from the “middle class” and directly deposit that money into Mitt’s bank account. That’s precisely how it works. You should write about this. People have GOT to know the truth!

    You can easily say inflation erodes value from savings. You can argue that bank fees are too high/unfair, etc. You can rail that banks should make no money at all (the very idea!).

    Bonus points, though, for not using the term “fat cats.”

    Okay, what’s your bright idea alternative? Command economy? Barter system? Whatcha got?

  • Morgan

    @helen #6:
    “As long as savings interest is being bled from the accounts of the middle class to make the 1% richer yet, that money won’t circulate (at least, not in America).”

    I’ll apologize for being prickly before I even start. But you have absolutely no earthly clue how financial markets work. Or how banks make money. Or the concept of interest. Or bank fees. Or how money circulates. Or how economies work. Or how jobs are created and lost.

    Yep, the banks “bleed” “savings interest” from the “middle class” and directly deposit that money into Mitt’s bank account. That’s precisely how it works. You should write about this. People have GOT to know the truth!

    You can easily say inflation erodes value from savings. You can argue that bank fees are too high/unfair, etc. You can rail that banks should make no money at all (the very idea!).

    Bonus points, though, for not using the term “fat cats.”

    Okay, what’s your bright idea alternative? Command economy? Barter system? Whatcha got?

  • DonS

    It sounds like both sides believe being pro-life and pro-traditional marriage are losing propositions. The Democrats apparently think they can win voters by emphasizing the Republicans’ official stance on these issues.

    I disagree. Consistently, polling shows that the pro-life view is winning the day. We have discussed that fact many times on this blog. Now, it is true that Republicans are often cowed by a hostile media into forgetting that the media does not represent the views of the people, but in this case the emphases in each convention were politically strategic. For the Republicans, their focus this year is on the economy, for reasons that should be apparent to all, particularly those many who are out of work or under-employed. Additionally, the Akin gaffe temporarily made it expedient not to dwell on the abortion issue unduly — he screwed up the real message of the right-to-life view with his ill considered comments.

    On the other hand, the Democrats absolutely do not want to talk about the economy this year, also for obvious reasons. Additionally, they thought they could continue to distract by focusing on abortion in the hopes that it would keep the Akin issue alive. They re-focused their convention for that reason, I think to their great detriment in the long run.

    The swing voter does not care about abortion (unfortunately). The fact that the Democrats are trying to appeal to their base and the Republicans are going after the swing voter tells you everything you need to know about the true state of this campaign.

  • DonS

    It sounds like both sides believe being pro-life and pro-traditional marriage are losing propositions. The Democrats apparently think they can win voters by emphasizing the Republicans’ official stance on these issues.

    I disagree. Consistently, polling shows that the pro-life view is winning the day. We have discussed that fact many times on this blog. Now, it is true that Republicans are often cowed by a hostile media into forgetting that the media does not represent the views of the people, but in this case the emphases in each convention were politically strategic. For the Republicans, their focus this year is on the economy, for reasons that should be apparent to all, particularly those many who are out of work or under-employed. Additionally, the Akin gaffe temporarily made it expedient not to dwell on the abortion issue unduly — he screwed up the real message of the right-to-life view with his ill considered comments.

    On the other hand, the Democrats absolutely do not want to talk about the economy this year, also for obvious reasons. Additionally, they thought they could continue to distract by focusing on abortion in the hopes that it would keep the Akin issue alive. They re-focused their convention for that reason, I think to their great detriment in the long run.

    The swing voter does not care about abortion (unfortunately). The fact that the Democrats are trying to appeal to their base and the Republicans are going after the swing voter tells you everything you need to know about the true state of this campaign.

  • mikeb

    Morgan @ 11 in RE: Helen @ 6

    Okay, what’s your bright idea alternative?

    That’s just it. The folks who decry our current system of economic liberty–the freedom to choose or choose otherwise–have no bright idea alternative. It amazes me how many who claim to believe in freedom and liberty actually have such little faith in those concepts.

  • mikeb

    Morgan @ 11 in RE: Helen @ 6

    Okay, what’s your bright idea alternative?

    That’s just it. The folks who decry our current system of economic liberty–the freedom to choose or choose otherwise–have no bright idea alternative. It amazes me how many who claim to believe in freedom and liberty actually have such little faith in those concepts.

  • mikeb

    DonS @ 12

    I don’t want to hijack the thread but I wanted to share an observation: I live in Missouri, or as our politicians say this time of year ‘Mizzurah’, and it seems to me that Akin is moving beyond his gaffe. His latest ad (from memory) has him saying something like ‘I made a 6 second mistake, but Clair McCaskill has been a 6 year mistake’. He then lays out his case pretty effectively.

    You’re right about the news media. Every news story about Akin makes sure to mention the gaffe, usually including the words “legitimate rape” but failing to include that he retracted the remark and apologized. That’s how the media is keeping Republicans in line: fear.

  • mikeb

    DonS @ 12

    I don’t want to hijack the thread but I wanted to share an observation: I live in Missouri, or as our politicians say this time of year ‘Mizzurah’, and it seems to me that Akin is moving beyond his gaffe. His latest ad (from memory) has him saying something like ‘I made a 6 second mistake, but Clair McCaskill has been a 6 year mistake’. He then lays out his case pretty effectively.

    You’re right about the news media. Every news story about Akin makes sure to mention the gaffe, usually including the words “legitimate rape” but failing to include that he retracted the remark and apologized. That’s how the media is keeping Republicans in line: fear.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @5

    It sounds glum and pessimistic, but the culture is tilted toward a culture of death and hedonism.

    How can you have hedonism without prosperity?

    It’s the economy that matters.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @5

    It sounds glum and pessimistic, but the culture is tilted toward a culture of death and hedonism.

    How can you have hedonism without prosperity?

    It’s the economy that matters.

  • DonS

    mikeb @ 14: Politicians on the left, like Joe Biden, get countless second chances after saying something stupid. They have the elite media wind at their back, and saying things like “”You cannot go to a 7-11 or a Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent…. I’m not joking” just get sloughed off, whereas if a Republican made a statement like that, he would be hounded for the rest of his days as a racist bigot.

    However, politicans on the right get no such slack. What Akin said was utterly stupid and factually incorrect. That statement will forever define him as “potatoe” did Dan Quayle, despite the fact that he has apologized and made amends repeatedly. Because Republicans are cowed by the media, they immediately withdrew all support and funding — Akin has no money. He should have withdrawn from the race, for the sake of the seat, Republican control of the Senate (for the purpose of repealing Obamacare) and the pro-life agenda. But, for some reason, he made this about himself instead of the movement, unfortunately. He still has a couple of more weeks to withdraw, as I understand MO law, and I hope he does.

    However, if he stays in, I hope he wins, despite the overwhelming odds against him and his lack of funding. I would much rather have him in office, despite his faults, than the pro-abortion, moderate pretender Claire McCaskill in the Senate, and I most definitely want to see the Senate in Republican hands.

  • DonS

    mikeb @ 14: Politicians on the left, like Joe Biden, get countless second chances after saying something stupid. They have the elite media wind at their back, and saying things like “”You cannot go to a 7-11 or a Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent…. I’m not joking” just get sloughed off, whereas if a Republican made a statement like that, he would be hounded for the rest of his days as a racist bigot.

    However, politicans on the right get no such slack. What Akin said was utterly stupid and factually incorrect. That statement will forever define him as “potatoe” did Dan Quayle, despite the fact that he has apologized and made amends repeatedly. Because Republicans are cowed by the media, they immediately withdrew all support and funding — Akin has no money. He should have withdrawn from the race, for the sake of the seat, Republican control of the Senate (for the purpose of repealing Obamacare) and the pro-life agenda. But, for some reason, he made this about himself instead of the movement, unfortunately. He still has a couple of more weeks to withdraw, as I understand MO law, and I hope he does.

    However, if he stays in, I hope he wins, despite the overwhelming odds against him and his lack of funding. I would much rather have him in office, despite his faults, than the pro-abortion, moderate pretender Claire McCaskill in the Senate, and I most definitely want to see the Senate in Republican hands.

  • DonS

    Well, this is off-track a bit, but still convention-related. It appears that when the DNC tried to honor our military at the DNC convention, they displayed four Russian warships:

    http://www.navytimes.com/news/2012/09/navy-russian-warships-displayed-dnc-veterans-tribute-091112/

    Heh.

  • DonS

    Well, this is off-track a bit, but still convention-related. It appears that when the DNC tried to honor our military at the DNC convention, they displayed four Russian warships:

    http://www.navytimes.com/news/2012/09/navy-russian-warships-displayed-dnc-veterans-tribute-091112/

    Heh.

  • mikeb

    DonS @ 16

    It was reported that Akin has raised some $400,000 since the gaffe. That’s no large sum but in Missouri politics some campaigns on spend a couple million.

    Akin has until Sept. 25 to with draw which would allow the Republicans to name a replacement whose name would be on the ballot. After that date he can still withdraw but his name would be on the ballot but (if I understand this correctly) a vote for Akin would be a vote for the replacement. He’s not going to withdraw though so anyone who wants a 51+ seat Republican senate better think about how they can be involved in the race. (Did you hear me Karl Rove?)

    I think it would be a mistake for the Republicans to ignore Missouri and could cost Romney our 11 electoral votes. He has approximately a 49-43 lead but you can never take the Show Me state for granted.

    Also – I hope he wins and shows the national political hacks who so quickly abandoned him out of fear of media backlash. Cowards.

  • mikeb

    DonS @ 16

    It was reported that Akin has raised some $400,000 since the gaffe. That’s no large sum but in Missouri politics some campaigns on spend a couple million.

    Akin has until Sept. 25 to with draw which would allow the Republicans to name a replacement whose name would be on the ballot. After that date he can still withdraw but his name would be on the ballot but (if I understand this correctly) a vote for Akin would be a vote for the replacement. He’s not going to withdraw though so anyone who wants a 51+ seat Republican senate better think about how they can be involved in the race. (Did you hear me Karl Rove?)

    I think it would be a mistake for the Republicans to ignore Missouri and could cost Romney our 11 electoral votes. He has approximately a 49-43 lead but you can never take the Show Me state for granted.

    Also – I hope he wins and shows the national political hacks who so quickly abandoned him out of fear of media backlash. Cowards.

  • Grace

    I don’t believe it’s just about the “economy.”

    Abortion, is front and center, as millions of innocent infants are killed every year. As for same sex marriage, it is being touted on television and schools, as the citizens of this country ‘yawn’ and their children are educated as to transgender, homosexuality, same sex, etc.

    I don’t want to hijack the thread, however some of you might have may have missed this one, it serves to give everyone a ‘heads up’ on what’s just around the corner.

    Three-way civil union in Brazil sparks controversy
    Sep 01, 2012
    By Yamiche Alcindor, USA TODAY

    “One man and two women became the first people granted a three-way civil union in Brazil, CNN reports.

    The Brazilian public notary who granted the trio all of the legal benefits of marriage has set off a firestorm. Claudia do Nascimento Domingues is defending her move, calling the three a “polyfidelitous union.”

    The relationship involves three professionals in their 30s who live together and say they love one another as equals and are like any other non-married cohabiting couple, CNN reports. They have not been identified.

    Some, including religious groups and legal scholars, say the union is not valid and would be the beginning of a slippery slope.

    http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2012/09/three-way-civil-union-in-brazil-sparks-controversy/1#.UEZtFCJ_4dp

  • Grace

    I don’t believe it’s just about the “economy.”

    Abortion, is front and center, as millions of innocent infants are killed every year. As for same sex marriage, it is being touted on television and schools, as the citizens of this country ‘yawn’ and their children are educated as to transgender, homosexuality, same sex, etc.

    I don’t want to hijack the thread, however some of you might have may have missed this one, it serves to give everyone a ‘heads up’ on what’s just around the corner.

    Three-way civil union in Brazil sparks controversy
    Sep 01, 2012
    By Yamiche Alcindor, USA TODAY

    “One man and two women became the first people granted a three-way civil union in Brazil, CNN reports.

    The Brazilian public notary who granted the trio all of the legal benefits of marriage has set off a firestorm. Claudia do Nascimento Domingues is defending her move, calling the three a “polyfidelitous union.”

    The relationship involves three professionals in their 30s who live together and say they love one another as equals and are like any other non-married cohabiting couple, CNN reports. They have not been identified.

    Some, including religious groups and legal scholars, say the union is not valid and would be the beginning of a slippery slope.

    http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2012/09/three-way-civil-union-in-brazil-sparks-controversy/1#.UEZtFCJ_4dp

  • helen

    Pete @ 2
    To the extent that what appears on television is an accurate metric of how the Culture War is going (content, philosophical/religious underpinnings, conservative versus progressive, willingness of sponsors to sponsor certain views, etc.) the good guys would appear to be losing.

    Or the “good guys” are bored/disgusted[ by it all and aren't watching TV shows?
    [Not buying Viagra et alia, or [anti-depressants], or a new car while the (independent) mechanic can keep this one going, so the advertisers aren’t any more worried about me than the choosers of shows are.]

  • helen

    Pete @ 2
    To the extent that what appears on television is an accurate metric of how the Culture War is going (content, philosophical/religious underpinnings, conservative versus progressive, willingness of sponsors to sponsor certain views, etc.) the good guys would appear to be losing.

    Or the “good guys” are bored/disgusted[ by it all and aren't watching TV shows?
    [Not buying Viagra et alia, or [anti-depressants], or a new car while the (independent) mechanic can keep this one going, so the advertisers aren’t any more worried about me than the choosers of shows are.]

  • Cincinnatus

    Morgan@11:

    The point: you missed it.

    Of course, Helen’s account is over-reductionist as well. The real problem is free trade. Yes, I said it.

  • Cincinnatus

    Morgan@11:

    The point: you missed it.

    Of course, Helen’s account is over-reductionist as well. The real problem is free trade. Yes, I said it.

  • mikeb

    Just wanted to point out a new poll is out today (and after my comments earlier) now showing Akin trailing McCaskill49-43. Obviously some slippage of the last couple of weeks.

    http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/elections/election_2012/election_2012_senate_elections/missouri/election_2012_missouri_senate

  • mikeb

    Just wanted to point out a new poll is out today (and after my comments earlier) now showing Akin trailing McCaskill49-43. Obviously some slippage of the last couple of weeks.

    http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/elections/election_2012/election_2012_senate_elections/missouri/election_2012_missouri_senate

  • Michael B.

    @Jon@8
    “Recently on here we remarked that about 51% of the public identify as pro-life”

    Even if that is true, remember that the majority of people who “identify” as Catholic voted for Obama. What percentage of America identifies as “Christian”?

  • Michael B.

    @Jon@8
    “Recently on here we remarked that about 51% of the public identify as pro-life”

    Even if that is true, remember that the majority of people who “identify” as Catholic voted for Obama. What percentage of America identifies as “Christian”?


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