The children’s conservative revolution

First lady Michelle Obama has joined with food activists to push through changes in  school lunch menus as a way to combat childhood obesity and promote better nutrition.  But children are rising up in revolution.  A new generation of anti-big government, anti-nanny state meddling, is born!  The Tea Party is passing its generational torch to the School Lunch Party.

A new product has popped up on the city’s black market and it’s selling in an unexpected place: Greater New Bedford Vocational-Technical High School, which has become ground zero for a new underground economy based on trade in chocolate syrup.

Students said some of their peers are buying the contraband liquid for 50 cents and squeezing it into cartons of white milk to give it flavor. It’s their way of coping with a ban on flavored milk — and a long list of other items — that took effect Aug. 1.

“Of course they got rid of dessert, (but) flavored milk … I don’t understand why we can’t have that,” said Paige Lame , 17, of New Bedford. She added that she thought the nutritional difference between white milk and chocolate, strawberry or coffee flavored milk was too minimal to have an important impact on health.

The changes reflect stricter nutrition standards imposed in January by the federal Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which was championed by Michelle Obama and her “Let’s Move” initiative.

They are also part of a law passed by the state Legislature in 2010 as a step toward combating childhood obesity. That law states that milk with more sugar than nonfat or 1 percent white milk may not be served a la carte starting in August 2013.

The rules, which apply to schools across the state, also reduce the amount of protein served to high schoolers, and increase servings of fruit and vegetables — going so far as to specify how many servings of green vegetables, legumes, and red/orange vegetables should be consumed each week. . . .

The changes are especially hard at the elementary school level, where hummus and black bean salad have been a tough sell, said Nancy Carvalho, director of food services for the New Bedford Public Schools, adding that bowls of chili served Wednesday to comply with the legume specifications were “not a very good decision.” . . .

At Voc-Tech, the changes have produced complaints from some students that portions are too small — particularly since the price of lunch has increased 10 cents to $1.95, again due to a federal mandate.”How do they expect us to go through the day and work hard when they give us smaller portions and we’re hungry?” said Ashley Chaneco, 13, of New Bedford.

“You’re paying more for less,” said Erik Cortez, 16, of New Bedford. “I get it, but why should they have the right to tell you what you can and can’t eat?”

via Healthy food policy at school jumpstarts chocolate syrup trade | SouthCoastToday.com.

Imagine trying to get elementary school-aged kids to eat humuus!

Hungry school children are now bringing their lunches and eating more snacks.  See this report.

And this new rising generation of radicalized students, newly opposed to big government and nanny-state meddling, are battling the oppression with the tools that they have.  Not only setting up black markets for chocolate syrup and other newly-controlled substances, but using the new information technology to promote the cause.   Consider this very creative video they made, which has now, of course, gone viral:

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Tom Hering

    Young people questioning and rejecting the “wisdom” of their elders, selling outlawed substances to one another, and organizing by means of alternative media. A conservative revolution? Sounds to me like the anti-establishment ’60s of my youth all over again. (Democrats were in power then, too.) :-D

  • Tom Hering

    Young people questioning and rejecting the “wisdom” of their elders, selling outlawed substances to one another, and organizing by means of alternative media. A conservative revolution? Sounds to me like the anti-establishment ’60s of my youth all over again. (Democrats were in power then, too.) :-D

  • Booklover

    The guy has a great voice, and the ending is hilarious. I will try to forget his reference to “lover” early in the song.

    It’s not just public schools that are having these issues. At our private Christian school, children aren’t allowed to bring “desserts” in their packed lunches. We also serve hummus for the morning snack. It is sometimes hard to reinforce these rules when a parent gets angry; but I figure, school gets out at 3:00, the parents can stuff them with whatever they want at that time.

  • Booklover

    The guy has a great voice, and the ending is hilarious. I will try to forget his reference to “lover” early in the song.

    It’s not just public schools that are having these issues. At our private Christian school, children aren’t allowed to bring “desserts” in their packed lunches. We also serve hummus for the morning snack. It is sometimes hard to reinforce these rules when a parent gets angry; but I figure, school gets out at 3:00, the parents can stuff them with whatever they want at that time.

  • Michael B.

    According to a report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health, 20 years from now, 1 out of every 2 people will be obese. (in all but a few states). Technically, that means non-obese people could be in the minority in some areas. And non-obese includes those who are merely overweight, without reaching the obesity threshold.

  • Michael B.

    According to a report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health, 20 years from now, 1 out of every 2 people will be obese. (in all but a few states). Technically, that means non-obese people could be in the minority in some areas. And non-obese includes those who are merely overweight, without reaching the obesity threshold.

  • Kirk

    I don’t know about you all, but I prefer kids emerging from school 100lbs overweight with diabetes and high cholesterol! Heart attacks at 30! Conservatism ftw!

    Really, though. I went to public high school in DE and our lunches were AWFUL. Not just unhealthy, but poorly made, gross looking, horrible tasting crap. Interestingly, this actually drove a lot of kids to eat healthier. My school offered a salad bar as an alternative, and I hit that up every day during my junior and senior years.

  • Kirk

    I don’t know about you all, but I prefer kids emerging from school 100lbs overweight with diabetes and high cholesterol! Heart attacks at 30! Conservatism ftw!

    Really, though. I went to public high school in DE and our lunches were AWFUL. Not just unhealthy, but poorly made, gross looking, horrible tasting crap. Interestingly, this actually drove a lot of kids to eat healthier. My school offered a salad bar as an alternative, and I hit that up every day during my junior and senior years.

  • Kirk

    Also, when has dissatisfaction with a government program ever constituted a “conservative revolution.” I though that was just called “normal life.”

  • Kirk

    Also, when has dissatisfaction with a government program ever constituted a “conservative revolution.” I though that was just called “normal life.”

  • Ryan

    Is it really so simple that portion size (strictly caloric intake) the cause of the obesity issue? There is a correlation btw avg. portions and rising obesity over the last half century but correlation is not causation. Are we more sedentary? Is the presence of various ubiquitous chemicals in our food related? Other environmental factors? Are the school lunches based on glycemic index so students feel fuller longer? And so on.

    Oddly, since it is a gov’t program I have no problem them deciding what to give students. What I have a problem with is earlier this year schools going through bag lunches and telling parents what to pack and/or throwing the kids lunches away and making them eat school lunch.

  • Ryan

    Is it really so simple that portion size (strictly caloric intake) the cause of the obesity issue? There is a correlation btw avg. portions and rising obesity over the last half century but correlation is not causation. Are we more sedentary? Is the presence of various ubiquitous chemicals in our food related? Other environmental factors? Are the school lunches based on glycemic index so students feel fuller longer? And so on.

    Oddly, since it is a gov’t program I have no problem them deciding what to give students. What I have a problem with is earlier this year schools going through bag lunches and telling parents what to pack and/or throwing the kids lunches away and making them eat school lunch.

  • Julian

    Another example of a well-intentioned but poorly conceived law achieving the exact opposite of its intended goal.

  • Julian

    Another example of a well-intentioned but poorly conceived law achieving the exact opposite of its intended goal.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    So many things are confusing here. How is any student who chooses to eat a government-selected lunch considered “anti-big-government”?

    Wouldn’t the true “tea party” child simply bring his own lunch? Man, that’s what I did, nearly every single day of my public school education. Wotta rebel I was!

    If anything, these kids aren’t “tea party” students, they’re Republicans — they claim to be leading a revolution, but all they’re really doing is complaining and tinkering with the government status quo. Ha!

    No, seriously, why does this article nowhere discuss kids bringing their own lunches? How is that not the best solution for everyone here?

    And what high school senior drinks milk on a regular basis? By the time I was in high school, everyone was either drinking sweetened drinks (soda, juice) or water. Milk is kind of a little kid thing, isn’t it?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    So many things are confusing here. How is any student who chooses to eat a government-selected lunch considered “anti-big-government”?

    Wouldn’t the true “tea party” child simply bring his own lunch? Man, that’s what I did, nearly every single day of my public school education. Wotta rebel I was!

    If anything, these kids aren’t “tea party” students, they’re Republicans — they claim to be leading a revolution, but all they’re really doing is complaining and tinkering with the government status quo. Ha!

    No, seriously, why does this article nowhere discuss kids bringing their own lunches? How is that not the best solution for everyone here?

    And what high school senior drinks milk on a regular basis? By the time I was in high school, everyone was either drinking sweetened drinks (soda, juice) or water. Milk is kind of a little kid thing, isn’t it?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Finally, Veith said:

    Imagine trying to get elementary school-aged kids to eat humuus!

    Forgive me, but from where I’m typing this, that’s a remarkably provincial statement.

    You think hummus (please don’t feed the kids humus — that actually would be a hard sell) is exotic. That’s cute.

    To be fair, when I first met a hummus-eating child in Portland, I was a bit surprised, as well. I didn’t think hummus was exotic, even back then, but I considered it more adult fare. Then I learned that the same child also enjoyed sushi.

    I suppose it’s a West-Coast/East-Coast thing. But my three-year-old regularly eats (and enjoys) hummus on a near-daily basis.

    Of course, that has a lot to do with what his parents enjoy eating. We like hummus so much, we make it ourselves — I know, I know, it’s incomprehensible to those of you who don’t live in a major coastal city.

    Heck, in Portland, there’s at least one school where the kids clamor for Brussels sprouts!

    Ahem. But, of course, this is all a horrible statist plot, and our government should really be serving the children a steady diet of chicken strips and fries.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Finally, Veith said:

    Imagine trying to get elementary school-aged kids to eat humuus!

    Forgive me, but from where I’m typing this, that’s a remarkably provincial statement.

    You think hummus (please don’t feed the kids humus — that actually would be a hard sell) is exotic. That’s cute.

    To be fair, when I first met a hummus-eating child in Portland, I was a bit surprised, as well. I didn’t think hummus was exotic, even back then, but I considered it more adult fare. Then I learned that the same child also enjoyed sushi.

    I suppose it’s a West-Coast/East-Coast thing. But my three-year-old regularly eats (and enjoys) hummus on a near-daily basis.

    Of course, that has a lot to do with what his parents enjoy eating. We like hummus so much, we make it ourselves — I know, I know, it’s incomprehensible to those of you who don’t live in a major coastal city.

    Heck, in Portland, there’s at least one school where the kids clamor for Brussels sprouts!

    Ahem. But, of course, this is all a horrible statist plot, and our government should really be serving the children a steady diet of chicken strips and fries.

  • trotk

    tODD -

    I don’t live in a major coastal city, but my wife makes great hummus, and my three kids can empty a fresh bowl of it in minutes. Chips, tortillas, carrots, crackers, fingers, you name it – if it can be fit in the bowl, it will get dipped and licked clean.

    But milk? Come on. I still like milk, especially whole milk. The one thing you won’t see in my house or in my kids’ lunches (which we pack!) is soda.

  • trotk

    tODD -

    I don’t live in a major coastal city, but my wife makes great hummus, and my three kids can empty a fresh bowl of it in minutes. Chips, tortillas, carrots, crackers, fingers, you name it – if it can be fit in the bowl, it will get dipped and licked clean.

    But milk? Come on. I still like milk, especially whole milk. The one thing you won’t see in my house or in my kids’ lunches (which we pack!) is soda.

  • John C

    Milk is kind of a little kid thing.
    Fair suck of the sav.
    (for Australian readers)

  • John C

    Milk is kind of a little kid thing.
    Fair suck of the sav.
    (for Australian readers)

  • John Schuetz

    Sure, the goal of addressing childhood obesity is a good goal. But the method employed–restricting school lunches to ~700 calories with only one ounce of protein–is absurd. First of all, for many families who are food insecure, school lunch is THE main meal of the day for the children. In such families, due to cost, the ability to send the child to school with a lunch packed at home; home-packed lunches are not subsidized. So, the “hunger-difference” is often made up with snack foods which are more accessible/affordable. In the school district where I live about half of the students receive subsidized or free lunches.

    Secondly, the whole athlete issue is a real issue. These kids just burn more calories and so have a need of higher calories. Common sense.

    Third, it is hard for kids with stomachs rumbling to concentrate in school. Again, common sense.

    Sure, the YouTube video exaggerates to make the point, but the point is still valid.

    John

  • John Schuetz

    Sure, the goal of addressing childhood obesity is a good goal. But the method employed–restricting school lunches to ~700 calories with only one ounce of protein–is absurd. First of all, for many families who are food insecure, school lunch is THE main meal of the day for the children. In such families, due to cost, the ability to send the child to school with a lunch packed at home; home-packed lunches are not subsidized. So, the “hunger-difference” is often made up with snack foods which are more accessible/affordable. In the school district where I live about half of the students receive subsidized or free lunches.

    Secondly, the whole athlete issue is a real issue. These kids just burn more calories and so have a need of higher calories. Common sense.

    Third, it is hard for kids with stomachs rumbling to concentrate in school. Again, common sense.

    Sure, the YouTube video exaggerates to make the point, but the point is still valid.

    John

  • Tom Hering

    I recently tried hummus for the first time, at one of my cardiac rehab nutrition classes. Now my fridge is packed with the stuff. Who doesn’t like a yummy bean dip?

  • Tom Hering

    I recently tried hummus for the first time, at one of my cardiac rehab nutrition classes. Now my fridge is packed with the stuff. Who doesn’t like a yummy bean dip?

  • trotk

    Good for you, Tom! Even the liberal Cranach lap-dog realizes the blessings of God when he tastes them.

  • trotk

    Good for you, Tom! Even the liberal Cranach lap-dog realizes the blessings of God when he tastes them.

  • Tom Hering

    Ahem. That’s liberal Cranach lap-cat. Check the avatar, righty. ;-)

  • Tom Hering

    Ahem. That’s liberal Cranach lap-cat. Check the avatar, righty. ;-)

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom (@15), not sure if you’re making it yourself or not, but it really is easy to make! The hardest part is soaking the garbanzo beans overnight. … Assuming you have access to dry garbanzo beans, I guess.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Tom (@15), not sure if you’re making it yourself or not, but it really is easy to make! The hardest part is soaking the garbanzo beans overnight. … Assuming you have access to dry garbanzo beans, I guess.

  • Kathy

    I could be wrong, but I thought there was a legal issue that made milk the drink of schools. I recall a neighbor trying to get an alternative drink for her son at school. She couldn’t…unless she got a doctor’s slip that said her son was allergic to milk. She said it had to do with some kind of law in favor of milk.

  • Kathy

    I could be wrong, but I thought there was a legal issue that made milk the drink of schools. I recall a neighbor trying to get an alternative drink for her son at school. She couldn’t…unless she got a doctor’s slip that said her son was allergic to milk. She said it had to do with some kind of law in favor of milk.

  • SKPeterson

    Todd @ 16 – I prefer my hummus to be made from chickpeas. They’re so much more tasty than garbanzo beans.

  • SKPeterson

    Todd @ 16 – I prefer my hummus to be made from chickpeas. They’re so much more tasty than garbanzo beans.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    My kids love hummus. We have made an effort to broaden our kids taste, and its paid off.

    If this is a “conservative” revolution, I wouldn’t worry. It’ll soon run out of energy, and its proponents will all expire, relieving the rest of us of a mighty economic/insurance burden.

    (Said only partly in jest…)

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    My kids love hummus. We have made an effort to broaden our kids taste, and its paid off.

    If this is a “conservative” revolution, I wouldn’t worry. It’ll soon run out of energy, and its proponents will all expire, relieving the rest of us of a mighty economic/insurance burden.

    (Said only partly in jest…)

  • SKPeterson

    Kathy @ 17 – The act to which you refer is part of the “Keep Wisconsin in the United States by Making Every Child Drink Milk Act” passed to prevent Wisconsin from merging with Ontario and creating a major salient into the United States threatening our national security and cutting off the economically important Upper Peninsula of Michigan, though this act was vigorously opposed by Delaware, which wanted an assurance of a compensatory bill for eggs. When Rhode Island refused to go along, Delaware cracked, the bill passed, and Wisconsin and subsidized dairy were safely made 100% Real.

  • SKPeterson

    Kathy @ 17 – The act to which you refer is part of the “Keep Wisconsin in the United States by Making Every Child Drink Milk Act” passed to prevent Wisconsin from merging with Ontario and creating a major salient into the United States threatening our national security and cutting off the economically important Upper Peninsula of Michigan, though this act was vigorously opposed by Delaware, which wanted an assurance of a compensatory bill for eggs. When Rhode Island refused to go along, Delaware cracked, the bill passed, and Wisconsin and subsidized dairy were safely made 100% Real.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    SKP – I prefer chickpeas too.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    SKP – I prefer chickpeas too.

  • Kirk

    I didn’t know you could make hummus with garbanzo beans

  • Kirk

    I didn’t know you could make hummus with garbanzo beans

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    To be serious, I think that the big issue with the school lunch is not as much the type of food that is offered, but rather the quality thereof. I remember using no less than eight napkins to soak off the grease from the “Real Italian Pizza” (yes, it was an ethnic slur) my school served as a kid. To not do so was to risk seeing that stuff again during track practice, if you catch my drift.

    And the salads my school started to offer? Worse yet. Imagine SPAM on iceberg lettuce with a heavy mayo based dressing, or more accurately dressing acting as if it had been in the same room with a jar of mayo once.

    Put gently, if you want to make school food better, teach the cooks how to cook it so you can have tasty food that isn’t loaded down with grease. Moving to hummus or other foods without addressing the quality level just changes the type of grease-bomb served to kids.

    (Kathy is correct that serving milk in schools is a matter of law–where that milk goes to waste not only because kids prefer pop, but also because most non-white students can’t process lactose very well)

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    To be serious, I think that the big issue with the school lunch is not as much the type of food that is offered, but rather the quality thereof. I remember using no less than eight napkins to soak off the grease from the “Real Italian Pizza” (yes, it was an ethnic slur) my school served as a kid. To not do so was to risk seeing that stuff again during track practice, if you catch my drift.

    And the salads my school started to offer? Worse yet. Imagine SPAM on iceberg lettuce with a heavy mayo based dressing, or more accurately dressing acting as if it had been in the same room with a jar of mayo once.

    Put gently, if you want to make school food better, teach the cooks how to cook it so you can have tasty food that isn’t loaded down with grease. Moving to hummus or other foods without addressing the quality level just changes the type of grease-bomb served to kids.

    (Kathy is correct that serving milk in schools is a matter of law–where that milk goes to waste not only because kids prefer pop, but also because most non-white students can’t process lactose very well)

  • JonSLC

    Funny — My wife and I snacked on hummus last night, while watching the “Parks and Rec” episode about a ban on giant-sized sodas. “Why is your 512 oz. soda called the ‘Child’ size?” “Because that’s the size a typical toddler would be if he were liquified.”

  • JonSLC

    Funny — My wife and I snacked on hummus last night, while watching the “Parks and Rec” episode about a ban on giant-sized sodas. “Why is your 512 oz. soda called the ‘Child’ size?” “Because that’s the size a typical toddler would be if he were liquified.”

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    bike – I don’t know if you watched Jamie Oliver’s efforts to improve American school lunches.

    The obstacles he faced were immense – cultural and media, but the most formidable was from – Administration, School District officials and even Health dept.’s. Most kids came around once they understood the facts, and were encouraged to develop their taste buds. It was a question of overcoming the group prejudice, and their suspicion of everything new.

    Interesting also, is that while the teachers “converted” quite quickly, administration, especially on the district level, was particularly wooded-headed.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    bike – I don’t know if you watched Jamie Oliver’s efforts to improve American school lunches.

    The obstacles he faced were immense – cultural and media, but the most formidable was from – Administration, School District officials and even Health dept.’s. Most kids came around once they understood the facts, and were encouraged to develop their taste buds. It was a question of overcoming the group prejudice, and their suspicion of everything new.

    Interesting also, is that while the teachers “converted” quite quickly, administration, especially on the district level, was particularly wooded-headed.

  • Stephen

    Chickpeas and garbanzos are the same thing, no? And I get a big tub of hummus from Costco. Always in the fridge. They have roasted red pepper and pine nut one. You can also make great dips with tofu in a blender.

  • Stephen

    Chickpeas and garbanzos are the same thing, no? And I get a big tub of hummus from Costco. Always in the fridge. They have roasted red pepper and pine nut one. You can also make great dips with tofu in a blender.

  • Stephen

    Try hummus and guacamole (just avocado, salt, pepper and garlic powder is all you need) on a sub sandwich roll together with whatever trimmings you like. You won’t be missing the meat and you won’t be hungry.

    Nothing wrong with a cup cake. And nothing wrong with the First Lady advocating for healthier eating starting with school lunches when we have a homegrown epidemic of obesity among children, children that are the target of billions of dollars in marketing. I thought conservatives were out to make the government protect children.

  • Stephen

    Try hummus and guacamole (just avocado, salt, pepper and garlic powder is all you need) on a sub sandwich roll together with whatever trimmings you like. You won’t be missing the meat and you won’t be hungry.

    Nothing wrong with a cup cake. And nothing wrong with the First Lady advocating for healthier eating starting with school lunches when we have a homegrown epidemic of obesity among children, children that are the target of billions of dollars in marketing. I thought conservatives were out to make the government protect children.

  • trotk

    Stephen, although that sandwich sounds good, it would be better with steak on it as well.

    Why is there no love for black bean hummus?

  • trotk

    Stephen, although that sandwich sounds good, it would be better with steak on it as well.

    Why is there no love for black bean hummus?

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Stephen, much as I prefer freshly made produce, local food and all that, I have to give it to that Roasted red pepper Hummus from Costco!

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Stephen, much as I prefer freshly made produce, local food and all that, I have to give it to that Roasted red pepper Hummus from Costco!

  • Tom Hering

    … to prevent Wisconsin from merging with Ontario … (@ 20)

    That would be Quebec. We were always meant to be part of New France. Look at our oldest non-Indian place names!

  • Tom Hering

    … to prevent Wisconsin from merging with Ontario … (@ 20)

    That would be Quebec. We were always meant to be part of New France. Look at our oldest non-Indian place names!

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Given the original post, and the subsequent comments, we really must be an Iniquitous Den of Hummus-eating Lib’rals… :)

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Given the original post, and the subsequent comments, we really must be an Iniquitous Den of Hummus-eating Lib’rals… :)

  • larry

    It’s neither a “conservative revolution” nor a parallel with the “liberal revolution” of the 60s nor is it “kids rebellion thing” as opposed to an “adult rebellion thing”, it’s not a big government rebellion thing as opposed to a big business rebellion thing, etc… It’s precisely a law thing. You say, “I must eat, vote, dress, X”, I’m going to say, child, teen, adult, senior, democrat, republican, whig, “I’ll show you.”

    So if someone says for example, “Humus is great you need/should/must eat some”, sin arises to arms having been laying latent until that law expressed itself. Or conversely, “Humus is something you need to avoid”, the reverse reaction.

    It’s really no more complicated than that and of course both the rebellion AND the effort to cause a food change will fail in sufficient time…both are pissing in the wind.

  • larry

    It’s neither a “conservative revolution” nor a parallel with the “liberal revolution” of the 60s nor is it “kids rebellion thing” as opposed to an “adult rebellion thing”, it’s not a big government rebellion thing as opposed to a big business rebellion thing, etc… It’s precisely a law thing. You say, “I must eat, vote, dress, X”, I’m going to say, child, teen, adult, senior, democrat, republican, whig, “I’ll show you.”

    So if someone says for example, “Humus is great you need/should/must eat some”, sin arises to arms having been laying latent until that law expressed itself. Or conversely, “Humus is something you need to avoid”, the reverse reaction.

    It’s really no more complicated than that and of course both the rebellion AND the effort to cause a food change will fail in sufficient time…both are pissing in the wind.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    One of my good friends in high school was tall and skinny. He would buy two full lunch trays and milk every day and eat it all. I asked him if he really liked that stuff. Not really, just hoping to gain weight.

    Personally, I agree with Michelle Obama on the food thing.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    One of my good friends in high school was tall and skinny. He would buy two full lunch trays and milk every day and eat it all. I asked him if he really liked that stuff. Not really, just hoping to gain weight.

    Personally, I agree with Michelle Obama on the food thing.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @32

    When a child is two and you feed him deep fat fried everything and mac n cheese, etc., aren’t you in fact making him eat that? When you set him in front of the TV, aren’t you in fact training him to watch it/ making him do it? Michelle is right, people need to eat right and exercise, she sets a good example.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @32

    When a child is two and you feed him deep fat fried everything and mac n cheese, etc., aren’t you in fact making him eat that? When you set him in front of the TV, aren’t you in fact training him to watch it/ making him do it? Michelle is right, people need to eat right and exercise, she sets a good example.

  • Med Student

    The whole protein limit part makes little sense to me. Cut down fat and sugar, yes, but kids (and teenagers) need protein, even more so than adults because they’re still growing, especially if they are athletes.

  • Med Student

    The whole protein limit part makes little sense to me. Cut down fat and sugar, yes, but kids (and teenagers) need protein, even more so than adults because they’re still growing, especially if they are athletes.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Trotk said (@28):

    Why is there no love for black bean hummus?

    Because it doesn’t exist? Black bean dip is often tasty, though.

    Anyhow, if you want to be really cool, you should refer to them with the word “chich”, which was the first English term for the bean, dating back to 1388, but sadly obsolete by the 18th C.

    Oh, and that 1388 reference? From Wycliffe’s Bible. 2 Samuel 17:28, albeit in its plural, non-standard orthography form: “chichis”. Maybe that’s why classicists like Veith find hummus to be so afffected. He thinks they’re chichi. (See what I did there?)

    Speaking of classicists, what famous Latin-speaker has a name that comes from the Latin for chickpea?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Trotk said (@28):

    Why is there no love for black bean hummus?

    Because it doesn’t exist? Black bean dip is often tasty, though.

    Anyhow, if you want to be really cool, you should refer to them with the word “chich”, which was the first English term for the bean, dating back to 1388, but sadly obsolete by the 18th C.

    Oh, and that 1388 reference? From Wycliffe’s Bible. 2 Samuel 17:28, albeit in its plural, non-standard orthography form: “chichis”. Maybe that’s why classicists like Veith find hummus to be so afffected. He thinks they’re chichi. (See what I did there?)

    Speaking of classicists, what famous Latin-speaker has a name that comes from the Latin for chickpea?

  • Tom Hering

    Cicer / Cicero?

  • Tom Hering

    Cicer / Cicero?

  • DonS

    Hummus and pita chips — there is no better snack.

    This is hardly a “conservative” revolution, since, as has been pointed out by many commenters, we are talking about a federal program. Ryan @ 6 is right — when the lunch police start rummaging through the lunch you brought from home, then it is time for the conservative revolution.

  • DonS

    Hummus and pita chips — there is no better snack.

    This is hardly a “conservative” revolution, since, as has been pointed out by many commenters, we are talking about a federal program. Ryan @ 6 is right — when the lunch police start rummaging through the lunch you brought from home, then it is time for the conservative revolution.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Yup, Tom (@37). Maybe that was obvious, after all my chichi talk.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Yup, Tom (@37). Maybe that was obvious, after all my chichi talk.

  • larry

    “…she sets a good example.” I suppose if one thinks that the guy whose on his third filing of bankruptcy saying to you, “I’ll tell you where you can invest your money to make money”, sets a good example to follow.

    It’s much simpler than that. As a wise old farmer in his eighties still going strong, eating whatever he likes and has skinny as a rail once told me, “I figure a body was made to move”. Juxtaposition that with the American generation that will spend 15 minutes driving around in the Walmart parking lot to find that coveted parking space that’s 20 feet closer to the entrance than the one they just passed.

  • larry

    “…she sets a good example.” I suppose if one thinks that the guy whose on his third filing of bankruptcy saying to you, “I’ll tell you where you can invest your money to make money”, sets a good example to follow.

    It’s much simpler than that. As a wise old farmer in his eighties still going strong, eating whatever he likes and has skinny as a rail once told me, “I figure a body was made to move”. Juxtaposition that with the American generation that will spend 15 minutes driving around in the Walmart parking lot to find that coveted parking space that’s 20 feet closer to the entrance than the one they just passed.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    Klasie; I don’t watch much TV, but I am not exactly surprised at what you say. More or less, the administrators are those responsible for setting the “Real Italian Pizza System” in place, and overturning makes them look like…..well, like what they are, really. “Hummus-heads” or something.

    No insult intended against hummus. Can’t find much of it around here, but I’ve enjoyed it, too.

    Med Student; there is a condition called ketosis from too much protein (my mom was a dietician, I read the journals) , but I have trouble envisioning a scenario where school administrators (see Klasie’s note again) actually spend enough on typical protein sources (even hummus) to get to that level. If you require servings of fruits, vegetables, and starches and limit funding, you will get the protein limit.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    Klasie; I don’t watch much TV, but I am not exactly surprised at what you say. More or less, the administrators are those responsible for setting the “Real Italian Pizza System” in place, and overturning makes them look like…..well, like what they are, really. “Hummus-heads” or something.

    No insult intended against hummus. Can’t find much of it around here, but I’ve enjoyed it, too.

    Med Student; there is a condition called ketosis from too much protein (my mom was a dietician, I read the journals) , but I have trouble envisioning a scenario where school administrators (see Klasie’s note again) actually spend enough on typical protein sources (even hummus) to get to that level. If you require servings of fruits, vegetables, and starches and limit funding, you will get the protein limit.

  • SKPeterson

    I remember either driving back home or to a friend’s house to eat during lunch, or heading over to Taco Bueno for these really neat hummus/bean dip wraps, with a nice tomato and hot pepper sauce as a condiment. I think they were called borachos or something like that.

  • SKPeterson

    I remember either driving back home or to a friend’s house to eat during lunch, or heading over to Taco Bueno for these really neat hummus/bean dip wraps, with a nice tomato and hot pepper sauce as a condiment. I think they were called borachos or something like that.

  • The Jones

    Bureaucratic orders from the top show ignorance at the top through bad effects of those orders at the bottom.

    Do kids eat unhealthily? Of course. Is food prepared badly at school? Of course. But you don’t go changing the world through a federal program. This just proves that.

    It also shows the things that “slip through the cracks” like football players, basketball players, and cross country and track runners who are not only burning calories going to crazy practices, but also growing an inch or three every year. Worthy goal, but overreach by the first lady. Please try again through private means.

  • The Jones

    Bureaucratic orders from the top show ignorance at the top through bad effects of those orders at the bottom.

    Do kids eat unhealthily? Of course. Is food prepared badly at school? Of course. But you don’t go changing the world through a federal program. This just proves that.

    It also shows the things that “slip through the cracks” like football players, basketball players, and cross country and track runners who are not only burning calories going to crazy practices, but also growing an inch or three every year. Worthy goal, but overreach by the first lady. Please try again through private means.

  • Cheri T

    Meat (generally fried), potatoes, butter, gravy, a vegetable and bread and butter. That was the makeup of our family meals, for lunch and dinner every day when I grew up. Fried eggs, cereal & milk & toast for breakfast. The breakfast for the hard-working farmer and his family. We worked hard, and we played hard. There were no video games to waste our time, and kids could run free all day during the summer, getting lots of exercise. It is NOT the food that we are eating that is causing the obesity, it is the lack of EXERCISE. Plain and simple. Get those kids out running, playing ball, getting fresh air. Our society has become way too sedentary.

  • Cheri T

    Meat (generally fried), potatoes, butter, gravy, a vegetable and bread and butter. That was the makeup of our family meals, for lunch and dinner every day when I grew up. Fried eggs, cereal & milk & toast for breakfast. The breakfast for the hard-working farmer and his family. We worked hard, and we played hard. There were no video games to waste our time, and kids could run free all day during the summer, getting lots of exercise. It is NOT the food that we are eating that is causing the obesity, it is the lack of EXERCISE. Plain and simple. Get those kids out running, playing ball, getting fresh air. Our society has become way too sedentary.

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  • Joe

    The obvious answer is to bring a bag lunch. My problem with the school lunch program is that it exists as anything other than a means-tested welfare program. My problem with the protest is that it appears to be a bunch of middle class kids complaining about the almost free lunch they are getting.

    As an aside, wasn’t the justification for the program that kids would learn better if they weren’t hungry? So doesn’t this portion control/calorie limit kind of go against the point of the program? Are there comparable studies that say it is hard to learn if your fat?

    On to random stuff from the thread:

    I drink Milk every single day (yes, I’m from Wisconsin). My family of 6 consumes a gallon a day on average. My only complaint is that I live too far away from a farm to buy raw milk and have to drink what the the farm kids I grew up with called “city milk.”

    I also loved “hot lunch” when I was in school. Growing up in a farming community they gave us so much food it was simply awesome! The lunch ladies were all old farm grandmas who knew how to feed people. They used an ice cream scoop to dole out the mashed potatoes. You could get up to 6 scoops of potatoes smothered with turkey and gravy. Then you could take a dinner roll and open it up and they lunch ladies would dump turkey gravy all over that too! My mouth is watering just thinking about it.

    Oh and you know what? I struggled with my weight as a kid. I could not keep myself at my football playing weight. I wanted to be around 180 lbs (I was and am 6’3) but I kept dipping down to 165-170. I couldn’t consume enough calories.

  • Joe

    The obvious answer is to bring a bag lunch. My problem with the school lunch program is that it exists as anything other than a means-tested welfare program. My problem with the protest is that it appears to be a bunch of middle class kids complaining about the almost free lunch they are getting.

    As an aside, wasn’t the justification for the program that kids would learn better if they weren’t hungry? So doesn’t this portion control/calorie limit kind of go against the point of the program? Are there comparable studies that say it is hard to learn if your fat?

    On to random stuff from the thread:

    I drink Milk every single day (yes, I’m from Wisconsin). My family of 6 consumes a gallon a day on average. My only complaint is that I live too far away from a farm to buy raw milk and have to drink what the the farm kids I grew up with called “city milk.”

    I also loved “hot lunch” when I was in school. Growing up in a farming community they gave us so much food it was simply awesome! The lunch ladies were all old farm grandmas who knew how to feed people. They used an ice cream scoop to dole out the mashed potatoes. You could get up to 6 scoops of potatoes smothered with turkey and gravy. Then you could take a dinner roll and open it up and they lunch ladies would dump turkey gravy all over that too! My mouth is watering just thinking about it.

    Oh and you know what? I struggled with my weight as a kid. I could not keep myself at my football playing weight. I wanted to be around 180 lbs (I was and am 6’3) but I kept dipping down to 165-170. I couldn’t consume enough calories.

  • Jimmy Veith

    I think we need to use the federal school lunch program to promote multiculturalism.

    We should make the kids eat things like “Indian Tacos”. This is a very popular food in here in Oklahoma, and it takes care of two cultures in one!

    By the way, what cultural group started eating hummus?

  • Jimmy Veith

    I think we need to use the federal school lunch program to promote multiculturalism.

    We should make the kids eat things like “Indian Tacos”. This is a very popular food in here in Oklahoma, and it takes care of two cultures in one!

    By the way, what cultural group started eating hummus?

  • JonathanH

    @25: Jamie Oliver, really? He’s the last person I want influencing policy.

  • JonathanH

    @25: Jamie Oliver, really? He’s the last person I want influencing policy.

  • cattail

    My grandkids (8, 10, 12) love hummus!

    I’m all for giving kids healthier foods like whole grains, veggies, fruit, nuts, cut out the hydrogenated fats–but cutting the calories? Especially for rapidly growing adolescents? (I raised four of them and had the usual horrendous grocery bill!) That’s horrible! All it does is encourage them to fill up on junk food!

    Instead of cutting the calories, add a daily PE session. The problem is not eating too much, it’s not moving enough!

  • cattail

    My grandkids (8, 10, 12) love hummus!

    I’m all for giving kids healthier foods like whole grains, veggies, fruit, nuts, cut out the hydrogenated fats–but cutting the calories? Especially for rapidly growing adolescents? (I raised four of them and had the usual horrendous grocery bill!) That’s horrible! All it does is encourage them to fill up on junk food!

    Instead of cutting the calories, add a daily PE session. The problem is not eating too much, it’s not moving enough!

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    JonathanH @ 47, why?

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    JonathanH @ 47, why?

  • Tom Hering

    Cheri T @ 44, I did a quick Google search for information on farmers versus the general population. While farmers have a lower incidence of some cancers, they have a higher incidence of others, and cardiac risk factors are the same for both farmers and non-farmers.

  • Tom Hering

    Cheri T @ 44, I did a quick Google search for information on farmers versus the general population. While farmers have a lower incidence of some cancers, they have a higher incidence of others, and cardiac risk factors are the same for both farmers and non-farmers.

  • larry

    People falsely worry about stats as if they will stave off death, they confuse a means of death with the cause of death. When its ones time to die your going to die whether you ate rabbit food all your life or steak…your hour is set, so is mine and we don’t know when. Nothing wrong with working hard and staying in shape I do it myself, but its an utter delusion to think if I’m group x as opposed to group y ill live a single minute longer. Americans are obsessed with food and not just the obese but diet addicts too. “Eat and drink and let God give you health ” supposedly Luther said, wise words. Just a few years ago the egg was the “death pill ” now gods say its ok to eat even healthy.

  • larry

    People falsely worry about stats as if they will stave off death, they confuse a means of death with the cause of death. When its ones time to die your going to die whether you ate rabbit food all your life or steak…your hour is set, so is mine and we don’t know when. Nothing wrong with working hard and staying in shape I do it myself, but its an utter delusion to think if I’m group x as opposed to group y ill live a single minute longer. Americans are obsessed with food and not just the obese but diet addicts too. “Eat and drink and let God give you health ” supposedly Luther said, wise words. Just a few years ago the egg was the “death pill ” now gods say its ok to eat even healthy.

  • Abby

    Jimmy @46 Hummus = Middle East

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hummus

  • Abby

    Jimmy @46 Hummus = Middle East

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hummus

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Right, Abby! It’s a pro-Muslim plot! No, guys, talk about missing the point. For the record, I like hummus too. The article I quoted was the one that said it was a “hard sell” for elementary kids. This is because young children experience flavors more intensely than adults. I remember hating spinach, like most little kids, and then enjoying it now that I’m old and my taste buds are not so sensitive. I remember how strong it tasted back then. Garlic, onions, and other spices–including those that make hummus so good– do not tend to be favorites among the primary set. I don’t deny, however, that children from the Middle East and the American northwest might not like them. But your complaint is with the article, not me.

    As for these not being true rebels, of course they are! It’s the government-lunch program, yes, and the schools are following mandatory government regulations. So their protests are against the government. Didn’t you see the kids–none of whom looked particularly obese– burning that copy of the law?

    It’s funny how liberals think they are rebels. The liberals control EVERYTHING. The only possible way of rebelling is if you are being conservative.

  • http://www.geneveith.com Gene Veith

    Right, Abby! It’s a pro-Muslim plot! No, guys, talk about missing the point. For the record, I like hummus too. The article I quoted was the one that said it was a “hard sell” for elementary kids. This is because young children experience flavors more intensely than adults. I remember hating spinach, like most little kids, and then enjoying it now that I’m old and my taste buds are not so sensitive. I remember how strong it tasted back then. Garlic, onions, and other spices–including those that make hummus so good– do not tend to be favorites among the primary set. I don’t deny, however, that children from the Middle East and the American northwest might not like them. But your complaint is with the article, not me.

    As for these not being true rebels, of course they are! It’s the government-lunch program, yes, and the schools are following mandatory government regulations. So their protests are against the government. Didn’t you see the kids–none of whom looked particularly obese– burning that copy of the law?

    It’s funny how liberals think they are rebels. The liberals control EVERYTHING. The only possible way of rebelling is if you are being conservative.

  • helen

    Two things:
    Farmers used to walk behind a plow, and use pitch forks and shovels a lot. Now days, everything is mechanized; that big tractor has an air conditioned cab, you can’t even sweat off weight. And it has a radio, a phone, and sometimes a TV inside.

    If weight is so bad, how is it that two friends one distinctly overweight and one a sparrow, are neck and neck in hospital and doctor visits for many of the same ailments, (primary one being anno domini)!

  • helen

    Two things:
    Farmers used to walk behind a plow, and use pitch forks and shovels a lot. Now days, everything is mechanized; that big tractor has an air conditioned cab, you can’t even sweat off weight. And it has a radio, a phone, and sometimes a TV inside.

    If weight is so bad, how is it that two friends one distinctly overweight and one a sparrow, are neck and neck in hospital and doctor visits for many of the same ailments, (primary one being anno domini)!

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Gene, I seriously doubt the kids are actually thinking that too much government is the problem. If the government started handing out itunes gift cards, they will turn into meek little things.

    No, this is about rebelling against an authority that doesn’t merely give them all the fast food decadence which they want.

    As toy your point about tasting – poor excuse. My children have been tasting all kinds of food since a young age, and loved them. It is called food cultural conditioning, where their food culture has all the depth of a puddle of mostly synthetic ketchup.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    Gene, I seriously doubt the kids are actually thinking that too much government is the problem. If the government started handing out itunes gift cards, they will turn into meek little things.

    No, this is about rebelling against an authority that doesn’t merely give them all the fast food decadence which they want.

    As toy your point about tasting – poor excuse. My children have been tasting all kinds of food since a young age, and loved them. It is called food cultural conditioning, where their food culture has all the depth of a puddle of mostly synthetic ketchup.

  • Abby

    Dr Veith @53: I may have miscommunicated something! My husband’s background is the Middle East — I thought that was where hummus originated but I wasn’t sure. However, maybe I did subliminally allude to a Muslim plot — now I don’t know myself! :)

  • Abby

    Dr Veith @53: I may have miscommunicated something! My husband’s background is the Middle East — I thought that was where hummus originated but I wasn’t sure. However, maybe I did subliminally allude to a Muslim plot — now I don’t know myself! :)

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    hele, as to weight, some individuals might show an aberration from the trend, and each have their own problems, but that does not invalidate the association of obesity with many health problems.

    Why do so many preachers never preach against gluttony? I know, it is because they cannot see their own damn toes!!

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    hele, as to weight, some individuals might show an aberration from the trend, and each have their own problems, but that does not invalidate the association of obesity with many health problems.

    Why do so many preachers never preach against gluttony? I know, it is because they cannot see their own damn toes!!

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Veith (@53), once again, my three-year-old eats hummus on an almost daily basis, and has done so for well over a year. By the time he gets to elementary school, he will consider it old hat.

    Trust me, it has little to nothing to do with children “experiencing flavors more intensely than adults”. As Klasie said (@55), it’s about what you’re exposed to — and, especially, what your parents eat, or let you eat. My son’s a very picky eater, honestly.

    But hummus is no weirder or more intense than peanut butter, which American children obviously love. Ah, but ask kids from certain parts of Europe what they think of peanut butter!

    But then, I suspect you’re being less serious about this than I am.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Veith (@53), once again, my three-year-old eats hummus on an almost daily basis, and has done so for well over a year. By the time he gets to elementary school, he will consider it old hat.

    Trust me, it has little to nothing to do with children “experiencing flavors more intensely than adults”. As Klasie said (@55), it’s about what you’re exposed to — and, especially, what your parents eat, or let you eat. My son’s a very picky eater, honestly.

    But hummus is no weirder or more intense than peanut butter, which American children obviously love. Ah, but ask kids from certain parts of Europe what they think of peanut butter!

    But then, I suspect you’re being less serious about this than I am.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To my big brother, “Dr. Veith”: It is true that young children experience flavors more intensely than adults. This explains why I ate your favorite comic books as a child. They were delicious. Now that I am an adult, I just don’t find them quite as satisfying.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To my big brother, “Dr. Veith”: It is true that young children experience flavors more intensely than adults. This explains why I ate your favorite comic books as a child. They were delicious. Now that I am an adult, I just don’t find them quite as satisfying.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    My wife is getting ready to teach our kids at home (I have 3 and 2 year old girls).

    That leaves the responsibility for food with us and not with nosy do-gooders who think they know best for everyone else.

    That means a steady diet of sandwiches, fruit, yogurt and dairy.

    IRT toddlers eating hummus; Is there a compelling reason to expose kids to exotic foods with strong flavors?

    If so fine. If not it appears like intentional idiosyncrasy in order to be hip or edgy.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    My wife is getting ready to teach our kids at home (I have 3 and 2 year old girls).

    That leaves the responsibility for food with us and not with nosy do-gooders who think they know best for everyone else.

    That means a steady diet of sandwiches, fruit, yogurt and dairy.

    IRT toddlers eating hummus; Is there a compelling reason to expose kids to exotic foods with strong flavors?

    If so fine. If not it appears like intentional idiosyncrasy in order to be hip or edgy.

  • Matt

    I read through all the comments, still smarting from the one which suggested milk as “kind of a little kid thing.” Maybe it’s being from the dairy state where people think nothing of wearing a replica of a giant piece of cheese on their heads. I probably go through a gallon every few days, but I was not amused. End lactose inspired rant :D.

  • Matt

    I read through all the comments, still smarting from the one which suggested milk as “kind of a little kid thing.” Maybe it’s being from the dairy state where people think nothing of wearing a replica of a giant piece of cheese on their heads. I probably go through a gallon every few days, but I was not amused. End lactose inspired rant :D.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I seriously doubt the kids are actually thinking that too much government is the problem. If the government started handing out itunes gift cards, they will turn into meek little things.

    No, this is about rebelling against an authority that doesn’t merely give them all the fast food decadence which they want.

    There it is in a nutshell.

    Big gov’t/authority takes from you: bad.

    Big gov’t/authority takes from others and gives to you: good.

    Seriously, this is very basic, even childlike simple.

    Responsible citizens want the government to provide for the general welfare, not individual welfare. The proper role of the community here is to provide the school and its lunch room, not the food. These are kids and under someone else’s authority. Parents have to make these choices, and yes, kids have to live with the results of their parents’ decisions.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    I seriously doubt the kids are actually thinking that too much government is the problem. If the government started handing out itunes gift cards, they will turn into meek little things.

    No, this is about rebelling against an authority that doesn’t merely give them all the fast food decadence which they want.

    There it is in a nutshell.

    Big gov’t/authority takes from you: bad.

    Big gov’t/authority takes from others and gives to you: good.

    Seriously, this is very basic, even childlike simple.

    Responsible citizens want the government to provide for the general welfare, not individual welfare. The proper role of the community here is to provide the school and its lunch room, not the food. These are kids and under someone else’s authority. Parents have to make these choices, and yes, kids have to live with the results of their parents’ decisions.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    Paige Lame, 17, is wrong. Flavored milk is multi-covariant with other dietary choices. There is no “smoking gun” in the childhood obesity epidemic.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com/ John

    Paige Lame, 17, is wrong. Flavored milk is multi-covariant with other dietary choices. There is no “smoking gun” in the childhood obesity epidemic.

  • Jen Lehmann

    I just wanted to chime in to say that my daughter loves hummus. I get so tired of the crap that people expect her to want to eat. We go out to eat, and restaurants want me to pay five bucks for a box of macaroni and cheese or a peanut butter sandwich. While we eat those at home, I resent the assumption that she’ll only eat that when we go out. I don’t have a problem with desserts in lunches. I also don’t have a problem with trying to aim for healthier school lunches. The problem is that a lot of what kids will be willing to eat has a lot more to do with what they eat at home than what they eat at school.

  • Jen Lehmann

    I just wanted to chime in to say that my daughter loves hummus. I get so tired of the crap that people expect her to want to eat. We go out to eat, and restaurants want me to pay five bucks for a box of macaroni and cheese or a peanut butter sandwich. While we eat those at home, I resent the assumption that she’ll only eat that when we go out. I don’t have a problem with desserts in lunches. I also don’t have a problem with trying to aim for healthier school lunches. The problem is that a lot of what kids will be willing to eat has a lot more to do with what they eat at home than what they eat at school.

  • Jen Lehmann

    Also, SAL, most hummus is not actually all that strong-flavored, and it’s a really good source of protein. It’s great for toddlers, actually, because many toddlers and school age kids love to dip. Hummus has more nutritional benefits than Ranch dressing.

  • Jen Lehmann

    Also, SAL, most hummus is not actually all that strong-flavored, and it’s a really good source of protein. It’s great for toddlers, actually, because many toddlers and school age kids love to dip. Hummus has more nutritional benefits than Ranch dressing.

  • Tom Hering

    It’s funny how liberals think they are rebels. The liberals control EVERYTHING. The only possible way of rebelling is if you are being conservative. (@ 53)

    It’s true that the tastes and values of the ’60s counter-culture have become mainstream, and the rebels of those years have become the cultural and political establishment. Or a good part of it. But it’s not as if conservatives ever stopped being the establishment, or rather, don’t continue to be a good part of it themselves.

    I think we have a situation, now, where two different cultures make up the mainstream and the establishment. So neither culture can really lay claim to the mantle of noble rebel.

    Yes, it’s been the conservative narrative – for half of a century now – that they’re a majority culture opressed by a minority culture. (The elites versus the people and all that.) But it’s been the counter-culture’s narrative – for the same amount of time – that they’re a minority culture opressed by a majority culture.

    Obviously, both cultures find identity in a narrative of opression and rebellion. But can either culture rightfully claim that narrative as a description of reality? Hasn’t it become just a useful fiction for both cultures at this point? Perhaps a necessary fiction, in that there’s no sense of identity without it? I mean, what’s an American, of any stripe, if not a proud descendant of revolutionaries? Ah well. Stories have more power than facts …

  • Tom Hering

    It’s funny how liberals think they are rebels. The liberals control EVERYTHING. The only possible way of rebelling is if you are being conservative. (@ 53)

    It’s true that the tastes and values of the ’60s counter-culture have become mainstream, and the rebels of those years have become the cultural and political establishment. Or a good part of it. But it’s not as if conservatives ever stopped being the establishment, or rather, don’t continue to be a good part of it themselves.

    I think we have a situation, now, where two different cultures make up the mainstream and the establishment. So neither culture can really lay claim to the mantle of noble rebel.

    Yes, it’s been the conservative narrative – for half of a century now – that they’re a majority culture opressed by a minority culture. (The elites versus the people and all that.) But it’s been the counter-culture’s narrative – for the same amount of time – that they’re a minority culture opressed by a majority culture.

    Obviously, both cultures find identity in a narrative of opression and rebellion. But can either culture rightfully claim that narrative as a description of reality? Hasn’t it become just a useful fiction for both cultures at this point? Perhaps a necessary fiction, in that there’s no sense of identity without it? I mean, what’s an American, of any stripe, if not a proud descendant of revolutionaries? Ah well. Stories have more power than facts …

  • Dan Kempin

    I’m just amazed at the quality of that recording. It was really well done and well sung. I couldn’t place the song that was being “covered,” though. Can anyone help with that?

    Oh, and, uh, I like hummous.

  • Dan Kempin

    I’m just amazed at the quality of that recording. It was really well done and well sung. I couldn’t place the song that was being “covered,” though. Can anyone help with that?

    Oh, and, uh, I like hummous.

  • Abby

    Dan @67: Song comes from: http://youtu.be/3lsB4Sp-T3Q

  • Abby

    Dan @67: Song comes from: http://youtu.be/3lsB4Sp-T3Q

  • Abby
  • Abby
  • Abby

    While the Mediterranean “Diet” is purported to be the most healthy in the world — there is obesity in the Middle East too. And there is not a Middle East function without the presence of Hummus.

    Is anyone aware of what Michael Phelps used to eat for breakfast while in training? http://www.michaelphelps.net/michael-phelps-diet/

  • Abby

    While the Mediterranean “Diet” is purported to be the most healthy in the world — there is obesity in the Middle East too. And there is not a Middle East function without the presence of Hummus.

    Is anyone aware of what Michael Phelps used to eat for breakfast while in training? http://www.michaelphelps.net/michael-phelps-diet/

  • Abby

    “Professionals add that Michael Phelps diet consists of the calories he needs for energy to give his muscles fuel and to recover and repair the muscles. He has around eight percent fat in his body, and if he does not consume enough carbohydrates during a competition, Phelps could reach the stage when the body is out of carbohydrate fuel or muscle glycogen and it needs to begin to burn fat. It is more difficult for the body to burn fat than to use available carbohydrates, and if the body has to do this it puts more stress on the body than just using available carbohydrate energy.”

    All about exercise.

  • Abby

    “Professionals add that Michael Phelps diet consists of the calories he needs for energy to give his muscles fuel and to recover and repair the muscles. He has around eight percent fat in his body, and if he does not consume enough carbohydrates during a competition, Phelps could reach the stage when the body is out of carbohydrate fuel or muscle glycogen and it needs to begin to burn fat. It is more difficult for the body to burn fat than to use available carbohydrates, and if the body has to do this it puts more stress on the body than just using available carbohydrate energy.”

    All about exercise.

  • helen

    My Canadian friend:
    A preacher in southern Minnesota once equated overeating to drunkeness, with elaboration… sermons were longer in my youth. (45 minutes was no surprise) But the sermon on “gluttony” (your term) was the most widely talked about in the county.
    It was in the 40′s, after a decade when “skinny” children often meant that the family didn’t have enough food to put on the table. A little “chubbiness” implied the head of the household had a job.

    Overweight is best combatted by choosing parents with the right genes. Efficient metabolism accounts for at least 40% of it. When our “Nanny-state” is carried to the Nth, heavy women will be sterilized on the grounds that their children have a 75% chance of being heavy themselves.

    It would help, too, if all children had exercise programs at school and not just the first string of the sports teams!

  • helen

    My Canadian friend:
    A preacher in southern Minnesota once equated overeating to drunkeness, with elaboration… sermons were longer in my youth. (45 minutes was no surprise) But the sermon on “gluttony” (your term) was the most widely talked about in the county.
    It was in the 40′s, after a decade when “skinny” children often meant that the family didn’t have enough food to put on the table. A little “chubbiness” implied the head of the household had a job.

    Overweight is best combatted by choosing parents with the right genes. Efficient metabolism accounts for at least 40% of it. When our “Nanny-state” is carried to the Nth, heavy women will be sterilized on the grounds that their children have a 75% chance of being heavy themselves.

    It would help, too, if all children had exercise programs at school and not just the first string of the sports teams!

  • helen

    Matt @ 61
    I usually buy 2 gallons of milk a week and drink them/use them on my oatmeal.
    (I do not buy soft drinks for the house; I have them occasionally when I go out, for lack of other choices in the collegiate FF places I patronize.) :)

  • helen

    Matt @ 61
    I usually buy 2 gallons of milk a week and drink them/use them on my oatmeal.
    (I do not buy soft drinks for the house; I have them occasionally when I go out, for lack of other choices in the collegiate FF places I patronize.) :)

  • Abby

    It seems somewhat common to cut “gym class” when the budget needs to be “adjusted.” When I grew up it was required. Where is all the “casino/lottery” money going for education?

  • Abby

    It seems somewhat common to cut “gym class” when the budget needs to be “adjusted.” When I grew up it was required. Where is all the “casino/lottery” money going for education?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    SAL (@60), based on the age of your children, I’m going to guess you’re my age or younger, so I can’t attribute the difference to age. Still, I had to laugh when I read this:

    Is there a compelling reason to expose kids to exotic foods with strong flavors? If so fine. If not it appears like intentional idiosyncrasy in order to be hip or edgy.

    Honestly, have you had hummus? It’s a bean dip. I guess it’s “exotic” in some sense, but in the same way that an Italian pasta is exotic. Which is to say: not terribly exotic these days.

    I’m going to guess this is a function of where we live. I live in a major(ish) coastal city, and you … I don’t know, probably don’t?

    But yes, there is a “compelling reason” to “expose” my kids to this food. Namely, it’s tasty. And, what’s more, my son will eat it, and it’s good for him. Remarkably compelling, that.

    But it sounds like you aren’t terribly adventurous in your eating habits. Which is, I’d suggest, why you feel the need to toss out pejorative terms like “hip or edgy” to describe people who eat a wider variety of foods than you do.

    I don’t know how you think about food, but for me, food is still about the flavors of the things I’m eating. Even if I wanted to be, ahem, hip or edgy, that wouldn’t make it possible for me to eat things I didn’t like.

    But seriously, it’s a big world out there, and they’re making some tasty stuff. Not because they’re trying to be cool, but because they actually like it. Perhaps they know something you don’t?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    SAL (@60), based on the age of your children, I’m going to guess you’re my age or younger, so I can’t attribute the difference to age. Still, I had to laugh when I read this:

    Is there a compelling reason to expose kids to exotic foods with strong flavors? If so fine. If not it appears like intentional idiosyncrasy in order to be hip or edgy.

    Honestly, have you had hummus? It’s a bean dip. I guess it’s “exotic” in some sense, but in the same way that an Italian pasta is exotic. Which is to say: not terribly exotic these days.

    I’m going to guess this is a function of where we live. I live in a major(ish) coastal city, and you … I don’t know, probably don’t?

    But yes, there is a “compelling reason” to “expose” my kids to this food. Namely, it’s tasty. And, what’s more, my son will eat it, and it’s good for him. Remarkably compelling, that.

    But it sounds like you aren’t terribly adventurous in your eating habits. Which is, I’d suggest, why you feel the need to toss out pejorative terms like “hip or edgy” to describe people who eat a wider variety of foods than you do.

    I don’t know how you think about food, but for me, food is still about the flavors of the things I’m eating. Even if I wanted to be, ahem, hip or edgy, that wouldn’t make it possible for me to eat things I didn’t like.

    But seriously, it’s a big world out there, and they’re making some tasty stuff. Not because they’re trying to be cool, but because they actually like it. Perhaps they know something you don’t?

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Abby said (@70):

    While the Mediterranean “Diet” is purported to be the most healthy in the world — there is obesity in the Middle East too.

    Kind of a non-sequitur there. There’s obesity lots of places these days. Usually wherever Western fast/junk foods have been introduced, and where a Western-style activity level has crept in. I’d be willing to bet that the obese people in the Middle East aren’t strictly on a traditional diet.

    But then, given that much of the Middle East isn’t actually on the Mediterranean, I’m not sure how much the cuisine of the whole region is considered to be part of that “diet”. Or who is actually doing the purporting you suggested, for that matter.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Abby said (@70):

    While the Mediterranean “Diet” is purported to be the most healthy in the world — there is obesity in the Middle East too.

    Kind of a non-sequitur there. There’s obesity lots of places these days. Usually wherever Western fast/junk foods have been introduced, and where a Western-style activity level has crept in. I’d be willing to bet that the obese people in the Middle East aren’t strictly on a traditional diet.

    But then, given that much of the Middle East isn’t actually on the Mediterranean, I’m not sure how much the cuisine of the whole region is considered to be part of that “diet”. Or who is actually doing the purporting you suggested, for that matter.

  • Abby

    Todd @76: “Or who is actually doing the purporting you suggested, for that matter.”

    Mediterranean diet for health: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mediterranean-diet/CL00011

  • Abby

    Todd @76: “Or who is actually doing the purporting you suggested, for that matter.”

    Mediterranean diet for health: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mediterranean-diet/CL00011

  • Abby

    Todd @76: The Syrian/Lebanese recipes that I am familiar with fit the Mediterranean diet..

  • Abby

    Todd @76: The Syrian/Lebanese recipes that I am familiar with fit the Mediterranean diet..

  • Abby

    This food is still extremely important at my husband’s Eastern Orthodox church — they use it as an evangelism tool! — I’m not kidding!

  • Abby

    This food is still extremely important at my husband’s Eastern Orthodox church — they use it as an evangelism tool! — I’m not kidding!

  • larry

    Sermons on gluttoney first I would hope such waste of time sermons would stay in the Baptist realm. Second gluttoney means far more than than those with bellies hanging over their belts. In fact the very exercise and diet obsessed who look like Swartznegger use to and the picky eaters are gluttons. Its like the dry drunk versus the wet drunk. The obsession with food either way is gluttoney. Non gluttons really don’t care at all they just eat and give thanks.

  • larry

    Sermons on gluttoney first I would hope such waste of time sermons would stay in the Baptist realm. Second gluttoney means far more than than those with bellies hanging over their belts. In fact the very exercise and diet obsessed who look like Swartznegger use to and the picky eaters are gluttons. Its like the dry drunk versus the wet drunk. The obsession with food either way is gluttoney. Non gluttons really don’t care at all they just eat and give thanks.

  • helen

    I eat fish several times a week, sardines or salmon when I’m at home.
    Someone shopped for me for a few weeks when I couldn’t drive and
    I was surprised to find that sardines (packed in olive oil) were a
    totally new idea to her.
    I don’t keep corn oil, but when a recipe called
    for it, I found that coconut oil worked very well. :)
    I eat hummus when someone serves it; it isn’t on my regular list.

    I think “chichi” is arugula… which looks like dandelion greens
    to me, and tastes about the same, too. ;)

  • helen

    I eat fish several times a week, sardines or salmon when I’m at home.
    Someone shopped for me for a few weeks when I couldn’t drive and
    I was surprised to find that sardines (packed in olive oil) were a
    totally new idea to her.
    I don’t keep corn oil, but when a recipe called
    for it, I found that coconut oil worked very well. :)
    I eat hummus when someone serves it; it isn’t on my regular list.

    I think “chichi” is arugula… which looks like dandelion greens
    to me, and tastes about the same, too. ;)

  • larry

    “Casino lottery money ” I think most normal folks knew that was bullshit when it came up for legislation, kind of like “hey where did all the social security money go”, damn near the oldest joke based in truth in the book.

    Helen you are one of the few I know that even know what greens are also. Although you must be around those big rich corporate farms in the middle of the country. I don’t know any farmer including our family and friends that owned such equipment. We didn’t load up an old mule like my granddad did but at best we had an oooold tractor you had to coax into running with starter. The rest of the work was elbows and rear ends.

  • larry

    “Casino lottery money ” I think most normal folks knew that was bullshit when it came up for legislation, kind of like “hey where did all the social security money go”, damn near the oldest joke based in truth in the book.

    Helen you are one of the few I know that even know what greens are also. Although you must be around those big rich corporate farms in the middle of the country. I don’t know any farmer including our family and friends that owned such equipment. We didn’t load up an old mule like my granddad did but at best we had an oooold tractor you had to coax into running with starter. The rest of the work was elbows and rear ends.

  • Abby

    For Pastor Bill Cwirla and Pastor Craig Donofrio: hummus with bacon bits!

  • Abby

    For Pastor Bill Cwirla and Pastor Craig Donofrio: hummus with bacon bits!

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @72

    That about sums up the whole lot of it!

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @72

    That about sums up the whole lot of it!

  • Michael B.

    @Helen@72

    “Overweight is best combatted by choosing parents with the right genes.”

    Really? Because our collective genotype must be changing rather quickly. In the USA from 1980 to 2008, the prevalence of obesity in children aged 6 to 11 years tripled from 6.5% to 19.6%. The prevalence of obesity in teenagers more than tripled from 5% to 18.1% in the same time frame. What happened to all these “skinny genes” in the last 3 decades?

  • Michael B.

    @Helen@72

    “Overweight is best combatted by choosing parents with the right genes.”

    Really? Because our collective genotype must be changing rather quickly. In the USA from 1980 to 2008, the prevalence of obesity in children aged 6 to 11 years tripled from 6.5% to 19.6%. The prevalence of obesity in teenagers more than tripled from 5% to 18.1% in the same time frame. What happened to all these “skinny genes” in the last 3 decades?

  • helen

    larry @ 82
    My cousin bought a tractor as described (they aren’t all HUGE) for his son, to farm 160 acres.
    [I heard about it last time I was home in Minnesota, which was about 20 years ago.]
    You have to do a great deal to “keep them down on the farm” , I understand!
    The notion of discarding the acres your family has owned for three 0r four generations grieves me no end
    but I guess the younger ones don’t see it that way. (Mostly the land stays with neighbors, but strangers buy the house and an acre or two. The barns are demolished.)

    I met a man who owns the kind of machinery you are thinking of, which is too big even for 1000 acres+. He puts in a crop in Texas and harvests in June. Then he takes his several behemoth combines, trucks to collect harvested grain, two house trailers (one the cookhouse and family quarters, one quarters for the men) and other equipment (parts and repair) and starts north. He can harvest grain, beans or corn from here to Canada and from June to November on other people’s mega- farms. Quite a life with the weather and all!

  • helen

    larry @ 82
    My cousin bought a tractor as described (they aren’t all HUGE) for his son, to farm 160 acres.
    [I heard about it last time I was home in Minnesota, which was about 20 years ago.]
    You have to do a great deal to “keep them down on the farm” , I understand!
    The notion of discarding the acres your family has owned for three 0r four generations grieves me no end
    but I guess the younger ones don’t see it that way. (Mostly the land stays with neighbors, but strangers buy the house and an acre or two. The barns are demolished.)

    I met a man who owns the kind of machinery you are thinking of, which is too big even for 1000 acres+. He puts in a crop in Texas and harvests in June. Then he takes his several behemoth combines, trucks to collect harvested grain, two house trailers (one the cookhouse and family quarters, one quarters for the men) and other equipment (parts and repair) and starts north. He can harvest grain, beans or corn from here to Canada and from June to November on other people’s mega- farms. Quite a life with the weather and all!

  • helen

    Michael B @ 85
    I did mention the decline in exercise (formerly known as hard physical work) and also said “40%” of the tendency to overweight, i.e., according to several medical reports I’ve researched (I did a paper on it.) four of those 10 exess pounds you carry, (or 4o in a 100, if you please), can be blamed on “yo mama”. The other six, (or sixty) are your own doing.

    In the last several decades, TV has become the primary entertainment, office work has multiplied and physical jobs have declined. Also, kids “for reasons of safety” (!) are not even allowed to play tag at recess… if they get recess! More often they are confined to a desk or series of desks all day (as are their parents). They are bussed because it’s too far or too unsafe to walk home from school. Gym is the first thing to go when budgets are cut.

    Then I have some more fanciful theories, which no one ever will research.
    In brief, our “obesity epidemic” dates back about four decades…. to 1973, maybe?

    Also, in that time, Moms have been “liberated” to the tyranny of a paid job plus keeping a home, ( with/without spouse) and children spend 12 hours a day “in custody”, which even as adjunct to a very good day school was largely spent in front of a TV (though they probably had more time on the playground than some places.).

    My kids (I was a 50′s housewife) could be outdoors from school’s out to supper time anywhere within shouting distance in suburbia. [Many urban kids aren't safe in their homes, let alone the streets in front of them.] No adjustment to school lunches is going to solve that problem. [And if they are limited to 750 calories, the older ones will be buying anything they can get their hands on as soon as they are let out of school.]

  • helen

    Michael B @ 85
    I did mention the decline in exercise (formerly known as hard physical work) and also said “40%” of the tendency to overweight, i.e., according to several medical reports I’ve researched (I did a paper on it.) four of those 10 exess pounds you carry, (or 4o in a 100, if you please), can be blamed on “yo mama”. The other six, (or sixty) are your own doing.

    In the last several decades, TV has become the primary entertainment, office work has multiplied and physical jobs have declined. Also, kids “for reasons of safety” (!) are not even allowed to play tag at recess… if they get recess! More often they are confined to a desk or series of desks all day (as are their parents). They are bussed because it’s too far or too unsafe to walk home from school. Gym is the first thing to go when budgets are cut.

    Then I have some more fanciful theories, which no one ever will research.
    In brief, our “obesity epidemic” dates back about four decades…. to 1973, maybe?

    Also, in that time, Moms have been “liberated” to the tyranny of a paid job plus keeping a home, ( with/without spouse) and children spend 12 hours a day “in custody”, which even as adjunct to a very good day school was largely spent in front of a TV (though they probably had more time on the playground than some places.).

    My kids (I was a 50′s housewife) could be outdoors from school’s out to supper time anywhere within shouting distance in suburbia. [Many urban kids aren't safe in their homes, let alone the streets in front of them.] No adjustment to school lunches is going to solve that problem. [And if they are limited to 750 calories, the older ones will be buying anything they can get their hands on as soon as they are let out of school.]

  • helen

    excess [And I didn't mean to bold that whole paragraph.. oh well] :(

  • helen

    excess [And I didn't mean to bold that whole paragraph.. oh well] :(

  • Michael B.

    @Helen@87

    “Then I have some more fanciful theories, which no one ever will research. In brief, our “obesity epidemic” dates back about four decades…. to 1973, maybe?”

    You have to tell us how that connection works.

  • Michael B.

    @Helen@87

    “Then I have some more fanciful theories, which no one ever will research. In brief, our “obesity epidemic” dates back about four decades…. to 1973, maybe?”

    You have to tell us how that connection works.

  • helen

    I can only offer a small and unsatisfactory sample:
    There were 10 girls in my high school class (prior to 1973).
    Three or four of them married in June following graduation,
    and were mothers before Christmas… time varied.
    They were not the overweight wall flowers in the class.

    Suppose the same thing had occurred post roe vs wade,
    but these girls had “places to go and things to do”.

    Someone has already pointed out to me that I am assuming a disproportionate number of abortions are secured by thin girls. No, I am assuming that thin girls, (in my limited experience) have more opportunity to need one, and wondering…. [Looking at the girls who are "shacking up" decades later, nothing seems to have changed much.]
    To verify this admittedly off the wall theory, there would have to be records assembled of the pre-pregnancy birth weights of those who abort, compared to those who keep their babies. I don’t think anyone wants to know this.
    It’s more interesting to fiddle with school lunches and call overweight people rude names.

    But as you say, “our collective genotype must be changing rather quickly”. Does nobody else wonder why? Meanwhile, I did mention exercise and the increasingly sedentary life style. Callouses on the thumbs from texting aren’t going to equate to weight loss.

  • helen

    I can only offer a small and unsatisfactory sample:
    There were 10 girls in my high school class (prior to 1973).
    Three or four of them married in June following graduation,
    and were mothers before Christmas… time varied.
    They were not the overweight wall flowers in the class.

    Suppose the same thing had occurred post roe vs wade,
    but these girls had “places to go and things to do”.

    Someone has already pointed out to me that I am assuming a disproportionate number of abortions are secured by thin girls. No, I am assuming that thin girls, (in my limited experience) have more opportunity to need one, and wondering…. [Looking at the girls who are "shacking up" decades later, nothing seems to have changed much.]
    To verify this admittedly off the wall theory, there would have to be records assembled of the pre-pregnancy birth weights of those who abort, compared to those who keep their babies. I don’t think anyone wants to know this.
    It’s more interesting to fiddle with school lunches and call overweight people rude names.

    But as you say, “our collective genotype must be changing rather quickly”. Does nobody else wonder why? Meanwhile, I did mention exercise and the increasingly sedentary life style. Callouses on the thumbs from texting aren’t going to equate to weight loss.

  • helen

    Yes, I know this assumes that heavy girls are more likely to keep their babies when they have them.

    This is not a scientific study!

  • helen

    Yes, I know this assumes that heavy girls are more likely to keep their babies when they have them.

    This is not a scientific study!

  • larry

    I guess we’ve exhausted this episode of the humus belly sneeches Vs. the bacon and egg belly sneeches.

  • larry

    I guess we’ve exhausted this episode of the humus belly sneeches Vs. the bacon and egg belly sneeches.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #75, Hmm.

    If it appeals to the toddler palate and is nutritious I may try it. They sell it at Aldi’s for $1.50 so it’s fairly cheap if it turns out to be any good.

    I’m not a big food person so I’ve not eaten anything more exotic than Mexican or Chinese food.

  • http://steadfastlutherans.org/ SAL

    #75, Hmm.

    If it appeals to the toddler palate and is nutritious I may try it. They sell it at Aldi’s for $1.50 so it’s fairly cheap if it turns out to be any good.

    I’m not a big food person so I’ve not eaten anything more exotic than Mexican or Chinese food.

  • helen

    Larry @ 92
    I guess we’ve exhausted this episode of the humus belly sneeches Vs. the bacon and egg belly sneeches.

    LOL! Thanks, Larry! Good place to drop that one.

    BTW, one of our LWML ladies served hummus and another Middle Eastern dish at a meeting.
    Not the usual fare, but a welcome change. :)

  • helen

    Larry @ 92
    I guess we’ve exhausted this episode of the humus belly sneeches Vs. the bacon and egg belly sneeches.

    LOL! Thanks, Larry! Good place to drop that one.

    BTW, one of our LWML ladies served hummus and another Middle Eastern dish at a meeting.
    Not the usual fare, but a welcome change. :)

  • http://acroamaticus.blogspot.com Pr Mark Henderson

    Re post title: Do conservatives revolt?

  • http://acroamaticus.blogspot.com Pr Mark Henderson

    Re post title: Do conservatives revolt?

  • Abby

    @95 They feebly try :)

  • Abby

    @95 They feebly try :)

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “What happened to all these “skinny genes” in the last 3 decades?”

    Birth control.

    Heavier women have more children.

    http://mrhoyestokwebsite.com/AOKs/Natural%20Science/Related%20Articles/Female%20Evolution.pdf

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “What happened to all these “skinny genes” in the last 3 decades?”

    Birth control.

    Heavier women have more children.

    http://mrhoyestokwebsite.com/AOKs/Natural%20Science/Related%20Articles/Female%20Evolution.pdf

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “What happened to all these “skinny genes” in the last 3 decades?”

    and immigration.

    We have imported lots of people not adapted to our diet.

    Check this out:

    http://the10000yearexplosion.com/

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “What happened to all these “skinny genes” in the last 3 decades?”

    and immigration.

    We have imported lots of people not adapted to our diet.

    Check this out:

    http://the10000yearexplosion.com/

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “Re post title: Do conservatives revolt?”

    Good question. Conservatives stick to time tested (akin to scientific method) successful strategies and behaviors to survive. Those who love novelty, chase after it and are occasionally wildly successful, but far more often die out. So, as Kruschev might say, conservatives bury them. That doesn’t mean destroy them. They destroy themselves. So, no need to revolt per se, because those who sow destruction will also hang themselves. The truth is conservatives are the liberals in this country, and the so-called liberals are innovators of many destructive and oppressive strategies.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “Re post title: Do conservatives revolt?”

    Good question. Conservatives stick to time tested (akin to scientific method) successful strategies and behaviors to survive. Those who love novelty, chase after it and are occasionally wildly successful, but far more often die out. So, as Kruschev might say, conservatives bury them. That doesn’t mean destroy them. They destroy themselves. So, no need to revolt per se, because those who sow destruction will also hang themselves. The truth is conservatives are the liberals in this country, and the so-called liberals are innovators of many destructive and oppressive strategies.

  • Cheri T

    Tom Hering @50 – I was not implying that farmers are healthier. The point I was making is that we ate very ‘unhealthy’ by today’s standards, yet we did not have an obesity problem in our family. The fat, carbs and everything else got worked off by hard manual labor. Granted, farmers today have much more mechanization, but again, that is not the point. The point is, people need to exercise. We used to get natural exercise just because most everything required manual labor, and having only 3 TV channels and no video games, as a kid I spent more time outside running and playing than I did inside sitting around. (and we had 3 recesses a day in lower elementary grades, which was cut back to 1 in the upper elementary grades, and also PE).

    I also have to wonder about the quality of food today, vs ‘back then’. The majority of our meat came from our farm, our potatoes and vegetables were grown in our own garden (I didn’t eat a canned pea until I was in kindergarten. What a letdown that taste was!), and even much of our snack foods were home-made. Sure I had a few chips now and then, but we just didn’t have the money for all that crap, either.

  • Cheri T

    Tom Hering @50 – I was not implying that farmers are healthier. The point I was making is that we ate very ‘unhealthy’ by today’s standards, yet we did not have an obesity problem in our family. The fat, carbs and everything else got worked off by hard manual labor. Granted, farmers today have much more mechanization, but again, that is not the point. The point is, people need to exercise. We used to get natural exercise just because most everything required manual labor, and having only 3 TV channels and no video games, as a kid I spent more time outside running and playing than I did inside sitting around. (and we had 3 recesses a day in lower elementary grades, which was cut back to 1 in the upper elementary grades, and also PE).

    I also have to wonder about the quality of food today, vs ‘back then’. The majority of our meat came from our farm, our potatoes and vegetables were grown in our own garden (I didn’t eat a canned pea until I was in kindergarten. What a letdown that taste was!), and even much of our snack foods were home-made. Sure I had a few chips now and then, but we just didn’t have the money for all that crap, either.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    I am surprised and somewhat disappointed that nobody jumped on Jimmy Veith’s “Indian taco” comment. For the uninitiated, an Indian Taco is a white bread pita deep fried in lard, filled predominantly with meat. It dates back to when Uncle Sam fed native americans with a barrel of lard, a sack of flour, and whatever beef could be easily sent to the reservation. It has a lot to do with why diabetes and heart disease take such a toll on native americans, and is not exactly what Mrs. Obama would promote, I’d at least hope.

    Also, regarding SAL’s question about the wisdom of exposing kids to exotic food with strong flavors got me thinking about missions. Having done a touch of traveling, I can vouch for the fact that if you want to win the hearts of people across the world, eating their kind of food in the way they eat it is a powerful tool.

    So bring on the hummus, fry bread, chitterlings, fugu, and birds’ nest soup. I’ll even eat lutefisk to get someone to Christ!

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com bike bubba

    I am surprised and somewhat disappointed that nobody jumped on Jimmy Veith’s “Indian taco” comment. For the uninitiated, an Indian Taco is a white bread pita deep fried in lard, filled predominantly with meat. It dates back to when Uncle Sam fed native americans with a barrel of lard, a sack of flour, and whatever beef could be easily sent to the reservation. It has a lot to do with why diabetes and heart disease take such a toll on native americans, and is not exactly what Mrs. Obama would promote, I’d at least hope.

    Also, regarding SAL’s question about the wisdom of exposing kids to exotic food with strong flavors got me thinking about missions. Having done a touch of traveling, I can vouch for the fact that if you want to win the hearts of people across the world, eating their kind of food in the way they eat it is a powerful tool.

    So bring on the hummus, fry bread, chitterlings, fugu, and birds’ nest soup. I’ll even eat lutefisk to get someone to Christ!

  • Mary Jack

    I thought Jimmy Veith’s Indian taco comment was hilarious! And just about all Gene Veith’s grandkids eat hummus, though it’s funny so many felt the need to jump to protect its honor.

  • Mary Jack

    I thought Jimmy Veith’s Indian taco comment was hilarious! And just about all Gene Veith’s grandkids eat hummus, though it’s funny so many felt the need to jump to protect its honor.


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