Jolly old St. Nicholas

The real Santa Claus, thought to have been a participant at the Council of Nicaea and to have slugged Arius for his heretical Christology:

HT:  Mary Moerbe

 

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • SKPeterson
  • SKPeterson
  • SKPeterson
  • SKPeterson
  • Tom Hering

    Unable to put a stop by argument to the senseless blasphemy of Arius against the Son of God and His most pure Mother, St. Nicholas struck Arius in the face. The holy fathers at the Council strongly disapproved of such behavior, and they banned Nicholas from the Council and stripped him of all marks of his episcopal rank. That very night, several of the fathers had the selfsame vision: how the Lord stood on one side of Nicholas with the Gospels and the Mother of God on the other with a pallium, offering to the saint those marks of rank that had been stripped from him. Seeing this, the fathers were amazed, and quickly returned to Nicholas that which they had taken from him. They began from that time to respect him as a great man, and to interpret his action against Arius not as some senseless rage but as the expression of great zeal for God’s truth.

    From Coptic Orthodox Church Network

  • Tom Hering

    Unable to put a stop by argument to the senseless blasphemy of Arius against the Son of God and His most pure Mother, St. Nicholas struck Arius in the face. The holy fathers at the Council strongly disapproved of such behavior, and they banned Nicholas from the Council and stripped him of all marks of his episcopal rank. That very night, several of the fathers had the selfsame vision: how the Lord stood on one side of Nicholas with the Gospels and the Mother of God on the other with a pallium, offering to the saint those marks of rank that had been stripped from him. Seeing this, the fathers were amazed, and quickly returned to Nicholas that which they had taken from him. They began from that time to respect him as a great man, and to interpret his action against Arius not as some senseless rage but as the expression of great zeal for God’s truth.

    From Coptic Orthodox Church Network

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com John

    “A bishop then, must be blameless…no striker (unless it is a blasphemous heretic)” – prior to the Great Redaction, the original text included a clause for Smiting The Foe.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com John

    “A bishop then, must be blameless…no striker (unless it is a blasphemous heretic)” – prior to the Great Redaction, the original text included a clause for Smiting The Foe.

  • Rose

    John, What is the Great Redaction–can you provide a link?

  • Rose

    John, What is the Great Redaction–can you provide a link?

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com John

    Sorry Rose. Sometimes my sarcasm gets lost in cyberspace.

  • http://www.redeemedrambling.blogspot.com John

    Sorry Rose. Sometimes my sarcasm gets lost in cyberspace.

  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall
  • http://facebook.com/mesamike Mike Westfall
  • Carl Vehse

    I agree with this guy’s conclusion about the legend/fairy tale of the Nicolas-Arius donnybrook. In fact from the evidence (or lack of it) it is doubtful that Nicolas was even at the Council of Nicaea meeting.

    “Supposedly, Bishop Nicholas of Myra was so incensed when he heard Arius tearing down the divinity of Christ that he went up to the heretic and slapped him in the face. Some accounts have jolly old St. Nicholas slugging Arius with his fist!

    “The Emperor Constantine (who sympathized with the Arians) was present and demanded that Nicholas be thrown into prison. His fellow bishops, shocked at the impropriety, voted to strip him of his office and removed his bishop’s stole.

    “That night, according to the legend, as Nicholas was languishing in his cell, he had a vision of Jesus and Mary. The Lord asked him, ‘Why are you here?’ Nicholas replied, ‘Because I love you.’ Jesus gave him a golden book of the Gospels, and Mary gave him a new bishop’s stole. The next day, the other bishops woke up with a conviction that they should restore Nicholas, which they did.

    “So, did any of this actually happen? Probably not. The contemporary accounts of the council do not mention any such incident… Some early accounts say that Nicholas of Myra was present. A list of attendees, though, does not include him. (That is to say, of the eleven surviving copies, only three do, but those might be later additions.)” Dr. Gene Edward Veith, Lutheran Witness, Vol. 130, #12, December, 2011

  • Carl Vehse

    I agree with this guy’s conclusion about the legend/fairy tale of the Nicolas-Arius donnybrook. In fact from the evidence (or lack of it) it is doubtful that Nicolas was even at the Council of Nicaea meeting.

    “Supposedly, Bishop Nicholas of Myra was so incensed when he heard Arius tearing down the divinity of Christ that he went up to the heretic and slapped him in the face. Some accounts have jolly old St. Nicholas slugging Arius with his fist!

    “The Emperor Constantine (who sympathized with the Arians) was present and demanded that Nicholas be thrown into prison. His fellow bishops, shocked at the impropriety, voted to strip him of his office and removed his bishop’s stole.

    “That night, according to the legend, as Nicholas was languishing in his cell, he had a vision of Jesus and Mary. The Lord asked him, ‘Why are you here?’ Nicholas replied, ‘Because I love you.’ Jesus gave him a golden book of the Gospels, and Mary gave him a new bishop’s stole. The next day, the other bishops woke up with a conviction that they should restore Nicholas, which they did.

    “So, did any of this actually happen? Probably not. The contemporary accounts of the council do not mention any such incident… Some early accounts say that Nicholas of Myra was present. A list of attendees, though, does not include him. (That is to say, of the eleven surviving copies, only three do, but those might be later additions.)” Dr. Gene Edward Veith, Lutheran Witness, Vol. 130, #12, December, 2011

  • PinonCoffee

    We tell that story at our house under the “legendary but awesome” category.

  • PinonCoffee

    We tell that story at our house under the “legendary but awesome” category.

  • Abby
  • Abby

CLOSE | X

HIDE | X