What tolerance entails

Mollie Hemingway has a piece in the Wall Street Journal about the difficulty of giving away a $20 million piece of property due to a New England town’s hatred of evangelicals:

Unable to maintain its 217-acre campus and 43 buildings, the board of Northfield Mount Hermon [a prep school founded by evangelist Dwight L. Moody but since turned secular] tried to sell the campus for $20 million in 2005. With no takers and prohibitive annual upkeep costs, the school sold the property to the Green family of Oklahoma City, owners of the Hobby Lobby craft stores, for $100,000.

The Greens planned to give the property to the C.S. Lewis Foundation to launch a college with a Great Books curriculum. But the foundation’s fundraising fell short by the end of 2011 and the Greens began soliciting new proposals. The family does insist that whoever ultimately takes over the school promote Christianity in “the tradition of Moody.” That has people in Northfield worried about how well the new neighbors will fit in culturally.

More than 100 interested Christian groups toured the campus this year. When word got out that the contenders included Liberty University, founded by the fundamentalist Rev. Jerry Falwell, some school alumni launched a petition drive arguing that Liberty was a “homophobic and intellectually narrow institution” that would be “fundamentally incompatible” with the prep school’s principles. Some residents of Northfield, home to 128 alumni and 60 employees of the school, held meetings to fight the transfer of the property to Liberty.

After Liberty was ruled out by the Green family, residents continued to worry. In April, at a meeting of the Northfield Campus Collaborative—established by the Northfield Board of Selectmen to improve communication between interested parties—resident Bruce Kahn “brought up the ‘elephant in the room’ which was the concern that an extremist Christian campus might polarize and upset the peace and tranquility of the town,” according to meeting minutes. Resident Ted Thornton said it is a paradox that “we consider ourselves tolerant but we won’t tolerate intolerance.” . . .

By June, Mr. Pattengale narrowed down the finalists to Grand Canyon University and the domestic missions agency of the Southern Baptist Convention. Residents expressed concern about both Southern Baptist doctrines and the impact of the 5,000 students that Grand Canyon proposed to bring to Northfield.

In September, the Green family named Grand Canyon as the recipient of the campus. But five weeks later Grand Canyon walked away from the gift, citing millions in unanticipated infrastructure, environmental and other costs. Mr. Pattengale has said there is another candidate with the means to operate the campus, but “it’s hard to get excited” because the mystery school is as big and conservative as Liberty University.

At another public meeting earlier this year—one that included questions about the contenders’ views on creation and same-sex marriage—a Northfield resident argued that “the religious tradition of the area welcomes people of many faiths, belief or nonbelief. There is potential conflict with those who follow more restrictive teachings.”

Tolerance has to do precisely with how you treat people you disagree with and people you don’t like.  If someone has no problem with a particular group, that person is not practicing tolerance, since tolerance is not necessary.  It isn’t that liberals are tolerant and conservatives are not.  Someone from either side can practice the virtue of tolerance or the vice of intolerance.  The good people of Northfield may have valid reasons for not wanting a college in their community, but they shouldn’t at the same time pat themselves on their own backs about how tolerant they are.  Evidently, they are not tolerant of creationists or those who don’t believe in same sex marriage.  They certainly do not welcome “people of many faiths, belief, or nonbelief,”  when they seek to keep out adherents of a particular religion.  (Well, “many” is not “all,” but not many religions other than liberal Protestants are fine with gay marriage, if that is one shibboleth being used.  Are Roman Catholics allowed in Northfield?  How about Muslims?  If so, on what grounds are evangelical Christians excluded?)  To use the ever-expanding phrase about not discriminating according to “race, color, or creed” and add to that “sexual orientation, gender, national origin, religion, age, marital status, or disability,” these folks are without a doubt discriminating on the basis of “creed.”

 

HT:  Trey
About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Secular fundies.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    Secular fundies.

  • Pete

    The power of words. I’ve always been a bit perplexed by the designation “homophobe”. Who, after all, is afraid of homosexuals? I lived in San Francisco for four years. They’re not scary. Castro Street is maybe a bit creepy, but I don’t know that I’d call it scary. Maybe as Christians we need to push back a bit linguistically and insist that we are scared for them not of them.

  • Pete

    The power of words. I’ve always been a bit perplexed by the designation “homophobe”. Who, after all, is afraid of homosexuals? I lived in San Francisco for four years. They’re not scary. Castro Street is maybe a bit creepy, but I don’t know that I’d call it scary. Maybe as Christians we need to push back a bit linguistically and insist that we are scared for them not of them.

  • Paul Reed

    When liberals say tolerance, they been every group except Christian evangelicals. Several years back, Harvard University banned men from one of its gyms for a few hours a week, a move to accomodate Muslim women who, for religious and cultural reasons, cannot exercise comfortably in their presence. Could you imagine something like that ever be done for Christian evangelicals? Picture a young Christian man saying he doesn’t feel conformable exercising around women who dress like harlots.

  • Paul Reed

    When liberals say tolerance, they been every group except Christian evangelicals. Several years back, Harvard University banned men from one of its gyms for a few hours a week, a move to accomodate Muslim women who, for religious and cultural reasons, cannot exercise comfortably in their presence. Could you imagine something like that ever be done for Christian evangelicals? Picture a young Christian man saying he doesn’t feel conformable exercising around women who dress like harlots.

  • Hanni

    @Pete #2
    I have wondered about this too, Pete. There was a fuss when Frank Schaeffer called Charles Colson a homophobic after his death (CC’s} A phobia is an irrational fear. I have one, a fear of loud noises, but I have gradually gotten over it as I age (muchly), altho the the old trigger is there before it leaves. It is a physical fear, your body reacts. How the term homophobia is even apropos I dont know, but I suppose there are some who are physically fearful of homosexuals, but you would have to know they were gay to have a real phobia.

  • Hanni

    @Pete #2
    I have wondered about this too, Pete. There was a fuss when Frank Schaeffer called Charles Colson a homophobic after his death (CC’s} A phobia is an irrational fear. I have one, a fear of loud noises, but I have gradually gotten over it as I age (muchly), altho the the old trigger is there before it leaves. It is a physical fear, your body reacts. How the term homophobia is even apropos I dont know, but I suppose there are some who are physically fearful of homosexuals, but you would have to know they were gay to have a real phobia.

  • Tom Hering

    Hmm. Other reporting on the story gives a somewhat different picture. (Emphases added.)

    When discussion of gifting the campus first began, some school alumni and Northfield residents voiced concerns about a few of the conservative evangelical groups Hobby Lobby was considering. Some said they hoped that the intellectual legacy of the school would be carried on by whichever group calls the campus home in the future. Yet Northfield Town Administrator Thomas W. Hutcheson said in November that most town residents are eager to see the campus filled again. (New Hampshire Sentinel Source.com, January 3rd, 2013)

    “It’s been vacant for quite a while, too long, really, for the town to be comfortable,” Hutcheson said. “I think that there aren’t many people who would object to some group which fitted the campus coming in.” … Hutcheson said he knows nothing about the National Christian Foundation’s plans, though Minnich said the group has scheduled a trip next week to meet residents. Hutcheson said robust communication among the foundation, interested owners and the town’s decision-makers would help the new relationship. “That was one thing that we didn’t have last time. People were interested in the campus as a campus and, as we saw, were not entirely well informed as to the community into which they would be moving,” he said. “A dialogue would be useful.” (Associated Press, January 2nd, 2013)

    So these reports say it’s not the whole town that has raised objections to Evangelical groups, which is kind of the impression Hemingway gives. The real issue seems to have been a lack of communications on the part of Hobby Lobby’s owners – a fear that the Greens would just air drop new owners into an institution that’s a major part of the town, culturally and economically. But why wouldn’t residents be concerned that the institution be repurposed in a way that’s a good fit with the community? What community wouldn’t consider that important?

    Now that the owners of Hobby Lobby have given the campus away to the National Christian Foundation, the whole matter may be handled better. (Not that a minority of anti-Evangelical types won’t continue to protest.) Indeed, gifting the campus to the NCF is something of an admission by the Greens that they didn’t handle things in a good way.

  • Tom Hering

    Hmm. Other reporting on the story gives a somewhat different picture. (Emphases added.)

    When discussion of gifting the campus first began, some school alumni and Northfield residents voiced concerns about a few of the conservative evangelical groups Hobby Lobby was considering. Some said they hoped that the intellectual legacy of the school would be carried on by whichever group calls the campus home in the future. Yet Northfield Town Administrator Thomas W. Hutcheson said in November that most town residents are eager to see the campus filled again. (New Hampshire Sentinel Source.com, January 3rd, 2013)

    “It’s been vacant for quite a while, too long, really, for the town to be comfortable,” Hutcheson said. “I think that there aren’t many people who would object to some group which fitted the campus coming in.” … Hutcheson said he knows nothing about the National Christian Foundation’s plans, though Minnich said the group has scheduled a trip next week to meet residents. Hutcheson said robust communication among the foundation, interested owners and the town’s decision-makers would help the new relationship. “That was one thing that we didn’t have last time. People were interested in the campus as a campus and, as we saw, were not entirely well informed as to the community into which they would be moving,” he said. “A dialogue would be useful.” (Associated Press, January 2nd, 2013)

    So these reports say it’s not the whole town that has raised objections to Evangelical groups, which is kind of the impression Hemingway gives. The real issue seems to have been a lack of communications on the part of Hobby Lobby’s owners – a fear that the Greens would just air drop new owners into an institution that’s a major part of the town, culturally and economically. But why wouldn’t residents be concerned that the institution be repurposed in a way that’s a good fit with the community? What community wouldn’t consider that important?

    Now that the owners of Hobby Lobby have given the campus away to the National Christian Foundation, the whole matter may be handled better. (Not that a minority of anti-Evangelical types won’t continue to protest.) Indeed, gifting the campus to the NCF is something of an admission by the Greens that they didn’t handle things in a good way.

  • Abby

    “Picture a young Christian man saying he doesn’t feel conformable exercising around women who dress like harlots.”

    Like at a gym? :)

  • Abby

    “Picture a young Christian man saying he doesn’t feel conformable exercising around women who dress like harlots.”

    Like at a gym? :)

  • DonS

    Pete @ 2: +1

    Tom @ 5: Good counterpoint. The Wall Street Journal piece is an opinion piece — the opposition may well be, according to the AP article, far less widespread than Hemingway is portraying. Just another example of how the news media can really distort our view of things.

    That said, one wonders whether those quoted by Hemingway, who are clearly opposed to Christian evangelicals invading their town, would feel about the property becoming a Muslim institution. It’s odd to me how some liberals seem more comfortable with Islam, despite its intolerance of homosexuality and ill treatment of women, enforced by violence or death, than they are with biblical Christians. Worldly wisdom is certainly foolishness, and hardened hearts are certainly blinded to the Truth.

  • DonS

    Pete @ 2: +1

    Tom @ 5: Good counterpoint. The Wall Street Journal piece is an opinion piece — the opposition may well be, according to the AP article, far less widespread than Hemingway is portraying. Just another example of how the news media can really distort our view of things.

    That said, one wonders whether those quoted by Hemingway, who are clearly opposed to Christian evangelicals invading their town, would feel about the property becoming a Muslim institution. It’s odd to me how some liberals seem more comfortable with Islam, despite its intolerance of homosexuality and ill treatment of women, enforced by violence or death, than they are with biblical Christians. Worldly wisdom is certainly foolishness, and hardened hearts are certainly blinded to the Truth.

  • John C

    On what grounds are evangelical Christians excluded?

    Evangelical schools are not just sites of disagreement over whether Intelligent Design is included within the science curriculum, they can be deeply divisive and partisan institutions. Liberty University does not hide its association with the Republican Party and its attitude towards gay marriage, sex education, creation science and global warming is notorious.
    In fact, the use of the word University in Liberty’s case is probably a misnomer. Perhaps, Liberty Un-university would be more appropriate.

    I doubt whether Liberals are more comfortable with Islam, Don. It would depend upon the character and reputation of the institution.
    Liberals and the middle class are not comfortable with extremes in any form.

  • John C

    On what grounds are evangelical Christians excluded?

    Evangelical schools are not just sites of disagreement over whether Intelligent Design is included within the science curriculum, they can be deeply divisive and partisan institutions. Liberty University does not hide its association with the Republican Party and its attitude towards gay marriage, sex education, creation science and global warming is notorious.
    In fact, the use of the word University in Liberty’s case is probably a misnomer. Perhaps, Liberty Un-university would be more appropriate.

    I doubt whether Liberals are more comfortable with Islam, Don. It would depend upon the character and reputation of the institution.
    Liberals and the middle class are not comfortable with extremes in any form.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    gay marriage, sex education, creation science and global warming

    Yup, those things are divisive alright. But Liberty U is hardly to blame for these things being divisive. People who promote gay marriage are divisive, as are those pushing sex education. My, how did we make babies before sex ed? As far as I know the resistance to global warming is not really to idea but that taxing us will somehow solve it.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    gay marriage, sex education, creation science and global warming

    Yup, those things are divisive alright. But Liberty U is hardly to blame for these things being divisive. People who promote gay marriage are divisive, as are those pushing sex education. My, how did we make babies before sex ed? As far as I know the resistance to global warming is not really to idea but that taxing us will somehow solve it.

  • Tom Hering

    Just another example of how the news media can really distort our view of things. (@ 7)

    Yes, but the corrective in this case was to check other media reports. So the problem with the media these days may be our own – relying on a single source for a story, as well as a single kind of source, i.e., one that shares our perspective on things. Always check multiple sources, as well as a variety of sources, even if they’re sources that usually rub one the wrong way.

  • Tom Hering

    Just another example of how the news media can really distort our view of things. (@ 7)

    Yes, but the corrective in this case was to check other media reports. So the problem with the media these days may be our own – relying on a single source for a story, as well as a single kind of source, i.e., one that shares our perspective on things. Always check multiple sources, as well as a variety of sources, even if they’re sources that usually rub one the wrong way.

  • Trey

    So these reports say it’s not the whole town that has raised objections to Evangelical groups, which is kind of the impression Hemingway gives. The real issue seems to have been a lack of communications on the part of Hobby Lobby’s owners – a fear that the Greens would just air drop new owners into an institution that’s a major part of the town, culturally and economically. But why wouldn’t residents be concerned that the institution be repurposed in a way that’s a good fit with the community? What community wouldn’t consider that important?
    Now that the owners of Hobby Lobby have given the campus away to the National Christian Foundation, the whole matter may be handled better. (Not that a minority of anti-Evangelical types won’t continue to protest.) Indeed, gifting the campus to the NCF is something of an admission by the Greens that they didn’t handle things in a good way.

    Tom I don’t think she does give that impression. She says, Some residents of Northfield, home to 128 alumni and 60 employees of the school, held meetings to fight the transfer of the property to Liberty. and At another public meeting earlier this year—one that included questions about the contenders’ views on creation and same-sex marriage…

    So you think it is okay to exclude people who “aren’t a good fit with your community”? Who determines who is a “good fit”? Secularists? What happened to non-discrimination based upon creed? It’s not like the city is a church, which they would have a reason to exclude other creeds. What we see is that the church of secularism has infiltrated some in the town. This is the point of the article that this is intolerant not as claimed tolerance. So now one must go to the local Bolshevik to get permission to build a religions building/school or to buy an existing religious building/school. Let’s face the the facts they think those who hold to Biblical Christianity are dangerous because we may faithfully teach the Word and we may convert them. Why else the Christophobia?

  • Trey

    So these reports say it’s not the whole town that has raised objections to Evangelical groups, which is kind of the impression Hemingway gives. The real issue seems to have been a lack of communications on the part of Hobby Lobby’s owners – a fear that the Greens would just air drop new owners into an institution that’s a major part of the town, culturally and economically. But why wouldn’t residents be concerned that the institution be repurposed in a way that’s a good fit with the community? What community wouldn’t consider that important?
    Now that the owners of Hobby Lobby have given the campus away to the National Christian Foundation, the whole matter may be handled better. (Not that a minority of anti-Evangelical types won’t continue to protest.) Indeed, gifting the campus to the NCF is something of an admission by the Greens that they didn’t handle things in a good way.

    Tom I don’t think she does give that impression. She says, Some residents of Northfield, home to 128 alumni and 60 employees of the school, held meetings to fight the transfer of the property to Liberty. and At another public meeting earlier this year—one that included questions about the contenders’ views on creation and same-sex marriage…

    So you think it is okay to exclude people who “aren’t a good fit with your community”? Who determines who is a “good fit”? Secularists? What happened to non-discrimination based upon creed? It’s not like the city is a church, which they would have a reason to exclude other creeds. What we see is that the church of secularism has infiltrated some in the town. This is the point of the article that this is intolerant not as claimed tolerance. So now one must go to the local Bolshevik to get permission to build a religions building/school or to buy an existing religious building/school. Let’s face the the facts they think those who hold to Biblical Christianity are dangerous because we may faithfully teach the Word and we may convert them. Why else the Christophobia?

  • Trey

    @Tom #10
    Its one thing to recognize your bias, but you use it against yourself. Recognizing your bias doesn’t mean you give it up, but rather you are aware of it and make sure the facts actually support it. Do you have quotes from members of the town that debunk Mollie Hemingway’s quotes?

  • Trey

    @Tom #10
    Its one thing to recognize your bias, but you use it against yourself. Recognizing your bias doesn’t mean you give it up, but rather you are aware of it and make sure the facts actually support it. Do you have quotes from members of the town that debunk Mollie Hemingway’s quotes?

  • fws

    trey @ 11

    So you think it is okay to exclude people who “aren’t a good fit with your community” [such as gays)]? Who determines who is a “good fit”? Secularists? [the majority vote? christians? gays? the courts? the dictionary? tradition? ] What happened to non-discrimination based upon creed? [for example, what about those who believe that gays should be treated exactly as anyone else in society as a religious and moral principle]

    So Trey, you are advocating for gay marriage now? whatever happened to you?

  • fws

    trey @ 11

    So you think it is okay to exclude people who “aren’t a good fit with your community” [such as gays)]? Who determines who is a “good fit”? Secularists? [the majority vote? christians? gays? the courts? the dictionary? tradition? ] What happened to non-discrimination based upon creed? [for example, what about those who believe that gays should be treated exactly as anyone else in society as a religious and moral principle]

    So Trey, you are advocating for gay marriage now? whatever happened to you?

  • Tom Hering

    Tom I don’t think she does give that impression. She says, “Some residents …” (@ 11)

    True, but she also says, “That has people in Northfield worried” (no indication what percentage) and “residents continued to worry” and “Residents expressed concern.” She ends her article with “the town’s character will be tested again. Does the progressive town’s tolerance still extend to evangelicals?” Which certainly sounds to me like she’s characterizing the whole town.

    Do you have quotes from members of the town that debunk Mollie Hemingway’s quotes? (@ 12)

    I don’t deny that some residents said the things quoted by Hemingway. So why would I try to debunk them? The issues I’ve raised are (1.) whether it’s a minority that’s opposed to Evangelical groups, (2.) whether even that minority is opposed to all Evangelical groups, or just some, and (3.) whether Hemingway has given a fair impression of the town.

  • Tom Hering

    Tom I don’t think she does give that impression. She says, “Some residents …” (@ 11)

    True, but she also says, “That has people in Northfield worried” (no indication what percentage) and “residents continued to worry” and “Residents expressed concern.” She ends her article with “the town’s character will be tested again. Does the progressive town’s tolerance still extend to evangelicals?” Which certainly sounds to me like she’s characterizing the whole town.

    Do you have quotes from members of the town that debunk Mollie Hemingway’s quotes? (@ 12)

    I don’t deny that some residents said the things quoted by Hemingway. So why would I try to debunk them? The issues I’ve raised are (1.) whether it’s a minority that’s opposed to Evangelical groups, (2.) whether even that minority is opposed to all Evangelical groups, or just some, and (3.) whether Hemingway has given a fair impression of the town.

  • Tom Hering

    Letter to the Editor in the WSJ, January 3, 2013:

    With respect to Mollie Ziegler Hemingway’s Dec. 29 Cross Country column “When New England Progressives Won’t Tolerate Evangelicals,” let me add a little texture. I am a New England native, an evangelical minister (yet raised Unitarian), and also attended a Northfield, Mass., town meeting on behalf of the C.S. Lewis Foundation.

    The deepest concerns of Northfield residents were aesthetic and practical. First, Grand Canyon University (GCU) was aiming to eventually bring in 4,800 students, with 900 faculty and staff, which would have deeply changed the nature of the town. And second, GCU wanted the town’s 3,100 people to foot a $30 million sewage project to make it happen.

    Evangelicalism can be multifaceted, but this was not a facile case of intolerance on part of “New England progressives.”

    In fact, the town largely and warmly embraced the evangelical C.S. Lewis Foundation (the original proposed recipient) and its vision for a Great Books College and Performing Arts Center.

    Finally, I know New England well and the evangelical church here. In such a skeptical corner of the nation, evangelicals do thrive as we live the biblical nature of sound thinking and hospitality to the image of God in all people equally, regardless of theological, cultural or political differences.

    Rev. John C. Rankin

    West Simsbury, Conn.

  • Tom Hering

    Letter to the Editor in the WSJ, January 3, 2013:

    With respect to Mollie Ziegler Hemingway’s Dec. 29 Cross Country column “When New England Progressives Won’t Tolerate Evangelicals,” let me add a little texture. I am a New England native, an evangelical minister (yet raised Unitarian), and also attended a Northfield, Mass., town meeting on behalf of the C.S. Lewis Foundation.

    The deepest concerns of Northfield residents were aesthetic and practical. First, Grand Canyon University (GCU) was aiming to eventually bring in 4,800 students, with 900 faculty and staff, which would have deeply changed the nature of the town. And second, GCU wanted the town’s 3,100 people to foot a $30 million sewage project to make it happen.

    Evangelicalism can be multifaceted, but this was not a facile case of intolerance on part of “New England progressives.”

    In fact, the town largely and warmly embraced the evangelical C.S. Lewis Foundation (the original proposed recipient) and its vision for a Great Books College and Performing Arts Center.

    Finally, I know New England well and the evangelical church here. In such a skeptical corner of the nation, evangelicals do thrive as we live the biblical nature of sound thinking and hospitality to the image of God in all people equally, regardless of theological, cultural or political differences.

    Rev. John C. Rankin

    West Simsbury, Conn.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @15

    Thanks, Tom. Very helpful.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    @15

    Thanks, Tom. Very helpful.

  • Tom Hering

    Another consideration in all this is tax revenue. Even residents who aren’t “intolerant” might have concerns about a non-profit taking over from Hobby Lobby. Hobby Lobby has paid $861,865 over the past two years.

  • Tom Hering

    Another consideration in all this is tax revenue. Even residents who aren’t “intolerant” might have concerns about a non-profit taking over from Hobby Lobby. Hobby Lobby has paid $861,865 over the past two years.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “Hobby Lobby has paid $861,865 over the past two years.”

    Is that local taxes paid to the town, county, MUDistrict, etc?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “Hobby Lobby has paid $861,865 over the past two years.”

    Is that local taxes paid to the town, county, MUDistrict, etc?

  • Tom Hering
  • Tom Hering
  • John C

    My, how did we make babies before sex ed?

    Well sg, with the invention of the contraceptive pill in the early 1960s, women have been able to control their own fertility and this has had an enormous impact on woman’s education and career prospects, income levels and the way in which women and men regard one another.
    Education and the control of women’s fertility has refashioned society and is still doing so in the third world.

  • http://www.nflauthenticjerseysshop.com lydia

    Very good article,I like it.Thank you.

  • Paul Reed

    @John C (20)
    @SG

    “Well sg, with the invention of the contraceptive pill in the early 1960s, women have been able to control their own fertility”

    One thing that pro-lifers need to challenge more is this assertion by pro-aborts that somehow women can’t control getting pregnant. It’s as if pregnancy is this mysterious disease (and it is treated like a disease by them) that no one is sure how it happens. Pro-aborts resemble a bunch of peasants in the 14th century discussing the Black Plague when it comes to pregnancy. When our opponents acknowledge that there may be some connection between having sex and pregnancy, it’s as if they want us to believe their are roaming gangs of men breaking in people’s houses and raping them.


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