The end of [fill in the blank]

Carlos Lozada writes about the publishing trend of books that announce “the end” of something.  Here are some recent titles:

The End of America
The End of Sex
The End of Men
The End of Money
The End of Lawyers
The End of Work
The End of the Free Market
The End of Nature
The End of Reason
The End of War
The End of the Good Life
The End of Big
The End of Overeating
The End of Cheap China
The End of Reform
The End of Power
The End of Growth
The End of Business as Usual
The End of Illness
The End of Poverty
The End of Education
The End of Leadership
The End of History

Read the discussion here:  The end of everything – The Washington Post.

Not all of these books are arguing that the subject (like “sex”) is actually going to stop existing.  Some, as Mr. Lozada, explains are citing the end of something “as we know it.”  He also cites other senses of the term.  Most interesting and most valuable is  “end” as in “purpose”; that is, the telos.  In fact, we need more books and more reflection on what things are for.  (The end of sex is engendering new life.  The end of work is to love and serve one’s neighbors.  The end of nature and of history is Christ [Colossians 1:16].)

What are some other “ends” can you identify?

What other book titles could we come up with?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Rod

    I had some suggestions:

    The End of misappropriated egalitarianism,
    The End of the divine right of self,
    The End of entitlement abuse,
    The End of feminism,
    The End of Isms,
    The End of the end of books about the end of things,
    The End.

    :)

  • Tom Hering

    The appeal may be in the way these titles imply there’s a flip side of the coin. If something big is ending, at least in its familiar form, then something else must be taking its place. What does the author say that new thing is or will be?

  • Michael H.

    Along the same lines, there must be a thousand books with subtitle “and why it matters,” which sometimes makes me wonder if it really does.

  • fjsteve

    It’s the end of hyperbole!

  • Mary Jack

    The End of the Rope: The End of Patience
    The End of Self-Restraint
    The End of Civilized Discourse

  • Steve Bauer

    A good comedy starring Burt Reynolds and Dom DeLuise.

    “The man’s nuts…grab ‘im!”

  • Hanni

    I would suggest “The End of Dieting” as a best seller but I see that overeating is listed. Rod, your list is interesting, but prob not publishable. No facts but the way we look and the best way to acquire money and things (books about) seem to fly off the shelves.

  • Klasie Kraalogies

    It’s a marketing meme, and a rather tired one at that.

  • Tom Hering

    What amused me in the article were the authors who claimed that a literal end isn’t what they meant by their titles, and who then expressed surprise or disappointment that anyone understood their titles to mean “end” in the simplest sense. Can it be worth it to read books by thinkers (?) who seriously expect us to sympathize with this complaint about their readers? Who’s the clueless one in that picture?

  • sg

    It’s the end of hyperbole!

    LOL!!!!

  • http://pekoponian.blogspot.com pekoponian

    Awww! I thought it was the End of Fill-in-the-Blank Questions.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X